web site hit counter Suspect Communities: Anti-Muslim Racism and the Domestic War on Terror - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Suspect Communities: Anti-Muslim Racism and the Domestic War on Terror

Availability: Ready to download

The first major qualitative study of “countering violent extremism” in key U.S. cities   Suspect Communities is a powerful reassessment of the U.S. government’s “countering violent extremism” (CVE) program that has arisen in major cities across the United States since 2011. Drawing on an interpretive qualitative study, it examines how the concept behind CVEaimed at combatin The first major qualitative study of “countering violent extremism” in key U.S. cities   Suspect Communities is a powerful reassessment of the U.S. government’s “countering violent extremism” (CVE) program that has arisen in major cities across the United States since 2011. Drawing on an interpretive qualitative study, it examines how the concept behind CVEaimed at combating homegrown terrorism by engaging Muslim community members, teachers, and religious leaders in monitoring and reporting on young peoplehas been operationalized through the everyday work of CVE actors, from high-level national security workers to local community members, with significant penalties for the communities themselves. Nicole Nguyen argues that studying CVE provides insight into how the drive to bring liberal reforms to contemporary security regimes through “community-driven” and “ideologically ecumenical” programming has in fact further institutionalized anti-Muslim racism in the United States. She forcefully contends that the U.S. security state has designed CVE to legitimize and shore up support for the very institutions that historically have criminalized, demonized, and dehumanized communities of color, while appearing to learn from and attenuate past practices of coercive policing, racial profiling, and political exclusion.  By undertaking this analysis, Suspect Communities offers a vital window into the inner workings of the U.S. security state and the devastating impact of CVE on local communities. 


Compare

The first major qualitative study of “countering violent extremism” in key U.S. cities   Suspect Communities is a powerful reassessment of the U.S. government’s “countering violent extremism” (CVE) program that has arisen in major cities across the United States since 2011. Drawing on an interpretive qualitative study, it examines how the concept behind CVEaimed at combatin The first major qualitative study of “countering violent extremism” in key U.S. cities   Suspect Communities is a powerful reassessment of the U.S. government’s “countering violent extremism” (CVE) program that has arisen in major cities across the United States since 2011. Drawing on an interpretive qualitative study, it examines how the concept behind CVEaimed at combating homegrown terrorism by engaging Muslim community members, teachers, and religious leaders in monitoring and reporting on young peoplehas been operationalized through the everyday work of CVE actors, from high-level national security workers to local community members, with significant penalties for the communities themselves. Nicole Nguyen argues that studying CVE provides insight into how the drive to bring liberal reforms to contemporary security regimes through “community-driven” and “ideologically ecumenical” programming has in fact further institutionalized anti-Muslim racism in the United States. She forcefully contends that the U.S. security state has designed CVE to legitimize and shore up support for the very institutions that historically have criminalized, demonized, and dehumanized communities of color, while appearing to learn from and attenuate past practices of coercive policing, racial profiling, and political exclusion.  By undertaking this analysis, Suspect Communities offers a vital window into the inner workings of the U.S. security state and the devastating impact of CVE on local communities. 

30 review for Suspect Communities: Anti-Muslim Racism and the Domestic War on Terror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Asim Qureshi

  2. 4 out of 5

    Waqas Mirza

  3. 4 out of 5

    Justme

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jaylani Adam

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Garcia

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik Gunnarsson

  7. 4 out of 5

    G

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amar Baines

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hamzah Ibrahim

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joel Trono-Doerksen

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanj Aziz

  12. 4 out of 5

    Umar

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marya Al Maskari

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nusaiba

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hafsa

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mehdi Faizy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Asif Hashmi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hurayra

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad Ashraf

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deniz

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurelle Giovannoli

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Wales

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ke

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten Pearson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Moon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Camila

  28. 4 out of 5

    Zainab

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason Fasano

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fadia

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.