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Selected Poetry of Delmira Agustini: Poetics of Eros

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This graceful translation and bilingual edition, now in paperback, is the first to bring English readers a representative sampling of the poetry Delmira Agustini published before her untimely death on July 6, 1914 at the age of twenty-seven. Translated by native Uruguayan Alejandro Cáceres and including work from each of Agustini's four published books, Selected Poetry of This graceful translation and bilingual edition, now in paperback, is the first to bring English readers a representative sampling of the poetry Delmira Agustini published before her untimely death on July 6, 1914 at the age of twenty-seven. Translated by native Uruguayan Alejandro Cáceres and including work from each of Agustini's four published books, Selected Poetry of Delmira Agustini: Poetics of Eros is a response to a resurgent interest not just in the poems but in the passionate and daring woman behind them and the social and political world she inhabited. Delmira Agustini was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, on October 24, 1886 to wealthy parents of German and Italian descent. She published her first volume of poetry when she was twenty-one and followed with two more in the next six years: the fourth volume was a posthumous publication. Her life was cut short in 1914, when Enrique Job Reyes, her ex-husband, shot her to death and then turned the gun on himself. Carefully selected for this bilingual, en face edition, the poems collected here track and highlight Agustini's development and strengths as an artist—including her methods of experimentation, first relying on modernista forms and later abandoning them—and her focus on the figure of the male, which she portrays as the crux of devotion and attention but deems ultimately unreachable. Cáceres's introduction presents biographical information and situates Agustini's work and life in a larger political, historical, and literary context, particularly the modernismo movement, whose followers broke linguistic and political ties with the pathos and excesses of romanticism.  


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This graceful translation and bilingual edition, now in paperback, is the first to bring English readers a representative sampling of the poetry Delmira Agustini published before her untimely death on July 6, 1914 at the age of twenty-seven. Translated by native Uruguayan Alejandro Cáceres and including work from each of Agustini's four published books, Selected Poetry of This graceful translation and bilingual edition, now in paperback, is the first to bring English readers a representative sampling of the poetry Delmira Agustini published before her untimely death on July 6, 1914 at the age of twenty-seven. Translated by native Uruguayan Alejandro Cáceres and including work from each of Agustini's four published books, Selected Poetry of Delmira Agustini: Poetics of Eros is a response to a resurgent interest not just in the poems but in the passionate and daring woman behind them and the social and political world she inhabited. Delmira Agustini was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, on October 24, 1886 to wealthy parents of German and Italian descent. She published her first volume of poetry when she was twenty-one and followed with two more in the next six years: the fourth volume was a posthumous publication. Her life was cut short in 1914, when Enrique Job Reyes, her ex-husband, shot her to death and then turned the gun on himself. Carefully selected for this bilingual, en face edition, the poems collected here track and highlight Agustini's development and strengths as an artist—including her methods of experimentation, first relying on modernista forms and later abandoning them—and her focus on the figure of the male, which she portrays as the crux of devotion and attention but deems ultimately unreachable. Cáceres's introduction presents biographical information and situates Agustini's work and life in a larger political, historical, and literary context, particularly the modernismo movement, whose followers broke linguistic and political ties with the pathos and excesses of romanticism.  

49 review for Selected Poetry of Delmira Agustini: Poetics of Eros

  1. 5 out of 5

    Edita

    In the silence of the night my soul Reaches yours like a great mirror. * It was a sea overflowing with madness and fire, * Imagine! To embrace, vivid, radiant The impossible! The lived illusion! I blessed God, the sun, the flower, the air And life itself, because you were life!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    Every once in a while, I read a book like this and think that I should have totally studied Comparative Literature instead of Economics. Review to come, after I finally figure out how the heck to do math

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Delmira Agustini was a turn-of-the-century Uruguayan poet of Italian descent who died at age 27 in a grisly murder-suicide perpetrated by her equally passionate ex-husband. If you're unfamiliar with Agustini's work, you may be wondering what wise thoughts this poet could possibly have had to share with the world at the callow age of 27. But Keats died at age 25; Rimbaud retired from poetry at age 21. Why shouldn't there exist a woman poet as precocious as these two celebrated men were? Like Keats Delmira Agustini was a turn-of-the-century Uruguayan poet of Italian descent who died at age 27 in a grisly murder-suicide perpetrated by her equally passionate ex-husband. If you're unfamiliar with Agustini's work, you may be wondering what wise thoughts this poet could possibly have had to share with the world at the callow age of 27. But Keats died at age 25; Rimbaud retired from poetry at age 21. Why shouldn't there exist a woman poet as precocious as these two celebrated men were? Like Keats, Agustini is the very type of a Romantic, prone to lapse into hazy reveries peopled by angels and vampires and sirens and Greek gods. An idealist in the worst sense of the word, she prefers her landscapes to be adorned by roses and lilies and diamonds and rubies and crystal fountains. It would be so easy to write her off as an amateur who traffics in cliches, the sanitized stock furniture of the world's most banal poetry. But to do so would be to lose one's opportunity to enjoy the subtler nuances of her work. An excessive love for all things pretty and all things Greek didn't prevent H.D. from becoming a significant poet, and it didn't fatally blight Agustini's career, either. Agustini is a poet clear-sighted enough to admit her own worst shortcomings: that is, her over-fondness for reverie and her weak grasp on objective truth. In an early poem addressing her beloved, she says: "I die of reverie; I will drink the truth In your fountains... I know in the great depths of your chest Is the spring that will vanquish my thirst." Agustini boldly re-conceives the poet's role, envisioning the poet as a Salome figure who beheads her victims in order to study their suffering, a vampire who feeds off of the emotional lives of the people around her. Her love poetry is sometimes quite splendid: "Your eyes seem to me Two seeds of light within the shadow, And there is in my soul a great blossoming If you fix them upon me; and if you lower them, I feel As if the carpet were to blossom." Her late poem "Mis Amores" (My Loves) is worthy of comparison to Millay's "What Lips My Lips Have Kissed" and Tsvetaeva's "Whence All This Tenderness?"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lou Last

    Entreaty Eros: have you ever felt Piety for the statues? One would say they are chrysalides of stone Of I know not what formidable lineage In an eternal, unspeakable wait. The sleeping craters of their mouths Give the black ash of silence, From the columns of his shoulders Emanates the copious shroud of calm, And from the hollows of their eyes the night flows; Victims of the Future or the Mystery, In terrible and magnificent blooms Await life or death. Eros: have you ever felt piety for the statue Entreaty Eros: have you ever felt Piety for the statues? One would say they are chrysalides of stone Of I know not what formidable lineage In an eternal, unspeakable wait. The sleeping craters of their mouths Give the black ash of silence, From the columns of his shoulders Emanates the copious shroud of calm, And from the hollows of their eyes the night flows; Victims of the Future or the Mystery, In terrible and magnificent blooms Await life or death. Eros: have you ever felt piety for the statues? Piety for the lives That with fire guild not your calms Nor besprinkle or break off your storms; Piety for the bodies clad In the solemn ermine of calm, And the lighted foreheads that bear Great marmoreal lilies of purity, Heavy and glacial like icebergs; Piety for the hands gloved With ice, which pick not The pleasurable fruits of the flesh Nor the fanciful flowers of the soul; Piety for the eyes that bat Spiritual eyelids: Scales of mystery, Black shrouds of rosy visions . . . They never see anything no matter how far they look! Piety for the fine locks —mystical halos— Combed as lakes Never aired by the black fan, The black and enormous fan of the tempest; Piety for the illustrious spirits Carved in diamond, Tall, clear, ecstatic Lightning rods of moral domes; Piety for the lips like celestial gem mountings Where shines Invisible the pearl of the host; —lips that were never, That never captured A vampire of fire With more thirst and more hunger than an abyss—. Piety for the sacred sexes That chastity ironclads With a leaf of an astral vine; Piety for the magnetized soles Of eternity which drag Through the eternal azure The burning sandals of their wounds; Piety, piety, piety For all the lives that are defended From your spectacular elements by The erect tower of pride: Aim your sunbeams or your thunderbolts at them! Eros: have you ever felt Piety for the statues? FromThe Empty Chalices (1913) *

  5. 4 out of 5

    Oana Dragomir

    Don't mind me as I start 17 online Spanish courses in order to read this in its original language :) These poems were splendid! Don't mind me as I start 17 online Spanish courses in order to read this in its original language :) These poems were splendid!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lia

    One of my favorite poets, this is a delightful collection from 4 collections (plus an introduction) by Agustini's foremost translator. One of my favorite poets, this is a delightful collection from 4 collections (plus an introduction) by Agustini's foremost translator.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Delgado

    Voices of dissent toward normative voices.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Premnarayan Nath

    Please provide me to read some poems prior to my writing reviews of the book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    GENESIS

    “Red love, love of mine; Blood of worlds, and blush of skies . . . Give him to me, my God!”

  10. 5 out of 5

    Вікторія Слінявчук

    Я еще никогда так сильно не жалела о том, что не знаю испанский. Алехандро Касерес, конечно, проделал большую работу, перевел около половины стихотворений Агустини на английский. Но, увы, это скорее подстрочники. Такой подход избрал переводчик - сделать как можно более буквальные переводы. А поэзия от этого страдает... Впрочем, я нашла несколько переводов на русский, сделанных Инной Чежеговой: http://imwerden.de/pdf/agustini_stihi... Они не настолько близки к тексту оригинала, но зато они поэтическ Я еще никогда так сильно не жалела о том, что не знаю испанский. Алехандро Касерес, конечно, проделал большую работу, перевел около половины стихотворений Агустини на английский. Но, увы, это скорее подстрочники. Такой подход избрал переводчик - сделать как можно более буквальные переводы. А поэзия от этого страдает... Впрочем, я нашла несколько переводов на русский, сделанных Инной Чежеговой: http://imwerden.de/pdf/agustini_stihi... Они не настолько близки к тексту оригинала, но зато они поэтические. А те, кто читают по-испански, имеют возможность насладиться ее стихотворениями в оригинале, и это самое лучшее.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adriana Alejandra

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jett

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karina Montalvo

  15. 5 out of 5

    grace

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  17. 4 out of 5

    حواء

  18. 5 out of 5

    Suman Pokhrel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Therese

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tony Paese

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ray

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicolás Bruno Guedes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Casey Lawrence

  27. 4 out of 5

    Diane Wallace

  28. 5 out of 5

    Endri

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luis Damian Robles

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Lett

  32. 5 out of 5

    abcdefg

  33. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  34. 4 out of 5

    okei

  35. 5 out of 5

    Trinity

  36. 4 out of 5

    Shamvabee Chakraborty

  37. 4 out of 5

    Aqueous

  38. 5 out of 5

    Clover Youngblood

  39. 5 out of 5

    tia

  40. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  41. 4 out of 5

    Mirela

  42. 5 out of 5

    Enid

  43. 4 out of 5

    **the True Snow Queen**

  44. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Mansour

  45. 5 out of 5

    Anthea

  46. 5 out of 5

    John Varner

  47. 4 out of 5

    Noora

  48. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  49. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

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