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At a time when the Christian church faces an ever-increasing challenge from a secular and pluralistic culture, leading apologist Norman Geisler provides a substantive resource for answering the challenge. "Christian Apologetics" addresses issues such as Deism, Theism, Christ's authority, and inspiration of the Bible. Geisler's systematic approach presents both methods and At a time when the Christian church faces an ever-increasing challenge from a secular and pluralistic culture, leading apologist Norman Geisler provides a substantive resource for answering the challenge. "Christian Apologetics" addresses issues such as Deism, Theism, Christ's authority, and inspiration of the Bible. Geisler's systematic approach presents both methods and reasons for defending the claims of Christianity. (58)


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At a time when the Christian church faces an ever-increasing challenge from a secular and pluralistic culture, leading apologist Norman Geisler provides a substantive resource for answering the challenge. "Christian Apologetics" addresses issues such as Deism, Theism, Christ's authority, and inspiration of the Bible. Geisler's systematic approach presents both methods and At a time when the Christian church faces an ever-increasing challenge from a secular and pluralistic culture, leading apologist Norman Geisler provides a substantive resource for answering the challenge. "Christian Apologetics" addresses issues such as Deism, Theism, Christ's authority, and inspiration of the Bible. Geisler's systematic approach presents both methods and reasons for defending the claims of Christianity. (58)

30 review for Christian Apologetics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tom Talamantez

    If you have not studied apologetics up to now, this is a good place to start. If you have had some philosophy, that will be helpful as you are going to dive into areas of epistemology, rationalism, empiricism and evaluate worldviews of some of the classic western philosophers. This is a classical approach to apologetics, not presuppositional. Basically, classical starts with using reason to inductively and deductively move someone from where they are at to a place where they can read scripture w If you have not studied apologetics up to now, this is a good place to start. If you have had some philosophy, that will be helpful as you are going to dive into areas of epistemology, rationalism, empiricism and evaluate worldviews of some of the classic western philosophers. This is a classical approach to apologetics, not presuppositional. Basically, classical starts with using reason to inductively and deductively move someone from where they are at to a place where they can read scripture with some conviction that it is true. Presuppositional starts with the Bible as the primary source for evangelism, even if talking to an atheist. Personally, I think that there is a place for both schools of thought depending on the seeker. I lean classical, but either way we should have discernment for the situation recognizing that it is the Holy Spirit who convicts of sin, righteousness and judgement. The book itself is well written and follows a logical progression from understanding what truth is to evaluating belief systems, then applying epistemology to Christianity. This book will give you some foundational knowledge for evaluating any belief system that you encounter whether that be religion, philosophy, or cultural trends like post modernism. If you desire to love God with all of your heart, soul, mind and strength, this is a good one to train your mind.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    A good starting textbook if you are interested in defense of the Christian faith. Clear, concise definitions of various worldviews and explanations of why their truth-tests fail. It also provides an explanation of a truth-test that works and why. This is not an easy book to read, primarily because of the deep thought required by the subject matter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vance Gatlin

    Chapter 8 alone is worth the money spent on this book. "Formulating an Adequate Test for Truth" builds a test of worldviews and truth based on logical first principles.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gene

    I came to realize what a brilliant apologist and gifted writer Norman Geisler was by reading this book. His organizational skills are excellent, making this book not only a good book to read, but also an extremely valuable resource. I learned quite a few things and had my mind changed about some things, too, by reading this book. As to method, the book is split mainly into two sections. In the first part, Geisler examines all the major world views (like agnosticism, atheism, pantheism, panentheis I came to realize what a brilliant apologist and gifted writer Norman Geisler was by reading this book. His organizational skills are excellent, making this book not only a good book to read, but also an extremely valuable resource. I learned quite a few things and had my mind changed about some things, too, by reading this book. As to method, the book is split mainly into two sections. In the first part, Geisler examines all the major world views (like agnosticism, atheism, pantheism, panentheism, deism, and theism) and makes a strong case for the truth claims of theism opposed to the other views. In the second part, he examines historical evidence for the likelihood of Christianity being true as opposed to other theistic beliefs. What I really love is that for each viewpoint he disagrees with, he first presents that viewpoint's strongest case before showing its flaws. It is done in a fair and even-handed manner. This reminds me of the writings of John Henry Newman that used the same method. I used to feel that the historical approach was sufficient in apologetics to make a case for the truth of Christianity. Geisler explains that the evidences for the resurrection of Christ (on which the belief in Christianity is based) are only convincing for those who have already accepted a theistic worldview. If I were to compare the approach of Peter Kreeft to that of Geisler, I see both to be very useful and valuable, but Geisler is perhaps more systematic and Kreeft more accessible for those with no prior education in philosophy. As an aside, I will mention that the views of the pantheists and panentheists were very difficult for me to understand. I found there is more to them than I previously grasped and that to really come to terms with them would require much more effort than just reading a few chapters of this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pastor Greg

    Not for everyone, but a good, in-depth look at the defense of the Christian faith. This was a college textbook and I wrote a 100 page paper on the book. It was time well spent. And if you are really into apologetics, beyond the basics and a bit of a "wonk" on the matter, then this might just be something that you would enjoy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Silviu

    One of the must-reads!:)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laurent Dv

    Good overall and introduction to apologetics. Good analysis of worldview and objections to them. But wrong critic against van til (cause he's not fideist)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luke Miller

    Amazing! Started me off right on my lifelong journey through apologetics

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martin Kaonga

    It is an outstanding textbook of Christian Apologetics, especially for Christians who are faced with tough-minded humanism to provide a robust response.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John

    In this book, Norman Geisler brilliantly lays out a foundational argument in favor of belief in Christianity. Through a combination of logic and metaphysics, he analyzes and discards each of the major non-theistic worldviews held throughout human history. Step-by-step, he builds the case for theism before next examining why Christianity is the most reliable of all the theistic religions. Since the scope of the book is so vast, it's inevitable that certain areas get short shrift. But as an introdu In this book, Norman Geisler brilliantly lays out a foundational argument in favor of belief in Christianity. Through a combination of logic and metaphysics, he analyzes and discards each of the major non-theistic worldviews held throughout human history. Step-by-step, he builds the case for theism before next examining why Christianity is the most reliable of all the theistic religions. Since the scope of the book is so vast, it's inevitable that certain areas get short shrift. But as an introductory text, CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS is the book to beat. It's only real shortcoming is Geisler's dry, academic writing style, and the fact he so consistently misses the sweet spot between too little explanation and beating a dead horse.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jipson Lawrance

    Norman Geiser’s masterful work, Christian Apologetics, is a very thorough textbook that builds a strong epistemological foundation before even addressing Christian truth. Geisler’s initial goal is to establish an adequate test for truth, and from there to show that the Christian worldview meets the tests for truth. Because of this, the book covers over a half a dozen alternate view before even evaluating theism. First, Geisler shows the shortcomings of agnosticism. He critiques the views of Kant, Norman Geiser’s masterful work, Christian Apologetics, is a very thorough textbook that builds a strong epistemological foundation before even addressing Christian truth. Geisler’s initial goal is to establish an adequate test for truth, and from there to show that the Christian worldview meets the tests for truth. Because of this, the book covers over a half a dozen alternate view before even evaluating theism. First, Geisler shows the shortcomings of agnosticism. He critiques the views of Kant, Hume, Ayer, and Wittgenstien. Following the critique of agnosticism comes the evaluation of rationalism. The views of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hackett, and Clark are examined. Next comes an inspection of fideism. Here Pascal, Kierkegaard, Barth, and Van Til are summarized and critiqued as adherents to various strands of fideism. Geisler continues in his worldview analysis by looking at experientialism, evidentialism, and pragmatism. Again, the author’s goal in presenting each of these views is to examine its core epistemology and to find out what its test for truth is. Geisler shows that rationalism, fideism, experientialism, evidentialism, combinationalism, and pragmatism all fall short as adequate tests for truth. Each of them may have elements that are useful in one sense or another, but none of them is a fully adequate test for truth. Before Geisler launches into theism, he does lay out what he presents as an adequate test for truth. First, he presents unaffirmability as a test for falsity. That is to say: if a view is self-defeating, whether directly or indirectly, it must be false. Second, Geisler presents undeniability as a test for truth. If something is either definitionally undeniable or existentially undeniable, it must be true. These two tests are for the truthfulness of a worldview. Once you establish the correct worldview, then you can move on to determine the test for truth within that worldview. For this internal test, Geisler presents systematic consistency as the test for truth for statements within a worldview that has first been established through the tests of unaffirmability and undeniability. Systematic consistency means that whatever most consistently and comprehensively fits into that system is true. Geisler admits that systematic consistency does not provide absolute certainty of truth. Here he points to probability as the guide, as absolute certainty is not possible when a finite mind is not in possession of all the facts. Having laid a very thorough epistemological base, the author then proceeds to establish the truthfulness of Christianity. The worldviews of deism, pantheism, panentheism, atheism, and theism are compared. Using the aforementioned tests for truth for each of these worldviews, theism wins out. With theism established through a very methodological evaluation of each competing worldview, Geisler then builds on the theistic worldview. Now Geisler builds the case for the historical reliability of the New Testament. After showing that the New Testament is an accurate picture of Jesus, he makes the case for the deity and authority for Jesus Christ. And finally, with the Lordship of Christ established, a case can be made for the inspiration and authority of the Bible as a whole. This review has attempted to paint an overall flow of Geisler’s apologetic system. It truly is thorough. Christian Apologetics is not light reading, as it deals heavily with philosophical foundations and epistemological concerns from the outset. However, Geisler has succeeded in authoring a comprehensive text for establishing a complete and systematic framework for Christian apologetics. This text can be commended as required reading for any serious student of apologetics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben B

    There is certainly a place on my shelf for The Case for Christ and Evidence that Demands a Verdict and other "apologetics" books. But this one stands alone. Rather than picking the nits of scientific arguments or the Shroud of Turin or archaeological findings, this book takes in the broad sweep of world views. It sets forth the differences between Monotheism on the one hand and Atheism, Pantheism, Panentheism, and Polytheism on the other. Then it compares and contrasts Christianity, Judaism, and There is certainly a place on my shelf for The Case for Christ and Evidence that Demands a Verdict and other "apologetics" books. But this one stands alone. Rather than picking the nits of scientific arguments or the Shroud of Turin or archaeological findings, this book takes in the broad sweep of world views. It sets forth the differences between Monotheism on the one hand and Atheism, Pantheism, Panentheism, and Polytheism on the other. Then it compares and contrasts Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, the three great monotheistic faiths. The result is that having read this book, you know how to think about the big questions, and you can pull apart the multiple layers of belief that underlie every religious doctrine. After all, it's not much use "proving" that Jesus is the only way to be absolved of sin and enter heaven, if you're talking to a person who doesn't believe in sin or heaven.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura Carter

    I can't believe that I was finally able to click the "I'm finished" button on this one! This book is very thorough and descriptive. I don't know that I would have understood even half of it if we hadn't discussed each chapter for an hour and a half in the Apologetics class I read it for. But after reading it, and discussing it, I have an understanding of world views and tests for truth. Before this book (and class) I would have been able to tell you that other world views were wrong, but I could I can't believe that I was finally able to click the "I'm finished" button on this one! This book is very thorough and descriptive. I don't know that I would have understood even half of it if we hadn't discussed each chapter for an hour and a half in the Apologetics class I read it for. But after reading it, and discussing it, I have an understanding of world views and tests for truth. Before this book (and class) I would have been able to tell you that other world views were wrong, but I couldn't tell you why or how. The only problem I had with the book was that in one of the last chapters, Geisler used the KJV wording and phrases as proof of the Bible's historical accuracy, but refuses to denounce other versions for changing the very phrases that prove the accuracy of the Bible itself. Just a tad bit self-defeating!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Royce Ratterman

    Most books are rated related to their usefulness and contributions to my research. Overall, a good book for the researcher and enthusiast. Read for personal research - found this book's contents helpful and inspiring - number rating relates to the book's contribution to my needs.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alwin

    That was a fun refresher through four millenia of philosophy and two of history. Made for a lot of pensive chin scratching. Still not convinced about the role of apologetics but it was a good intellectual exercise in any case

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dave Gibson

    Norm Geisler's book on Christian apologetics is well written, well organized, and very readable. It is a great introduction to the field. I highly recommend this book to everyone who wishes to learn more about the Christian faith.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

    I read this book a while back as I was really digging into apologetics texts. The best value is his analysis of many different philosophies from history.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nestor Romero

    Christian Apologetics Christian Apologetics

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Highly informative, and flawless logic used in establishing the truth in the Bible and the existence of the God of the Bible.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kais Shammas

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Gomez

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robert Morrin

  23. 5 out of 5

    H. M.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eldridge Harley,

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  26. 5 out of 5

    Duanduan Kamei

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amogelang Tshikhovhokhovho

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Bradley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Stein

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