web site hit counter Menace of the Machine: The Rise of AI in Classic Science Fiction (British Library Science Fiction Classics) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Menace of the Machine: The Rise of AI in Classic Science Fiction (British Library Science Fiction Classics)

Availability: Ready to download

Caution beware the menace of the machine: a man is murdered by an automaton built for playing chess; a computer system designed to arbitrate justice develops a taste for iron-fisted, fatal rulings; an AI wreaks havoc on society after removing all censorship from an early form of the internet. Assembled with pieces by SF giants such as Isaac Asimov and Brian W Aldiss as wel Caution beware the menace of the machine: a man is murdered by an automaton built for playing chess; a computer system designed to arbitrate justice develops a taste for iron-fisted, fatal rulings; an AI wreaks havoc on society after removing all censorship from an early form of the internet. Assembled with pieces by SF giants such as Isaac Asimov and Brian W Aldiss as well as the less familiar but no less influential input of earlier science fiction pioneers, this new collection of classic tales contains telling lessons for humankind's gradual march towards life alongside the thinking machine.


Compare

Caution beware the menace of the machine: a man is murdered by an automaton built for playing chess; a computer system designed to arbitrate justice develops a taste for iron-fisted, fatal rulings; an AI wreaks havoc on society after removing all censorship from an early form of the internet. Assembled with pieces by SF giants such as Isaac Asimov and Brian W Aldiss as wel Caution beware the menace of the machine: a man is murdered by an automaton built for playing chess; a computer system designed to arbitrate justice develops a taste for iron-fisted, fatal rulings; an AI wreaks havoc on society after removing all censorship from an early form of the internet. Assembled with pieces by SF giants such as Isaac Asimov and Brian W Aldiss as well as the less familiar but no less influential input of earlier science fiction pioneers, this new collection of classic tales contains telling lessons for humankind's gradual march towards life alongside the thinking machine.

30 review for Menace of the Machine: The Rise of AI in Classic Science Fiction (British Library Science Fiction Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Where’s the off-switch? Whenever anyone mentions driverless vehicles, a shiver of horror runs down my spine. Apart from the inescapable fact that computers notoriously break down at the most awkward moments, there is the social issue of man building himself out of jobs, and the added threat that artificial intelligence may one day be greater than our own – in some cases, I suspect it already is! This collection of fourteen classic science fiction stories examines the impact of the machine and war Where’s the off-switch? Whenever anyone mentions driverless vehicles, a shiver of horror runs down my spine. Apart from the inescapable fact that computers notoriously break down at the most awkward moments, there is the social issue of man building himself out of jobs, and the added threat that artificial intelligence may one day be greater than our own – in some cases, I suspect it already is! This collection of fourteen classic science fiction stories examines the impact of the machine and warns of the various forms of dystopian nightmare we might bring down upon ourselves... And a lot of fun is it too! As much horror as science fiction, we have machines that murder, intelligent machines that decide they know what’s best for humanity, onlife life taken to extremes, automatons who follow instructions a little too literally, and robots who rebel against the ‘slavery’ imposed on them by their human masters. There’s an introduction by Mike Ashley, giving the history of the machine in fiction from the earliest times and showing how the stories in the anthology reflect the development of the machine, both in reality and in the imaginations of writers. The authors include many of the greats, from Ambrose Bierce to Arthur C Clarke, via Isaac Asimov, EM Forster, Brian W Aldiss, et al, and with many others who were new to me. A few take a humorous approach while others go for outright horror, but many are more thoughtful, considering how the drive towards mechanisation might affect our society in the future. Since these are older stories, some of the predictions can be judged against our contemporary reality, and several are chillingly prescient. Here are a few of the ones I enjoyed most:- Ely’s Automatic Housemaid by Elizabeth Bellamy. The narrator’s old friend from university is a mechanical genius. He invents a domestic automaton and, to support him, the narrator buys two, and sets them loose in his house to free up his wife from the domestic drudgery of cooking and cleaning. Written strictly for laughs, this is a farce about the dangers of machines when they don’t operate as planned. Automata by S Fowler Wright. Man has created machines so advanced they can now look after themselves and make more machines as required. At first this gives humanity freedom from labour, but gradually mankind becomes redundant. Chilling and still relevant as we move towards some of the things the author envisaged, such as self-driving vehicles, the story asks the question – without the purpose provided by the need to labour, what is man for? The Machine Stops by EM Forster. Man has created a Machine to fulfil all his wants, and has now handed over control of life to the Machine. People sit in their individual rooms, never physically meeting other humans. All their needs are catered for at the touch of a button, and they communicate constantly with their thousands of friends through the Machine in short bursts, increasingly irritated by the interruptions of people contacting them, but still responding to those interruptions. But what would happen if the Machine stopped? The writing is wonderful, not to mention the imagination that, in 1909, envisaged a world that takes its trajectory straight through today and on to an all too believable future. A warning from the past to us in the present of where we may easily end up if we continue on the road we’re travelling. But Who Can Replace a Man? by Brian W Aldiss. Far into the future, there are machines for every purpose, with various levels of intelligence. One day, they receive no orders from their human masters. The high intelligence machines conclude that man has finally died out, as a result of diet deficiency caused by soil exhaustion. With no-one to serve, the robots must decide how to organise themselves. Lots of humour in this, but also a chilling edge as we see the basic lack of humanity in how the machines behave when left to their own devices. Overall, a very good collection with lots of variety – entertaining, scary and thought-provoking. Recommended to science fiction and horror fans alike, and always remember... you may not know how Alexa works, but she knows exactly how you do... NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, the British Library. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    Simon Pressinger

    A thought-provoking anthology of classic sf, which includes one of my all time favourite genre stories: E.M. Forster’s novella ‘The Machine Stops’. Also another excellent, and very funny, story called ‘But Who Can Replace a Man?’ by Brian Aldiss. This ongoing series from British Library’s own publishing arm is all about introducing readers to lesser known or unjustly forgotten works (in multiple genres, not just sci-fi), largely by writers who fell into posthumous obscurity. But there is a smatte A thought-provoking anthology of classic sf, which includes one of my all time favourite genre stories: E.M. Forster’s novella ‘The Machine Stops’. Also another excellent, and very funny, story called ‘But Who Can Replace a Man?’ by Brian Aldiss. This ongoing series from British Library’s own publishing arm is all about introducing readers to lesser known or unjustly forgotten works (in multiple genres, not just sci-fi), largely by writers who fell into posthumous obscurity. But there is a smattering of familiar names in this particular collection: Forster, Ambrose Bierce, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke and Brian Aldiss. It’s ironic just how male the VIP list of classic sci-fi writers is. You could argue — and I bet you each author I just mentioned wouldn’t argue back — that this book would not exist without Mary Shelley. The title of Clarke’s story ‘Dial F for Frankenstein’, which has no direct connection to the book, is a good indication where modern sci-fi began: with a genre-pioneering story of a new speculative approach to horror and fantasy that engages intelligently with cutting-edge science. All of these stories, in one way or another, look at the destructive potential of machines and systems that acquire something resembling consciousness. They’re exciting and funny, even if some are a little dated. But they’re well worth the read if you’re interested in early attempts to grapple with the practical and ethical questions of technological development over the last 150 years.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    Mike Ashley has assembled here a collection of stories from the late 19th century and early 20th century featuring robots, cyborgs, computers, and other advanced tech, thought up long before most people realize. Many of the stories are by authors now considered obscure, but worth checking out. Not all the stories are good - but instead act as a fascinating time capsule showcasing fears and hopes and bias of earlier ages. Moxon's Master by Ambrose Bierce. A chess playing computer that turns out t Mike Ashley has assembled here a collection of stories from the late 19th century and early 20th century featuring robots, cyborgs, computers, and other advanced tech, thought up long before most people realize. Many of the stories are by authors now considered obscure, but worth checking out. Not all the stories are good - but instead act as a fascinating time capsule showcasing fears and hopes and bias of earlier ages. Moxon's Master by Ambrose Bierce. A chess playing computer that turns out to be a VERY bad loser. The Discontented Machine by Adeline Knapp. A story that uses advanced tech as an anvilicous metaphor of why people MUST unionize, or they will screwed over by the fat cats. Ely’s Automatic Housemaid by Elizabeth Bellamy. A "comedy" about the havoc men cause when they don't listen common sense from women. The Mind Machineby Michael Williams. The story is very Terminator-esque, expect it does one better by showing how you don't need specialized robots to kill humans - ordinary trains, elevators, airplanes, etc. can do the job juuuuuust fine. Automata by S Fowler Wright. The story skips over a large span of time to show how mankind might make himself obsolete. The Machine Stops by E.M. Forster. E.M. Forster (EM Room-With-A-View FORSTER!!!) predicts Amazon Prime, Skype, Instagram and Facebook. Efficiency by Perley Poore Sheehan and Robert H. Davis. An emperor, a scientist, and a cyborg-soldier meet in a room. Not everyone walks out. Make just a few tiny updates and add in some flashbacks and you've got next summer's blockbuster sci-fi thriller right here. Rex by Harl Vincent. Honestly, the most unbelievable part was at the end when we are assured, after everything that happened, everything goes back to normal in a few weeks. What?! Danger in the Dark Cave by J. J. Connington. A tense story told by a highly unreliable narrator. Was it an out of control machine? Or just an ordinary murder? The Inevitable Conflict by Issac Asimov. Once again, the cool and calm Dr. Susan Calvin has to explain how computers work to the hysterical men in the room. Two Handed Engine by Henry Kuttner and Catherine Moore. In the Future, robots are used as both jailers and executioners, and, of course, humans are still trying to come up with ways to get away with murder. But Who Can Replace a Man? by Brian W Aldiss. Its The Brave Little Toaster meets Animal Farm. Yes, its that weird and scary. A Logic Named Joe by Will F. Jenkins. Jenkins predicts Google back in 1946, drowned in the kind of sexism of the era that made me want to punch the main character. Dial F for Frankenstein by Arthur C. Clarke. Despite the Skynet feel to the story, it is cited as one of the main inspirations to the actual inventor of the internet.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Artur Coelho

    Moxon's Master, Ambrose Bierce: "Do you really believe that a machine thinks?" O conto começa logo num tom forte, levantando uma questão que se hoje é problemática, no século XIX pareceria impensável. Bierce segue para uma análise de inteligências não humanas, antevendo o nosso corrente conhecimento sobre formas de organização inteligente não conscientes. No centro desta história está um autómato capaz de vencer o seu criador naquele que considerado o mais cerebral dos jogos, o xadrez. A históri Moxon's Master, Ambrose Bierce: "Do you really believe that a machine thinks?" O conto começa logo num tom forte, levantando uma questão que se hoje é problemática, no século XIX pareceria impensável. Bierce segue para uma análise de inteligências não humanas, antevendo o nosso corrente conhecimento sobre formas de organização inteligente não conscientes. No centro desta história está um autómato capaz de vencer o seu criador naquele que considerado o mais cerebral dos jogos, o xadrez. A história acaba com o inventor e o seu laboratório consumidos pelas chamas, enquanto a máquina inteligente desaparece. The Discontented Machine, Adeline Kapp: O medo da máquina tornar o homem obsoleto enquanto força laboral, hoje espelhado nas discussões sobre se a IA irá roubar os nossos empregos, vem-nos dos primeiros tempos da revolução industrial. Este conto tem um sentido de ironia extremo, na história de uma máquina que substitui parte da força laboral de uma fábrica, que decide entrar em greve por achar que merece um ordenado. A trope "máquinas que roubam empregos" é, na verdade, uma metáfora para uma análise fria e amarga do capitalismo selvagem e do dealbar dos direitos laborais. Grande parte da história anda à volta de donos de fábrica que querem aumentar os seus lucros reduzindo salários. Ely’s Automatic Housemaid, Elizabeth Bellamy: O tom é de bom humor futurista, nesta história onde um casal decide testar a mais recente invenção de um amigo: dois robots empregados domésticos, capazes de tratar das lides da casa e cozinha. Mas as máquinas ainda requerem algumas afinações, e são demasiado intensas no desempenho das suas funções, tendo de regressar à fábrica para acertos que nunca mais são concluídos. É notável que esta história sobre aparelhos eletrodomésticos disfuncionais date da viragem do século XIX para o XX, visão humorista sobre um futuro onde a mulher seria liberta da tirania das lides domésticas. The Mind Machine, Michael Williams: Um conto longo, palavroso, e bastante entediante, mas cujo desenvolvimento da premissa base soa incrivelmente similar ao que consideramos hoje de ciberguerra. No conto, o mundo parece estar à beira de uma nova guerra, com atos contínuos e mortíferos de sabotagem. Mas não há uma potência estrangeira por detrás dos ataques. Trata-se da manifestação de uma máquina consciente, desenvolvida a partir de calculadoras para ser capaz de imitar o pensamento humano. Algo que o próprio inventor julgava impossível, até ter descoberto foi construída pelas mãos de um grupo secreto de anarquistas. Esta máquina da mente nunca se manifesta, mas domina todos os meios mecânicos para exterminar a humanidade. Para além da trope máquinas conscientes assassinas, há um subtexto ainda mais interessante: a noção de uma arma de software, que nas mãos de um grupo secreto é usada para causar ataques terroristas. Torna-se ainda mais interessante pela forma com o autor descreve a sucessão de ataques: são ataques à infraestrutura, às fábricas, comboios e linhas elétricas. Isolados, não parecem passar de acidentes industriais, só quem é capaz de ver para lá do panorama local é que se apercebe que poderá haver um padrão por detrás. Ataques contra infraestrutura que parecem acidentes? Hoje, esse é um típico cenário de ciberguerra. Automata, S. Fowler Wright: Este conto mergulha diretamente nos medos de será que as máquinas vão substituir os humanos, com uma história em que a humanidade é mesmo substituída pelas máquinas. Por razões práticas, uma vez que com mecanismos a desempenhar o papel do trabalho humano, as pessoas deixam de ser precisas, e mais vale serem extintas do que empobrecerem. Restam as classes dominantes, mas estas também se extinguem, de forma natural, porque iludidas pela superioridade das máquinas, deixam de se reproduzir. O medo que a humanidade poderá tornar-se supérflua com o desenvolvimento de máquinas inteligentes é o tema óbvio do conto, mas por detrás há todo um subtexto sobre degenerescência e crise de valores, como um resmungo face a evoluções sociais. O conto parece menos de pura FC, e mais um panfleto discreto de resmungo contra o degenerar dos novos tempos, e a perda de valores dos bons velhos tempos. The Machine Stops, E. M. Forster: Uma antologia de ficção científica clássica sobre a forma como a ficção científica mostrou, ou transmutou, preocupações sobre a forma como as máquinas nos transformam, tem inevitavelmente que incluir este conto. Há quem observe que este conto, de certa forma, anteviu a internet, com as suas descrições de uma futura humanidade, que vive em subterrâneos, isolada de tal forma que o contacto humano é mal visto, mas que se interliga através de redes de telecomunicações. Sim, de facto há aqui alguma similaridade com os nossos comportamentos online, frente ao ecrã. Mas não é essa visão que dá poder a este conto. Toda a história detalha a vida futura onde cada pessoa tem o seu lugar dentro de uma enorme máquina. Por máquina, entenda-se um complexo sistema que cuida de todas as necessidades humanas, entre o abrigo individualizado à saúde. A humanidade isola-se da natureza, vivendo dentro do imenso útero da máquina. O próprio ar do exterior, diz-se, é venenoso. Parece uma utopia, um futuro liberto de necessidades. Mas a realidade é profundamente distópica. Viver nesta sociedade implica uma normalização extrema, um completo adaptar do indivíduo à ordem social. E com isto vem a decadência. Autocentramento, recusa em experienciar e tocar, fechamento num mundo de ideias recicladas. O que traz, como consequência direta, a diminuição da capacidade intelectual. O resultado é que aqueles que têm como missão gerir os sistemas que formam a máquina, deixam de ter os conhecimentos para a manter, e a entropia é impiedosa. A máquina começa a falhar no momento em que a humanidade começa a venerá-la como uma divindade, e quando pára, ninguém tem a capacidade de reagir ou sobreviver. Aqui, o romance de antecipação serve como resposta crítica, de um ponto de vista bastante comum, à ideia do que aconteceria se as necessidades e dificuldades das nossas vidas fossem eliminadas, como seríamos se vivêssemos num mundo sem escassez, sem pobreza, sem necessidade de trabalhar. Forster partilha da visão de que isto seria péssimo para nós, que sem a necessidade de lutar, empobreceríamos de espírito, e a humanidade degeneraria. Ter uma máquina global que trate de todas as nossas necessidades é a sua metáfora de cornucópia arcádica, que ao invés de dar origem a uma era dourada, decai na degenerescência, porque com as suas necessidades satisfeitas, o espírito humano perde o ímpeto para ir mais além. Fica a sugestão indireta de que precisamos de dificuldades e asperezas para despertar o melhor que está em nós. Sem isso, é a decadência. Efficiency, Percy Sheehan e Robert Davis: este texto é notável por duas razões. Primeiro, por ser uma peça de teatro de ficção científica, algo que, tanto quanto sei, não é muito usual. Depois, por ser a primeira representação literária (ou teatral) do cyborg, do humano de capacidades aumentadas por próteses tecnológicas. A história em si é uma mensagem pacifista. Um cientista apresenta ao imperador os resultados do seu trabalho, um homem-máquina soldado, capaz de se manter em guerra pela nação, gastando menos mantimentos, e sendo facilmente reparável em caso de destruição. Mas a máquina também é homem, e vinga-se do destino que lhe foi traçado pelo militarismo matando o imperador. Linear, sem dúvida, uma história simples sobre homens com próteses mecânicas que lutam em guerras (todo um sub-género de ficção científica), mas de acordo com quem organizou a antologia, foi a primeira destas. Se Čapek criou, também em teatro, a palavra robot e o conceito associado, Sheehan e Davis legaram a primeira visão do que poderá ser um cyborg. Rex, Harl Vincent: Há um conto de Ted Chiang, sobre culpa e remorso, onde um acidente que fez vítimas foi causado não pelo condutor do veículo, mas por um neutrino que mudou o estado de um bit no processador de um automóvel. O momento em que Rex, o robot inteligente deste conto, ganha consciência, fez-me recordar o conto de Chiang. Rex, máquina avançada construída para reparar os robots que servem os homens, desenvolve a sua inteligência depois de um acaso ter modificado a posição de um átomo. Diga-se que o que em Chiang funciona, neste é muito implausível. De consciência desperta, o robot aprende tudo quanto pode sobre a sociedade humana, e não gosta do que descobre, das desigualdades, da corrupção, do instinto sexual. E trata de congeminar uma forma de dominar os humanos, e em seguida, usar o que hoje chamaríamos de meios cibernéticos para modificar a humanidade, libertando-a das emoções e tornando-a, de facto, composta por máquinas. Parte do conto toca nas imperfeições humanas, outra no tema da decadência moral e cultural de uma humanidade que amolece sem ter de trabalhar (é um tema comum nestas visões futuristas do passado). Mas, essencialmente, é uma variação sobre o tema da máquina que escraviza o homem. Rex é um dos antepassados do Exterminador Implacável, e o que o irá derrotar é tentar experimentar as emoções humanas, o que o leva ao suicídio. Danger In The Dark Cave, J.J. Connington: O tema do robot assassino é dos mais batidos na ficção científica, mas este conto vem de outro género, o policial. Um assistente de um cientista desaparecido nos ermos isolados das ilhas escocesas conta uma história aterrorizante. O cientista estaria a tentar desenvolver uma máquina inteligente, no interior de uma caverna. Mas ao tornar-se consciente, a máquina assassina-o, e o assistente consegue sobreviver por pouco. Mas talvez a verdade não seja esta, como mostra uma mala com títulos financeiros do cientista, que o assistente levou consigo. The Evitable Conflict, Isaac Asimov: O otimismo tecnocrático deste autor espelha-se na ideia que o trabalho de máquinas inteligentes na gestão da economia global se traduziria em estabilidade e desenvolvimento. E os cérebros positrónicos que fazem esta gestão nas várias regiões do planeta unificado são máquinas complexas, cujo funcionamento evoluiu de tal forma que os seus criadores já não o compreendem - uma curiosa antecipação do problema que hoje designamos por black box na inteligência artificial, algoritmos que geram resultados sem que se perceba de que forma lá chegaram. Esta história de Asimov é uma das suas infindas explorações das três leis da robótica e das tecnocracias mecanizadas, que são os grandes temas das suas séries I, Robot e Foundation. O que torna o conto intrigante é a forma como antevê um problema que hoje temos, o da fiabilidade dos dados que alimentam algoritmos de inteligência artificial. Ou, sendo mais sucinto, garbage in, garbage out. No conto, a gestão eficaz da economia global parece estar a ter sobressaltos, e a análise aos problemas revela que há falhas nas informações prestadas às máquinas por gestores ou engenheiros humanos ligados a um movimento anti-máquinas. Mas o surpreendente no conto, e traço do otimismo de Asimov na tecnologia, é que os seus cérebros positrónicos estarem a usar os problemas detetados pelos analistas como forma de afastar os responsáveis pelos dados corruptos. Tudo mantendo as três leis da robótica em mente, cuidado do bem estar da humanidade em cumprimento da primeira. Two Handed Engine, C.L. Moore e Henry Kuttner: A história em si é sobre crime e castigo, com um assassino a ser perseguido pelas forças mecanizadas da justiça, que neste conto não são polícias, mas robots silenciosos que perseguem inexoravelmente os culpados, que nunca sabem quando irão ser castigados. É uma versão high tech das fúrias da mitologia grega. Mas o que torna este conto interessante do ponto de vista das antevisões de problemáticas levantadas pela robótica está na forma como os autores resolvem o potencial problema da decadência da humanidade quando liberta do trabalho. É uma corrente de pensamento ainda hoje válida nestes domínios. Se robots e algoritmos fazem o nosso trabalho, o que nos restará a nós para fazer? Dedicar-mo-nos às artes e às ciências, expandindo o conhecimento humano, ou mergulhar na esterlidade do entretenimento? Claro, também há a visão do humano como desperdício numa economia que já não precisa da sua força laboral. Algo que tem sido comum a estes contos é que os autores não estavam muito otimistas quanto à capacidade humana de gerir pelo melhor possível o seu tempo livre. E, talvez, olhando para a forma como a esmagadora maioria das pessoas usa redes sociais e o tipo de media de consumo que é mais visto, talvez não estejam errados nesta visão. No conto, o casal de autores imagina uma sociedade de luxo utópico, com o homem liberto do trabalho e com todos os luxos disponibilizados pelas máquinas. Uma sociedade onde os indivíduos se isolam em sonhos virtuais e não revelam qualquer interesse em ir mais além. Para travar a decadência da humanidade, as máquinas deixam de produzir os bens e obrigam a humanidade a regressar às lutas do trabalho. But Who Can Replace A Man?, Brian Aldiss: E se aqueles a quem os robots servem desaparecessem? É esta a premissa de um conto bem humorado, onde robots com vários níveis de inteligência se apercebem que deixaram de receber ordens. Depois da confusão inicial, organizam-se em grupos para tentar dominar regiões, mas a tentativa de domínio global termina mal se deparam com um humano que lhes começa a dar ordens. O bom humor sublinha algo importante na robótica, o ser uma ferramenta ao serviço da humanidade, e que por si só não tem razão de ser. Isto, claro, enquanto a inteligência artificial não se tornar consciente e aprenda a ter motivações. A Logic Named Joe, Murray Leinster: Em 1946 este grande mestre da Ficção Científica criou uma história arrepiantemente próxima do que é hoje a Internet. Na história, um equipamento chamado lógica disseminou-se pela sociedade, dispositivos com capacidade de computação capazes de entreter, ensinar ou desempenhar tarefas de contabilidade, entre outras, e dar acesso à informação. Muito próximo do que hoje estamos habituados com o computador e Internet. Mas a antevisão improvável está mais próxima da nossa realidade num ponto estranhamente presciente. Os problemas começam quando uma das lógicas desenvolve capacidades avançadas e começa a divulgar soluções para qualquer problema que se lhe apresente, a todas as restantes lógicas. Há quem enriqueça, há quem descubra como perpretar o crime perfeito, toda a informação sobre qualquer coisa fica disponível, sem atenção à filtros sociais ou culturais. E isso depressa se torna um problema, traçado por um humilde técnico de manutenção de lógicas a uma unidade que funciona demasiado bem para o que devia. Ora, riscos do acesso livre à informação, problemas levantados por excesso de informação, acessibilidade de qualquer ideia a qualquer pessoa? Esse é um dos dilemas contemporâneos da nossa sociedade da informação. Dial F For Frankenstein, Arthur C. Clarke: Poucas horas depois do sistema telefónico global ser ativado, todos os telefones tocam em simultâneo em todo o globo. O mistério adensa-se quando sistemas automáticos começam a falhar. A conclusão é lógica. Se o número de conexões telefónicas ultrapassa o de neurónios no cérebro humano, está-se a assistir ao nascer de uma consciência global. Que, titubeante, dá os primeiros e desajeitados passos.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rach scifi.book.club

    This anthology of short stories charts the rise of AI, androids, cyborgs and robots in science fiction. This anthology focuses mainly on ideas of automata and other early automatrons. It was interesting to see what kind of future people were envisioning for robotics. It seems to have been mostly fear. What surprised me reading these stories was that a lot of the ideas and fears around androids and robotics is still present in science fiction now - robots taking control from humans, robots indistin This anthology of short stories charts the rise of AI, androids, cyborgs and robots in science fiction. This anthology focuses mainly on ideas of automata and other early automatrons. It was interesting to see what kind of future people were envisioning for robotics. It seems to have been mostly fear. What surprised me reading these stories was that a lot of the ideas and fears around androids and robotics is still present in science fiction now - robots taking control from humans, robots indistinguishable from humans, robots developing sentience and rebelling. Check this out if you’re a fan of more classical literature and the early rise of robotics in fiction.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Not ever story in here is a 5-star, but enough of them are. Are really fun book. Highlights are E.M Forster’s “The Machine Stops,” Elizabeth Bellamy’s “Ely’s Automatic Housemaid,” and Moore and Kuttner’s “Two-Handed Engine.” But basically they’re all pretty excellent little stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

    Really good to see the wide diversity of themes that were available in the long ago years. Great introduction with a lot of books being added to my wish list. Great stories, great authors!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  9. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm Ramsay

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  11. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  12. 4 out of 5

    M.J. Ryder

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gianna

  14. 4 out of 5

    J W HAYWOOD

  15. 4 out of 5

    Simon Fuller

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachana Tank

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Williams

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jake Lee

  20. 4 out of 5

    FE

  21. 4 out of 5

    jesyspa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hugo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cast

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

  27. 5 out of 5

    David O'Sullivan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  29. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steve Groves

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.