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A major work by this prominent Caribbean author and philosopher, available for the first time in English Édouard Glissant, long recognized in the French and francophone world as one of the greatest writers and thinkers of our times, is increasingly attracting attention from English-speaking readers. Born in Martinique in 1928, Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. A major work by this prominent Caribbean author and philosopher, available for the first time in English Édouard Glissant, long recognized in the French and francophone world as one of the greatest writers and thinkers of our times, is increasingly attracting attention from English-speaking readers. Born in Martinique in 1928, Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. When he returned to his native land in the mid-sixties, his writing began to focus on the idea of a "relational poetics," which laid the groundwork for the "créolité" movement, fueled by the understanding that Caribbean culture and identity are the positive products of a complex and multiple set of local historical circumstances. Some of the metaphors of local identity Glissant favored—the hinterland (or lack of it), the maroon (or runaway slave), the creole language—proved lasting and influential. In Poetics of Relation, Glissant turns the concrete particulars of Caribbean reality into a complex, energetic vision of a world in transformation. He sees the Antilles as enduring suffering imposed by history, yet as a place whose unique interactions will one day produce an emerging global consensus. Arguing that the writer alone can tap the unconscious of a people and apprehend its multiform culture to provide forms of memory capable of transcending "nonhistory," Glissant defines his "poetics of relation"—both aesthetic and political—as a transformative mode of history, capable of enunciating and making concrete a French-Caribbean reality with a self-defined past and future. Glissant's notions of identity as constructed in relation and not in isolation are germane not only to discussions of Caribbean creolization but also to our understanding of U.S. multiculturalism. In Glissant's view, we come to see that relation in all its senses—telling, listening, connecting, and the parallel consciousness of self and surroundings—is the key to transforming mentalities and reshaping societies. This translation of Glissant's work preserves the resonating quality of his prose and makes the richness and ambiguities of his voice accessible to readers in English.


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A major work by this prominent Caribbean author and philosopher, available for the first time in English Édouard Glissant, long recognized in the French and francophone world as one of the greatest writers and thinkers of our times, is increasingly attracting attention from English-speaking readers. Born in Martinique in 1928, Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. A major work by this prominent Caribbean author and philosopher, available for the first time in English Édouard Glissant, long recognized in the French and francophone world as one of the greatest writers and thinkers of our times, is increasingly attracting attention from English-speaking readers. Born in Martinique in 1928, Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. When he returned to his native land in the mid-sixties, his writing began to focus on the idea of a "relational poetics," which laid the groundwork for the "créolité" movement, fueled by the understanding that Caribbean culture and identity are the positive products of a complex and multiple set of local historical circumstances. Some of the metaphors of local identity Glissant favored—the hinterland (or lack of it), the maroon (or runaway slave), the creole language—proved lasting and influential. In Poetics of Relation, Glissant turns the concrete particulars of Caribbean reality into a complex, energetic vision of a world in transformation. He sees the Antilles as enduring suffering imposed by history, yet as a place whose unique interactions will one day produce an emerging global consensus. Arguing that the writer alone can tap the unconscious of a people and apprehend its multiform culture to provide forms of memory capable of transcending "nonhistory," Glissant defines his "poetics of relation"—both aesthetic and political—as a transformative mode of history, capable of enunciating and making concrete a French-Caribbean reality with a self-defined past and future. Glissant's notions of identity as constructed in relation and not in isolation are germane not only to discussions of Caribbean creolization but also to our understanding of U.S. multiculturalism. In Glissant's view, we come to see that relation in all its senses—telling, listening, connecting, and the parallel consciousness of self and surroundings—is the key to transforming mentalities and reshaping societies. This translation of Glissant's work preserves the resonating quality of his prose and makes the richness and ambiguities of his voice accessible to readers in English.

30 review for Poetics of Relation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Noé

    I've been reading and learning a lot about colonialism this year, and I feel this book provides the framework to tie everything together. It is a powerful critique of the mindset that governs western thought. Using the history of slaves taken to the Caribbean (who lost everything they knew and were thrown into a completely different world) as a starting point, Glissant explores a new epistemology that is centered on Relation. Some of the concepts explored are errantry (as opposed to linear strivi I've been reading and learning a lot about colonialism this year, and I feel this book provides the framework to tie everything together. It is a powerful critique of the mindset that governs western thought. Using the history of slaves taken to the Caribbean (who lost everything they knew and were thrown into a completely different world) as a starting point, Glissant explores a new epistemology that is centered on Relation. Some of the concepts explored are errantry (as opposed to linear striving) opacity as an understanding that the Other cannot be fully known (as opposed to transparency, that thinks everything can be fully known, studied, and controlled), giving-on-and-with which is a reciprocal exchange of knowledge and experiences (as opposed to grasping, which implies control and possession), and the world seen as totalite-monde, echos-monde, and chaos-monde. Glissant is a gifted writer that weaves theoretical and poetical styles. You might not understand everything here, but the text is filled with depth and evokes many ideas and emotions. Poetry is essential to Glissant as a way of knowing, and it becomes evident he is right when reading this. The translation by Betsy Wing is also really good. Her notes on Glissant's concepts allowed me to understand what he meant way more precisely. The ideas of the book are really powerful. As an avid traveler and couch-surfer, as someone curious and very appreciative about the diversity of humanity and the world, and as someone that despises how harmful injustice to others is, Poetics of Relation gives me a way of embracing, celebrating, and protecting the beauty of the world. It encourages me to not assume anything about anybody, put aside labels of identity politics to truly connect with others, to strive to understand as much as I can, for the joy of it, even though it is ultimately impossible to fully understand. https://blogelarca.com/poetica-de-la-...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    A beautiful methodology which breaks down constructs of worldview and, in essence, helps us stop playing God and to get on with embracing others, being oneself an "other". An excerpt from a research paper I wrote on this methodology: Edouard Glissant, in his text Poetics of Relation, finds it impossible and limiting to attempt to grasp the world, or all its peoples, in any type of system, or to simply assimilate all working classes into one universal, political melting pot of humanity (Glissant A beautiful methodology which breaks down constructs of worldview and, in essence, helps us stop playing God and to get on with embracing others, being oneself an "other". An excerpt from a research paper I wrote on this methodology: Edouard Glissant, in his text Poetics of Relation, finds it impossible and limiting to attempt to grasp the world, or all its peoples, in any type of system, or to simply assimilate all working classes into one universal, political melting pot of humanity (Glissant 135). He uses a term, 'Chaos-monde', which at its essence considers the world in fluidity and suggests that we must embrace, but not group together, all the elements and forms of expression within the totality (Glissant 95). Thus the only totality we can consider for our world is one of chaos, not in a meaningless, nihilistic way, but in a way that will always escape our full understanding and categorizing. Edouard Glissant offers not a universal, idealized view of language and identity, but a heterogenous process of uprooting the cultural artifacts of consciousness we carry, by allowing them to be informed and transformed by others. Glissant calls this the process of creolization, using the Colonial example of the French language being intermingled and changed within local Caribbean dialects (Glissant 5). French is not the dominant language used to subvert populations (though it was thought to be by the colonizers), nor is it ignored by the colonized. Rather, through the relations between peoples, the process mixes these languages and creates something new, unique and localized to the situation. This process, rhizomatic in its movements, is interdependent on the relations between people, bridging the abyss of difference that separates humans. It is the relation that permeates and works in ourselves, for “sometimes, by taking up the problems of the Other, it is possible to find oneself” (Glissant 18).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jee Koh

    What I missed in my education as a poet: Édouard Glissant. About the entry of a dominant culture into a fragile and composite one, such as French culture into Martinique or Anglo-American into Singapore: "Consequently, wouldn't it be best just to go along with it? Wouldn't it be a viable solution to embellish the alienation, to endure while comfortably receiving state assistance, with all the obvious guarantees implied in such a decision? This is what the technocratic elite, created for the manag What I missed in my education as a poet: Édouard Glissant. About the entry of a dominant culture into a fragile and composite one, such as French culture into Martinique or Anglo-American into Singapore: "Consequently, wouldn't it be best just to go along with it? Wouldn't it be a viable solution to embellish the alienation, to endure while comfortably receiving state assistance, with all the obvious guarantees implied in such a decision? This is what the technocratic elite, created for the management of decoy positions, have to talk themselves into before they convince the people of Martinique. Their task is all the less difficult since they use it to give themselves airs of conciliation, of cooperative humanism, of a realism anxious to make concrete improvements in circumstances. Not counting the pleasures of permissive consumption. Not counting the actual advantages of a special position, in which public funds (from France or Europe) serve to satisfy a rather large number of people (to the benefit, however, of French or European companies that are more and more visible in the country or castes of bekes converted from former planters into a tertiary sector and thus won over to the ideas of this elite) and serve to foster the hopes of an even greater number. "And it is true that in a contest of this sort one spares oneself both the sacred violence, which is spreading with such lightning speed over half the planet. What remains here is only the suppressed and intermittent violence of a community convulsively demonstrating its sense of disquiet. What sense of disquiet? The one that comes from having to consume the world without participating in it, without even the least idea of it, without being able to offer it anything other than a vague homily to a generalizing universal. Privileged disquiet.... "Thus, within the pitiless panorama of the worldwide commercial market, we debate our problems. No matter where you are or what the government brings you together into a community, the forces of this market are going to find you. If there is profit to be made, they will deal with you. These are not vague forces that you might accommodate out of politeness; these are hidden forces of inexorable logic that must be answered with the total logic of your behavior. For example, one could not accept state assistance and at the same time pretend to oppose it. You must choose your bearing. And, to get back to the question raised earlier, simply consenting would not be worth it, in any case. Contradiction would knot the community (which ceases to be one) with impossibilities, profoundly destabilizing it. The entire country would become a Plantation, believing it operates with freedom of decision but, in fact, being outer directed. The exchange of goods... is the rule. Bustling commerce only confirms the fragmentation and opposition to change. Minds get used up in this superficial comfort, which has cost them an unconscious, enervating braining.... "Now let us try to summarize the things we don't yet know, the things we have no current means of knowing, concerning all the singularities, all the trajectories, all the histories, all the forms of denaturaton, and all the syntheses that are at work or that have resulted from our confluences. How have cultures—Chinese or Basque, Indian or Inuit, Polynesian or Alpine—made their way to us, and how have we reached them? What remains to us of all the vanished cultures, collapsed or exterminated, and in what form? What is our experience, even now, of the pressures of dominant cultures? Through what fantastic accumulations of how many existences, both individual and collective? Let us try to calculate the result of all that. We will be incapable of doing so. Our experience of this confluence will forever be only one part of its totality. "No matter how many studies and references we accumulate (thought it is our profession to carry out such things), we will never reach the end of such a volume; knowing this in advance makes it possible for us to dwell there. Not knowing this totality is not a weakness. Not wanting to know it certainly is. Consequently, we imagine it through a poetics: this imaginary realm provides the full-sense of all these always decisive differentiations. [my emphasis] A lack of this poetics, its absence or its negations, would constitute a failing. "Similarly, thought of the Other is sterile without the other of Thought. "Thought of the Other is the moral generosity disposing me to accept the principle of alterity, to conceive of the world as not simple and straightforward, with only one truth—mine. But thought of the Other can dwell within me without making me alter course, without "prizing me open," without changing me within myself. An ethical principle, it is enough that I not violate it. "The other of Thought is precisely this altering. Then I have to act. That is the moment I change my thought, without renouncing its contribution. I change, and I exchange. This is an aesthetics of turbulence, whose corresponding ethics is not provided in advance. "If, thus, we allow that an aesthetics is an art of conceiving, imagining, and acting, the other of Thought is the aesthetics implemented by me and by you to join the dynamics to which we are to contribute. This is the part fallen to me in an aesthetics of chaos, the work I am to undertake, the road I am to travel. Thought of the Other is occasionally presupposed by dominant populations, but with an utterly sovereign power, or proposed until it hurts by those under them, who set themselves free. The other of Thought is always set in motion by its confluences as a whole, in which each is changed by and changes the other."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scott Neigh

    A classic work (originally published in 1990) theorizing aesthetics and politics starting from the ways in which the experiences of people in the Caribbean have historically been organized. By a renowned intellectual and poet from Martinique. Translated from French (and not just any French, but a French infused with Creole and torqued through linguistic innovation and play that is central to the theoretical work being done). Gonna be honest here, I do not bring enough to this book to get out of i A classic work (originally published in 1990) theorizing aesthetics and politics starting from the ways in which the experiences of people in the Caribbean have historically been organized. By a renowned intellectual and poet from Martinique. Translated from French (and not just any French, but a French infused with Creole and torqued through linguistic innovation and play that is central to the theoretical work being done). Gonna be honest here, I do not bring enough to this book to get out of it even close to all the richness it contains. But I think I got some of the basics. He doesn't use this language, exactly, but the book is about different logics that organize different cultures, different ways of moving through the world, and the world itself. Classic Western culture of the last five centuries is characterized by an impulse to projection into the world via linear movement, to assertion of legitimacy via connection to some mythical root, to linear notions of time, to knowing the world through a particular kind of rationalism that subsumes particularities under generalities and enables power-over, to relating to difference as expressive of static essences – to, in short, all of the ways of being wound through colonial and other forms of domination. That is not the only logic out there in the world, of course – he also mentions, for example, the circular temporalities of Buddhist cultures, and others beside. But his main focus beyond the Western cultural logic is what he describes as Relation, a cultural logic that has emerged from cracks in the world that the Western logic has produced, particularly in the Caribbean and other places where domination was organized through the social form of the plantation. Relation, it seems to me, is both a description of how the world is in practice increasingly organized – the classical world of the 18th century West is no more, regardless of the violent nostalgia of white nationalists – but also as something to aspire to, something that some embrace while other do not and that all of us should, and still a context in which great harm can be done by those with a will to dominate. It is a world of complexity, of networks of difference in which particularities understand themselves through their inevitable relationships with other particularities but are never forced to become other than they are through generalization. Its associated logic of movement is not linear projection with the intent to dominate (nor the exile such domination can impose on others, nor the circular nomadism of certain other cultures) but what he describes as "errantry," a kind of non-linear but deliberate movement through the world via which connection is cultivated. All of this is explored in a lot of different ways, not all of which I completely understood. I read this because there is one particular idea that Glissant uses that I think might be useful to me, and I wanted to make sure I understand it well enough to know for sure and to use it respectfully. Another feature of classical Western cultural logics is a drive towards what he calls transparency – to relating to everything as if it can be completely known, including other people and peoples. This is connected to the colonial tendency to generate knowledge about the colonized in ways that render them knowable and therefore controllable objects. In contrast, Relation is premised on respecting the reality of opacity – that we cannot ever know everything that there is to know about other people, other cultures. Moreover, accepting opacity means accepting the personhood and agency of those who are different, rather than indulging in the violent pretense of knowing enough to know better (in the ways the colonizer always claims to know better). Mutual opacity, and respect for mutual opacity, is foundational to the kinds of nonhierarchical relations across difference that are emerging as Relation emerges, and certainly part of what the aspiartion for Relation points towards. Opacity is both a feature of the world, because we really *can't* know everything about other people and it is only the violent generalization of Western cultural logics that allows us to pretend that we do. But it is also something that we must fight for – "We clamor for the right to opacity for everyone" (194). Anyway...any work like this inevitably has strengths and weaknesses, but there's lots about it that I just don't feel capable of evaluating. But it is, overall, fascinating and brilliant, if sometimes quite hard work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I have read different sections at different points over the last two years. I will continue to reread it and let its wisdom and proximity to Relation sink in. There is a documentary Manthia Diawara made about his conversations with Glissant on an ocean voyage across the Atlantic I need to check out next. Betsy Wing's notes on her translation of this book are brilliant and add insight into the meaning of the text. The keys for me are: abyss, arrow-like vs. circular nomadism, rhizomatic rootedness I have read different sections at different points over the last two years. I will continue to reread it and let its wisdom and proximity to Relation sink in. There is a documentary Manthia Diawara made about his conversations with Glissant on an ocean voyage across the Atlantic I need to check out next. Betsy Wing's notes on her translation of this book are brilliant and add insight into the meaning of the text. The keys for me are: abyss, arrow-like vs. circular nomadism, rhizomatic rootedness, "transparency-opacity" denotes opposition, "Totality: Relation" denotes consecution, "creolizations, errantry" denotes relation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Solaris

    You should absolutely not miss this book if you're into Identity Studies or Postcolonialism. Extremely short version: it's a very powerful and insightful read. You should absolutely not miss this book if you're into Identity Studies or Postcolonialism. Extremely short version: it's a very powerful and insightful read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    L

    - How to establish Relation not based on generalizability and transparency of the Other, but upon difference and opacity (unity-diversity) - The stretch of the Plantation; Plantation geographies "People who have been to the abyss do not brag of being chosen. They do not believe they are giving birth to any modern force. They live Relation and clear the way for it..." (8) "The theory of the poem is resistant to expression." (30) "The imagined transparency of Relation is, in that way, the opposite of - How to establish Relation not based on generalizability and transparency of the Other, but upon difference and opacity (unity-diversity) - The stretch of the Plantation; Plantation geographies "People who have been to the abyss do not brag of being chosen. They do not believe they are giving birth to any modern force. They live Relation and clear the way for it..." (8) "The theory of the poem is resistant to expression." (30) "The imagined transparency of Relation is, in that way, the opposite of reductive transparency of the generalizing universal." (55) "For centuries 'generalization,' as operated by the West, brought different community tempos into an equivalency in which it attempted to give a hierarchical order to the times they flowered. Now that the panorama has been determined and equidistances described, is it not, perhaps, time to return to a no less necessary 'degeneralization'? Not to a replenished outrageous excess of specificities but to a total (dreamed-of) freedom of the connections among them cleared out of the very chaos of their confrontations." (62) "The Plantations, entities turned in upon themselves, paradoxically have all the symptoms of extroversion. They are dependent, by nature, on someplace elsewhere. In their practice of importing and exporting, the established politics is not decided from within. One could say, in fact, that, socially, the Plantation is not the product of a politics but the emanation of a fantasy." (67) "This is the only sort of universality there is: when, from a specific enclosure, the deepest voice cries out." (74) "It doesn't feel right to have to represent someone so rigorously adrift, so I won't try to describe him. What I would like to show is the nature of this speechlessness. All the languages of the world had come to die here in the quiet, tortured rejection of what was going on all around him in this country...I made an attempt to communicate with this absence. I respected his stubborn silence, but (frustrated by my inability to make myself 'understood' or accepted) wanted nonetheless to establish some system of relation with this walker that was not based on words." (122) "I thought that how everywhere, and in how many different modes, it is the same necessity to fit into the chaotic drive of totality that is at work, despite being subjected to the exaltations or numbing effects of specific existences." (124) "This is why we cannot put a hierarchical order to the different 'times' pressing into this global space. It is not certain that the time of History leads to confluences any faster or more certainly than the diffracted times in which the histories of populations are scattered and call out to one another. Within this problematic, beyond decisions made by power and domination, nobody knows how cultures are going to react in relation to one another nor which of their elements will be the dominant ones, or thought of as such. In this full sense all cultures are equal within Relation." (163)' "Agree not merely to the right to difference but, carrying this further, agree also to the right to opacity that is not enclosure within an impenetrable autarchy but subsistence within an irreducible singularity." (190)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Valladares

    "A language that does not risk the disturbances arising from contact among cultures, and not ardently involved in the reflections generated by an equal relation with other languages, seems to me doomed to real impoverishment. [...] It would be more beautiful to live in a symphony of languages than in some reduced universal monolinguism—neutered and standardized. There is one thing we can be sure of: a lingua franca (humanistic French, Anglo-American sabir, or Esperanto code) is always apoetical. "A language that does not risk the disturbances arising from contact among cultures, and not ardently involved in the reflections generated by an equal relation with other languages, seems to me doomed to real impoverishment. [...] It would be more beautiful to live in a symphony of languages than in some reduced universal monolinguism—neutered and standardized. There is one thing we can be sure of: a lingua franca (humanistic French, Anglo-American sabir, or Esperanto code) is always apoetical." "In the course of this journey, Identity—at least as far as the Western peoples who made up the great majority of voyagers, discoverers, and conquerors were concerned—consolidates itself implicitly at first ("my root is the strongest") and then is explicitly exported as a value ("a person's worth is determined by his root"). The conquered or visited peoples are thus forced into a long and painful quest after an identity whose first task will be opposition to the denaturing process introduced by the conqueror. A tragic variation of a search for identity. For more than two centuries whole populations have had to assert their identity in opposition to the processes of identification or annihilation triggered by these invaders. Whereas the Western nation is first of all an "opposite," for colonized peoples identity will be primarily "opposed to"—that is, a limitation from the beginning. Decolonization will have done its real work when it goes beyond this limit." "In this context uprooting can work toward identity, and exile can be seen as beneficial, when these are experienced as a search for the Other (through circular nomadism) rather than as an expansion of territory (an arrowlike nomadism). Totality's imaginary allows the detours that lead away from anything totalitarian." "In the poetics of Relation, one who is errant (who is no longer traveler, discoverer, or conqueror) strives to know the totality of the world yet already knows he will never accomplish this—and knows that is precisely where the threatened beauty of the world resides. Errant, he challenges and discards the universal."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Humphrey

    A difficult book to comprehend, without being a difficult to read, necessarily, per se. In a book written to resist being pinned down, it is inevitable that one would struggle through some chapters; perhaps this is another form of the opacity that the book upholds. I suspect that different chapters speak to different readers; for me, the chapters I found most amenable were "Closed Place, Open World," "Dictate, Decree," and the later chapter "Opacity." The opening chapter, "The Open Boat," is rig A difficult book to comprehend, without being a difficult to read, necessarily, per se. In a book written to resist being pinned down, it is inevitable that one would struggle through some chapters; perhaps this is another form of the opacity that the book upholds. I suspect that different chapters speak to different readers; for me, the chapters I found most amenable were "Closed Place, Open World," "Dictate, Decree," and the later chapter "Opacity." The opening chapter, "The Open Boat," is rightly famous.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emanuel Hritcu

    i’m not ready to understand, for now, what is all about this book . i realize that i need to grow, to improve my level of knowledge and understanding; yet, the sensation that leaves is one of a very good and articulate writing

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Carroll

    This is how literary theory should be: poetic yet accessible; political yet universal. Glissant was a truly gifted writer.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Saltarelli

    One of the most interesting books I have read in a long time .

  13. 4 out of 5

    Varun Nayar

    nice

  14. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    brilliant and will take my whole lifetime to parse through

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aurore

    Livre à ne pas lire en une fois à mon avis, ou à relire plusieurs fois si on veut réellement le faire sien (je l'ai d'ailleurs commencé il y a plusieurs années...). Très profond, avec une présence réelle de l'auteur dans son écrit, sans toutefois une once de narcissisme ou d'égocentrisme, bien au contraire. Bref, au fil du livre, on finit réellement par rentrer en relation, et pas seulement avec lui! Livre à ne pas lire en une fois à mon avis, ou à relire plusieurs fois si on veut réellement le faire sien (je l'ai d'ailleurs commencé il y a plusieurs années...). Très profond, avec une présence réelle de l'auteur dans son écrit, sans toutefois une once de narcissisme ou d'égocentrisme, bien au contraire. Bref, au fil du livre, on finit réellement par rentrer en relation, et pas seulement avec lui!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leif

    Every time I read this, I can only jump across it, skimming back and forth through the pages. Reading chapters out of joint. I do not know but can sense why this is. Glissant is never predictable, always two steps different than where he could be––exhilarating reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tonia

    Glissant is a tough read. Very abstract and obscure, but he is at once an amazing thinker and user of language.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anuradha Vikram

    One of the most important philosophy books currently circulating. Glissant adapts post-Lacanian theory to the contemporary global milieu in a number of useful, intersectionally-minded ways.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    🗣🤝🌿🏵🌌🔮📖🗝

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    A really intriguing take on the history of Western literature (among other things), and a proposal for a different way of seeing, telling, and living.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara-Maria

    didn't finish didn't finish

  22. 5 out of 5

    Talitha

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelann

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Kroll

  25. 5 out of 5

    Omilani

  26. 4 out of 5

    M

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vika Kirchenbauer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lukas

  30. 5 out of 5

    erik

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