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Things That Shatter: A Memoir

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"I couldn’t put it down until I read every last page...  I saw a universal traumatic experience that most people could never be brave enough to put on paper for the world to read... It’s a story of realization & growth... Parts will make you uncomfortable because it’s raw and the truth can hurt." - Kaitlin, The American Muslim Mama "This is a w "I couldn’t put it down until I read every last page...  I saw a universal traumatic experience that most people could never be brave enough to put on paper for the world to read... It’s a story of realization & growth... Parts will make you uncomfortable because it’s raw and the truth can hurt." - Kaitlin, The American Muslim Mama "This is a wonderful story! The strength Kaighla has maintained throughout her journey is amazing. Her understanding that "The Sheikh's" actions are incorrect and abusive, and do not reflect God's judgement of her, are the elements which I believe have helped her stay firm in Islam. I hope the strength with which she has come out of her ordeal inspires other women in these unfortunate situations." - Danish Qasim, founder of In Shaykh's Clothing In 2009, Kaighla—a young, single mother from the Midwest, and a fresh convert to Islam—married an Egyptian immigrant, the sheikh of a mosque in Brooklyn. Unbeknownst to her, he hadn't divorced his wife back home, and was about to be deported. Two years later, she moved with him, her son, and their baby girl to his hometown in rural Egypt, where she was abused and neglected—along with his first wife—for the next four years.  A much-beloved speaker and imam in Brooklyn and in Dearborn, Michigan, the sheikh lectured and taught at mosques and Islamic centers around the country in the early 2000's. But across their seven-year marriage, Um Dayo’s identity and cultural heritage were systematically shattered by him, all in the name of making her the ideal "wife of the Sheikh"—and she wasn't the first or last convert to be abused by him. A story about what happens when Muslim women are broken by Muslim men, and find the courage to heal themselves through the real Islam, Things That Shatter aims to shed light on abuse and healing within the Muslim community, and to help female converts protect themselves from men like him. More than anything, this story is a convert's re-declaration of faith that there is no God but God, and it serves as a reminder that women have intrinsic worth in God’s eyes, beyond and outside of their relationships to the men in their lives.


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"I couldn’t put it down until I read every last page...  I saw a universal traumatic experience that most people could never be brave enough to put on paper for the world to read... It’s a story of realization & growth... Parts will make you uncomfortable because it’s raw and the truth can hurt." - Kaitlin, The American Muslim Mama "This is a w "I couldn’t put it down until I read every last page...  I saw a universal traumatic experience that most people could never be brave enough to put on paper for the world to read... It’s a story of realization & growth... Parts will make you uncomfortable because it’s raw and the truth can hurt." - Kaitlin, The American Muslim Mama "This is a wonderful story! The strength Kaighla has maintained throughout her journey is amazing. Her understanding that "The Sheikh's" actions are incorrect and abusive, and do not reflect God's judgement of her, are the elements which I believe have helped her stay firm in Islam. I hope the strength with which she has come out of her ordeal inspires other women in these unfortunate situations." - Danish Qasim, founder of In Shaykh's Clothing In 2009, Kaighla—a young, single mother from the Midwest, and a fresh convert to Islam—married an Egyptian immigrant, the sheikh of a mosque in Brooklyn. Unbeknownst to her, he hadn't divorced his wife back home, and was about to be deported. Two years later, she moved with him, her son, and their baby girl to his hometown in rural Egypt, where she was abused and neglected—along with his first wife—for the next four years.  A much-beloved speaker and imam in Brooklyn and in Dearborn, Michigan, the sheikh lectured and taught at mosques and Islamic centers around the country in the early 2000's. But across their seven-year marriage, Um Dayo’s identity and cultural heritage were systematically shattered by him, all in the name of making her the ideal "wife of the Sheikh"—and she wasn't the first or last convert to be abused by him. A story about what happens when Muslim women are broken by Muslim men, and find the courage to heal themselves through the real Islam, Things That Shatter aims to shed light on abuse and healing within the Muslim community, and to help female converts protect themselves from men like him. More than anything, this story is a convert's re-declaration of faith that there is no God but God, and it serves as a reminder that women have intrinsic worth in God’s eyes, beyond and outside of their relationships to the men in their lives.

30 review for Things That Shatter: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    This is a book that obviously needed to be written. It's the kind of story that you know was bursting the free itself from the author. There was a lot of pain and grief that needed to get out and onto the page. The author herself admits that this was the case and that writing all that she experienced in her marriage to a "sheikh" and her time spent living in rural Egypt with him was cathartic. I am also a convert to Islam, with ties to Egypt through my husband and I found out about this book thr This is a book that obviously needed to be written. It's the kind of story that you know was bursting the free itself from the author. There was a lot of pain and grief that needed to get out and onto the page. The author herself admits that this was the case and that writing all that she experienced in her marriage to a "sheikh" and her time spent living in rural Egypt with him was cathartic. I am also a convert to Islam, with ties to Egypt through my husband and I found out about this book through the social media of another Western convert living there currently. (There's literally dozens of us!) Conversion to Islam (I personally prefer the word convert to revert, others differ) is such a rocky road. Not to say there aren't sweet highs, of course there are as you draw closer to God and His people. But it is rough going through that change. Then add to that period also trying to adjust to a new marriage and it is doubly so. Now if that marriage is also abusive...well then you have a story such as Um Dayo presents here. When I was circling conversion and mulling it over, I would search the internet and forums reading many such stories of women who had converted. It was full of so much good but also stories like this which is honestly sad that they are somewhat common. Western women who convert to Islam are often targeted for marriage, almost always by abusive and manipulating parties. They know these women are easy pickings for whatever perverted ways and unIslamic things they want to get away with. This is not only found in Islam. Rather it is the m.o. of any abusive and transgressive people. Abusers look for people who are cut off from family or culture, small children who can't speak up, or women who have been abused in the past. Young convert women tick almost all of these boxes. The hard part of Um Dayo's life are laid bare here. I struggle with anxiety and it made me anxious. It is important story to have out there because this scenario is NOT uncommon. Women need to be made aware that abusers and transgressors hide in all manners of disguise, even that of "educated" men of faith. But beware if you struggle with anxiety, or the fear of being helpless while in charge of children (my own special breed of anxiousness) then you may want to read the synopsis and have a friend fill you in on the details. I really enjoyed Kaighla's insights about faith and culture. There isn't much of that here but when she does have realizations, they were close to a lot of my own and I imagine it is part of being a Western convert to Islam that much of the illusions we are taught through our individual societies get broken down through learning Islam and interacting with communal Muslim cultures. She ends the book not with a happy ending but with her reality that things are still hard, and a work in progress every day. I'd love to hear more of what she has learned about Islam and was pleased to see she had coauthored a book about converting The New Muslim's Field Guide and look forward to reading that next. Um Dayo includes a preface to her book warning those that this is not a story which is mean to demean Islam or Muslims, but rather abusers and transgressors. So for those looking for a conversion story or to learn more about Islam or Muslims, you will not find that here. (Though I did enjoy a lot of her commentary on Egypt and would enjoy reading a book about that and, for as she wrote "Egyptians, amirite?!") Rather this is a sad horror story as to what can go wrong when people manipulate religion for their own means. Why fighting the patriarchal influences that pervert any religion is SO important. Um Dayo has given us a personal account which shows that the tradition of patriarchy is far from a victimless crime. As Muslims it is our duty to take such stories to heart as warnings. For as the Qur'an says "And when it is said to them, 'Follow what Allah has revealed,' they say, 'Rather, we will follow that which we found our fathers doing.' Even though their fathers understood nothing, nor were they guided?" I thank Um Dayo for sharing her pain. May Allah heal her and all those who have been hurt by such misguidance. May we take her warning to heart to all work toward a better way, ameen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    captivating and heartbreaking. i struggled with this book -- if it had been fiction i could have just hated saber and rooted for kaighla and been done with it. knowing this is all true and he's in canada likely still preying on women left me feeling furious and helpless. i hope any woman who encounters this man finds this book before he manages to entangle her. may god reward kaighla for speaking her truth in the face of obstacles 5 stars captivating and heartbreaking. i struggled with this book -- if it had been fiction i could have just hated saber and rooted for kaighla and been done with it. knowing this is all true and he's in canada likely still preying on women left me feeling furious and helpless. i hope any woman who encounters this man finds this book before he manages to entangle her. may god reward kaighla for speaking her truth in the face of obstacles 5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kaya Gravitter

    This is a book that I could not put down and read from the beginning to the end in only a few days. It is heart compelling and I think it is great for anyone to read. Being a Muslim woman myself, I am so happy to see someone share their true and raw story. Kaighla, you really wrote an amazing memoir.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lambda Moses

    God bless Kaighla for her courage to speak out against such abuse. This book is very well-written and moving; from time to time, when I read how Ameer abused Kaighla and tried to erase her personality, I almost broke into tears. This book is very hard to put down, so I finished it in one sitting. This book also opened my eyes to how patriarchy twists Islam to suit its purposes, producing such a narcissistic and arrogant asshole like Ameer who had no fear of God. He considered himself God, so he God bless Kaighla for her courage to speak out against such abuse. This book is very well-written and moving; from time to time, when I read how Ameer abused Kaighla and tried to erase her personality, I almost broke into tears. This book is very hard to put down, so I finished it in one sitting. This book also opened my eyes to how patriarchy twists Islam to suit its purposes, producing such a narcissistic and arrogant asshole like Ameer who had no fear of God. He considered himself God, so he could lie, break promises, and abuse his authority to protect his reputation, even citing scripture to coddle his gigantic ego. The bad news is, Kaighla wasn't alone in getting tricked by these monster "sheikhs". What a shame when so many new Muslims were tricked by such narcissistic monsters into a life of torment, and those monsters are among "sheikhs"! How disgusting is this kind of ego-serving, oppressive, and godless Pharisee Islam! How many congregations are poisoned by this kind of falsehood! How strongly I wish to burn that backward culture to the ground! Isn't secular humanism so much more Islamic than that sort of ugly Islam that is for those who are "more machine than man, twisted and evil"? This is not an Islam that I can recognize from my readings of the Quran. There is no such thing in the Quran as wife pleasing the husband to please God. I strongly suspect this teaching somehow made its way into Islam from Paul, who said Christ is the head of man and man is the head of woman, that men were not created for women but women for men, and women should obey their husbands as they obey the Lord (1 Corinthians 11:3, 8-9, Ephesians 5:22-24). Fortunately many Christian churches realized that misogyny is wrong and now ordain women ministers, though this is still opposed by Roman Catholicism and some conservative Protestant denominations. After all, Paul also said husbands should love their wives as their bodies. When would Muslims realize that this thing that isn't even in the Quran is wrong? Thankfully, Kaighla is now safe, and is healing from years of trauma with a new, loving husband. She also got to know the real beautiful and just Islam from Dr. Khaled Abou El-Fadl, one of the foremost critic of Wahhabism, who founded the Usuli Institute to give thoughtful Islamic resources that is so lacking today. I really enjoy watching Usuli sermons and study circles. I pray that may God heal her and her friends that went down similar paths, and take those monster hypocrite "sheikhs" to justice. I'm thankful that Kaighla has a questioning mind, that has survived "Ameer", and that she did not pour out the baby with the bath water and reject Islam as a whole. I can see that when I first encounter her in the Usuli Institute Community Facebook group. I also really appreciate how Kaighla wants to forgive tho who abused her. May God bless her soul! I converted to Islam 9 years ago, with a rebellious spirit. To be honest, due to the abundance of Wahhabi inspired online resources and the strong influence of the oppressive cultures in Asia, the Islam I first got to know is the kind of legalistic Pharisee Islam that focuses too much on outer form and too little on our personal connection to God. As a result, my first year of practice was much more about outward declarations of joining the club than loving God. I was so confused by all those legalistic details that are at times oppressive thrown at me that I simply gave up and tried to read the Quran myself to find those legalistic details myself. To my surprise, the vast majority of those Pharisee legalistic details and those restrictive teachings are nowhere to be found in the Quran. I thought something must be wrong with the version of Islam I found online, but I suppressed my doubts and continued down the Pharisee path for a while, since I wanted to learn more about Islam before I make a judgment. I'm thankful that Edip Yuksel introduced me to the Quranist movement and showed that I was right in suspecting that Pharisee Islam is wrong. I might have gone down the path Kaighla had taken had I not been stopped by Edip Yuksel. Now I practice an Islam that is spiritual and theologically liberal, largely away from heritage Muslims.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    OMG, where do I even start. I don't think I've read a non-fiction book so fast. Absolutely 100% recommend. This book was full of heart-wrenching moments but it also really lets the reader see the thought process of someone being emotionally abused and how difficult it is just "up and leave" as many people suggest; it's more than that, master manipulators are the best at what they do and they weave you into a web of isolation and guilt. This book is such an eye-opener, especially to any woman who OMG, where do I even start. I don't think I've read a non-fiction book so fast. Absolutely 100% recommend. This book was full of heart-wrenching moments but it also really lets the reader see the thought process of someone being emotionally abused and how difficult it is just "up and leave" as many people suggest; it's more than that, master manipulators are the best at what they do and they weave you into a web of isolation and guilt. This book is such an eye-opener, especially to any woman who is a new revert to Islam, it cations women to question everything and make sure the information you are receiving has a valid source. You may think that this book leads the reader to see that Islam allows abuse but you can find this same story in not just other religions but cultures as well. This isn't a single person's story about the horrors of Islam but of how there are many people in the world, both good and bad. This actually helped me understand that we (news and social media) often see things that we think are Islam but in reality, it's just culture that intertwined and taken over the religion. I cannot express how much I think every woman should this book, ignorance is not bliss.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Buccolo

    I understood why the author had to write this story for her own healing. But I feel it needed to be revised into a format other than her personal journal and stream of consciousness narrative when shared with her readers. I found it convoluted, disjointed, and very hard to follow.

  7. 4 out of 5

    CHERYL A. CATANZANO

    Kaighla plays victim perfectly! I am fascinated by the lives women live in different cultures. Off the bat the author is defensive telling the reader this isn't a typical Muslims are bad book, yet all she does is complain about the life she CHOSE! She married husband number 2 barely knowing him, who was the stereotypical muslum husband; wanting an obedient wife who he abuses and neglects. Unable to financially care for herself and son, she adds 3 more to the brood and expects her younger sister t Kaighla plays victim perfectly! I am fascinated by the lives women live in different cultures. Off the bat the author is defensive telling the reader this isn't a typical Muslims are bad book, yet all she does is complain about the life she CHOSE! She married husband number 2 barely knowing him, who was the stereotypical muslum husband; wanting an obedient wife who he abuses and neglects. Unable to financially care for herself and son, she adds 3 more to the brood and expects her younger sister to put the 5 of them up. Sister takes on a second job to support them all. Her situation was deplorable and she places a lot blame for her choices on others. At one point she calls out Trump supporters as bigots because they intruded on her sanity. I am glad this book was VERY inexpensive! I would never recommend it

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The fact that I read over 300 pages in 3 days (while dealing with taking care of 3 kids and a household) should be testament that this book was one I just couldn't put down. This book will make you want to rip your hair out and scream SO MANY TIMES for so many different reasons. You may even have to walk away from it at times if it is overwhelming and/or triggering for you. Trigger warnings: psychological abuse, neglect, gaslighting, suicide attempt This book was written well, in plain English, The fact that I read over 300 pages in 3 days (while dealing with taking care of 3 kids and a household) should be testament that this book was one I just couldn't put down. This book will make you want to rip your hair out and scream SO MANY TIMES for so many different reasons. You may even have to walk away from it at times if it is overwhelming and/or triggering for you. Trigger warnings: psychological abuse, neglect, gaslighting, suicide attempt This book was written well, in plain English, in a way that keeps you reading. I appreciate that Kaighla was authentic and honest in her writing. She owns her faults and holds other accountable for theirs. I read this for a book club that I am a part of and I cannot wait for our discussions. It will be very rich indeed! Highly recommend this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frankie Siciliano

    This woman.... I finished this read in less than 2 days. Mesmerized by the life and stories of this young, strongwilled, loving mother. Her stories, as sad and horrific as they were, tell of a life so many women endure still to this day. Kaighla is an amazing woman and mother, her strength and love shine bright all throughout this book. She has a blessing for writing as well as being able to vividly share her experiences and make the reader feel as if they are there with her. Many times during t This woman.... I finished this read in less than 2 days. Mesmerized by the life and stories of this young, strongwilled, loving mother. Her stories, as sad and horrific as they were, tell of a life so many women endure still to this day. Kaighla is an amazing woman and mother, her strength and love shine bright all throughout this book. She has a blessing for writing as well as being able to vividly share her experiences and make the reader feel as if they are there with her. Many times during this read, i found myself crying and also yelling. This book was one of the top reads i have read in a long time. I applaud kaighla for her strength and perseverance to be where is she is today, a loving mother, wife, sister, and daughter. I wish nothing but the best and highest wishes in everything she reaches to achieve for her and her family. God bless!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Kaighla is an incredibly talented writer. Everything about the way this book was written is captivating and compelling. I couldn’t put it down and finished it in about 36 hours. At times this book made me feel suffocated with frustration. There were moments when I could see what was coming and that was excruciating. This book should be widely read within the Ummah, because we have issues that we need to work through and they’re brought to light in the book. All of this should never have happened Kaighla is an incredibly talented writer. Everything about the way this book was written is captivating and compelling. I couldn’t put it down and finished it in about 36 hours. At times this book made me feel suffocated with frustration. There were moments when I could see what was coming and that was excruciating. This book should be widely read within the Ummah, because we have issues that we need to work through and they’re brought to light in the book. All of this should never have happened. Things That Shatter should be an outlandish novel, not a memoir! I pray Kaighla heals from everything she went through.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Marie

    This book was recommended by a friend who raved about it. I read this in about a day- I couldn't put it down. This memoir was as enjoyable as such a memoir can be- sometimes painful to read, but an amazing story, nonetheless. The author's writing is incredible. As a writer myself, I aspire to such eloquence. It may sound cliche, but I laughed during this book and I cried. I really felt like I was in Egypt. The author's words were raw, honest, and meaningful. I'd recommend anyone who is intereste This book was recommended by a friend who raved about it. I read this in about a day- I couldn't put it down. This memoir was as enjoyable as such a memoir can be- sometimes painful to read, but an amazing story, nonetheless. The author's writing is incredible. As a writer myself, I aspire to such eloquence. It may sound cliche, but I laughed during this book and I cried. I really felt like I was in Egypt. The author's words were raw, honest, and meaningful. I'd recommend anyone who is interested in trauma, personal growth, and overcoming against all odds to read this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sara Bawany

    This book made me so sad as it exposed the reality of spiritual abuse in certain cultures. The author does a good job of articulating at the beginning and end of the book that her memoir was not meant to paint a bad picture of either Egyptians or Muslims. I hope this book is a teaching tool for many who are unaware of the reality of spiritual abuse in religious communities.

  13. 5 out of 5

    kelly viel

    Good book until the end when she called all Trump supporters bigots. I did not like the fact that she called all Trump supporters bigots at the end. Very judgemental. If I would have known this I would not have read her book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alison Lasher

    This book is a testament to the strength and resiliency of the author. Heart wrenching as it is. The hopelessness of being a struggling single mother, with little support to speak of, kept me rapt the entire book. Thank you Um Dayo for writing this important book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan Hartung

    I am refraining from stars on this one. I read this one because it popped up as a suggestion on my Kindle Unlimited membership. I commend the author for ultimately breaking the cycle of abuse and power she was stuck in for so long. Kudos to her for sharing her story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Candace H-H

    Kaighla’s memoir recounts her experiences converting to Islam and enduring an abusive marriage, including several years in Egypt. Although she endured traumatic experiences, she has a resilient spirit and ultimately engages with a more authentic, loving relationship with Allah. Highly recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Miss R

    Honest I appreciate the honestly Kaighla writes with. Not all of the book portrays her in a good light but as humans we all have our flaws. I really enjoyed the book and I think Kaighla is incredibly brave, not just for writing this book but for everything she endured.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Adams

    Great read I could not put this book down. It is very honest and open. I had wanted to read about the life of a Muslim lady. She is truly a hero and strong in my eyes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah om Hamzah

    Heartbreaking but gives hope Um Dayo explains very well the lack of support unfortunately in our Muslim community. The book is gripping and you definitely can’t put it down.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marge

    Very honest and interesting Appreciate seeing what life was like in this particular instance of being Muslim, her marriage and life in Egupt. Not a dull read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marta Muñoz-Cobo

    Before buying this book, I already knew that I would read it in a few days, ignoring bedtimes and prolonging my breakfast, unable to put it down. Yet when I finished it, I still needed to digest the feelings it arose in me. This is a powerful story, more so since there is no artifice in it: it’s raw and real like life. Sometimes it made me feel terribly. Often it just baffled me, how the author can pick herself up over and over, when everything and everyone has decided to throw her down. Resilie Before buying this book, I already knew that I would read it in a few days, ignoring bedtimes and prolonging my breakfast, unable to put it down. Yet when I finished it, I still needed to digest the feelings it arose in me. This is a powerful story, more so since there is no artifice in it: it’s raw and real like life. Sometimes it made me feel terribly. Often it just baffled me, how the author can pick herself up over and over, when everything and everyone has decided to throw her down. Resilience is the bittersweet word that comes to my mind. Sadly, I think many women can relate to letting themselves go, to giving up control or changing at the hands of a skilled, deceitful someone. The fact that this person would use faith to mask their agenda is just an extra serving of “how dare anyone”. But people dare, sadly, and nothing is holy when it means getting their way. Eventually, it falls on the shoulders of a brave woman to deal with all the pain of the mess that their refurbishing and our self betrayals walk us through. And this one is a brave one. If you don’t relate it’s fine, but it’s no less of a good reading choice. If only to exercise some compassion and empathy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Sanasie

    Let me begin on a good note, this book was easy to read and beautifully written. There is no doubt that the writer is talented. I finished it in about two days. My problem with this book is the annoying self pity and playing the victim. What the author went through was emotional abuse, manipulation at the hands of a "godly" man. But what infuriates me is the fact that every opportunity she had to get out and start over she blames religion for going back. This happens about 5 times in the book. Th Let me begin on a good note, this book was easy to read and beautifully written. There is no doubt that the writer is talented. I finished it in about two days. My problem with this book is the annoying self pity and playing the victim. What the author went through was emotional abuse, manipulation at the hands of a "godly" man. But what infuriates me is the fact that every opportunity she had to get out and start over she blames religion for going back. This happens about 5 times in the book. This is a book for American converts who have the options/ privileges to flee at any point. White American converts to Islam, marries a man she met online, already found he lied to her, marries him anyway. Finds out he has been married several times, and is still married to a woman (his cousin) in Egypt. Decides to MOVE TO EGYPT so her and her husband can live with his other wife who knew nothing about her by the way. The real victim here is that poor girl his first wife who had to endure it all and now has to deal with his new american wife. All the author does at this point is complain complain complain about a country SHE wanted to move to , about a situation SHE wanted. She moved to Cairo where she had a great job and was taking care of her kids but decided to move back to the village. At one point she moves back to America with her 3 kids to have her 4th child. Moves in with her little sister who was working two jobs to provide for them. With no job and relying on her sister she complained about her sister having a guy over one night. She complained about her mom not helping enough. She complained about everyone not helping enough. Pure annoying entitlement. She moved back to Egypt and what does she do? complain some more. My point is this is the story of an American convert. That should be read by American converts. People with choices, where getting out is always an option. Someone from a third world country like me, would not be able to grasp this. For us there are no embassy's to run to if our husbands wont listen to us. There's no family in America to financially help. There is no choice for us. And in my opinion the author failed to acknowledge this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I pray for Kaighla and her kids to heal and move forward in life. An amazing story but sadly not uncommon experience of so many women.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Williford

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julie Swanson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Ketcherside

  27. 4 out of 5

    DAISY GONZALEZ

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  29. 5 out of 5

    Papatia Feauxzar

  30. 4 out of 5

    Iman Elwan

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