web site hit counter Because a Woman's Heart is Like a Needle at the Bottom of the Ocean - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Because a Woman's Heart is Like a Needle at the Bottom of the Ocean

Availability: Ready to download

Through fun and gore, love and monsters, Sugar Magnolia Wilson’s riveting first collection takes readers inside a world where past and present, fiction and fact, author and subject collide. Playful and yet not so sunny, these poems invite you in with extravagant and surprising imagery, only to reveal the uneasy, Frankenstein world within.


Compare

Through fun and gore, love and monsters, Sugar Magnolia Wilson’s riveting first collection takes readers inside a world where past and present, fiction and fact, author and subject collide. Playful and yet not so sunny, these poems invite you in with extravagant and surprising imagery, only to reveal the uneasy, Frankenstein world within.

30 review for Because a Woman's Heart is Like a Needle at the Bottom of the Ocean

  1. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

    As beautiful and eclectic as the cover. I particularly enjoyed the original and unexpected similes and metaphors; like "grey clouds like quiet dogs" and "as if the wind had murmured through but it hadn't " or "how easily you eat the yolk of people's confidence! " The writing is just so pretty and melancholic and bruised - and bruising, I have a million highlights; "My grandmother, so many silk scarves gifted to her/... stolen, thieved from her neck and thrown into the sea at Seatoun -- she gave up As beautiful and eclectic as the cover. I particularly enjoyed the original and unexpected similes and metaphors; like "grey clouds like quiet dogs" and "as if the wind had murmured through but it hadn't " or "how easily you eat the yolk of people's confidence! " The writing is just so pretty and melancholic and bruised - and bruising, I have a million highlights; "My grandmother, so many silk scarves gifted to her/... stolen, thieved from her neck and thrown into the sea at Seatoun -- she gave up, had enough, her bones turned to dust and she blew away" " I am myself and not myself again and again and again until you find me through the small water in my wrist the channel where the darkest fish run to the lake in my palm." "We were both human and this seemed enough. " "Open up your mouth and we'll press our lives together. In the future you'll stop breathing, and in a loving way we either will or will not have been kind enough to each other in this lifetime. " "Don't forget, the world is almost still young, the elephants of the mind still roam in huge, populous hoards, the Rainbow Warrior has only just stopped floating among the confetti of floral islands, and we're angry with the French like a young woman is angry with her insouciant lover, " "My heart belongs to mornings like this one. It was my own "

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Hobson

    This is a very different collection of poetry, not least because of the different sections of the book. They divide the work into three discreet parts. We start with ‘Dear Sister’, nine separate letters to a sister. Then there are a range of different poems, reflections on a relationship, moving through different stages, and out of the other side. Finally, in ‘Pen pal’, there are fifteen letters addressed to a pen pal who seems disinclined to respond to all that is being said. All three sections This is a very different collection of poetry, not least because of the different sections of the book. They divide the work into three discreet parts. We start with ‘Dear Sister’, nine separate letters to a sister. Then there are a range of different poems, reflections on a relationship, moving through different stages, and out of the other side. Finally, in ‘Pen pal’, there are fifteen letters addressed to a pen pal who seems disinclined to respond to all that is being said. All three sections are very different moods and voices within the collection. In the ‘Dear sister’ poems, much of the symbolism is rural and pastoral. Sometimes I feel that the writer is a child and at other times she is talking adult to adult with her sister. The writer is gifted a horse, which at first she will not name. She describes the gift as follows; “I think the theory presented her by this gifted horse is; you can’t take the wild from the heart of the girl, but maybe you can put the wild girl upon a horse and teach her to master some of her own wild hysteria. I am expected to ride her and learn to hold my tongue.” Then, in the shortest of the letters, all we get is “I have named the horse. She is Lilith.” In the letter after the girl leaves the house in the night to go riding on the horse. “The night is a strange tune. Past the hustle of elm, and there she is, Lilith, far from the Red Sea, a night creature without capacity for fear. A breeder of demons? No. She gives me strength. We ride out fast and I hear someone out there, some trickster, some two-faced she-Pan, deep in the forest luring me, daring me. Her voice appears as those of songsters; corncrakes, nightjars, the reed and sedge warbler, and it takes a different kind of listening to hear the way. And we hunt for her, furiously, Lilith and I, but we are home, stabled and in bed before the new day reminds the robin and the redstart they exist. It is secret work we do.” I love all the imagery here, and I am surprised by the choices of the birds that are named, ones that you would find in a European summer, but never in New Zealand. In the middle section of twenty-eight poems, there are some lovely contrasts in ‘Conversations with my boyfriend’, one from English to Korean the other Korean to English, allowing both sides to interpret the same events and put their own spin on what happens, how important rice is and why the nick-name Flower-Piglet is used. In the poem ‘Heat Wave’ one short beautiful verse especially caught my attention: “We battled our way home, valiant on our drunkenness as men waved radishes in our faces and old women elbowed our sides and the moon was just another grubby lamp on a night-coloured pole.” This is a wonderful collection. It deserves to be read many times to absorb the smells and flavours, to feel the wind and sense the different landscapes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    My favourite poems in this collection were so awfully specific to the author that I couldn't help but feel as if I, too, an only child, understood what it meant to have a sister in California. Poems are so personal, I think. It's somewhat of a voyeuristic endeavour to experience someone else's loss, joy, confusion. And the wonder comes with being able to relate these specific experiences to parts of your own memory. Sugar Magnolia Wilson (what a name) manages to combine the lyrical prose I fall t My favourite poems in this collection were so awfully specific to the author that I couldn't help but feel as if I, too, an only child, understood what it meant to have a sister in California. Poems are so personal, I think. It's somewhat of a voyeuristic endeavour to experience someone else's loss, joy, confusion. And the wonder comes with being able to relate these specific experiences to parts of your own memory. Sugar Magnolia Wilson (what a name) manages to combine the lyrical prose I fall too easily for with just the right beat of mundanity: "My up-to-ears beard and reindeer jersey is very handsome and in your winter boots you look more like a distant, snowy mountain than a girl who threw on my long coat -- but nonetheless it is very cute." I also loved that she writes narrative poetry. I have longed for stories over Instagram sentences. The Dear sister poems tell not just a story -- "maybe you can put the wild girl upon a horse and teach her to master some of her own terrible hysteria. I am expected to ride her and learn to hold my tongue" -- but contains an entire arc. Home Alone 2 (with you) also lands a punch at just the right moment. The last poem I'll highlight is Muddy Heart . It made me think of my own father, the insurmountable absence.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    "Because a Woman's Heart is Like a Needle at the Bottom of the Ocean" by Sugar Magnolia Wilson Truly original, raw, real. ‘Spent’ page 38, ‘The Sleep of Trees’ page 54 So good! **** Also "grey clouds like quiet dogs" "as if the wind had murmured through but it hadn't " "how easily you eat the yolk of people's confidence! " … "My grandmother, so many silk scarves gifted to her/... stolen, thieved from her neck and thrown into the sea at Seatoun -- she gave up, had enough, her bones turned to dust and she b "Because a Woman's Heart is Like a Needle at the Bottom of the Ocean" by Sugar Magnolia Wilson Truly original, raw, real. ‘Spent’ page 38, ‘The Sleep of Trees’ page 54 So good! **** Also "grey clouds like quiet dogs" "as if the wind had murmured through but it hadn't " "how easily you eat the yolk of people's confidence! " … "My grandmother, so many silk scarves gifted to her/... stolen, thieved from her neck and thrown into the sea at Seatoun -- she gave up, had enough, her bones turned to dust and she blew away" " I am myself and not myself again and again and again until you find me through the small water in my wrist the channel where the darkest fish run to the lake in my palm." "We were both human and this seemed enough. " "Open up your mouth and we'll press our lives together. In the future you'll stop breathing, and in a loving way we either will or will not have been kind enough to each other in this lifetime. " "Don't forget, the world is almost still young, the elephants of the mind still roam in huge, populous hoards, the Rainbow Warrior has only just stopped floating among the confetti of floral islands, and we're angry with the French like a young woman is angry with her insouciant lover, " "My heart belongs to mornings like this one. It was my own "

  5. 5 out of 5

    Genetic Cuckoo

    This was a strange book of poems. I think it was juxtaposing beautful and unpleasant imagery to create contrast, but it felt uncomfortable at times. Most felt so fantastical they could be a fever dream. I liked the mix of Asian and Western, and so I would likely recommend this to someone with mixed heritage or has lived and grown up in both regions, as they might relate and connect with this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon Sweetman

    A set of strange, dazzling, brilliant poems. Some of the best I've read in a long time. Intriguing and commanding. A set of strange, dazzling, brilliant poems. Some of the best I've read in a long time. Intriguing and commanding.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katarina Moonshine

    A truly exquisite book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A diverse collection of poetry and brief fiction stories on many topics, some joyful and positive, and others quite dark and scary. Plentiful complex imagery and a couple of entries that I came back to re-read. I especially enjoyed “The Lake has a Long Memory”.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

  10. 4 out of 5

    Luumarka

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  12. 5 out of 5

    George McGowan

  13. 4 out of 5

    flajol

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Holdaway

  16. 4 out of 5

    Breanna

  17. 5 out of 5

    G Morris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Jones

  19. 4 out of 5

    Noelani

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gray

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  22. 4 out of 5

    Neo Caduceus

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sea

  24. 4 out of 5

    j.c 🍒

  25. 5 out of 5

    Belinda

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jackson Nieuwland

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anuja

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tierney

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lonergan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...