web site hit counter The Things We Left Unsaid: An unforgettable story of love and family - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Things We Left Unsaid: An unforgettable story of love and family

Availability: Ready to download

A LIFETIME OF SECRETS. A SUMMER OF NEW BEGINNINGS. _____________________ "So tender and thoughtful. I loved it" MARIAN KEYES "A gorgeous, rich treat" JANE FALLON "Warm, intriguing, brimming with tenderness... A joyous book" RUTH JONES ________________________ ONLY THE TRUTH WILL SET HER FREE . . . After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rac A LIFETIME OF SECRETS. A SUMMER OF NEW BEGINNINGS. _____________________ "So tender and thoughtful. I loved it" MARIAN KEYES "A gorgeous, rich treat" JANE FALLON "Warm, intriguing, brimming with tenderness... A joyous book" RUTH JONES ________________________ ONLY THE TRUTH WILL SET HER FREE . . . After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rachel is newly single and must move back in with her mother, Eleanor. But their relationship is far from perfect, and their family home is filled with secrets. It will take a devastating turn of events for Rachel to finally unravel a powerful truth. One that Eleanor has kept close to her heart for decades. Will unlocking the past help Rachel find the key to her future? "This book is incredibly special... I cared so deeply for all of the characters... I got lost in it and I miss the characters so much" GABY ROSLIN "Involving and emotional" JANET ELLIS "Warm and compelling" WOMAN ________________________ Early readers absolutely love The Things We Left Unsaid: 'A really enjoyable book.' 'Truly beautiful. I adored this book. I cried and know that when I read this again and again I'll cry each time.' 'A real and full story that was completely relatable.' 'An excellent read and I would certainly recommend it.' 'The sense of time and place was very authentic.' 'I loved the characters and both them and London felt so alive. The story unfolded at a good pace with lots of treasured moments and the story felt new.' 'The little details portraying the different time periods really make this book special. This is definitely one I'll be recommending.' 'A beautiful story of relationships and their complications.' 'Would recommend without hesitation.' 'I absolutely loved it.' 'Set in two time periods, present day and the sixties, this is a compelling tale of two women coming of age and coming to terms with themselves. I loved this book.' 'I loved this book, from start to finish it had me wanting to keep reading!' 'It is funny, sad and intriguing, a must read. I honestly was sad to get to the end.' 'A funny, touching story.' 'This novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it.' 'I loved the way the characters were developed in the story. They worked their way into my heart.' 'This author has insight and compassion and is an excellent storyteller, wise and full of empathy.'


Compare

A LIFETIME OF SECRETS. A SUMMER OF NEW BEGINNINGS. _____________________ "So tender and thoughtful. I loved it" MARIAN KEYES "A gorgeous, rich treat" JANE FALLON "Warm, intriguing, brimming with tenderness... A joyous book" RUTH JONES ________________________ ONLY THE TRUTH WILL SET HER FREE . . . After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rac A LIFETIME OF SECRETS. A SUMMER OF NEW BEGINNINGS. _____________________ "So tender and thoughtful. I loved it" MARIAN KEYES "A gorgeous, rich treat" JANE FALLON "Warm, intriguing, brimming with tenderness... A joyous book" RUTH JONES ________________________ ONLY THE TRUTH WILL SET HER FREE . . . After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rachel is newly single and must move back in with her mother, Eleanor. But their relationship is far from perfect, and their family home is filled with secrets. It will take a devastating turn of events for Rachel to finally unravel a powerful truth. One that Eleanor has kept close to her heart for decades. Will unlocking the past help Rachel find the key to her future? "This book is incredibly special... I cared so deeply for all of the characters... I got lost in it and I miss the characters so much" GABY ROSLIN "Involving and emotional" JANET ELLIS "Warm and compelling" WOMAN ________________________ Early readers absolutely love The Things We Left Unsaid: 'A really enjoyable book.' 'Truly beautiful. I adored this book. I cried and know that when I read this again and again I'll cry each time.' 'A real and full story that was completely relatable.' 'An excellent read and I would certainly recommend it.' 'The sense of time and place was very authentic.' 'I loved the characters and both them and London felt so alive. The story unfolded at a good pace with lots of treasured moments and the story felt new.' 'The little details portraying the different time periods really make this book special. This is definitely one I'll be recommending.' 'A beautiful story of relationships and their complications.' 'Would recommend without hesitation.' 'I absolutely loved it.' 'Set in two time periods, present day and the sixties, this is a compelling tale of two women coming of age and coming to terms with themselves. I loved this book.' 'I loved this book, from start to finish it had me wanting to keep reading!' 'It is funny, sad and intriguing, a must read. I honestly was sad to get to the end.' 'A funny, touching story.' 'This novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it.' 'I loved the way the characters were developed in the story. They worked their way into my heart.' 'This author has insight and compassion and is an excellent storyteller, wise and full of empathy.'

30 review for The Things We Left Unsaid: An unforgettable story of love and family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    Emily Kennedy's family drama focuses on a mother and daughter relationship and secrets that turn out to have tumultuous effects. Rachel gets hit by events that leave her reeling and griefstricken, six weeks ago her father Charlie died and to compound this emotional stress, her fiance, Claude, jilts her at the altar, and she cannot get in touch with him. Having no other options, Rachel returns to the family home, and her famous artist mother, Eleanor, despite the fact the two have had a tense and Emily Kennedy's family drama focuses on a mother and daughter relationship and secrets that turn out to have tumultuous effects. Rachel gets hit by events that leave her reeling and griefstricken, six weeks ago her father Charlie died and to compound this emotional stress, her fiance, Claude, jilts her at the altar, and she cannot get in touch with him. Having no other options, Rachel returns to the family home, and her famous artist mother, Eleanor, despite the fact the two have had a tense and troubled relationship that has never been addressed. Both women are in such pain and grief, that they are unable to offer any sense of comfort to each other. When Eleanor tries to tell her some critical information, Rachel is not in any frame of mind to want to listen to her. Tragedy strikes, and Rachel is at long last left curious about Eleanor and wondering what it was that her mother needed to tell her. In a narrative set in two different eras, we learn of Eleanor's time in the 1960s at a London Art College, her relationship with Jake and the life he introduces her, its the swinging 60s and she finds herself amidst the bohemian artistic circles that is to have a life long impact on her future. Eleanor and Charlie struggle to conceive a child, and when Rachel is born, they pour out all their love and care on her. Rachel has always got on better with her Aunt Agnes, and is shocked at what her mother had kept from her. Kennedy's storytelling is compassionate and human, exploring the nature of family dynamics, grief, loss, love, and a mother and daughter relationship that had Rachel feeling that her artistic talent is overshadowed by Eleanor's, with little understanding of the challenges that Eleanor had faced in her life. Many thanks to Random House Cornerstone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Eleanor and her daughter, Rachel have a difficult relationship. They are mourning the loss of their husband/father. Six weeks after her fathers death, Rachel gets jilted at the alter. There is nothing else she can do but move back into her family home. She has always lived under her mother's shadow. Eleanor is a famous artist. This story is told in a dual timeline. I liked the way the characters developed throughout the story. It's well written and emotionally charged. The parts that are told in Eleanor and her daughter, Rachel have a difficult relationship. They are mourning the loss of their husband/father. Six weeks after her fathers death, Rachel gets jilted at the alter. There is nothing else she can do but move back into her family home. She has always lived under her mother's shadow. Eleanor is a famous artist. This story is told in a dual timeline. I liked the way the characters developed throughout the story. It's well written and emotionally charged. The parts that are told in the past are of Eleanor when she was a naive young girl. This is an emotional read that deals with the pain of loss. The characters are true to life and well rounded. A beautifully told story. I do recommend this book. I would like to thank NetGalley, Random House Uk, Cornerstone and the author Emma Kennedy for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Things We Left Unsaid is an easy read, despite the fact that it tackles emotive issues around grief, loss and heartbreak. The ease with which I was able to read it and Emma Kennedy's clear and conscise writing style is why I've rated it 2.5 stars. Everything else about this book is mediocre. The story follows Rachel, a young woman who recently lost her father and was jilted at the altar by her husband-to-be. Due to these recent events Rachel is in a dark place emotionally and is living back The Things We Left Unsaid is an easy read, despite the fact that it tackles emotive issues around grief, loss and heartbreak. The ease with which I was able to read it and Emma Kennedy's clear and conscise writing style is why I've rated it 2.5 stars. Everything else about this book is mediocre. The story follows Rachel, a young woman who recently lost her father and was jilted at the altar by her husband-to-be. Due to these recent events Rachel is in a dark place emotionally and is living back at home with her mother, Eleanor, who she has a strained relationship with. Early on in the book, Rachel's mother dies and in the wake of this tragedy, Rachel realises she knows very little about her mother. Consumed with grief and having lost everything that she felt made her who she was, Rachel goes on a mission to uncover the secrets of her mother's past and makes a discovery that turns her life upside down. Despite how simple it is, I liked the premise and felt that there was a great oppourtunity to explore complex topics of identity, relationships, grief, family and love, and also craft a great character arc for Rachel filled with development. Unfortunately, Kennedy falls short on delivering any of this and I was left feeling underwhelmed and bitterly disappointed. The plot itself is rather predictable and pretty nonsensical. The big secret is that Rachel's father (Charlie) is not actually her biological father, instead it's Jake, Eleanor's gay best friend from university. I personally loved the depiction of a woman being in love with a gay man, because it's a a more common occurrence than people realise and is an entirely different kind of heartbreak than any other unreciprocated love. However, the rest of this plot was ridiculous and left me with SO MANY questions. Eleanor's motivations are all over the place and her actions are impossible to empathise with, because she's quite frankly, a BAD person. After struggling to concieve with her husband, she decides the best course of action is to have sex with her gay best friend who she used to be in love with and to pass the child off as being her husbands...WHO DOES THIS?!? And WHY? Does Eleanor do this because she's in love with Jake and desparate to have his child? Does she do it because she genuinely wants a child with Charlie but can't be bothered to go through the process of IVF or adoption? It's never made clear WHY Eleanor does this. What's worse is that neither Eleanor or Jake realise the implications of their actions. This is a decision that they make after a two minute discussion with no acknowledgement or understanding of the consequences or impact it could have on everyone around them. Jake's actions are as stupid as Eleanor's. He sleeps with her, knowing that she's been in love with him and probably still is, because he wants a child of his own. Yet he knows that if their one-night-stand does lead to a pregnancy that Eleanor will raise the child with Charlie. So what does Jake actually gain from it? He's essentially just a sperm donor. And do either of them think about the impact this could have on the child that they so desperately want? To be brought up in a lie and one day find out the truth? It's so selfish and silly. Maybe I could've sympathised with this more, if their desire for a child was more developed, but it's just a haphazard thing that's thrown in and then BAM, the decision is made. As for Eleanor's feelings and attitude towards Charlie, it was ALL OVER THE PLACE. She enters into a relationship with Charlie shortly after finding out Jake is gay (rebound much?) and repeatedly talks about how much she loves him and respects him, but the whole relationship feels stagnant. It's completely lacking in passion and intimacy. The only reason Eleanor seems to be with Charlie is because he's her safety blanket. She praises him for being a good, loyal, hard-working and reliable man, yet the second she's presented with the opportunity to cheat she does - TWICE. What's worse is that she doesn't even feel guilty or ashamed for cheating on him. She goes back to him like nothing ever happened and continues to lie to him until the day he dies. What sort of woman does this? I guess the sort of woman that purposefully gets pregnant by another man and pretends that the child is her husband's. Rachel was just as unsympathetic as her mother. She goes through a horrible ordeal - losing both her parents and the man she loves - but she's plain irritating. She spends the first quarter of the book fawning over how much she loves her fiance but hates what he did, then takes him back and instantly decides that she doesn't in fact love him and would rather get it on with the gardner that she knows little to nothing about. She holds a grudge against her mother which has NO LOGIC to it. Eleanor never does anything to warrant Rachel's resentment or dislike (at least until Rachel learns the truth about her paternity). And when Rachel discovers the truth and has every reason to hate her mother, she seems to forgive and forget in an instant. I understand what Kennedy is trying to portray with the relationship between Rachel and Eleanor, but it just didn't work for me, because there wasn't enough reasoning there to justify the tension and hostility between them. Overall, Rachel's character is very badly developed and comes across as a petty, whiny and mean person (I mean, how self-absorbed does a person have to be to not realise that they know NOTHING about their own mother?!). She doesn't progress much across the course of the book and the development she does undertake is shoved in the last few paragaphs of the epilogue. Although the book was easy to read, the pacing was slow and the dialogue was awful. Most of the conversations that took place between the characters lacked flow and felt inauthentic. They weren't conversations that reflected the types of conversations real people would have in real life. My main issue with this book is it all feels like a moot point. Rachel goes on a journey to discover the truth, but it doesn't actually ACHIEVE anything. Rachel's relationship with her mother wasn't negative because Charlie wasn't her biological father, it's because Rachel was insolent and cold. Discovering that Jake was her father and meeting him did nothing to change Rachel's perspective or feelings. And I don't really understand what the overall message of the book is supposed to be.

  4. 4 out of 5

    TARA

    3.5 ★ This book delivered what it promised—a story of love and family. We find Eleanor and Rachel grieving the loss of their husband / father and through a dual timeline NOW and THEN, we discover Eleanor's past and Rachel's present. There is a huge grief and loss component to this, letters and secrets, with a dark tone throughout. There is romance and heartbreak in this, and while there are moments and couplings I really enjoyed, many, most really, are skipped over or things just fade away. Furth 3.5 ★ This book delivered what it promised—a story of love and family. We find Eleanor and Rachel grieving the loss of their husband / father and through a dual timeline NOW and THEN, we discover Eleanor's past and Rachel's present. There is a huge grief and loss component to this, letters and secrets, with a dark tone throughout. There is romance and heartbreak in this, and while there are moments and couplings I really enjoyed, many, most really, are skipped over or things just fade away. Furthermore, Eleanor and Rachel's characters are private and aloof. You could definitely tell they are mother and daughter. Things between them never, truly feel resolved. I felt I never quite got to the bottom of them as people and in their relationship as we saw it. Even though the truth came out and things were mostly resolved, it still felt unfinished somehow. The supporting cast (almost all) were more open and brought life to the page. I did enjoy this book, it wasn't a page turner, but it kept drawing me back in. I found the writing style impactful and impressive, I just feel underwhelmed by it, on reflection. The third person POV was a was a bit clunky at times, especially in the beginning. (ARC KINDLY PROVIDED BY NETGALLEY IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    Rachel is jilted at the alter, by a man she thought was her happy ending, and the start to family life. Moving back home with her mother, Eleanor is a hard transition for them both. The tension between them is clear, but what secrets are beneath the surface for Rachel to discover? Kennedy wrote this story in a way that I LOVE - going back and forth between then and now, and as the reader you piece together the story as you go along. It meant I couldn’t put it down! This is a story for heartbreak, Rachel is jilted at the alter, by a man she thought was her happy ending, and the start to family life. Moving back home with her mother, Eleanor is a hard transition for them both. The tension between them is clear, but what secrets are beneath the surface for Rachel to discover? Kennedy wrote this story in a way that I LOVE - going back and forth between then and now, and as the reader you piece together the story as you go along. It meant I couldn’t put it down! This is a story for heartbreak, love, family, and most of all the power of friendship and support. I adored how Rachel grew throughout the narrative 💖

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine Rhodes

    A nice easy read with a lovely story that leaves you feeling warm and smiling.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Written in dual time frame, this novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it and would like to thank NetGalley and publisher Cornerstone Digital for my copy, sent in return for an honest review. The novel revolves around Eleanor a mother and her grown up daughter Rachel who have always had a tricky relationship. They love each other it’s true, but there are various tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. Throughout the story we learn that Eleanor is a talent Written in dual time frame, this novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it and would like to thank NetGalley and publisher Cornerstone Digital for my copy, sent in return for an honest review. The novel revolves around Eleanor a mother and her grown up daughter Rachel who have always had a tricky relationship. They love each other it’s true, but there are various tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. Throughout the story we learn that Eleanor is a talented and famous artist whose career rapidly escalated after her first triumphant exhibition. Thereafter she has always been very much in demand for portraiture. Born in the swinging sixties; she enjoyed her life in London surrounded by a small circle of good friends. She and Charlie, her husband, were undisputedly brilliant, hands-on parents who had waited sixteen years for the birth of Rachel and who had focused their nurturing, love and devotion on their only child. Rachel, however, has always felt that she lives her life in her mother’s shadow. She feels that she has never been good enough set alongside her famous mother; that she has always been a great disappointment to her. She adores her father and every photograph her parents had ever taken featured her with her father; her mother obviously the photographer. As the story starts Rachel has been jilted by her fiancé Claude on the morning of their wedding day and with nowhere else to go has been forced to return to the family home. The distance between her and her mother feels like a giant chasm, and as that long hot summer draws on she feels out of sorts and miserable. She can feel the tension rising. She cannot face her new life of unhappiness or her unsatisfactory relationship with her mother. Then one evening her life changes in a heartbeat. Nothing will ever be the same again. This is Rachel’s story and what a tremendous, engaging and beautifully written story it is. I loved the storyboard and the way the characters were developed in the story. They worked their way into my heart and the rogues were truly inspired. I like stories about families and I enjoyed this story especially. This author has insight and compassion and is an excellent storyteller, wise and full of empathy. I also loved the themes that made up the story and the way they were seamlessly resolved. I particularly loved the brilliant finale to the story, everything pulled together to give the reader a heart-warming and immensely satisfying ending. I highly recommend this novel as a breathtakingly excellent read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I’m a fan of Emma Kennedy’s writing so I couldn’t wait to read The Things We Left Unsaid. Actually, the title sums the book up beautifully. It’s about taking nothing for granted and taking the time to connect with loved ones. I found this thought-provoking and it made me change the way I view my relationships. The main characters are Eleanor, a renowned artist and her daughter Rachel. It is written in dual timelines of “then” and “now” and from both characters point of view. I didn’t find this con I’m a fan of Emma Kennedy’s writing so I couldn’t wait to read The Things We Left Unsaid. Actually, the title sums the book up beautifully. It’s about taking nothing for granted and taking the time to connect with loved ones. I found this thought-provoking and it made me change the way I view my relationships. The main characters are Eleanor, a renowned artist and her daughter Rachel. It is written in dual timelines of “then” and “now” and from both characters point of view. I didn’t find this confusing, in fact, I loved the flow of the story. Both women are going through heartbreak, however, they don’t reach out to each other even though they are living under the same roof. Their relationship is strained, awkward and I felt that Rachel felt intimidated by her mother’s success. As an artist herself she feels that she could never live up to her mother’s huge talent. Rachel finds great comfort in her aunt Agnes, who brings terrific light to the story. She is everything her sister Eleanor isn’t and an absolute rock for Rachel. There’s a wonderful feeling of mystery, which really keeps the pages turning and kept me truly captivated. It’s hard to say more without giving anything away and this story is far too good to spoil. It’s about love and loss, relationships, secrets, and revelations. I loved everything about it and highly recommend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adele

    This book is about family, and specifically the relationship between parents and children, and how well we really know each other - our inability to see our parents as people. In this is does a wonderful job, and is moving and yet still easy to read. This would have been a 5 star read if it wasn’t for the unnecessary love story that runs as a back drop to Rachel’s story. This just felt like an add in, as was completely predictable. I also felt that Rachel was not as interesting or as ‘real’ for This book is about family, and specifically the relationship between parents and children, and how well we really know each other - our inability to see our parents as people. In this is does a wonderful job, and is moving and yet still easy to read. This would have been a 5 star read if it wasn’t for the unnecessary love story that runs as a back drop to Rachel’s story. This just felt like an add in, as was completely predictable. I also felt that Rachel was not as interesting or as ‘real’ for much of the book as Eleanor, and I think it’s the love story that did this - it detracted from the main thrust of the story, and at the same time took an unconventional story and made it altogether too much of a traditional heteronormative narrative - something I did not expect from this author. Having said this, the rest of the story is wonderful, and I want to know what happened after the end of the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Only six weeks after the death of her father, Rachel is left standing at the altar by fiance, Claude, with no explanation. As she lived and worked with him, she has no choice but to return home to live with her mother, Eleanor, who is a well-known artist. Their relationship is strained and awkward, with neither of them able to comfort the other through their grief. One day, when she just has to get out of the house, Rachel does not stop to listen when her mother wants to talk about something imp Only six weeks after the death of her father, Rachel is left standing at the altar by fiance, Claude, with no explanation. As she lived and worked with him, she has no choice but to return home to live with her mother, Eleanor, who is a well-known artist. Their relationship is strained and awkward, with neither of them able to comfort the other through their grief. One day, when she just has to get out of the house, Rachel does not stop to listen when her mother wants to talk about something important, thinking there will be time later. On arriving home, she finds her mother lying dead in the garden. In her grief, she realises she knew little about her mother’s early life, and becomes obsessed with finding out what it was that Eleanor had been so desperate to tell her. Emma Kennedy makes good use of dual timelines to tell this heartbreaking story. From Rachel’s reading of old letters and diaries, we get Eleanor’s story about when she went off to art school in London in the 1960s. I especially enjoyed these chapters that revealed how she embraced the freedom of being away from her parents for the first time and met lots of interesting people. The characters are vividly portrayed; I particularly liked Jake, who Eleanor met on her first day at art school, and Eleanor’s sister, Agnes, who brought humour to both sections of the story. I’ll leave you to discover for yourself just how despicable and mercenary Claude turns out to be. The two separate strands of the narrative gradually coalesce until we discover the big secret Eleanor has been hiding from everyone. This is a fascinating portrayal of bohemian London in the 1960s, and my only reservation is that the ending felt a bit rushed. Caspar was an interesting character, but could perhaps have played a bigger part in the story. Thanks to Cornerstone Digital and NetGalley for a digital copy to review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tasmin Rhianne

    It was enjoyable and I did get quite invested at times, especially in the scenes set in the past. However it was also quite predictable and I guessed very early on what was going to happen. It didn’t necessarily happen in the way I thought originally, but the outcome was the same, which meant I spent most of the book just waiting for what I knew was going to happen, to happen. This meant that I did almost skim read the last 100 pages because I knew exactly where it was headed and just wanted to g It was enjoyable and I did get quite invested at times, especially in the scenes set in the past. However it was also quite predictable and I guessed very early on what was going to happen. It didn’t necessarily happen in the way I thought originally, but the outcome was the same, which meant I spent most of the book just waiting for what I knew was going to happen, to happen. This meant that I did almost skim read the last 100 pages because I knew exactly where it was headed and just wanted to get to the conclusion!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Loved it. If you're looking for a read that's relatively easy then add this one to your list. Set in a dual narrative The Things We Left Unsaid tells us about the life of Rachel and her mother, Eleanor. After a terrible tragedy Rachel sets out to find out about her mother's past and who she really is. This book is warm, funny and heartbreaking at the same time. I absolutely loved it and you will too. Loved it. If you're looking for a read that's relatively easy then add this one to your list. Set in a dual narrative The Things We Left Unsaid tells us about the life of Rachel and her mother, Eleanor. After a terrible tragedy Rachel sets out to find out about her mother's past and who she really is. This book is warm, funny and heartbreaking at the same time. I absolutely loved it and you will too.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Phelps

    A beautiful read!!! emotional, moving story, left me thinking about the characters and ending for days!! xx

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Goulding

    I really loved this book, such a great story with really interesting plot points. Touched some really good subjects which are not often discussed. Well worth a read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

    What an incredible story to make you self reflect on your relationships with your parents. How much do you actually know them? The real them- not the parent them! Have you ever asked? After a string of tragedies strike Rachel, she goes on a soul searching quest in an attempt to feel whole again. Except it is not just her own story she is piecing together. Set as a dual time line we explore the exciting life, loves and friendships of Eleanor, Rachel's mother. Eleanor's timeline, set mostly in 60' What an incredible story to make you self reflect on your relationships with your parents. How much do you actually know them? The real them- not the parent them! Have you ever asked? After a string of tragedies strike Rachel, she goes on a soul searching quest in an attempt to feel whole again. Except it is not just her own story she is piecing together. Set as a dual time line we explore the exciting life, loves and friendships of Eleanor, Rachel's mother. Eleanor's timeline, set mostly in 60's London is all you ever wanted that time period to be- in a subtle, 'not detracting from the story' kind of way. Eleanor as a young woman before she becomes a wife and mother is gripping and you will Rachel to change her opinion of her misunderstood mother. But, it is evident how our discovery of Eleanor, whilst unravelling Rachel's "Now" issues is fundamental for Rachel's new story to build. It was funny, tear-jerking and truly lovely. Part of me would love a sequel but maybe this is one that my imagination can build a future for.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Written in dual time frame, this novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it and would like to thank NetGalley and publisher Cornerstone Digital for my copy, sent in return for an honest review. The novel revolves around Eleanor a mother and her grown up daughter Rachel who have always had a tricky relationship. They love each other it’s true, but there are various tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. Throughout the story we learn that Eleanor is a talent Written in dual time frame, this novel is an absolute gem. I loved everything about it and would like to thank NetGalley and publisher Cornerstone Digital for my copy, sent in return for an honest review. The novel revolves around Eleanor a mother and her grown up daughter Rachel who have always had a tricky relationship. They love each other it’s true, but there are various tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. Throughout the story we learn that Eleanor is a talented and famous artist whose career rapidly escalated after her first triumphant exhibition. Thereafter she has always been very much in demand for portraiture. Born in the swinging sixties; she enjoyed her life in London surrounded by a small circle of good friends. She and Charlie, her husband, were undisputedly brilliant, hands-on parents who had waited sixteen years for the birth of Rachel and who had focused their nurturing, love and devotion on their only child. Rachel, however, has always felt that she lives her life in her mother’s shadow. She feels that she has never been good enough set alongside her famous mother; that she has always been a great disappointment to her. She adores her father and every photograph her parents had ever taken featured her with her father; her mother obviously the photographer. As the story starts Rachel has been jilted by her fiancé Claude on the morning of their wedding day and with nowhere else to go has been forced to return to the family home. The distance between her and her mother feels like a giant chasm, and as that long hot summer draws on she feels out of sorts and miserable. She can feel the tension rising. She cannot face her new life of unhappiness or her unsatisfactory relationship with her mother. Then one evening her life changes in a heartbeat. Nothing will ever be the same again. This is Rachel’s story and what a tremendous, engaging and beautifully written story it is. I loved the storyboard and the way the characters were developed in the story. They worked their way into my heart and the rogues were truly inspired. I like stories about families and I enjoyed this story especially. This author has insight and compassion and is an excellent storyteller, wise and full of empathy. I also loved the themes that made up the story and the way they were seamlessly resolved. I particularly loved the brilliant finale to the story, everything pulled together to give the reader a heart-warming and immensely satisfying ending. I highly recommend this novel as a breathtakingly excellent read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elite Group

    A beautiful story of relationships and their complications. This book is told in the then and now. The then is the story of Eleanor, who moves to London to study art in the swinging 60s. Eleanor meets Jake on her first day at college, and he introduces her to the 60s Soho lifestyle, so far removed from her upbringing in Brill. Eleanor embraces the life and the relationships that develop, which then influence the rest of her life. The now is Rachel, Eleanor’s daughter's story, which begins with her A beautiful story of relationships and their complications. This book is told in the then and now. The then is the story of Eleanor, who moves to London to study art in the swinging 60s. Eleanor meets Jake on her first day at college, and he introduces her to the 60s Soho lifestyle, so far removed from her upbringing in Brill. Eleanor embraces the life and the relationships that develop, which then influence the rest of her life. The now is Rachel, Eleanor’s daughter's story, which begins with her back in her mother's house after begin jilted by Claude at the altar. Rachel and Eleanor have a problematic relationship, in the present Eleanor is a successful artist, who has recently lost her husband Charlie, Rachel's father. Both women are struggling to come to terms with the pain of death and betrayal. Unable to comfort each other. Eleanor tries to tell Rachel something important, but Rachel is so consumed with her own pain she does not want to get into something profound, but Rachel recognises that whatever it is, it's having a significant impact on her mother and then Eleanor dies suddenly and Rachel becomes obsessed with finding out what was so important. The then tells the story of Eleanor's life and slowly catches up with the now revealing secrets about love and passion along the way. The now reveals clues for Rachel that brings her back to Soho where it all started. This was a great read, I really enjoyed how the then slowly revealed what you needed to know to answer what was happening in the now. Also, the perspective from Mother and Daughter on their relationship was so at odds and provided a great insight into people's interpretations of life. Would recommend without hesitation. Taramindo. Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This one is written in dual time frame and it revolves around the mother, Eleanor ane her mother grown up daughter Rachel. They have always had a tricky relationship and despite the clear love and respect for each other , there is also clearly a few tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. As you move through the story we learn that Eleanor is a very talented and famous artist whose career escalated after her first exhibition and from which she has always been very muc This one is written in dual time frame and it revolves around the mother, Eleanor ane her mother grown up daughter Rachel. They have always had a tricky relationship and despite the clear love and respect for each other , there is also clearly a few tensions and feelings of awkwardness that have never been addressed. As you move through the story we learn that Eleanor is a very talented and famous artist whose career escalated after her first exhibition and from which she has always been very much in demand for portraiture. Born in the swinging sixties. We learn she is married to husband Charlie and together they had waited sixteen years for the birth of Rachel. Rachel, is an odd character for me, one who has always felt that she lives her life in her mother’s shadow, never good enough to be alongside her famous mother, it comes across as being partly jealous and partly confused as to who her mother really is. However, Rachel clearly adores her father and every photograph her parents had ever taken featured her with her father; her mother obviously being the photographer. As the story starts Rachel has been jilted by her fiancé Claude on the morning of their wedding and with nowhere else to go has been forced to return to her family home. At this point the distance between mother and daughter becomes evident. As the Summer progresses those tensions and feelings of awkwardness intensify until one night when her life changes forever, nothing will be the same again or as she has ever known it. For me, this was quite the read. I loved how the story was told from two sides, the author not interfering in how you felt about either character, almost letting you decide before throwing a plot twist right into the mix. I enjoyed the themes, the ending was brilliant and if you like a good story that captivates you for hours, then this will tick those boxes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angelnet

    What a year for Rachel. Six weeks after her dad’s death it is her wedding day. When she is jilted by her fiance at the altar she has no option but to move back into the family home with her mother Eleanor. They have had a difficult relationship with Rachel feeling that she has always lived in her mother’s shadow. Eleanor is a famous painter who emerged in Soho in the Sixties and has lived a life where she associated with poets and photographers before marrying Charlie and settling down. It takes What a year for Rachel. Six weeks after her dad’s death it is her wedding day. When she is jilted by her fiance at the altar she has no option but to move back into the family home with her mother Eleanor. They have had a difficult relationship with Rachel feeling that she has always lived in her mother’s shadow. Eleanor is a famous painter who emerged in Soho in the Sixties and has lived a life where she associated with poets and photographers before marrying Charlie and settling down. It takes a dramatic event to make Rachel realise just how much her mother has done both for her and with her and for Rachel to come to terms with the losses in her life. Its hard to say any more without giving away a good chunk of the plot. Kennedy uses a dual perspective to craft this wonderful story. Eleanor’s voice is that of a naive young girl leaving home in the Sixties. Finding her feet at her new Art College in Chelsea, discovering her true self and meeting the love of her life. Rachel’s story is set in the present day and sees her searching through all of the gems she discovers to piece together the lives that her parents led before she came along. It is a poignant and touching tale that deals with the pain of loss and isolation. The characters are vivid and electrifyingly real. Learning to grieve and to move on is one of the hardest things that we ever have to come to terms with and this book is all about love in every possible aspect. Seeing the differing perspectives makes for a beautiful story of family and belonging. Supplied by Net Galley and Random House UK, Cornerstone in exchange for an honest review. UK Publication Date: Kindle Aug 01 2019/ Hardback Aug 22 2019. 416 pages. #TheThingsWeLeftUnsaid #NetGalley

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alison Bradbury

    This is the story of two women: Eleanor and Rachel. They are mother and daughter but they struggle with their relationship, all of which is complicated by the fact that they are in mourning for Charlie, Eleanor's husband and Rachel's father. Rachel is also trying to deal with being left at the alter by her fiancee who has disappeared and isn't answering his phone. Eleanor and Rachel deal with their losses in different ways and both lament the things that they never said to Charlie...and just wha This is the story of two women: Eleanor and Rachel. They are mother and daughter but they struggle with their relationship, all of which is complicated by the fact that they are in mourning for Charlie, Eleanor's husband and Rachel's father. Rachel is also trying to deal with being left at the alter by her fiancee who has disappeared and isn't answering his phone. Eleanor and Rachel deal with their losses in different ways and both lament the things that they never said to Charlie...and just what is Eleanor hiding? Taking place across two different era's - 'now' being present day, and 'then' being Eleanor's youth following her leaving home, going to university in London and falling in with an eclectic crowd of artists, photographers and poets in Soho's social scene. She is desperate for new experiences and to break out of the cloistered life that she had been living and is most peeved when her mothers friend asks a young writer called Charlie to keep an eye on Eleanor and report back. I found the pace of this story to be a little bit too slow for my liking. I kept wanting to skip ahead to find out what the big secret was. It's interesting how it leads you down a couple of different paths but the conclusion felt a little too predictable for me. Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jane Hunt

    An emotional. vibrant coming of age story, highlighting the relationship between a mother Eleanor, and her daughter, Rachel. Still reeling from the loss of Charlie, her father, she is jilted at the altar and has to return home to heal, and decide what to do next, Her complex relationship with Eleanor makes this emotional and difficult, and despite Eleanor's efforts, they remain estranged. With secrets untold, Rachel faces her third life-altering event and begins to realise what she has lost. She An emotional. vibrant coming of age story, highlighting the relationship between a mother Eleanor, and her daughter, Rachel. Still reeling from the loss of Charlie, her father, she is jilted at the altar and has to return home to heal, and decide what to do next, Her complex relationship with Eleanor makes this emotional and difficult, and despite Eleanor's efforts, they remain estranged. With secrets untold, Rachel faces her third life-altering event and begins to realise what she has lost. She begins to look back into her mother's life and discovers, she suffered pain and setbacks despite her glamorous persona. Told from dual points of view we revisit Eleanor's life, coming of age, in the swinging sixties and Rachel' solves a family secret that gives her hope for the future, whilst she comes to terms with her present, with the help of family and new friends. The characters are complex and easily draw you into their lives. The snapshot of life in the sixties highlights the decadence, but also the prejudices that still need to be overcome. There are many poignant episodes in this story, which has an authentic ethos. The plot is simple, and I have read similar stories, but this doesn't detract from the excellent storytelling. I received a copy of this book from Penguin Random House UK- Cornerstone Century via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Em J

    I read this book as part of a round robin amongst a friendship group - the friend who read it first described it as an easy light read, that had short chapters and was perfect for picking up and reading here and there......with my previous read being a bit of a heavy emotional read I was certainly ready to take on a lighter story. The story follows a difficult mother/ daughter relationship, Eleanor (mother) a successful artist and Rachel (daughter who moves back into her mothers home after being I read this book as part of a round robin amongst a friendship group - the friend who read it first described it as an easy light read, that had short chapters and was perfect for picking up and reading here and there......with my previous read being a bit of a heavy emotional read I was certainly ready to take on a lighter story. The story follows a difficult mother/ daughter relationship, Eleanor (mother) a successful artist and Rachel (daughter who moves back into her mothers home after being ditched at the altar on her wedding day). Ok, it's slightly far fetched in places, but I became easily connected to the characters (& frustrated with Rachel in places but that's surely how you know the author has hooked you in?) I liked the change in time frame, the 'Then', back in the 1960s with Eleanor's youth & initial freedom after leaving home to go to Art College in London, and the 'Now' Rachel trying to find out the mystery of the past and what her life is, and has become. I genuinely enjoyed it from start to finish. You just have to forgive some of the conveniences that bring the story together and accept it for what it is......an easy light read, that had short chapters & was perfect for picking up and reading here and there.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    The things we left unsaid by Emma Kennedy 2 ⭐️ / 5 .................................. After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rachel is newly single and must move back in with her mother, Eleanor. But their relationship is far from perfect, and their family home is filled with secrets. It will take a devastating turn of events for Rachel to finally unravel a powerful truth. One that Eleanor has kept close to her heart for decades. Will unlocking the past help Ra The things we left unsaid by Emma Kennedy 2 ⭐️ / 5 .................................. After her wedding in cancelled hours before she is due to walk down the aisle, Rachel is newly single and must move back in with her mother, Eleanor. But their relationship is far from perfect, and their family home is filled with secrets. It will take a devastating turn of events for Rachel to finally unravel a powerful truth. One that Eleanor has kept close to her heart for decades. Will unlocking the past help Rachel find the key to her future? .................................. This book was an easy read but it just didn’t grip me. It was quite underwhelming and I was constantly waiting for something to happen . It is told in the two view points/ time lines of Eleanor and her daughter Rachel. I did find it difficult to connect with Rachels character because she came across quite cold, ungrateful and whiny. I also felt some of the story lines (especially caspar’s) did not have enough weight to them. However this book explored some difficult topics like loss, grief and being gay in the 60’s. It was humorous in parts and told in a lighthearted way but it failed to keep me interested.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I wasn't sure what to expect of this book, but had heard good things about it. One thing I did notice was how quickly I fell into the style of writing, it was a nice easy languid way of rolling over the pages and so was a delight to read. The story is about a young girl called Rachel and her return to her family home following the collapse of her wedding day to her mother Eleanor. You learn quite quickly that the family are dealing with a lot of change after the fairly recent death of the father I wasn't sure what to expect of this book, but had heard good things about it. One thing I did notice was how quickly I fell into the style of writing, it was a nice easy languid way of rolling over the pages and so was a delight to read. The story is about a young girl called Rachel and her return to her family home following the collapse of her wedding day to her mother Eleanor. You learn quite quickly that the family are dealing with a lot of change after the fairly recent death of the father Charlie from a terminal illness. A few chapters in there is a scene between Rachel and Eleanor where Rachel wants to leave the house for the first time since coming home and Eleanor has something urgent to tell her, Rachel leaves and when she returns she finds Eleanor passed away. It starts an emotional journey for Rachel to uncover what her mother never got to say and the impact it has on Rachel is life changing. A lovely, emotionally charged but loving story about how we shouldn't wait until tomorrow to tell people we love them, in case tomorrow doesn't come.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    3.5 stars I'll admit I started reading this book because a) it was 99p on Amazon and b) it had the phrase "sexual intercourse" on page 1 in a scene set in 1964. Yes I am that shallow. I enjoyed this book but it was a book of two halves - the 1964 (onwards) parts and the modern day parts. I think I enjoyed the former more. Not just because the setting was less familiar but because I found young Eleanor more interesting than her modern day version and her daughter Rachel. (view spoiler)[I was a lit 3.5 stars I'll admit I started reading this book because a) it was 99p on Amazon and b) it had the phrase "sexual intercourse" on page 1 in a scene set in 1964. Yes I am that shallow. I enjoyed this book but it was a book of two halves - the 1964 (onwards) parts and the modern day parts. I think I enjoyed the former more. Not just because the setting was less familiar but because I found young Eleanor more interesting than her modern day version and her daughter Rachel. (view spoiler)[I was a little disappointed that Eleanor dies so quickly in the modern day sections as I would have liked to have more interaction with her and perhaps understand the transition from who she was to who she became. (hide spoiler)] Also some of the plot in the modern day section felt like a cross between Mills and Boon and a family drama pot-boiler whereas the 1960s sections felt more real. That said, it kept me wanting to read which is not to be sniffed at.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    What was good was the description of art school life in the 1960s and their gathering place, the French, and the energy but also the seediness. The choice between passion and the good steady, best of husbands. And the unobtainable. We had alternate then and now narratives from mother and daughter and I warmed to both of them. And a secret that could only be disclosed and discovered after death. A reminder perhaps of my uncle Geoffrey telling us he was my granny's illegitimate son, only after her What was good was the description of art school life in the 1960s and their gathering place, the French, and the energy but also the seediness. The choice between passion and the good steady, best of husbands. And the unobtainable. We had alternate then and now narratives from mother and daughter and I warmed to both of them. And a secret that could only be disclosed and discovered after death. A reminder perhaps of my uncle Geoffrey telling us he was my granny's illegitimate son, only after her death. Positive, loveable and human characters, apart from the dreadful Claude who let the bride down on her wedding day. The fact that we know at the end is where life is different, we will never know Geoffrey's father. I was crying out for DNA tests, but that would have ended the book half way, and I think the copyeditor may have missed wearing tights in 1964, we were still in stockings and suspenders and pregnancy tests you buy at the chemist in the early 1980s. I'm not usually that picky.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zara

    Finished this book in literally one sitting. It was an amazing read and definitely worth the four hours that I spent reading it. First of all, it is written in dual time frames like everyone has said, I personally found Eleanor’s past way more interesting than her daughter’s present time view. At times, Rachel did come off as whiny and immature. I do wish that Eleanor had been alive more for the present day chapters as a lot of things were still left unexplained, their tumultuous relationship wa Finished this book in literally one sitting. It was an amazing read and definitely worth the four hours that I spent reading it. First of all, it is written in dual time frames like everyone has said, I personally found Eleanor’s past way more interesting than her daughter’s present time view. At times, Rachel did come off as whiny and immature. I do wish that Eleanor had been alive more for the present day chapters as a lot of things were still left unexplained, their tumultuous relationship was touched on slightly but still vague. However, this was made up for with Emma Kennedy’s beautiful writing and characters. Instantly fell in love with characters such as Agnes, John, Jake and Eleanor as her writing made them strange but lovable characters which made reading the book immensely enjoyable!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    This tale was an absolute joy to read - set in two time frames much of the story was taken up with the difficult relationship between Eleanor and her daughter, Rachel. Both women are mourning the loss of a husband/father, Charlie but are unable to comfort each other. There is much truth in the difficulties portrayed in their relationship, neither feeling free to bridge the gap between them. Rachel is more bitter and less forgiving. The tale is a fascinating one with some emotional sections. Much This tale was an absolute joy to read - set in two time frames much of the story was taken up with the difficult relationship between Eleanor and her daughter, Rachel. Both women are mourning the loss of a husband/father, Charlie but are unable to comfort each other. There is much truth in the difficulties portrayed in their relationship, neither feeling free to bridge the gap between them. Rachel is more bitter and less forgiving. The tale is a fascinating one with some emotional sections. Much of the time I found it difficult to like Eleanor from her youth - her selfishness and rush to leave home and restrictions. Many thanks to Netgalley/Emma Kennedy/Random House UK, Cornerstone for a digital copy of this title. All opinions expressed are my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda Wilson

    I really enjoyed this book. Rachel has been jilted on her wedding day and has returned to her mother's home. Her relationship with Eleanor has always been difficult, and they are both mourning the loss of Charlie, Rachel's father, who has recently died of cancer. The story is told in 2 time frames. Eleanor went to London in 1964 to study Art. There she met and fell in love with Jake who introduced her to the hedonistic lifestyle of the time. The descriptions of the swinging sixties are colourful I really enjoyed this book. Rachel has been jilted on her wedding day and has returned to her mother's home. Her relationship with Eleanor has always been difficult, and they are both mourning the loss of Charlie, Rachel's father, who has recently died of cancer. The story is told in 2 time frames. Eleanor went to London in 1964 to study Art. There she met and fell in love with Jake who introduced her to the hedonistic lifestyle of the time. The descriptions of the swinging sixties are colourful and exciting. As Rachel tries to put her life back together, tragedy forces her to look in to Eleanor's past. I loved the characters in this book and I recommend it as a good read. Thanks to NetGalley copy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christine Rennie

    With thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the arc, which I have enjoyed reading. The Things We Left Unsaid by Emma Kennedy is a wonderful trip down memory lane, to a time no longer, when the swinging sixties were happening and life seem very vivid. The storyline is of a family saga but one lovingly portrayed and written by the author. We read of the lives of Eleanor, Agnes, Jake, John, Hen and Charlie and then of Eleanor’s daughter, Rachel and the deaths of her beloved father, Charlie and t With thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the arc, which I have enjoyed reading. The Things We Left Unsaid by Emma Kennedy is a wonderful trip down memory lane, to a time no longer, when the swinging sixties were happening and life seem very vivid. The storyline is of a family saga but one lovingly portrayed and written by the author. We read of the lives of Eleanor, Agnes, Jake, John, Hen and Charlie and then of Eleanor’s daughter, Rachel and the deaths of her beloved father, Charlie and then the death of Eleanor, her mother. Both the past and present are very vividly portrayed by Emma Kennedy and all of the characters with the exception of Claude are all fondly portrayed. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Highly recommended.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.