web site hit counter The Royal Baths Murder - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Royal Baths Murder

Availability: Ready to download

A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime writing festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime writing festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no apparent means of escape, how did the killer simply vanish from the scene of the crime?There’s only one mind capable of unlocking this mystery: DCI Jim Oldroyd. But as he and his team quickly discover, while Penrose was popular with the reading public, he had made plenty of enemies. Feuds over money, accusations of plagiarism, a string of affairs…His route to the top left a trail of embittered rivals—and suspects. But which of them was willing to commit murder?When Penrose’s shocking death proves to be just the first of many, it becomes clear to Oldroyd that he is dealing with a calculating criminal hell-bent on revenge. He must find and bring them to justice. Before the truth becomes more chilling than fiction…


Compare

A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime writing festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime writing festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no apparent means of escape, how did the killer simply vanish from the scene of the crime?There’s only one mind capable of unlocking this mystery: DCI Jim Oldroyd. But as he and his team quickly discover, while Penrose was popular with the reading public, he had made plenty of enemies. Feuds over money, accusations of plagiarism, a string of affairs…His route to the top left a trail of embittered rivals—and suspects. But which of them was willing to commit murder?When Penrose’s shocking death proves to be just the first of many, it becomes clear to Oldroyd that he is dealing with a calculating criminal hell-bent on revenge. He must find and bring them to justice. Before the truth becomes more chilling than fiction…

30 review for The Royal Baths Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    This book is the fourth in the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series about the delightfully diligent DCI Oldroyd and his team solving a series a locked-room conundrums (conundra surely?) in the fictional West Riding police force. This one is set against the backdrop of a Crime Writers Festival in Harrogate, modelled very closely on the famous Theakston’s Old Peculier Writing Festival and a large part of the fun was guessing which authors Ellis might’ve based his characters on. While there are evolving This book is the fourth in the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series about the delightfully diligent DCI Oldroyd and his team solving a series a locked-room conundrums (conundra surely?) in the fictional West Riding police force. This one is set against the backdrop of a Crime Writers Festival in Harrogate, modelled very closely on the famous Theakston’s Old Peculier Writing Festival and a large part of the fun was guessing which authors Ellis might’ve based his characters on. While there are evolving storylines about the detectives, this could easily be read as a stand-alone. Damian Penrose, a pompous and malicious but inexplicably popular crime writer, is found murdered in the historic Turkish bathhouse in Harrogate the morning after his Festival session, where several other authors have accused him of plagiarism. No one can work out how the killer escaped unnoticed, and with so many people having a motive, the police are stumped, but when other murders follow, only Oldroyd can unpick the puzzle, all while experiencing a new romance. Meanwhile his DS Steph has to cope with a predatory and possibly corrupt senior officer. I have enjoyed all the books in this borderline-cosy Agatha Christie-inspired series, and this was no exception. It’s taken me longer than usual to read but that’s been more to do with recovery from a difficult month, and serious jet lag. Ellis uses intriguing real locations, both historic and geographical, to great effect as a backdrop for his stories, and has fun with his characters paying homage to the great old detective series of the past, but set in contemporary times. They are well-written and comfortably paced, without too much violence. I didn’t guess the identity or motive of the killer, and while the reveal was a bit too Scooby-Doo-ish, again this was just following the Christie format of a villain who just can’t wait to explain how clever they were... My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the arc which allowed me to give an honest review. The Royal Baths Murder is available now.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jannelies

    It is not often that I don't finish a book. I am in fact curious as to how the murder was committed, but I am not willing to work my way through a book that reads as it is the first try of a budding author. Not entirely bad but needs a lot of work on the story and the characterization. Some dialogues were simply hilarious while not meant to be so. And that story about the female police officer having problems with her male colleagues... mweh. Thanks to Netgalley for this digital review copy. It is not often that I don't finish a book. I am in fact curious as to how the murder was committed, but I am not willing to work my way through a book that reads as it is the first try of a budding author. Not entirely bad but needs a lot of work on the story and the characterization. Some dialogues were simply hilarious while not meant to be so. And that story about the female police officer having problems with her male colleagues... mweh. Thanks to Netgalley for this digital review copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    All this book did unlike the others in the series was manage to piss me off.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Arybo ✨

    This was fun!🔪 Yes, yes, YES. Give me all the Ellis books! I really savoured this novel, even if I never read a book from the series before. I truly enjoyed the continuous connections with Agatha Chistie's mysteries: one Death at the beginning, the inside jokes, (view spoiler)[ an other Death at the middle (hide spoiler)] , a little group of candidates for the role of assassin, the setting (a Crime Festival in a little town, turkish baths, ancient hotels), the author's Death and the Conspiracy of This was fun!🔪 Yes, yes, YES. Give me all the Ellis books! I really savoured this novel, even if I never read a book from the series before. I truly enjoyed the continuous connections with Agatha Chistie's mysteries: one Death at the beginning, the inside jokes, (view spoiler)[ an other Death at the middle (hide spoiler)] , a little group of candidates for the role of assassin, the setting (a Crime Festival in a little town, turkish baths, ancient hotels), the author's Death and the Conspiracy of the press around his mysterious killer. I really appreciated the characters, both detectives and suspects. I think that I would enjoy the other books in the series because of the main protagonist and his colleagues. I really liked the literary vision on the matter, the references to Shakespeare and to English literature, and all this stuff. The rythm of the book is intense and it reminded me of the Agatha's stories. I totally recommend this book! ****Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for sending me an arc of this book in Exchange for an honest review ****

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an advance copy of The Royal Baths Murder, the fourth novel to feature DCI Oldroyd of the Harrogate Police. When Damian Penrose is found murdered in the steam room of the Royal Baths DCI Oldroyd and his team are faced with a mystery - how did the killer do it? There is no lack of suspects as Penrose was a deeply unpleasant man who had upset a number of people but which one took damage limitation to extremes by killing potential witnesse I would like to thank Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an advance copy of The Royal Baths Murder, the fourth novel to feature DCI Oldroyd of the Harrogate Police. When Damian Penrose is found murdered in the steam room of the Royal Baths DCI Oldroyd and his team are faced with a mystery - how did the killer do it? There is no lack of suspects as Penrose was a deeply unpleasant man who had upset a number of people but which one took damage limitation to extremes by killing potential witnesses? I enjoyed The Royal Baths Murder which has a complicated murder at its heart and a very readable style. The novel is written mostly from Oldroyd’s point of view so there is little more that the reader knows and he doesn’t. I like the guessing that goes with this approach although I defy any reader to guess the complicated method. In some ways it beggars belief but it keeps the reader interested and guessing. The hunt for the killer is the mainstay of the novel although there is a rather unconvincing subplot involving Oldroyd’s subordinate DS Steph Johnson. This has some clever elements but the attitudes are old fashioned and highly unlikely in this day and age. With all the emphasis on the plot it is not a particularly profound novel, keeping everything at surface level. It is, however, an easy way to pass a few hours. It is not easy to discuss the characters as there’s not much to them. Oldroyd is a lateral thinker, always able to find the solution to the most improbable circumstances but he’s a lonely man and has dipped in to internet dating at the urging of his daughter. You’ll have to read the novel to see how it goes. The Royal Baths Murder is an undemanding read which held my attention throughout.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The fourth book in J.R. Ellis's Yorkshire Murder Mysteries - DCI Jim Oldroyd series, this was another solid instalment in the old fashioned mystery mould. Rather than the Yorkshire Dales, like the other books in the series, The Royal Baths Murder is predominantly set in and around the spa-town of Harrogate, also home of the (fictional) West Riding Police HQ. The annual Harrogate Crime Writers' Festival (clearly based on the real Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival) is underway, with na The fourth book in J.R. Ellis's Yorkshire Murder Mysteries - DCI Jim Oldroyd series, this was another solid instalment in the old fashioned mystery mould. Rather than the Yorkshire Dales, like the other books in the series, The Royal Baths Murder is predominantly set in and around the spa-town of Harrogate, also home of the (fictional) West Riding Police HQ. The annual Harrogate Crime Writers' Festival (clearly based on the real Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival) is underway, with narcissistic but successful crime writer Damian Penrose one of its main drawcards. When Penrose is found strangled in a steam room of the nearby historic Royal Baths complex (based on Harrogate's Turkish Baths), DCI Oldroyd and DS Carter arrive to find what appears to be a classic "locked room" mystery. Meanwhile, DS Stephanie Johnson has been temporarily reassigned to the loathsome DI Fenton's team, investigating an accusation of corruption against a local councillor. Not only does Fenton continually harrass DS Johnson, he seems less than diligent in his efforts to uncover evidence against the councillor. The Royal Baths Murder is more homage-laden than Ellis's other books, using as it does several real life events and locations as barely-veiled models for the setting. The author Agatha Christie was discovered at the Swan Hydropathic Hotel, Harrogate following her much-publicised disappearance in 1926. It's now known as the Old Swan Hotel, and is the model for the White Swan Hotel, the location of both the real life and J.R. Ellis's fictional crime writing festivals. The Royal Baths Murder is peppered with other Christie references, some explicit, others more in the character of hidden crumbs, dropped for the amusement of enthusiasts. While I found the solution to the crimes really beggared belief, this was an enjoyable read, featuring a cast of well-developed characters with complex relationships. As readers have come to expect of Ellis, the stunning Yorkshire scenery and historic buildings are used to great effect as a setting. While there is a backstory that runs through the series concerning the central characters' relationships and personal lives, the crimes under investigation form the backbone of the plot and The Royal Baths Murder would be an enjoyable standalone read or entry point to the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stina

    The fourth book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series, THE ROYAL BATHS MURDER was my first read by J.R. Ellis and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I wouldn't call it a cosy mystery but it is a good old-fashioned murder mystery in the vein of Agatha Christie. Having read all of Ms Christie's books when I was a teenager, I felt her presence at every turn throughout this delightful mystery. Particularly as the setting was the Turkish baths in Harrogate, the very place where Ms Christie The fourth book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series, THE ROYAL BATHS MURDER was my first read by J.R. Ellis and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I wouldn't call it a cosy mystery but it is a good old-fashioned murder mystery in the vein of Agatha Christie. Having read all of Ms Christie's books when I was a teenager, I felt her presence at every turn throughout this delightful mystery. Particularly as the setting was the Turkish baths in Harrogate, the very place where Ms Christie was found after a 10 day disappearance in 1926. A definite nod to the Queen of Crime here in more ways than one. There were no super detectives with tortured private lives that seemed to spill over into their professional ones, usually by way of drink or sleeping with nameless strangers but still coming out on top of disturbed serial killers of heinous crimes...of course, after having evaded death themselves. This is simply put - a good old-fashioned murder mystery. It's all about solving a seemingly impossible murder with a freshness that is quite lighthearted, making it an enjoyable read. "3 December 1926. Agatha Christie went missing from her home in Berkshire. Her disappearance caused an outcry amongst the public, and thousands were involved in the effort to search for her, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, On 14 December she was found at The Swan Hydropathic Hotel (now known as The Old Swan) in Harrogate, Yorkshire..." In the present day, at the White Swan Hotel in Harrogate, the annual Crime Writing Festival is in full swing. A place where fans and would-be writers gather to learn from the best. And there is no one better than Damian Penrose...at least, that's what he thinks. Having come up from London for somewhat a reprieve, Penrose is loved and hated in equal doses by his readers and peers but never misses an opportunity to talk about himself - in which the festival provides the ideal event. However, there is one consolation in having to travel to the dull and provincial north hundreds of miles away from civilisation...the Royal Baths. It is his one solace from the world. Early one morning, Penrose heads to the Baths to relax in solitude in a pre-booked private session before the baths open to the public. A short time later, he is found brutally strangled in the steam room... Enter DCI Oldroyd and DS Andy Carter of the West Riding Police Harrogate Division HQ (somewhat of a mouthful) who question the staff of the Royal Baths and all who interacted with Penrose in the hours leading up to his murder. It isn't long before they discover that his murder is straight from the pages of one of his fellow writer's books - his arch rival, no less. Charles Derryvale, the said writer, soon becomes a suspect when it is revealed that he was last seen having a row with the murder victim at the bar of the the White Swan, where the event took place. Derryvale, on the other hand, is taking macarbre pleasure in the murder and finding it great fun! There is a slightly related case in which DS Steph Johnson has been seconded to the lecherous DI Fenton to investigate Jack Sandford who has been suspended from council after being suspected of illegally granting a contract to his architect wife, Clare Bayliss...who just happens to be Penrose's second wife. The contract? For renovations to the Royal Baths. Maybe this case has more to do with Oldroyd's case than at first thought. With Fenton making unwelcome sexual advances towards Steph, she has no alternative than to take matters into her own hands to stop Fenton once and for all. Going to her superiors is not an option as the force is the age-old boys club and Fenton is her superior officer. Steph then works on gathering evidence of complaints and instances of how Fenton treats his female subordinates, as well as a secret investigation into his taking back-handers from none other than Jack Sandford. Then the body of the Crime Writing Festival's organiser turns up with a third murder taking place in true Christie style, at the climatic end of festival's "Murder Mystery Event" of Penrose's first wife, both of which bear a striking resemblances to other stories by Penrose's rivals. So who killed Penrose? And what is the significance in likening all subsequent murders to books by his rivals? Perhaps someone wishes to cast him as a character in a real life murder mystery - someone with a real motive. But who? Oldroyd and Carter soon discover that the murder of Penrose corresponds to that of the Locked Room Mystery, in which there appears to be no way in and no escape for the murderer without being seen. So how did the murderer get in and how did he leave...all without being seen? A classic "whodunnit" as well as a being a "howdunnit" in the vein of Ms Christie's own Hercule Poirot's mysteries. Oldroyd and his team learn than Penrose had been accused of stealing other writers', both seasoned and fledgling, ideas and portrayed them as his own. He claimed they needed to be told by an expert...him being the said expert. There were no shortage of suspect and there were plenty of complexities, although somewhat restrained compared with today's fast paced high octane thrillers. DCI Jim Holroyd is instantly likable and loves nothing more than to turn his hand at solving the unsolvable puzzle. Having separated from his wife some years before, at the encouragement of his daughter Louise, Oldroyd embarks on a journey in the world of online dating...where he meets Deborah, with whom he features in his down-time. They were a delightful couple, without any of the angst and battle of wills that is found the more modern style of mystery, with this being old-fashioned in more ways than one making it an enjoyable lighthearted read. Excellent light reading of the true old-fashioned British murder mystery with a nod to the old greats that have gone before, THE ROYAL BATHS MURDER is a perfect combination of the old and new in this classic tale of whodunnit. Well crafted with delightful elements of humour, THE ROYAL BATHS MURDER a is lighthearted and fun read. What I also like about this book is that although it is part of a series it can be read as a standalone and you don't miss any important backstories as the focus is on the murders and not the private lives of the police. My first by J.R. Ellis but definitely not my last. A welcome change to the more high octane thrillers, THE ROYAL BATHS MURDER is a classic old-fashioned murder mystery at its best. And I especially love the nod and reference to Agatha Christie. An undemanding read that will hold your attention throughout, I highly recommend to those who love the classic style of the old-fashioned murder mystery. I would like to thank #JREllis, #NetGalley and #AmazonPublishingUK for an ARC of #TheRoyalBathsMurder in exchange for an honest review. This review appears on my blog at https://stinathebookaholic.blogspot.com/.

  8. 5 out of 5

    S J HUSSAIN

    I love crime books but this was pants! The only parts that held my interest were when areas of Harrogate were mentioned ( I live in Harrogate). To be honest I skipped from 50% of book to 90% and just read the last chapter just to find out who did it!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Boring book. The most boring book I’ve ever read. Skimmed the last 50% not fast moving enough and didn’t like the style of writing . Sorry not a GoodRead.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    4 stars Damian Penrose, famous author and a man who loved to be hated. He was very self centered and self-important. While attending a crime writers convention in Harrogate, he rubs with some old enemies and ruffles some feathers during and after a presentation. The next morning he goes off to the Victorian Baths, a favorite place of his to go when in Harrogate. He has the place to himself except for three employees. When one of the employees finds him dead in the baths, it sets off DCI Jim Oldro 4 stars Damian Penrose, famous author and a man who loved to be hated. He was very self centered and self-important. While attending a crime writers convention in Harrogate, he rubs with some old enemies and ruffles some feathers during and after a presentation. The next morning he goes off to the Victorian Baths, a favorite place of his to go when in Harrogate. He has the place to himself except for three employees. When one of the employees finds him dead in the baths, it sets off DCI Jim Oldroyd's latest investigation, along with his sidekick DS Andy Carter and the rest of his team. There is a plethora of suspects, including another writer who had her story ideas stolen by Penrose, a very angry ex-wife, a wronged business partner and writers he had borderlined libeled, among others. Meanwhile one of Oldroyd's DS's has been pinched by the thoroughly unlikable Fenton to “assist” him on a case. It is the investigation of wrongdoing on the local council. But, of course, Fenton has other things on his dirty little mind. Steph comes up with a brilliant plan to trap him and expose his behavior. Oldroyd's investigation is confounding and very difficult to solve. How could the murderer have gotten out of the baths without being noticed by the staff? This is a very well written and plotted story. I really like Oldroyd and his team. He is kind and very patient. He is a great teacher to his subordinates and loves to spout inconsequential facts that just seem to spring out of nowhere. And he has a new relationship! The identity of the murderer surprised me. I hadn't even given them any thought. It was a nice surprise. More please, Mr. Ellis I want to thank NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK for forwarding to me a copy of this delightful book for me to read, enjoy and review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Lee

    Dont you feel that you enjoy a novel more when you have a good picture of the location where it is set, in your mind ? Some authors are better than others at this descriptive element of their task but nothing beats your own personal knowledge. I lived in Yorkshire for 20 years and for half of that time I was a regular visitor to Harrogate. I even had a session in the baths and steam rooms and can share DS Andy Carters revulsion and reactions on tasting the historic waters at the Pump House. I had Dont you feel that you enjoy a novel more when you have a good picture of the location where it is set, in your mind ? Some authors are better than others at this descriptive element of their task but nothing beats your own personal knowledge. I lived in Yorkshire for 20 years and for half of that time I was a regular visitor to Harrogate. I even had a session in the baths and steam rooms and can share DS Andy Carters revulsion and reactions on tasting the historic waters at the Pump House. I had thought that the previous book in the series was less enjoyable than the opener but this one has reclaimed the earlier charm (NOTE. That was #2 The Quartet Murders, I went out of order.) There were plenty of characters around again this time but in the main , I managed to remember them all and only a couple of times found myself turning back to the 'search' option to check. I had thought that the 'cozy' style of book was going to be threatened in the early stages when Steff was 'lent' to DI Fenton. However, that part of the story was admirably handled by the author and provided a good counterbalance to the main tale. Did I solve the mystery first? Well I got the 'who' half right but not the 'how' and I had an altogether incorrect and totally unfounded suspicion about the purpetrator of the incident at Brimham Rocks. Most enjoyable and back to form.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Miglė

    I loved the setting and the premise - a hated writer is found dead in the baths, and nobody saw anyone come in or leave. Did I mention he was universally hated? The pace was fast and elegant, and I love the idea of "hiding the criminal in plain sight". Unfortunately, I was able to guess the murderer by the way the characters were introduced and I don't think that was intended. I'll mark the following part as a spoiler just in case - I won't reveal the murderer, but I'll mention something about the I loved the setting and the premise - a hated writer is found dead in the baths, and nobody saw anyone come in or leave. Did I mention he was universally hated? The pace was fast and elegant, and I love the idea of "hiding the criminal in plain sight". Unfortunately, I was able to guess the murderer by the way the characters were introduced and I don't think that was intended. I'll mark the following part as a spoiler just in case - I won't reveal the murderer, but I'll mention something about the manner of writing. (view spoiler)[When all of the characters are described in their relation to the case or personal relationship with the main characters, and then a person just shows up a couple of times, and nothing is said about them, you get the feeling that they're probably the murderer. You know the meme (I made up the names): CALEB was jealous DANNY had the motive ABIGAIL doesn't have an alibi BART DYLAN needed the money I'm guessing it's INCREDIBLY hard to write in a way that the reader would be surprised at the end, "Oh, it was this person all along!", but it just didn't work for me this time. (hide spoiler)] Still, a good read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gianna Lorandi

    This is my first J.R. Ellis book and I can say I was pleasantly surprised. It’s the 4th DCI Oldroyd murder mystery series and that’s exactly what it is, a good old murder mystery. There was no, and I quote “super-detectives with their tortured private lives triumphing over diabolical serial killers, after having evaded death themselves.” It’s all about solving an impossible murder and there’s a freshness about that as it’s quite lighthearted and it makes a very enjoyable read. It reminds me of th This is my first J.R. Ellis book and I can say I was pleasantly surprised. It’s the 4th DCI Oldroyd murder mystery series and that’s exactly what it is, a good old murder mystery. There was no, and I quote “super-detectives with their tortured private lives triumphing over diabolical serial killers, after having evaded death themselves.” It’s all about solving an impossible murder and there’s a freshness about that as it’s quite lighthearted and it makes a very enjoyable read. It reminds me of the BBC series Death in Paradise. The characters are quite straight forward, there’s not a great deal of development but it really didn’t matter to me as all I wanted was to solve the murder! I will definitely be reading the other book in this series. Thank you Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for the advanced copy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gardener0126

    I wish to thank the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this novel. This is another fine entry in the Yorkshire Murder series. I have read all four books that are currently available in this series and I hope that Ellis plans more. This is a fairly classic police procedural, featuring DCI Oldroyd, who Is both clever and intuitive. He isn’t perfect by any means, but he is human and likable,. The characters in this series are well drawn, and I have grown to care about what happens to th I wish to thank the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this novel. This is another fine entry in the Yorkshire Murder series. I have read all four books that are currently available in this series and I hope that Ellis plans more. This is a fairly classic police procedural, featuring DCI Oldroyd, who Is both clever and intuitive. He isn’t perfect by any means, but he is human and likable,. The characters in this series are well drawn, and I have grown to care about what happens to them, Ellis sets his books in somewhat unusual places. This book, like the others, seems well researched. I really enjoyed this novel, and think it would appeal to anyone who likes mysteries.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jude Coleman

    Brilliant I really enjoyed The Royal Baths Murder, DCI Jim Oldroyd is a great character,who I thoroughly enjoy, I have enjoyed all of J R ellis' books and recommend them to anyone who likes a good murder mystery with twists and some colourful characters Brilliant I really enjoyed The Royal Baths Murder, DCI Jim Oldroyd is a great character,who I thoroughly enjoy, I have enjoyed all of J R ellis' books and recommend them to anyone who likes a good murder mystery with twists and some colourful characters

  16. 5 out of 5

    Agatha C Reads

    As Local and a massive Crime fiction fan, and the crime festival. I tried to get into this book, I enjoyed the first book but this was hard going as the storyline was padded out. I enjoyed the quotations at the beginning of each chapter. The acknowledgments were probably the best part of the book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Another great book from J R Ellis that has you puzzled but determined to solve with some fab characters that make the book. worthy of the 5*.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Another great book from J R Ellis that has you puzzled but determined to solve with some fab characters that make the book. worthy of the 5*.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lynda Birch

    This was my first time reading a book by this author. The story is a puzzle in the style of Agatha Christie and the author references Christie a number of times. The five W’s will be evident to most mystery fans but the ‘how’ is the real brain teaser. I think very few readers will figure out how the main murder was committed. Even though the author drops a number of clues to give you an inkling of how it was done, he also does a nice job of misdirection making it unlikely that you’ll completely This was my first time reading a book by this author. The story is a puzzle in the style of Agatha Christie and the author references Christie a number of times. The five W’s will be evident to most mystery fans but the ‘how’ is the real brain teaser. I think very few readers will figure out how the main murder was committed. Even though the author drops a number of clues to give you an inkling of how it was done, he also does a nice job of misdirection making it unlikely that you’ll completely work it out. The main character, DCI Oldroyd, is a kind, sympathetic character to follow and stands in stark contrast to the victim in the story, Penrose, who was a person that everyone loved to hate. The story has a number of interesting characters and there is suspense, some tension, some romance and a nod to the “Me Too” movement. Overall it is an intriguing read, though long-winded. Thank you to Net Galley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trish R.

    This was a good book. About an author of murder mysteries who was murdered at the Harrogate Turkish Baths and there seemed to be no way in or out of the murder room without passing the front desk. Then there were two other murders when people were getting too close. And in-between the murders our hero, DCI Jim Oldroyd met a woman through the personal ads and we got to see how that was going. It was a good addition to the story. Overall, it was pretty interesting, with some really good characters. This was a good book. About an author of murder mysteries who was murdered at the Harrogate Turkish Baths and there seemed to be no way in or out of the murder room without passing the front desk. Then there were two other murders when people were getting too close. And in-between the murders our hero, DCI Jim Oldroyd met a woman through the personal ads and we got to see how that was going. It was a good addition to the story. Overall, it was pretty interesting, with some really good characters. There was no real romance in this and only a little bit of swearing. As to the narration: Michael Page has no emotion whatsoever. His voices are okay but you need more than that to be a good narrator. You can't just read the book. Several times someone laughed but the narrator didn't make a sound.

  21. 5 out of 5

    The Lotus Readers

    These books are like sinking into a warm bath.Reading one of J.R.Ellis’s novels is like a comforting warm bath after a tough day. They are an easy, undemanding read. I could imagine a Sunday evening series on television featuring DCI Oldroyd and the beautiful Yorkshire scenery - rather like James Herriot but with murder instead of poorly animals, Murder is at the heart of the novel, but not in a gritty, shocking way. This is ‘old fashioned’ murder where we don’t become close to the victim and th These books are like sinking into a warm bath.Reading one of J.R.Ellis’s novels is like a comforting warm bath after a tough day. They are an easy, undemanding read. I could imagine a Sunday evening series on television featuring DCI Oldroyd and the beautiful Yorkshire scenery - rather like James Herriot but with murder instead of poorly animals, Murder is at the heart of the novel, but not in a gritty, shocking way. This is ‘old fashioned’ murder where we don’t become close to the victim and the focus is on the intellectual twists and turns of the case. This novel is based within a crime writing festival with workshops, book launches and author interviews. The novel begins at one of these events where a novelist is meant to be giving an insight into crime writing for fans and budding authors. Damian Penrose is a best-selling crime writer, but is not inclined to give newer writers tips on his success. He is arrogant and very complacent about his genius. He believes there are no tips to pass on; you either have talent or you don’t, and in his opinion most people don’t. He is asked pointed questions by fellow writers that feel more personal than professional. It soon becomes clear that this man is hated by several people in both his professional and personal life. So it is no surprise when he is found strangled the next morning in the Royal Baths. The only surprise about his death is the method, as in all of Oldroyd’s cases there is a central mystery involved that seems unsolvable. This time the killer seems to have appeared and disappeared without being seen. The baths were checked by the caretaker who leaves them empty. Where has the killer hidden? Even more confusing than that, how did they leave? There is only one exit covered by a receptionist and she has seen no one but Penrose. Oldroyd is just the detective for this mystery. In previous novels he has solved a murder where the body is in an inaccessible pot hole and during a magic trick in a locked room. He has an incredible mind that seems to store clues without him knowing. During difficult cases he suddenly sees something that jogs his memory or stirs up a clue. This is a great talent for his job, but isn’t so useful in his personal life. Oldroyd and his wife are now divorced, mainly due to his workaholic nature. In this novel his daughter has talked him into internet dating and he reluctantly starts chatting to people. During a date with Debbie his mind suddenly wanders down one of these corridors and he knows there is something about the aftermath of the murder that is niggling at his brain. However, to Debbie it simple seems he has wandered off and does not have his mind on their date. It may be that he has blown this relationship before it has really begun. Apart from Oldroyd the other regular characters are only lightly sketched out in this instalment. His other team members Andy and Steph are living together, but beyond the first novel I have never really seen their feelings for each other or even their reasons for being together. I feel more as if we are ‘told’ they are in love, rather than shown their chemistry. Here, Steph is seconded to another team where the DCI is very sexist and predatory. She hates working with him and we soon see why, especially when he attempts to blackmail Steph with some topless photos from a girls holiday. However, this doesn’t fully ring true either as I can’t imagine this serious and cautious police woman doing something so frivolous. I found I missed the interplay between Oldroyd and his daughter. Again we are told that she has gone away and he misses her, rather than being shown this transition. I felt this might have given more depth to Oldroyd’s character because his daughter had filled a void left when he split with his wife. His daughter is a feminist and quite spiky so I enjoyed how she brought him into the 21st Century. Her departure would have been a massive adjustment and takes away that family element created by their visits with Oldroyd’s sister who is a local vicar. I feel that the twists and turns of the case did take centre stage and I kept reading, wanting to know the who and how of the murder. Penrose is such an unpleasant man that this is largely an intellectual fascination. The more that is revealed about the victim, the harder it is to care that someone killed him. His personal life is littered with ex-wives and lovers with grudges. His professional life is full of other authors he may have plagiarised or trodden on as he became famous. There are also financial obligations he hasn’t met, leaving business partners struggling. I think the author was so focused on exploring the people in this world that other regular characters may have been neglected. There are some brilliant characters, but we rarely reach more than a surface understanding of them. I would say that this is not the best J.R. Ellis novel, but it is very humorous in its explorations of crime writers and the publishing world and this makes a great backdrop to a case full of twists and turns. It is a diverting way to pass a few hours in the same way we might watch a comforting Sunday night series. If you love traditional crime writers such as Agatha Christie and Sherlock Holmes this is a great author to try. Thank you to NetGalley for my gifted copy in exchange for an honest review

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    In this fourth book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series, a renowned crime writer dies under mysterious circumstances. This book can be read as a standalone. It’s a beautiful summer evening in Harrogate and the Crime Writing Festival is in full swing. This year the guest writer is Damian Penrose. The event is “The Perfect Crime: Writing a Bestselling Crime Novel”, chaired by Ben Poole, a writer, journalist and presenter. Damian Penrose is a highly successful crime writer and is rumored to be m In this fourth book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series, a renowned crime writer dies under mysterious circumstances. This book can be read as a standalone. It’s a beautiful summer evening in Harrogate and the Crime Writing Festival is in full swing. This year the guest writer is Damian Penrose. The event is “The Perfect Crime: Writing a Bestselling Crime Novel”, chaired by Ben Poole, a writer, journalist and presenter. Damian Penrose is a highly successful crime writer and is rumored to be making six figures. He’s also has a reputation for throwing sling at other writers. He writes harsh reviews and sometimes leaves subtle personal insults in between. He steals ideas from young female writers whenever they sent him their work for his feedback. In some cases, he’d seduce them then leave them high and dry. At the session, rather than offer useful advice to budding writers and offer some insights into his writing methods, he instead starts boasting about his work and disparaging other writers’ work. Several writers in attendance are not happy about this. At the end of the session, the festival director, Patricia Hughes approaches him and expresses her disappointment in his session. She then reminds him about the upcoming session and warns him to get his act together or he wouldn’t be invited again. The next day Penrose decides to tour the quaint village of Harrogate. During his short stays at Harrogate, he visits the Royal Baths—one of the town’s famous attractions—every morning where he goes to relax. For this trip, he’s booked a private early morning session at the Royal Baths 🛁 and he plans to arrive early before the Baths are open to the public. After a swim session, he retires to the cold plunge pool 🏊 and later to the dry hot room. While getting some steam, someone sneaks into the room and strangles him. When the staff find him laying unmoving on the floor, they assume he’s passed out from the heat. Upon close inspection, they find ligature marks around his neck. Puzzled, they call the police. DS Andrew Carter from the West Riding Police Harrogate Division HQ receives a call from the Royal Baths and leaves immediately taking a DI and two Police Constables with him. At the crime scene, he calls his boss, DCI Jim Oldroyd to inform him about the murder. As they question the staff of Royal Baths, and people who interacted with him before he was murdered, they discover that Penrose’s murder looks like something from one of his fellow writer’s—and arch-rival—books. The writer’ is now a suspect seeing as he was last seen having a row with the victim at the bar of the hotel where the event took place. Meanwhile, on a slightly related case, DI Fenton alongside DI Steph has been assigned to investigate a Jack Sanford who’s been suspended from the Procurement Committee after allegedly awarding a contract to his wife, Claire Bayliss, an architect. The contract was for renovations to the Royal Baths last year. DI Fenton and DI Steph don’t get along; there have been complaints about how he treats his female subordinates unfairly. Then two more bodies turn up dead with the third victim and manner of death having similarities with the stories of a female character in a novel written by one of the suspects. Who killed Penrose? Perhaps someone with a real motive to enact a mysterious murder and cast him as a character. And the other victims, what’s the connection? Following an attempt on DCI Jim’s life, he realizes there’s someone out there with real motives who’d do anything to cover their tracks. Back at West Riding Police Harrogate Division HQ, Derek Fenton is facing charges for collecting bribes from Jack Sanford and looking the other way rather than conduct a thorough investigation in the Royal Bath contract. Well crafted mystery with elements of humor. This is my second book by this author and I’m looking forward to reading the next book in the series. Would recommend. Thank you to J. R. Ellis, NetGalley, and Amazon Publishing UK for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anne Brown

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s the annual Crime Writing Festival at Harrogate, a Yorkshire spa town. One of the main draws, Damien Penrose is being interviewed by local reporter Ben Poole on stage. The theme of the interview is meant to be the writing process but Damien insists that there isn’t a process, there’s only talent and that his talent is the best. When a defeated and uncomfortable Ben turns the discussion over to questions from the floor, the event is highjacked by three people who each have a reason to hate Pe It’s the annual Crime Writing Festival at Harrogate, a Yorkshire spa town. One of the main draws, Damien Penrose is being interviewed by local reporter Ben Poole on stage. The theme of the interview is meant to be the writing process but Damien insists that there isn’t a process, there’s only talent and that his talent is the best. When a defeated and uncomfortable Ben turns the discussion over to questions from the floor, the event is highjacked by three people who each have a reason to hate Penrose. One is a fellow author whose books Penrose has rubbished in literary reviews. One is an author who claims that Penrose stole her ideas, and those of others, and used them in his own books. The third is a past friend of Penrose who received a loan from him to set up his publishing business which Penrose then demanded to be returned at the worst possible moment. The acrimonious argument continues in the hotel bar after the event. When Penrose turns up dead in the Harrogate Turkish Baths the following morning, these three are at the head of what turns out to be a very long queue of suspects. As usual with this series, discovering how the murder was done, especially the escape, is the key to revealing the murderer. It takes Jim Oldroyd quite a few reveries prompted by chance remarks and observances before he cracks the case. Steph, one of his sargeants, is the focus of the subplot. The odious letch, Derek Fenton, asks to borrow Steph to work on a case of council corruption. It turns out he has some sexual blackmail on his mind. He has gone through Steph’s desk and found some old compromising photos there which he’s threatening to pass to her superiors unless she gives in to his overtures. Steph refuses to capitulate and fights back instead. Will she find a way to deal with Fenton? On a personal note for Jim Oldroyd, he meets a woman through internet dating. Dorothy is a psychotherapist who shares Jim’s sense of humour. Although it took a lot of cajoling by Caroline, Jim’s daughter, to get him to try, he seems to have chosen well for his first attempt. There’s a definite spring in Jim’s step in this book. Very enjoyable, well plotted who dunnit. Strangely enough I’ve just made plans to visit the Turkish Baths in Harrogate in the spring. It will be my first time. I’ll let you know if I spot the ghost of Damien Penrose lurking in the steam room.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angie Boyter

    Classic whodunit police procedural with believable characters and a vivid setting! I have been enjoying this series so much that I pre-ordered this book, something I have not done in years! What makes it special? First, good, believable characters with genuine human problems but not so unrelievedly dysfunctional I get turned off; I am interested in them and care about them. Second, a classic mystery where there are clues laid along the way that I mostly missed (although that was my fault. The aut Classic whodunit police procedural with believable characters and a vivid setting! I have been enjoying this series so much that I pre-ordered this book, something I have not done in years! What makes it special? First, good, believable characters with genuine human problems but not so unrelievedly dysfunctional I get turned off; I am interested in them and care about them. Second, a classic mystery where there are clues laid along the way that I mostly missed (although that was my fault. The author goes out of his way to be fair to the reader and to tease them at the same time. When Oldryd gets an insight, Evans tells us so, but we have to figure out for ourselves just what that insight is and what it means. ). Third, a very vivid evocation of the Yorkshire area, with some particular feature being highlighted in each book, in this case the Harrogate Turkish Baths and the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival. Best of all a great story, in this case the murder of a mystery writer beloved by his readers but hated by just about everyone who knows him at a crime writing festival. Royal Baths Murder lived up to the previous books in all respects. The crime was cleverly planned, but Oldryd’s deductions were, of course, even cleverer. Oldryd himself is an unusually human mystery protagonist, in addition to his deductive talents, and the events in his personal life added to the story. A subtheme of sexual harassment that emerged early in the book at first annoyed me, because I feared it was just an attempt to be au courant, but ultimately I enjoyed that as well. If I want to quibble there was a small but in one respect weighty aspect of the denouement that seemed a bit strained, but some might disagree. If you have not read the earlier books, you will have no problem picking the series up at this point, but if you want to avoid minor spoilers involving the characters’ lives, I would recommend beginning with The Body in the Dales (also called The Body in Jingling Pot). If you read one, you will want to read them all, so why not begin at the beginning!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    3.5/5* This is the second book in this series that I've read, the first one being No 2 which got me seriously considering a move north to Ripon... Although that hasn't happened, I did enjoy my return to Yorkshire and the city of Harrogate. It makes me want to re-visit the county and have a good old mooch around it. I've been to the lovely city of York, but there's so much outside of that city and I love the north, so it's near the top of my 'to visit' list. A murder happens at the Crime Writers Fes 3.5/5* This is the second book in this series that I've read, the first one being No 2 which got me seriously considering a move north to Ripon... Although that hasn't happened, I did enjoy my return to Yorkshire and the city of Harrogate. It makes me want to re-visit the county and have a good old mooch around it. I've been to the lovely city of York, but there's so much outside of that city and I love the north, so it's near the top of my 'to visit' list. A murder happens at the Crime Writers Festival in Harrogate, and it's up to DI Oldroyd and his Sergeant to figure out 'whodunnit' amongst those who write about this sort of thing for a living. It's another 'locked room' mystery, cleverly thought out. Anyhow, I enjoyed this latest installment to the series, although not QUITE as much as the first one I read. It felt a bit more clunky than I remembered. Some of the dialogue felt a bit basic, and there wasn't a lot of description - it was almost complete, a nearly finished sketch, just slightly lacking in fullness. The dialogue moved the story on nicely but wasn't exceptionally robust or in-depth. Again, sort of an almost finished sketch of conversations, like one more round of edits or reading aloud was required. I'm not particularly sharp at spotting clues or red herrings, so I didn't guess the murderer which is good, and the book kept me reading steadily over a few days. The secondary story of Steph dealing with sexual harassment felt a bit 1970s and a touch too cliche, but is something that women deal with on a daily basis and I suppose the police aren't immune to this in varying degrees. Particularly difficult when you've got ranks and discipline involved (like the military). Anyhow, overall I did enjoy it and have purchased the first one so that I can start at the beginning. The more I read about Yorkshire, the higher it goes on my 'to visit' list. This series is recommended for those who like clever mysteries, easy reads and nothing too gory (oh, and Yorkshire! :D ) Thank you to NetGalley, the author and publisher for the ARC to read and review. All opinions are strictly my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J. F.

    Book Review: The Royal Baths Murder (Yorkshire Murder Mysteries #4) by J.R. Ellis 3 December 1926. Agatha Christie went missing from her home in Berkshire. Her disappearance caused an outcry amongst the public, and thousands were involved in the effort to search for her, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, On 14 December she was found at The Swan Hydropathic Hotel (now known as The Old Swan) in Harrogate, Yorkshire... Present day. The White Swan Hotel, Harrogate, Yorkshire. The Crime Writing Festiva Book Review: The Royal Baths Murder (Yorkshire Murder Mysteries #4) by J.R. Ellis 3 December 1926. Agatha Christie went missing from her home in Berkshire. Her disappearance caused an outcry amongst the public, and thousands were involved in the effort to search for her, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, On 14 December she was found at The Swan Hydropathic Hotel (now known as The Old Swan) in Harrogate, Yorkshire... Present day. The White Swan Hotel, Harrogate, Yorkshire. The Crime Writing Festival is in full swing. For respite from work in this idyllic town, Damian "Poison Pen" Penrose, murder mystery novelist, loved and hated in invariably equal doses by his readers and peers, enjoys visits to the Royal Baths. It was one of his few consolations "...of having to travel to the north and stay in a dull little spa town two hundred miles of north of civilization." Early one morning, Penrose is found ruthlessly strangled at the Royal Baths...   Means, opportunity, motive. Author J.R. Ellis certainly couldn't have chosen a more scenic and relevant stage for his murder mystery. He molds his DCI Jim Oldroyd in the finest tradition of Agatha Christie's sleuth sans pareil, Hercule Poirot, reminiscent of those bygone halcyon days when criminals talked to police without being Mirandized, and spoke and boasted (i.e. confessed) freely of their crimes caught in flagrante like a badge of honor. Not these days, though. As in Christie's "The Mysterious Affair at Styles", the crime has many suspects, and, although restrained in comparison with today's high octane standards, the story is not without its complexities. The narrative does provide a fascinating if limited insight into the what may be considered as the life of a proud modern Yorkshireman and his accoutrements - that indispensable pint afterdark, good food, and a few incursions into the virtual world - Facebook, online dating and even some mention of the dark web. Excellent light reading of the old-fashioned British murder mystery flavor. Review based on an Advance Reading Copy from Amazon Publishing UK and Thomas & Mercer through NetGalley.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Louise Owen

    After reading this I can say I won’t be reading any more books by this author. It felt like the constant references to Agatha Christie’s disappearance and Harrogate felt like the author was hoping to trick you into thinking they were as good as her. They’re not, they are a very long way short. The dialogue was uncomfortable and felt very unnatural. In places you were almost expecting someone to say ‘lashings off ginger beer’ and in others you felt the author was trying to be oh so edgy. There wer After reading this I can say I won’t be reading any more books by this author. It felt like the constant references to Agatha Christie’s disappearance and Harrogate felt like the author was hoping to trick you into thinking they were as good as her. They’re not, they are a very long way short. The dialogue was uncomfortable and felt very unnatural. In places you were almost expecting someone to say ‘lashings off ginger beer’ and in others you felt the author was trying to be oh so edgy. There were plenty of contradictions throughout the book. For example in one part it’s mentioned that the inspector keeps his theories to himself until he knows they’re right, then in another the sergeant comments that his wild theories always turn out to be right. How would he know if he’s never told them before they are proven. When proven they are obviously no longer wild theories. I got fed up of being told how the inspector was an expert in solving unusual crimes. Having it mentioned once or twice would have been ok, but like the references to Christie it was far too frequent and started to feel like filler. The fact the supposedly incredibly observant and perceptive detective missed that a fellow officer was harassing every female officer he came across seems somewhat bizarre. I worked out how the murder was carried out pretty much immediately, even if I didn’t work out who did it. To the extent that even when it was revealed it took me a while to work out who it was as they’d barely been mentioned through the book. At first i thought it was a new character altogether, that is how little they’d been in the book. The authors love of Yorkshire was clear throughout and this book has given me a couple of places I might consider visiting if I’m that way. Overall a disappointment as I had high hopes before I started reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ileana Renfroe

    Description A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no apparent means of escape, how did the killer simply vanish from the scene of the crime? There’s only one mind capable of unl Description A murdered crime writer. An idyllic Yorkshire town. Can DCI Oldroyd separate fact from fiction? A famous writer is found murdered at the Victorian baths in the Yorkshire town of Harrogate. In a crime worthy of one of his novels, Damian Penrose, who was appearing at the town’s crime festival, has been ruthlessly strangled. But with no trace of the murderer and no apparent means of escape, how did the killer simply vanish from the scene of the crime? There’s only one mind capable of unlocking this mystery: DCI Jim Oldroyd. But as he and his team quickly discover, while Penrose was popular with the reading public, he had made plenty of enemies. Feuds over money, accusations of plagiarism, a string of affairs…His route to the top left a trail of embittered rivals—and suspects. But which of them was willing to commit murder? When Penrose’s shocking death proves to be just the first of many, it becomes clear to Oldroyd that he is dealing with a calculating criminal hell-bent on revenge. He must find and bring them to justice. Before the truth becomes more chilling than fiction… My Review: The Royal Baths Murder starts off at the crime festival with the introduction of a well-known writer Damian Penrose. The characters are well written, especially that of Penrose who you cannot help but not like as all he wants to do is talk about himself. There is an altercation at the hotel and you wonder when Penrose is murdered if one of these people present are the killer. The story keeps you guessing until the very end. Great job J.R. Ellis, amazing page turner. I received this book for free in exchange for my honest opinion. Highly recommend this book for anyone wanting to read a good mystery that keeps you on your toes and has surprising twists and turns.

  29. 5 out of 5

    M

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Could not suspend disbelief due to illogical situations. There are SPOILERS in this review. I expected a contemporary police procedural but got a démodé mystery reminiscent of my favorite vintage authors—Christie, Allingham and Sayers. It was unexpected, plus the two subplots were meh. The corruption case was boring, the police malfeasance obvious. The #metoo storyline was annoyingly retro and too ‘70s. Taking a photo? Use smartphones to record sexual harassment! The primary storyline featured f Could not suspend disbelief due to illogical situations. There are SPOILERS in this review. I expected a contemporary police procedural but got a démodé mystery reminiscent of my favorite vintage authors—Christie, Allingham and Sayers. It was unexpected, plus the two subplots were meh. The corruption case was boring, the police malfeasance obvious. The #metoo storyline was annoyingly retro and too ‘70s. Taking a photo? Use smartphones to record sexual harassment! The primary storyline featured few characters capable of the physicality needed to stage the “closed room” murder. Inconsistencies pointed to one suspect, who couldn’t have acted alone due to timeline. Yes, the author withheld information in order to do a TA DAH! reveal at the end. Problems at the crime scene: 1) Wet, sweaty towels were left overnight to mildew in a basket/hamper at a spa facility. 2) How did a detective, who felt around in the basket, not notice the change in depth? Or the change in stability due to its new weight? 3) Detectives watched whilst a spa attendant lifted the basket to his shoulder. Said basket now contained wet towels AND a hundred-plus pounds of woman (and equipment). 5) Wouldn’t someone breathing through a long, narrow tube for a few hours suffer hypoxia? 5) Why didn’t detectives notice exhalation bubbles in the water? If a diver exhales into a long tube, when he next inhales, he’ll re-breathe CO2 and will asphyxiate. 2 stars because I loved the atmospheric settings and enjoyed seeing the National Trust sights with DCI Oldroyd.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    The Royal Baths murder turned out to be the 4th book in a series but it is no problem to read it as a standalone. The story starts with Damian Penrose, a very narcissistic crime writer, who gives a lecture during the Harrogate Literary Crime festival. As it turns out he isn't much out to enjoy his public and even less disposed to answer questions from aspiring young crime writers. A couple of his fellow writers are interrupting his lecture and asking all kinds of accusing questions. The next mornin The Royal Baths murder turned out to be the 4th book in a series but it is no problem to read it as a standalone. The story starts with Damian Penrose, a very narcissistic crime writer, who gives a lecture during the Harrogate Literary Crime festival. As it turns out he isn't much out to enjoy his public and even less disposed to answer questions from aspiring young crime writers. A couple of his fellow writers are interrupting his lecture and asking all kinds of accusing questions. The next morning Penrose is found dead in the Royal Baths, in a kind of closed room situation, where it seems impossible that the murder has fled the premisses without anyone noticing. I found the setup, a murder or rather several murders at a crime writing festival, very interesting. The book is a real pageturner and a classical whodunit, rather in the tradition of Agatha Christie (I think it is not a coincidence that Harrogate is also the town where Christie stayed when she disappeared for a while and nobody knew where she was) and Sherlock Holmes. I found the secundary story line about the female constable and the "me too" situation rather week. On the whole the book is certainly a good read and I think I will also read the previous episodes. a small 3,5 stars I want to thank Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer Publishers for providing me with an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...