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Five Nights at Freddy's fans won't want to miss this pulse-pounding collection of three novella-length tales that will keep even the bravest player up at night . . . What do you wish for most? It's a question that Oswald, Sarah, and Millie think they know the answer to. Oswald wishes his summer wasn't so boring, Sarah wishes to be beautiful, and Millie wishes she could just Five Nights at Freddy's fans won't want to miss this pulse-pounding collection of three novella-length tales that will keep even the bravest player up at night . . . What do you wish for most? It's a question that Oswald, Sarah, and Millie think they know the answer to. Oswald wishes his summer wasn't so boring, Sarah wishes to be beautiful, and Millie wishes she could just disappear from the face of the earth. But in the twisted world of Five Nights at Freddy's, their hearts' deepest desires have an unexpected cost.In this volume, Five Nights at Freddy's creator Scott Cawthon spins three sinister novella-length stories from different corners of his series' canon, featuring cover art from fan-favorite artist LadyFiszi. Readers beware: This collection of terrifying tales is enough to unsettle even the most hardened Five Nights at Freddy's fans.


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Five Nights at Freddy's fans won't want to miss this pulse-pounding collection of three novella-length tales that will keep even the bravest player up at night . . . What do you wish for most? It's a question that Oswald, Sarah, and Millie think they know the answer to. Oswald wishes his summer wasn't so boring, Sarah wishes to be beautiful, and Millie wishes she could just Five Nights at Freddy's fans won't want to miss this pulse-pounding collection of three novella-length tales that will keep even the bravest player up at night . . . What do you wish for most? It's a question that Oswald, Sarah, and Millie think they know the answer to. Oswald wishes his summer wasn't so boring, Sarah wishes to be beautiful, and Millie wishes she could just disappear from the face of the earth. But in the twisted world of Five Nights at Freddy's, their hearts' deepest desires have an unexpected cost.In this volume, Five Nights at Freddy's creator Scott Cawthon spins three sinister novella-length stories from different corners of his series' canon, featuring cover art from fan-favorite artist LadyFiszi. Readers beware: This collection of terrifying tales is enough to unsettle even the most hardened Five Nights at Freddy's fans.

30 review for Into the Pit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andie Cranford

    I think this book is about as well-written as the Goosebumps books, but I couldn’t help but notice that this book is horribly negative towards its teen girl protagonists. I would definitely hesitate to give these stories to girls. The first story has a young boy protagonist and the narrative is sympathetic towards him. The last two stories have teen girl protagonists. The stories are viciously judgmental towards them for wanting things many girls that age want—to be pretty and to have a boyfriend I think this book is about as well-written as the Goosebumps books, but I couldn’t help but notice that this book is horribly negative towards its teen girl protagonists. I would definitely hesitate to give these stories to girls. The first story has a young boy protagonist and the narrative is sympathetic towards him. The last two stories have teen girl protagonists. The stories are viciously judgmental towards them for wanting things many girls that age want—to be pretty and to have a boyfriend. The punishments they face are many, many degrees more violent and extreme than the ones faced by the male protagonist. I hope as this series continues, the writers evaluate the messages they are promoting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    (NON SPOILER) I received an ARC of this book I'm interested in the FNaF series, and I am really looking forward to the rest of these upcoming short stories. Fazbear Frights #1 Into The Pit is something you would not expect out of FNaF, the events that occur are almost out of nowhere, and are uh, very confusing confusing, however, in some weird way, it all made sense by the end of the stories, at-least some. Now, I can say to all the FNaF enthusiasts out there, no; this is clearly not a book that is (NON SPOILER) I received an ARC of this book I'm interested in the FNaF series, and I am really looking forward to the rest of these upcoming short stories. Fazbear Frights #1 Into The Pit is something you would not expect out of FNaF, the events that occur are almost out of nowhere, and are uh, very confusing confusing, however, in some weird way, it all made sense by the end of the stories, at-least some. Now, I can say to all the FNaF enthusiasts out there, no; this is clearly not a book that is taking place within the games timeline, I myself am a diehard FNaF theorist, and it's clear here that, it's not supposed to be used as a book to solve the games, disappointingly. However, there are some references, and POTENTIAL connections you could make to the games that are definitely eye opening, and... certainly VERY disturbing for the average FNaF you're used to, it's clear that Scott wanted to take a more, darker tone; it's also nothing like the old novels, the character's here do have a lot more written into them, and it's quite shocking that you see the situations they end up in... especially the ones that got what was coming. ts an okay book, and it's certainly not a book used for the games, newcomers will certainly enjoy it, but if you want a darker fnaf route, if you enjoy Stranger Things, Lovecraft, ETC, you will certainly enjoy this book You're in for an... interesting ride. EDIT 1: I've seen some out-lash on another review about a girl with an eating disorder, now this is definitely true but uh, it's there for a reason, every story in this book does have a gimmick, but it relates to them of course, the girl with the eating disorder is there for a reason, I won't say why yet, but yes, there is clearly a reason for this. EDIT 2: Hey reddit :) EDIT 3: Hey Freddit Discord. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    “I know you like Poe because he’s dark and spooky, and it’s easy to romanticize death when you’re young and it’s so far away. But Poe didn’t write about death because he thought it was romantic. He wrote about it because he lost so many of the people he loved. You’ve never experienced that kind of loss, Millie. It...changes you.” “Oh, but that really takes action, doesn’t it?” The voice said. “Changing a life for the better, especially when the world is such a mean, rotten place?” I loved these “I know you like Poe because he’s dark and spooky, and it’s easy to romanticize death when you’re young and it’s so far away. But Poe didn’t write about death because he thought it was romantic. He wrote about it because he lost so many of the people he loved. You’ve never experienced that kind of loss, Millie. It...changes you.” “Oh, but that really takes action, doesn’t it?” The voice said. “Changing a life for the better, especially when the world is such a mean, rotten place?” I loved these FNAF short stories! So well written. I loved getting to see more pieces of the lore start to be revealed. They were quick but with just enough description to make me truly interested in the characters. Haunting! Loved it. Can’t wait for the next ones!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vlex

    Scott Master

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christina Pilkington

    My daughter and I read this collection of three novella aloud together right before bed. She's a big FNAF fan- has read the main trilogy of books and played the games- and she wanted to share these stories with me. They remind me a bit of Goosebumps books, but all three have some connection to the FNAF world. I was pleasnetly surprised how much I enjoyed reading these stories! A time traveling ball pit in a pizza parlor? I've never seen that before? And the classic themes of wanting to belong and My daughter and I read this collection of three novella aloud together right before bed. She's a big FNAF fan- has read the main trilogy of books and played the games- and she wanted to share these stories with me. They remind me a bit of Goosebumps books, but all three have some connection to the FNAF world. I was pleasnetly surprised how much I enjoyed reading these stories! A time traveling ball pit in a pizza parlor? I've never seen that before? And the classic themes of wanting to belong and fit in work well with the horror elements in these stories. Overall, I'd recommend reading this collection if you are familiar with the FNAF world. I think you'd appreciate them much more than if you just approach them blind.

  6. 5 out of 5

    mckenna ʕ •ᴥ•ʔ

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Okay, I know what you're thinking. Reading FNaF in 2020...but hear me out. Five Nights at Freddy's lore is a guilty pleasure that I don't mind admitting! Because while it is a little silly to think about enormous fuzzy robots shaped like cartoony animals chasing and eating kids somehow Scott Cawthon manages to make these books actually good? Like, surprisingly well written and at times actually chillingly good! But Scott Cawthon books wouldn't be complete without some weird twists that don't qui Okay, I know what you're thinking. Reading FNaF in 2020...but hear me out. Five Nights at Freddy's lore is a guilty pleasure that I don't mind admitting! Because while it is a little silly to think about enormous fuzzy robots shaped like cartoony animals chasing and eating kids somehow Scott Cawthon manages to make these books actually good? Like, surprisingly well written and at times actually chillingly good! But Scott Cawthon books wouldn't be complete without some weird twists that don't quite make sense but you have to let it go because as a whole Five Nights at Freddy's doesn't make sense. Fazbear Frights is the new FNaF book series and it looks like each novel is going to be split into three short stories, so let's dive right in! Into the Pit: 2.5 stars " Half a dozen kids, none of them older than Oswald, their lifeless bodies propped into sitting positions, their legs stretched out in front of them. Some of them had their eyes closed as if asleep. Others' eyes were open, frozen in an empty, doll-like stare." The first short story in this collection was a bit of an odd one and I'm still unsure if it was the best start to a brand new series. Into the Pit follows Oswald, who is having the worst Summer ever. With his best friend moving far away and his parents having crazy work hours Oswald is looking at spending the Summer at the library and Jeff's Pizza, the gross pizzeria with the weird owner. But as time passes Jeff's doesn't seem so bad, all because of one reason. The ball pit with a big Do Not Enter sign. After a prank gone wrong Oswald dives into the pit but when he comes back out something is different. Suddenly Oswald finds himself in another time. 1985. Freddy Fazbear's Pizza. Not wasting too much time worrying how this ball pit sent him into the past Oswald starts going to Freddy's every day and hanging out with his new friends from the past. But all too soon things go wrong, and it's all the yellow rabbit's fault. How will Oswald stop something that has already happened? This story was definitely unique, I could wrap my brain around the time traveling ball pit just fine but it was the last dozen or so pages that threw me off a bit. The yellow rabbit suddenly takes the place of Oswald's dad and nobody but him can see it? Like...what? Scott always adds parts to his story that just really don't make much sense and we never truly get an explanation, which is why this story is getting a pretty low rating. But even so, I did find myself enjoying the mystery behind this one! To Be Beautiful: 3.5 stars "Sarah looked at the floor. At first her brain couldn't even process what she saw. One bag contained a human leg, another a human arm. They were not the body parts of an adult, and they didn't appear to be the result of an accident. Blood pooled in the bottoms of the bags, but the limbs had been severed neatly, as if in a surgical amputation. Another bag, stuffed with bloody, snakelike entrails and what appeared to be a liver, slid from the cabinet's shelf and landed on the floor with a wet splat." This second story was a lot better and creepier than the first, which obviously made me happy! This story follows Sarah, a girl who hates her appearance more than anything. Every night she wishes to be beautiful like her classmates and the models who's pictures she hangs on her wall. After a series of mishaps, Sarah ends up finding a robot girl in a junkyard and decides to take her home. After cleaning her up and switching her on the robot springs to life and tells Sarah that she can grant her any wish she wants, as long as she wears the pendant the girl gives her and never takes it off. Sarah agrees and is promised to wake up each morning more beautiful than the night before, and to her surprise, it works! Suddenly Sarah has a spot at the popular table during lunch and a date with the boy of her dreams, but she soon realizes there is something not right about the robot she's brought home... This is the kind of tale I expect from FNaF! If this weren't based around characters seven years younger than me and clearly meant for a younger audience, therefore far less creepy than they could be, this would genuinely spook me when I was trying to sleep at night. Scott has a way of describing these characters and events in such a gruesome but somehow casual way and that's totally haunting! Being as this story revolved a lot around school and cliques most of this one was annoying teenage drama but the delivery of that twist was too good not to rate this well! Count the Ways: 5 stars ""Options of how to die. Exactly!" the voice in the darkness said. "You're catching on now, bright girl that you are. Now I'd call the first couple of options lazy choices. They don't require me to do anything but keep you here and let nature take its course. The advantage to these is that they're easy-peasy for me but not so easy for you. Slow, with lots of suffering, but who knows? That might appeal to your morbid sensibilities. Lots of opportunities for languishing. You like languishing."" So. Scary. Millie is a girl who thinks about dying almost all the time. She'll tell anyone who will listen how miserable she is. No friends. Family staying in another country. Living with her kooky old Grandpa. Millie hates happiness, she doesn't believe in it. That is until she meets Dylan. Dylan is like her, reads poetry and doesn't have many friends and he's the first person to pay any sort of attention to Millie. For the first time in her life Millie finds herself smiling, but soon that's all taken away. After a series of bad events, Millie tells her family she won't be participating in Christmas, and the only way to get out of it is to hide in her Grandpa's workshop. A robot he found and was fixing up happens to have a chest cavity large enough for a human to crawl inside. What could go wrong? Oh my god this story was incredible? Switching between past and present, Millie's normal life mixed with being inside the belly of the beast this story was perfectly crafted and terrifyingly executed! Inside the body of a robot Millie is ran through options of her demise because this is what she wanted, isn't it? All Millie talked about was death and now she's about to get her wish. The scariest part of this story is by far the end, Millie's family is starting to worry where she is but decide that she can come back when she stops being a brat. Her Christmas gifts are all in a pile for her while she chooses decapitation as her end. Literal shivers. This was a perfect end to the first book! It was this last story that made me rate the first Fazbear Frights a four! This book is an extremely quick read and a splendid addition to the FNaF lore. And the couple bonus pages at the end where we learn about Stitchwraith left me so excited for the next book! I'm glad all the other books seem to be releasing this year as it would be sort of a pain to have to wait so long for such short stories. While these books were definitely watered down horror and had cringe fourteen year old moments I would recommend this book to anybody looking for more digging into the world of Five Nights at Freddy's.

  7. 5 out of 5

    szara

    3.5/5 All three of the stories had both parts that I liked and parts that I didn't fully get into, but I enjoyed the horror elements a lot. And well, I'm always ready for some more FNAF content. What got me excited the most, though, was the promise of what's to come next at the very end. I'm really looking forward to more of Fazbear Frights right now. 3.5/5 All three of the stories had both parts that I liked and parts that I didn't fully get into, but I enjoyed the horror elements a lot. And well, I'm always ready for some more FNAF content. What got me excited the most, though, was the promise of what's to come next at the very end. I'm really looking forward to more of Fazbear Frights right now.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    I really liked this book it didn't bore me at all like some books do, I really like the way this book was made, 3 short horror stories all set in the Five Nights at Freddy's Universe, kinda like a short goosebumps book, but fnaf related. The first story is about a boy named Oswald, who lives in a rundown town, but one day during summer break, he finds out a very dark secret about the local pizza place in town. The second story is about a girl named Sarah who is very disgusted with herself when s I really liked this book it didn't bore me at all like some books do, I really like the way this book was made, 3 short horror stories all set in the Five Nights at Freddy's Universe, kinda like a short goosebumps book, but fnaf related. The first story is about a boy named Oswald, who lives in a rundown town, but one day during summer break, he finds out a very dark secret about the local pizza place in town. The second story is about a girl named Sarah who is very disgusted with herself when she looks in the mirror, she hates the way she looks and only has one friend, but one day while walking home, Sarah discovers something that can turn her life around. The third horror story is about a goth girl named Millie, she's always reading poems and fantasizing about death. But some very selfish moves ends up with Millie in prison, forced to chose the way she dies. Plus, it comes with a 4th story at the end, but it's not a complete story, it's kind of like a post credits scene for books, it tells the story of "the stitch wraith" a masked hooded figure who is evading police. At the end of every Fazbear Frights book, it tells part of the story, so when you read this your about 1/6 done with the story of the stitch wraith. I recommend this book if you love really big twists.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ren

    I've only read snippets of this book, which was read to me over the phone by one of my friends, but from what I've heard about the plot and the snippets I've been read, I feel the need to write a review; Don't get me wrong, I've actually heard the majority of the book word-for-word, but I'm sure there're a few things I'm missing here, which is why I won't actually be rating the book, in spirit of fairness. I'm honestly astonished at how many of these reviews are positive. The book's writing is d I've only read snippets of this book, which was read to me over the phone by one of my friends, but from what I've heard about the plot and the snippets I've been read, I feel the need to write a review; Don't get me wrong, I've actually heard the majority of the book word-for-word, but I'm sure there're a few things I'm missing here, which is why I won't actually be rating the book, in spirit of fairness. I'm honestly astonished at how many of these reviews are positive. The book's writing is decent at best, and the plot seems fairly plain; I suppose a younger audience could definitely enjoy it, but I think you would have to be very young to find it scary. The first story is alright, if you can get past a few plot-holes. It wasn't the best but, again, I could definitely see it being enjoyed by a young audience. The worst part of this book, in my opinion, is how it handles the last two stories and the very real concerns present there. The second story follows a teen-girl who is constantly wishing she was prettier or more popular and shames her body-image almost every other sentence. The third story follows a teen-girl as well, only this one seems obsessed with the idea of death. Both of these things are VERY REAL problems that people go through, but the story seems to handle these serious topics like a side-plot, and doesn't address them in a proper, realistic way; Instead the protagonists are treated like villains for having these thoughts, and (spoilers ahead) they both end up dying without this inner-conflict truly being resolved. It seems as though this might've been to appeal to an older audience, but it fails miserably and ends up being another cliche demonstration of very real-world problems. Overall, the plot is written poorly and the characters are written even worse. The stories also seem to do this weird thing where they decide to //ACTUALLY INCLUDE ELEMENTS OF FNAF// near the very end of the story?? Which ironically feels tacked on, and seems to ruins the original set-up of the plot. These are just my thoughts and if you genuinely enjoyed this book, that's awesome! I just had to get my opinion out there, seeing as most of these reviews are incredibly positive.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dark Heart Books

    Ok - quick disclaimer: I have given this 4 stars because I am ALL about that FNAF lore and I've been following it since the games blew up. I don't think someone new to the franchise would get as much out of it as fans would. Ok - so yeah, as the disclaimer says - although you COULD read this and understand it without the games, or previous books, I REALLY don't think you'd get as much out of it as you could. So, this is the first (of FIVE!!!) installments in the Fazbear Frights series - as I unde Ok - quick disclaimer: I have given this 4 stars because I am ALL about that FNAF lore and I've been following it since the games blew up. I don't think someone new to the franchise would get as much out of it as fans would. Ok - so yeah, as the disclaimer says - although you COULD read this and understand it without the games, or previous books, I REALLY don't think you'd get as much out of it as you could. So, this is the first (of FIVE!!!) installments in the Fazbear Frights series - as I understand, each book will contain 3 short stories surrounding the FNAF world (no, not the god awful FNAF World game, just the world in general) and this was a great start. The three stories in this are great little stories, but I was let down because I was told: "Readers beware: this collection of terrifying tales is enough to unsettle even the most hardened Five Nights at Freddy’s fans." ehhh....no. But then again, I'm not 14. My favourite story in this collection was the first one, and the one represented by the cover art. I really related to the story (and it even made me go and buy a pizza slize because of it!) but the otehrs were good too. Just...go into it with an open mind. What do I mean by that? Well, the first story involves a time-travelling ball pit...yeah...fun though! Yeah - fans will LOVE this, non-fans....probably not so much. But I'm a fan and I was all about this! I can't wait for the nexr installments!

  11. 5 out of 5

    emily_oriley

    You know what, when I finished the first story, I was ready to just chuck this book. But I’m glad I didn’t. I am so glad the other stories didn’t match that first one. Seriously, skip Oswald’s story. It is so awful. If you’re a theorist, maybe read a summary. Yes I am suggest a SUMMARY instead of a 60 page story - it’s THAT bad. Or hell, just watch The Game Theorist’s video and skip to the end - he’ll tell you all the important stuff. The other two stories were surprisingly good. Like Goosebumps You know what, when I finished the first story, I was ready to just chuck this book. But I’m glad I didn’t. I am so glad the other stories didn’t match that first one. Seriously, skip Oswald’s story. It is so awful. If you’re a theorist, maybe read a summary. Yes I am suggest a SUMMARY instead of a 60 page story - it’s THAT bad. Or hell, just watch The Game Theorist’s video and skip to the end - he’ll tell you all the important stuff. The other two stories were surprisingly good. Like Goosebumps good. Some parts dragged and I’m a little disappointed they made the characters so unlikable but I do understand why. And having the last story go back and forth between present and flashback was a nice effect. So, yeah, two out of three, worth the read and it is a very short read - total time reading was maybe an hour - which is also a good thing since these storylines would wear thin pretty quickly. And so so so so SO much better than Silver Eyes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anomaly

    First things first: this isn't a book I'd have picked for myself, nor did I even know it existed until I decided to let my library app choose a book for me. I outright hate FNAF as a game, but I enjoy the energy Markiplier brings to playing it and I have a friend who's basically obsessed with MatPat's theories on the lore, so I'm still familiar with it. Not enough to pick a book based on this world, but hey I decided to stick with what the library app chose, so here we are - and I'm one book clo First things first: this isn't a book I'd have picked for myself, nor did I even know it existed until I decided to let my library app choose a book for me. I outright hate FNAF as a game, but I enjoy the energy Markiplier brings to playing it and I have a friend who's basically obsessed with MatPat's theories on the lore, so I'm still familiar with it. Not enough to pick a book based on this world, but hey I decided to stick with what the library app chose, so here we are - and I'm one book closer to my 2020 reading goal, so that's a win regardless. This book, however, is not a win itself. It's average at best, but frankly a bit less due to having a very Knockoff Goosebumps feel to the juvenile writing style... and the disproportionately cruel way the female characters with very common real life problems were treated compared to the male character who had similarly realistic issues yet was a complete brat about them. That just doesn't settle well with me. Into the Pit - ★★★☆☆ Holy crap, did I ever hate the main character! The story begins with a sympathetic take on Oswald: he's sad and lonely and miserable now that his family is facing financial hardship and his best friend has moved away. His mother is trying very hard to help him and his father has taken a low-paying job - the only thing available - to make ends meet. Oz being sad makes sense. Even being upset does, because everything is falling apart around him, but by the second third-to-quarter of the story this kid loses all sympathy by turning into an ungrateful, little monster. Oh, his parents try to give him movie nights and have fun with him even though they can't afford to go out? Horrible! His friend has vacations at beaches and he should, too! Oh, his parents still let him have a daily slice of takeout pizza? How dare they not give him a dollar more so he can have a different flavour! Oh, his dad wastes fuel and time to drop Oz off at the library and pick him up all the time? Clearly that means his dad is 'throwing him away' every day and expending zero effort! Time to hide in a ball pit and force Dad to come find him to teach that terrible parent a lesson! It's disgusting and infuriating. The kid's parents are genuinely trying and he doesn't care because he can't have every single thing he wants anymore. So he finds a way out, seemingly magically rewarded for his behaviour... until things go very, very wrong. And let me tell you: seeing things go wrong for Oswald piqued my interest, even though the events were as crazy and nonsensical as reading a Goosebumps book. Seeing this ingrate learn a valuable lesson the hard way was completely worth the middlegrade level writing and complete absurdity of a magical, giant bunny everyone (except Oz) thinks is a real human. But, y'know. There was still a magical, giant, evil bunny which may very well be Zipper the Bunny Day mascot from Animal Crossing: New Horizons turned evil by the backlash from villagers all around the globe. Actually, that would have been horrifying. This... wasn't. I did like the time travel element and the general concept of Oz coming to terms with life being unfair while learning to appreciate what he already has, which made this entertaining enough to classify as average. But honestly that's about all I find worth saying about this one. To Be Beautiful - ★★☆☆☆ Sarah is a pudgy girl with plain hair and a flat chest who dreams of attaining supermodel beauty. Like most average girls her age, she hates her body and feels ugly. And, like many unfortunate girls who are ridiculed for not being supermodels, she starves herself on a 'low carb diet' in hopes of losing weight. She isn't an ingrate. She isn't a bad person, though of course she's human enough to make bad choices and say things that aren't perfectly nice when she's upset. She's just a sad, young girl who - like many of us did at her age - wants to meet her own goal of ideal beauty and wants to feel good in her own skin. Her best friend berates and judges her for this, and the narrative seems to think her friend is correct - which is made explicitly clear during the horrific outcome of Sarah's tale. Oz in the previous story was a worse person and he got a happy ending. Sarah did not; she got an ending filled with unfathomable betrayal. As a woman who was once just like Sarah and still suffers self-image issues, I'm disgusted by the ending of this story. I'm infuriated by how the author chose to handle Sarah's tale. And honestly, I also felt a little uncomfortable with some of the wording for Sarah's thoughts about herself. Also? No, you don't have to bleach hair before using platinum hair "dye" - the whole point is that a platinum kit bleaches and tones it for you. And, no, the smell from hair lightening products doesn't magically become overwhelming only after rinsed, especially in a small, closed space like a bathroom. And, no, you don't follow a botched bleach-and-dye job with a colour removal and more dye the same day, unless you want your hair to fall out by the handfuls. And for good measure? No, it's not okay to call green hair dye ugly and Martian-like, especially when your target audience is very likely to include young girls who want to experiment with hair dye just like the character being shamed and punished for seeking a change of hair. I just have a lot of grouchy emotions about how this tale seems to have a very vicious moral aimed at teens with self-image issues, eating disorders, and depression. While reading it, I thought perhaps the message would be a positive one about shallow people not being worthwhile and true friends accepting the real you, but nope. Seems to be more about how anyone who tries to change to make themselves feel more attractive is actually a worthless pile of trash who doesn't deserve to live. I sincerely hope that's just my ability to relate to Sarah making me feel disrespected and not the actual moral of this story. Oh, and to add insult to injury, the magic element makes absolutely zero sense. Even less than a giant, yellow bunny everyone ignores. I'm not surprised, given these are FNAF stories, but I'm still annoyed. Count the Ways - ★★☆☆☆ Hoo boy, this tale is something else. From the very beginning, it launches into berating a teenage girl for having a goth aesthetic and dark interests. And I don't mean subtly, either. I mean Freddy Freakin' Fazbear is given a human voice, with which he taunts and belittles the girl, Millie, in a cruel and condescending manner, insisting that because she was always so obsessed with death now she must die to "have her dream date with Death." It's brutal. "Goth girl taunted and forced to choose her own method of being murdered while being gaslighted about how it's what she always wanted when she's clearly saying she wants to live" level brutal. What is this, Saw installment one thousand?! I know FNAF can be brutal itself, but it feels a lot different in this context than in a silly game with subpar graphics. I felt physically ill reading this one. It made me uneasy. The way the bear spoke to Millie felt very much like real life bullies who abuse teens or tell depressed and suicidal victims to just go ahead and kill themselves etc. All this, and her only "crime" is being a melodramatic teenager who's a little creepy and unhappy with her lot in life. Ouch. Why so cruel to the female characters?! Anyway, Millie isn't the nicest of kids, but she has reasons when she acts out. Her parents went to a completely different country for the sake of 'adventure' and she was left behind with her grandfather. He's a loving and accepting person who is a magnificent gem, but that doesn't stop Millie from feeling unhappy. She has her heart broken, so she acts mean toward the other girl incolved. Her fascination with death and the goth aesthetic is a bit intense, but... well, who can't relate to the goth phase, really? I know I had one that spanned from late elementary school into sophomore year of high school. There isn't much more to this one, either. It just shows flashbacks to explain how Millie came to be in the animatronic bear's clutches and the problems which led to her emotional low, interspersed with the 'present time' wherein she's being forced to choose a method of death. I think it's trying to be profound, but it very much isn't. In fact, the voice taunting Millie sounds more like a deranged, adult man than... well, a sentiment animatronic bear. He has the kind of knowledge only a human should and taunts her in a very human-sounding way. Maybe I'm just missing something from the lore and it's a demon or other humanoid spirit, but I can't imagine if I were watching Markiplier sit there while one of the game characters gave long-winded monologues about how the player character deserved to die. It would not be fun to watch, just as this was not fun to read. If the obnoxious demon-bear Jigsaw stand-in were removed and this were a story about a teenage girl coming to terms with life and realizing she wanted to live and treat others better, I'd have enjoyed it. Grandpa is a delight and Dylan is a great character. Millie, while flawed, feels realistic and likable due to the empathy she inspires. But nope, gotta have the awkward FNAF angle... ... and an infuriatingly open-ended conclusion. Untitled Epilogue - ★☆☆☆☆ A brief, overly dense, and boring foray into what appears to be setting up the next book. It details a detective being handed what amounts to an X-File case over the strange demise of Sarah from story two. Also, his family life sucks, apparently. Nothing more to say about this one. Overall ★★★☆☆ These stories feel very much like middlegrade writing, as I've already mentioned, but I cannot fathom handing this book to a child between 11 and 14 years of age - especially if they're a girl. It's uncomfortable that I can relate to having been like both of the female characters in this collection and they both get brutally murdered as twisted punishment for being like me. How will actual kids who read this feel, especially when they see themselves in Sarah or Millie? I'm not saying that horror which makes readers uncomfortable is inherently bad. I'm just saying: the implied target audience based on the writing style is too young for this content. But, hey, if a kid is already into FNAF, perhaps they're used to stuff like this. Who knows? While glad this was a quick read, I also am very glad to be through with it. I highly doubt I'll read any more of the books in this series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    eme

    3.5 That was actually better than I expected tbh (even tho I’ve heard that these are better than the main saga, the opinions about the saga are so abismal that I was kinda scared, but I was actually pleasantly surprised). It kinda felt like reading Goosebumps again, I can see these books becoming big in the middle grade horror genre. Into the pit (3 stars) This was the one that felt very fnafy. It connected well with the lore of the games (the whole afton getting into the bunny suit and being creep 3.5 That was actually better than I expected tbh (even tho I’ve heard that these are better than the main saga, the opinions about the saga are so abismal that I was kinda scared, but I was actually pleasantly surprised). It kinda felt like reading Goosebumps again, I can see these books becoming big in the middle grade horror genre. Into the pit (3 stars) This was the one that felt very fnafy. It connected well with the lore of the games (the whole afton getting into the bunny suit and being creepy) but was it’s own story at the same time. Not bad, but not the best either (and also the whole time traveling ball pit was kinda hilarious, and I would have liked it if the kid he befriends in the past was his father, although he might have been a victim maybe?) To be beautiful (3.5 stars) This one was... kinda better?? But it also really showed that it was written by a man. Idk, the whole self-negative thinking about being ugly was putting me off a bit, and it ended up being such a sad story in the end. Idk, kinda confused about how I feel about this story. Count the ways (3.5 stars) This one was the saddest one by far. The ending was so heartbreaking (no spoilers, I promise). But I kinda didn’t like the whole girls judging other girls just because they like being pretty (I guess we’re back at the whole I’m not like the other girls trope huh?) Its the kind of negativity we don’t need to keep in seeing in media (again, it really felt like it was written by a man, especially when you think about the difference in themes in Into the pit vs the other two stories, it makes you think, doesn’t it?).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Into The pit is an amazing book that pushes forward the fnaf series line although not cannon to the games it is considered 2 cannon to the game. So in the book, the basic dilemma is there a time-traveling bunny in a ball pit time machine in a pizzeria and our main character " millie" is lured into the pit and travels in the time leading him to the original Freddy Faz bear in the first book "silver eyes". After he's out of the pit he finds that his dad is no longer his dad but he is the bunny tha Into The pit is an amazing book that pushes forward the fnaf series line although not cannon to the games it is considered 2 cannon to the game. So in the book, the basic dilemma is there a time-traveling bunny in a ball pit time machine in a pizzeria and our main character " millie" is lured into the pit and travels in the time leading him to the original Freddy Faz bear in the first book "silver eyes". After he's out of the pit he finds that his dad is no longer his dad but he is the bunny that followed him thought the time-traveling pit. We meet a character named Oswalt's which he is weird because he has never come into contact with the animatronic but he enjoys drawing animals with endoskeletons and it's weird but moving off of that we find out the owner of the pizza he's the chef and the owner and in the book, it states " Jeff I had never seen jeff so close he looked dead " Which correlates with the purple man " William Afton " whos dead and uses animatronic parts to and remnant to keep alive so jeff might be the purple man. Into the pit is a very good story to read I would recommend but read the first series first silver eyes. This was a good book I would recommend, my fav part of the book is when oswald is first introdued.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samiha

    Another book from a franchise that consists of futuristic robots haunted by ghosts of child and time travel and video games? Why not? In addition, this can also be enjoyed just as a collection of stand alone creepy short stories, if one doesn't want to read into it too much. Scott Cawthon, as he had mentioned, made this to clear parts of the Games' obscure lore- for those who cares enough. Even though I just passively consumed the YouTube wave of this game, I could recognize the famously adored an Another book from a franchise that consists of futuristic robots haunted by ghosts of child and time travel and video games? Why not? In addition, this can also be enjoyed just as a collection of stand alone creepy short stories, if one doesn't want to read into it too much. Scott Cawthon, as he had mentioned, made this to clear parts of the Games' obscure lore- for those who cares enough. Even though I just passively consumed the YouTube wave of this game, I could recognize the famously adored animatronics; which was enjoyable. The plot of these stories were also kind of spoiled for me(Thanks, Matpat). So I didn't enjoy this as much as I would otherwise.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. Of course, I'm already a fnaf fan so I'm predisposed to like it, but I didn't expect to like it as much as I did. There were some aspects of the writing that I didn't enjoy, but overall it was a fun and satisfyingly creepy read. I'm excited to read the next installments. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. Of course, I'm already a fnaf fan so I'm predisposed to like it, but I didn't expect to like it as much as I did. There were some aspects of the writing that I didn't enjoy, but overall it was a fun and satisfyingly creepy read. I'm excited to read the next installments.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I was intrigued by Scott Cawthon's description of the Spring Bonnie character that it inspired me to make my own fnaf series based off of this book called Into the Closet. Instead of a typical human being in the suit, he interpreted the the thing inside the suit as some horrible monster with three rows of sharp teeth. Oswald does understand the reason why the the yellow rabbit suit killed the kids but was able to have the thing hang its self with a net. I was intrigued by Scott Cawthon's description of the Spring Bonnie character that it inspired me to make my own fnaf series based off of this book called Into the Closet. Instead of a typical human being in the suit, he interpreted the the thing inside the suit as some horrible monster with three rows of sharp teeth. Oswald does understand the reason why the the yellow rabbit suit killed the kids but was able to have the thing hang its self with a net.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    To be fair and up front I am not a FNaF fan at all for a multitude of reasons, so this was never going to get a five star review. But, I read this because my little cousin really wanted to read it and given his young age I wanted to see if it was something he could read. For a very young child I would not recommend this. It is a book with very long chapters. However, a older child who is into FNaF they might really enjoy the fear factor. It has a lot of game theories in the series. It’s a little To be fair and up front I am not a FNaF fan at all for a multitude of reasons, so this was never going to get a five star review. But, I read this because my little cousin really wanted to read it and given his young age I wanted to see if it was something he could read. For a very young child I would not recommend this. It is a book with very long chapters. However, a older child who is into FNaF they might really enjoy the fear factor. It has a lot of game theories in the series. It’s a little more intense than say goosebumps because at least one child dies in the book. It was just not my cup of tea.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Super fast read. I didn’t think I’d finish it under 2 hours but it was good. I just wish the stories were more FNAF related.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielius Tamasauskas

    Best book looks cool

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    3.5 stars

  22. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I took my time reading these stories, but I really liked them. I already have the next 3 books in my tbr, and I´m hoping there would be more to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Addison Clark

    It's a nice book to read if you know the stories of five nights at freddy's It's a nice book to read if you know the stories of five nights at freddy's

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ayden

    I was pleasantly surprised at how creepy the short stories actually we're. I've already pre ordered the other three books in the series! I was pleasantly surprised at how creepy the short stories actually we're. I've already pre ordered the other three books in the series!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Santiago Gutierrez

    The terrifying book “Five Nights at Freddy’s, Fazbear Frights; Into the Pit,” by Scott Cawthon and Elley Cooper, has three stories. “Into the Pit” is about a boy named Oswald who finds himself in a time traveling ball pit and is chased home by a giant horrifying yellow rabbit. “To Be Beautiful” is about a girl named Sarah who is worried about beauty and wishes to a robot she found in a junkyard to be beautiful. The last story, “Count the Ways,” is about a 14 year-old goth girl named Millie who i The terrifying book “Five Nights at Freddy’s, Fazbear Frights; Into the Pit,” by Scott Cawthon and Elley Cooper, has three stories. “Into the Pit” is about a boy named Oswald who finds himself in a time traveling ball pit and is chased home by a giant horrifying yellow rabbit. “To Be Beautiful” is about a girl named Sarah who is worried about beauty and wishes to a robot she found in a junkyard to be beautiful. The last story, “Count the Ways,” is about a 14 year-old goth girl named Millie who is trapped in a animatronic bear that appeared to be pink and white and that is counting the ways that he should kill her. I would recommend this book to people that are fans of the book series and who like horror.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The first book in the short planned series of anthology books set in the Five Nights at Freddy's universe, though most will be non-canon, was a very good and fun start! Into the Pit starts off with the story also titled Into the Pit about Oswald who spends his summer in a dumpy little pizza place that has a ball pit that takes him back to Fazbear's Pizzeria in 1985. This one took way too long to get going, but when it did I was totally pulled in. Thankfully, even though it took too long, what we The first book in the short planned series of anthology books set in the Five Nights at Freddy's universe, though most will be non-canon, was a very good and fun start! Into the Pit starts off with the story also titled Into the Pit about Oswald who spends his summer in a dumpy little pizza place that has a ball pit that takes him back to Fazbear's Pizzeria in 1985. This one took way too long to get going, but when it did I was totally pulled in. Thankfully, even though it took too long, what we had was still good writing and nice character. The second story, To Be Beautiful was rough for me personally as it deals with weight issues, fitting in, lack of self worth, all things that hits too close to home, with Sarah as she finds the animatronic Circus Baby who claims to be able to grant her wish of becoming beautiful. It's a rough little story with a very mean finale that, while hard to read, was incredible. And the final story, Count the Ways, follows goth high schooler Millie at is bounces between her living life with her Grandfather throughout the fall/winter at high school and present day being stuck inside a homicidal animatronic. This one was my favorite, I love a story that tells you where the ending is at and you get to figure out how the main character got there. This one was also pretty mean, which is often my jam. The book ends with a small short story that attempts to give bigger purpose and meaning to this book and gives us a good hook to connect us to future books. All in all, a very good anthology horror tale that started slightly weak, but only got better as the book continued!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emma Saanen

    Reminds me of Goosebumps. Who would have thought that a game series about children being murdered and stuffed into animatronic suits would have spawned a series of children's books? I am so very glad they did! Reminds me of Goosebumps. Who would have thought that a game series about children being murdered and stuffed into animatronic suits would have spawned a series of children's books? I am so very glad they did!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ila Golden

    Worth a read for any FNAF fan It's certainly a unique collection, but the short story format really works here. All the stories are interesting enough to keep you reading. The second one certainly had the most chilling ending. Worth a read for any FNAF fan It's certainly a unique collection, but the short story format really works here. All the stories are interesting enough to keep you reading. The second one certainly had the most chilling ending.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nich Wise

    This book series could easily become the goosebumps of the modern generation. The first two stories are thoroughly entertaining and the last is legitimately terrifying.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scarlet🍀

    Abby is a sweetheart and Grandpa is amazing. Also this might be one of my favourite covers ever, I love it!

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