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Finally: an introduction that captures the excitement of the early Christians, helping today's readers to think like a first-century believer while reading the text responsibly for today. The New Testament in Its World is your passageway from the twenty-first century to the era of Jesus and the first Christians. A highly-readable, one-volume introduction placing the entire Finally: an introduction that captures the excitement of the early Christians, helping today's readers to think like a first-century believer while reading the text responsibly for today. The New Testament in Its World is your passageway from the twenty-first century to the era of Jesus and the first Christians. A highly-readable, one-volume introduction placing the entire New Testament and early Christianity in its original context, it is the only such work by distinguished scholar and author N. T. (Tom) Wright. An ideal guide for students, The New Testament in Its World addresses the many difficult questions faced by those studying early Christianity. Both large and small, these questions include: What is the purpose of the New Testament? What was the first-century understanding of the kingdom? What is the real meaning of the resurrection in its original context? What really were the Gospels? Who was Paul and why are his letters so controversial? As twenty-first-century people, how do we recover the excitement of what it was like to live as Christians in the first or second centuries? In short, The New Testament in Its World brings together decades of ground-breaking research, writing, and teaching into one volume that will open readers' eyes to the larger world of the New Testament. It presents the New Testament books as historical, literary, and social phenomena located in the world of Second Temple Judaism, amidst Greco-Roman politics and culture, and within early Christianity.  Written for both classroom and personal use, the benefits of The New Testament in Its World include: A distillation of the life work of N. T. Wright on the New Testament with input from Michael Bird Historical context that situates Jesus and the early church within the history, culture, and religion of Second Temple Judaism and the Greco-Roman world Major sections on the historical Jesus, the resurrection of Jesus, and Paul's chronology and theology Surveys of each New Testament book that discuss their significance, critical topics like authorship and date, and that provide commentary on contents along with implications for the Christian life Up-to-date discussions of textual criticism and the canonization of the New Testament A concluding chapter dedicated to living the story of the New Testament Available Video and Workbook companion resources to enhance learning and experience the world of the New Testament Illustrated with visually rich pictures, maps, charts, diagrams, and artwork; plentiful sidebars provide additional explanations and insights


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Finally: an introduction that captures the excitement of the early Christians, helping today's readers to think like a first-century believer while reading the text responsibly for today. The New Testament in Its World is your passageway from the twenty-first century to the era of Jesus and the first Christians. A highly-readable, one-volume introduction placing the entire Finally: an introduction that captures the excitement of the early Christians, helping today's readers to think like a first-century believer while reading the text responsibly for today. The New Testament in Its World is your passageway from the twenty-first century to the era of Jesus and the first Christians. A highly-readable, one-volume introduction placing the entire New Testament and early Christianity in its original context, it is the only such work by distinguished scholar and author N. T. (Tom) Wright. An ideal guide for students, The New Testament in Its World addresses the many difficult questions faced by those studying early Christianity. Both large and small, these questions include: What is the purpose of the New Testament? What was the first-century understanding of the kingdom? What is the real meaning of the resurrection in its original context? What really were the Gospels? Who was Paul and why are his letters so controversial? As twenty-first-century people, how do we recover the excitement of what it was like to live as Christians in the first or second centuries? In short, The New Testament in Its World brings together decades of ground-breaking research, writing, and teaching into one volume that will open readers' eyes to the larger world of the New Testament. It presents the New Testament books as historical, literary, and social phenomena located in the world of Second Temple Judaism, amidst Greco-Roman politics and culture, and within early Christianity.  Written for both classroom and personal use, the benefits of The New Testament in Its World include: A distillation of the life work of N. T. Wright on the New Testament with input from Michael Bird Historical context that situates Jesus and the early church within the history, culture, and religion of Second Temple Judaism and the Greco-Roman world Major sections on the historical Jesus, the resurrection of Jesus, and Paul's chronology and theology Surveys of each New Testament book that discuss their significance, critical topics like authorship and date, and that provide commentary on contents along with implications for the Christian life Up-to-date discussions of textual criticism and the canonization of the New Testament A concluding chapter dedicated to living the story of the New Testament Available Video and Workbook companion resources to enhance learning and experience the world of the New Testament Illustrated with visually rich pictures, maps, charts, diagrams, and artwork; plentiful sidebars provide additional explanations and insights

30 review for The New Testament in Its World: An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dazet

    Amazing! What a gift this book is to the church and to Christ-followers. If you want to study the Bible in context, this is the resource to help you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    Very clear and helpful on the historical background of the NT world. Also very helpful in summarizing scholarly debates and perspectives on a variety of issues surrounding authorship and dating of each NT book. Funny thing, though: Michael Bird has gone on record a number of times saying that the New Perspective on Paul is generally "correct in what it affirms, but often wrong in what it denies." (For example, see this interview.) However, despite Bird's herculean effort at condensing Wright's co Very clear and helpful on the historical background of the NT world. Also very helpful in summarizing scholarly debates and perspectives on a variety of issues surrounding authorship and dating of each NT book. Funny thing, though: Michael Bird has gone on record a number of times saying that the New Perspective on Paul is generally "correct in what it affirms, but often wrong in what it denies." (For example, see this interview.) However, despite Bird's herculean effort at condensing Wright's corpus into a single volume, he does not escape this inscrutable flaw of making all kinds of puzzling denials. This, I presume, is one source of Wright's negative press in some circles. Perhaps in an attempt to distinguish himself from the (admittedly oft unexamined) theological tradition, Wright comes out with stark denials of clear and widely accepted Christian tradition. In reading what Wright asserts, there is typically not much to get upset about. He does fabulously at helping us to think our way through a text in its context. But in making his denials, he paints a gratuitous target on his back...only to subvert his own denial a few sentences or paragraphs later. Case in point: "The whole point of the sacrificial system was never, after all, about animals being killed by way of vicarious punishment. That notion has crept into Christian understandings of 'sacrifice' by an illegitimate transfer of ideas from Paul's law-court imagery. The point was not to punish people's sins so that they could enter God's presence, but to cleanse every trace of sin and death from the people and the sanctuary so that God could come to dwell with them. The sacrificial blood acted as the cleansing, purifying agent so that the stain of death, and the sin which leads to it, would not compel God to absent himself. In the same way, the point here is not to enable people to come into God's presence (though from our point of view that appears part of it) but to enable the living God to dwell in us and with us" (p. 723, italics added). Such paragraphs are littered all throughout the book. Wright gets maximum shock value from denying some widely (and historically) held belief. He then proposes a nuanced yet helpful way of viewing the issue. Then he hands us back the traditional perspective, if not on a silver platter, at least on a rubber placemat. In other words, his dichotomies (between what he denies and what he affirms) are not nearly as starkly antithetical as he himself appears to suggest. So I find that, if I don't get too worked up about the stringent denials of things I hold dear, Wright can be rather stimulating and insightful. Take those denials out of context, and he sounds extreme. In context, however, the denials more often than not simply overstate a fair point. I profited much from this important work, and you just might as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Watson

    This is contextual theology at its very finest. N.T. Wright is one of the most acclaimed, and prolific New Testament scholars alive today, and his written work is far reaching, and remarkably dense. In this book, Wright, with help of fellow New Testament scholar Michael Bird, has produced a condensed version of his entire literary corpus in a single volume. Presented in the format of a New Testament introduction, this volume begins with preliminary questions concerning the nature of the New Te This is contextual theology at its very finest. N.T. Wright is one of the most acclaimed, and prolific New Testament scholars alive today, and his written work is far reaching, and remarkably dense. In this book, Wright, with help of fellow New Testament scholar Michael Bird, has produced a condensed version of his entire literary corpus in a single volume. Presented in the format of a New Testament introduction, this volume begins with preliminary questions concerning the nature of the New Testament, then quickly moves on to explore the historical context in which it was written. After this superb historical survey, the authors then broadly examine both the history, and theology of each book of the New Testament. Wright is one of the preeminent historians of the second temple period, and the historical Jesus. His facility to discern, and convey the grand picture of Christian Theology, and narrative is perhaps the best that I have encountered. When zeroing in on more micro-level textual interpretations, Wright does sometimes adopt novel solutions. Though, this critique is less applicable to this work, given its scope. Readers may not always agree with the conclusions of Wright, and Bird, but I have little doubt that they will be educated by their work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robin Hatcher

    This was fascinating to listen to. I learned a lot and had much to think about each topic. I initially bought the audiobook due to some research I was doing. But I got much more than expected. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Creedy

    Wow. Genuinely brilliant. Even the slightly annoying 'emails from the edge' gradually made sense. Beautifully produced, written in a way that draws you in, and wonderfully fair and irenic to various views. Recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leasha

    The contents speak for themselves, but I want to give a huge THANK YOU to the editors of this book! Circumstances required that I get the kindle book rather than a physical copy, and I was ready to dance around the city when I realized that every single insert is at the END of a paragraph! NOT A SINGLE ONE interrupts a paragraph or line of thought. This is such a rarity, and I am incredibly thankful for the amount of thoughtfulness that went in to making this book readable and enjoyable. If you The contents speak for themselves, but I want to give a huge THANK YOU to the editors of this book! Circumstances required that I get the kindle book rather than a physical copy, and I was ready to dance around the city when I realized that every single insert is at the END of a paragraph! NOT A SINGLE ONE interrupts a paragraph or line of thought. This is such a rarity, and I am incredibly thankful for the amount of thoughtfulness that went in to making this book readable and enjoyable. If you know, you know. THANK YOU!!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wes Van Fleet

    Wonderful! I read through this so quickly because I was encompassed by it. Great format of teaching how a first century person would have understood a first century book like the New Testament. The writing is beautiful and the authors raise up a beautiful picture of faith, hope, and love for today’s church that is still being shaped by the raised Son of God in the New Testament.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Lewis

    Not necessarily the most immediately engaging in flow due to the fact that it read a bit more like a text book than other of Wright's material, but the scope & content were A+. A fantastic intro to his thought, & a book I'd recommend to any thinking Christian. Not necessarily the most immediately engaging in flow due to the fact that it read a bit more like a text book than other of Wright's material, but the scope & content were A+. A fantastic intro to his thought, & a book I'd recommend to any thinking Christian.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is a solid introduction to the New Testament. Wright and Bird write from a more conservative theological perspective, so they tend to favor earlier dating of New Testament books than more liberal scholars might as well as supporting Pauline authorship for some books others may reject (such as the pastorals). I can see myself returning to this book frequently. Large portions of it are essentially summaries of Wright’s longer works. Thus, it serves as a distilled version of Jesus and the Vict This is a solid introduction to the New Testament. Wright and Bird write from a more conservative theological perspective, so they tend to favor earlier dating of New Testament books than more liberal scholars might as well as supporting Pauline authorship for some books others may reject (such as the pastorals). I can see myself returning to this book frequently. Large portions of it are essentially summaries of Wright’s longer works. Thus, it serves as a distilled version of Jesus and the Victory of God, The Resurrection of the Son of God and Paul and the Faithfulness of God. I suppose the section then on the Gospels may be a preview of a future volume from Wright. I did not read the introductions to each New Testament book, but as I said, I will be returning to this frequently as a reference work. The best parts of the book are the aforementioned sections when Wright and Bird present theology of the gospel and of Paul as a whole. I also appreciated the background and the chapters on textual criticism and the formation of the New Testament. Overall, a solid work.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Quient

    Reviewing right now!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Herman

    Helpful in-depth overview of the New Testament in its own context

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bill Hooten

    About two months ago, I set aside approximately 30-45 minutes a day to read this introduction to the New Testament by N. T. Wright, with assistance from Michael Bird. It took me a little over two months to finish. Personally, I have not been much of a fan of Wright, not because I don't like what he does; but because I had not read or studied much of his material. He came to prominence during the 25 year period when I was involved in bi-vocational ministry, and just did not have (or take) the ti About two months ago, I set aside approximately 30-45 minutes a day to read this introduction to the New Testament by N. T. Wright, with assistance from Michael Bird. It took me a little over two months to finish. Personally, I have not been much of a fan of Wright, not because I don't like what he does; but because I had not read or studied much of his material. He came to prominence during the 25 year period when I was involved in bi-vocational ministry, and just did not have (or take) the time to keep up with a lot of the new authors and materials that was being published. But I read a review of this book, and discovered that it was more of a compiling of some of Wright's work; and it offered a starting point for me to get a great overview of Wright's theological and textual work. I thoroughly enjoyed the work, realizing that there were place's where the material was so far above my head; that I would have to go back re-read, and slowly digest the points that he was making. Lots of the material real struck a nerve with some things that I had been thinking (like the presence of God in the second temple), and other things made me scratch my head wondering "where in the world did he come up with that" or "why would he believe that" I loved the pictures that were place throughout the text, the emails between the student and the teacher (discussing the problems in New Testament studies), the "further reading" suggestions at the end of each chapter, the outline of the chapters at the beginning, all the information boxes inserted in the pages (explaining some point, or explaining its history, etc.), and the Bibliography. All of those just demonstrated to me how much more that I have to learn. One thing that I really did not like, was the window in the dust cover (mine tore before I was halfway through the book). To be perfectly honest, the likely reason I gave this book 4 stars, was my own intellectual shortcomings. My undergraduate work was done at a small Bible college in North Alabama that was very conservative, and it seemed to me that Wright tried to straddle the fence between the conservative and liberal views. One of my graduate school professors told me (concerning questions of authorship, date, and text), just study what you are given, and preach that. I'm not saying that Wright is wrong about the views concerning those subjects, just that they are beyond things that I have ever given a whole lot of study. My point of emphasis has always been the exegesis and exposition of the text, and not the theology of the book or text. I am trying to overcome that weakness. I would recommend this book to any serious student of the Scripture, but I don't know that reading it all the way through is the best use of it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zach Waldis

    I was tempted to give this four stars as it does drag at points, but the beginning and end alone are worth the price of admission. Interestingly enough they often don't come down on classic "NT Intro" questions like date, authorship, etc. Wright in particular's (and Bird is pretty great as well) sermonic prose is convicting, especially considering his academic and popular audience. "The world will probably raise its cynical eyebrows: can these things really be true? Yes, answers the church; and I was tempted to give this four stars as it does drag at points, but the beginning and end alone are worth the price of admission. Interestingly enough they often don't come down on classic "NT Intro" questions like date, authorship, etc. Wright in particular's (and Bird is pretty great as well) sermonic prose is convicting, especially considering his academic and popular audience. "The world will probably raise its cynical eyebrows: can these things really be true? Yes, answers the church; and they come about as people worship the God in whose image they are made, as they follow the Lord who bore their sins and rose from the dead, as they are indwelt by his spirit and thereby given new life, a new way of life, a new zest for life."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I love Tom Wright's work, so I was excited to listen to Parts 1 and 2 of this audiobook. I ended up being really disappointed, not in the content, but in the presentation. I have found out that the audio from this audiobook is not a reading of Wright's book entitled, "The New Testament in Its World," but rather it is the audio from a video series that accompanies a Bible study based on that book. Because of that, the audio quality fluctuates, and there are even times where his words are hard to I love Tom Wright's work, so I was excited to listen to Parts 1 and 2 of this audiobook. I ended up being really disappointed, not in the content, but in the presentation. I have found out that the audio from this audiobook is not a reading of Wright's book entitled, "The New Testament in Its World," but rather it is the audio from a video series that accompanies a Bible study based on that book. Because of that, the audio quality fluctuates, and there are even times where his words are hard to hear. I really want to read the actual book, which is said to be a compilation of Wright's "greatest hits" from his previous books, but this audiobook does not give me that exact content. Because of that, my 2-star rating reflects my disappointment with what this audiobook ended up being, again, not that Wright's content is poor. Online, I found a list of each of the sections included on the video series, so here is that list: Session Titles and Runtimes: 0 - Welcome to the Study (13 min) 1 - Beginning Study of the New Testament (19 min) 2 - The New Testament as History (5 min) 3 - The New Testament as Literature (18 min) 4 - The New Testament as Theology (19 min) 5 - The History of the Jews between the Persian and Roman Empires (10 min) 6 - The Jewish Context of Jesus and the Early Church (9 min) 7 - The Greco-Roman Context of the Early Church (14 min) 8 - The Study of the Historical Jesus (24 min) 9 - The Profile and Praxis of a Prophet (15 min) 10 - Who Did Jesus Think He Was? (45 min) 11 - The Death of the Messiah (9 min) 12 - The Afterlife in Greek, Roman, and Jewish Thought (11 min) 13 - The Story of Easter according to the Apostle Paul (35 min) 14 - The Story of Easter according to the Evangelists (41 min) 15 - The Story of Paul's Life and Ministry (9 min) 16 - A Primer on Pauline Theology (24 min) 17 - Galatians (23 min) 18 - 1 and 2 Thessalonians (25 min) 19 - Philippians (25 min) 20 - Colossians, Philemon, and Ephesians (28 min) 21 - 1 and 2 Corinthians (29 min) 22 - Romans (23 min) 23 - The Pastoral Epistles (31 min) 24 - The Gospel according to Mark (21 min) 25 - The Gospel according to Matthew (19 min) 26 - The Gospel according to Luke and Acts of the Apostles (31 min) 27 - The Gospel according to John (23 min) 28 - The Making of the Gospels (11 min) 29 - Introduction to the Early Christian Letters (6 min) 30 - The Letter to the Hebrews (16 min) 31 - Letters by Jesus' Brothers: James and Jude (17 min) 32 - Petrine Letters: 1 and 2 Peter (17 min) 33 - Johannine Letters: 1, 2, and 3 John (16 min) 34 - Revelation (20 min) 35 - Introduction to Textual Criticism of the New Testament (18 min) 36 - The Canonization of the New Testament (6 min) 37 - Bringing It All Together (32 min) I'm not sure exactly which session Part 1 got to, but it was somewhere in the middle, near the Paul content. I won't be listening to Part 2.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barb Hegreberg

    Bible Gateway gifted me with an excerpt from The New Testament in Its World, The Making of the New Testament by N.T. Wright & Michael F. Bird. The subtitle, An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians, is what drew me to accept the sample pages. The printed book is nearly 1000 pages long and I had less than 30 of them to peruse. “There is nothing like the Greek New Testament to rejuvenate the world, which came out of the Dark Ages with the Greek New Testament i Bible Gateway gifted me with an excerpt from The New Testament in Its World, The Making of the New Testament by N.T. Wright & Michael F. Bird. The subtitle, An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians, is what drew me to accept the sample pages. The printed book is nearly 1000 pages long and I had less than 30 of them to peruse. “There is nothing like the Greek New Testament to rejuvenate the world, which came out of the Dark Ages with the Greek New Testament in its hand. Erasmus wrote in the Preface to his Greek Testament about his own thrill of delight: ‘These holy pages will summon up the living image of His mind. They will give you Christ Himself, talking, healing, dying, rising, the whole Christ in a word; they will give Him to you in an intimacy so close that He would be less visible to you if He stood before your eyes.’ The Greek New Testament is the New Testament. All else is translations” (A. T. Robertson, cited in Porter 2013, 11.) This book contains beautiful color photographs as well as many charts and graphs to help the reader understand the concepts. This book could easily be used as a college textbook but that doesn’t mean that the average Christian would feel overwhelmed when reading it. If you are a person who often wonders how the Bible was compiled, translated, and distributed, this is the book for you. If you are a history nerd, this book is for you. If you want to learn more about the first century Christians, this book is for you. I can’t wait to get my hands on the full book! This review will also be posted on my blog on 11/25/20 https://mylifeinourfathersworld.com/2...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Frank Peters

    After recently reading the large four volume series by Prof. Wright (Christian Origins and the Question of God), I was excited to read this volume. According to the introduction, this book was to be a more approachable distillation of his larger work, plus a good deal of extra material. I hoped to be able to recommend the book to friends of mine would never get through the more academic works. So, after an OK start I reached chapter two. In the “chapter at a glance” summary, the following was li After recently reading the large four volume series by Prof. Wright (Christian Origins and the Question of God), I was excited to read this volume. According to the introduction, this book was to be a more approachable distillation of his larger work, plus a good deal of extra material. I hoped to be able to recommend the book to friends of mine would never get through the more academic works. So, after an OK start I reached chapter two. In the “chapter at a glance” summary, the following was listed as a goal of the chapter: • "Appreciate a critical-realist epistemology as a way of exploring historical questions." Unfortunately, this “simple” statement at the beginning of the book would be unintelligible by the people I hoped would read the book! So, ultimately while I enjoyed the book, I was disappointed. I was disappointed that it was not as accessible as I hoped. I was also disappointed that the most exciting and illuminating parts of the academic works (especially “The resurrection of the Son of God”, and the most recent one on Paul) did not come through. But, I believe (and hope) that the video series that the book was intended to accompany could well be brilliant, as Prof. Wright is much more approachable as a speaker.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Crouch

    I really enjoyed the journey through the New Testament that this book took me on. Whilst this is a fine reference book, and of great use to quickly find background info on any book in the New Testament - I think you get much more by reading all of it. The same argument can be made, of course for the New Testament itself (and our whole Bible). I do no always agree with the Authors - for example I am still of the conviction that John, son of Zebedee wrote the Gospels and the Letters, and most likel I really enjoyed the journey through the New Testament that this book took me on. Whilst this is a fine reference book, and of great use to quickly find background info on any book in the New Testament - I think you get much more by reading all of it. The same argument can be made, of course for the New Testament itself (and our whole Bible). I do no always agree with the Authors - for example I am still of the conviction that John, son of Zebedee wrote the Gospels and the Letters, and most likely Revelation. This is not a small book, nor is it a small topic - so it would come as no surprise that I also disagree at times with theological conclusions made. However, in these areas, the Authors do make me think - and that is what I want. The New Testament is treated seriously as the Word of God, and a good coverage of both Historic Christianity, and Scholarship is given. Plus, I like how well referenced the book is - plenty of other resources to go get your teeth into :) As a pastor, I find this book has been a good inspiration for my work and will continue to be a good reference.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Matt

    I'll post a full review on my blog site but suffice to say that, as always, Wright & Bird could not be boring if they tried! The massive tome (typical from Wright every 4-5 years) is a compelling read although I have serious disagreements with Wright (not so much Bird). Wright dismisses one prominent atonement theory without proving his own (I guess he expects the readers to pick up his books "Justification" and "The Day the Revolution Began."). He also adopts too late a date for many NT books a I'll post a full review on my blog site but suffice to say that, as always, Wright & Bird could not be boring if they tried! The massive tome (typical from Wright every 4-5 years) is a compelling read although I have serious disagreements with Wright (not so much Bird). Wright dismisses one prominent atonement theory without proving his own (I guess he expects the readers to pick up his books "Justification" and "The Day the Revolution Began."). He also adopts too late a date for many NT books and is far too skeptical of their ascribed authorship. I also have serious questions about Wright's view of the Kingdom and eschatology but, even with all of these disagreements, the former Bishop challenges the reader while maintaining within the bounds of the evangelical faith. A must read and, I would argue, a good textbook for NT Intro.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Haug

    Good summary of NT Wright’s main collection. Excellent overview of history, context and textual criticisms of the New Testament. Discusses main historical stances on authorship, context, etc. and provides extensive external resources for those looking for more information. A great “textbook” written for both in and outside the classroom - for the seminary/pastoral student, the common Christian and those looking into the history of the New Testament.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Smith

    The true meaning of this life we live This book encourages the reader to live his/her life not so much in anticipation of the new heaven and new earth to come, but with the understanding that Christ’s death and resurrection is awakening the new earth here and now. With the Spirit’s guidance, this shapes a new purpose in the life we now seek to live as a follower of Christ.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vance Gatlin

    This took about three months to read. It's compartmentalized enough that the chapters stand alone. However, every chapter has to be savored and pondered. It's not a book you can read straight through.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Harley Wykes

    Excellent summary of NT Wright's thought that is very engaing and easy to read. Would recommend for any Christian that wants to know more about the origins of their faith, church and the New Testament.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Queen

    Wow! N.T. Wright and Michael Bird have compiled an epic, fascinating study on what the New Testament is and why it is what it is. It's not easy, breezy reading; it's academic and profound. But it's edifying and oh so good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Otto Jacobsson

    An incredible volume. N. T. Wright (and Mike Bird) introduces the perspective of theology, history and literature when studying the New Testament. I read it as a bible study which was enlightening. The treatment of Paul’s letters is especially worthwhile.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    Very informative, and a good read. Enjoyed reading the book and I recommend highly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Scholarly work. The authors don't appear to have as high a regard for scripture as they should. It was interesting and educational. I especially appreciated the literary approach to studying the NT.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Debs Taylor

    A thorough look at the NT, book by book, and within the culture of the first century. This is a resource I will return to again and again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    José Calvo

    A fantastic book. Must have for every theological library and for serious but very accessible study of the New Testament

  29. 4 out of 5

    CarolAnne

    Great NT Survey, but I was looking for more geo-political/social/environmental insight into the NT world.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Great book for a basic understanding of early Christianity, why they believed it, and why you can trust it as well.

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