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"Boardwalk Empire" meets "The Great Gatsby" in this soft-boiled "Jazz Age" mystery, inspired by actual events. Prohibition is in full swing in 1920s Galveston, Texas: the "Sin City of the Southwest." Jasmine Cross, a young society reporter, feels caught between two clashing cultures: the seedy speakeasy underworld and the snooty social circles she covers in the Galveston G "Boardwalk Empire" meets "The Great Gatsby" in this soft-boiled "Jazz Age" mystery, inspired by actual events. Prohibition is in full swing in 1920s Galveston, Texas: the "Sin City of the Southwest." Jasmine Cross, a young society reporter, feels caught between two clashing cultures: the seedy speakeasy underworld and the snooty social circles she covers in the Galveston Gazette. During a night out with her best friend, Jazz witnesses a bar fight at the Oasis--a speakeasy secretly owned by her black-sheep half-brother, Sammy Cook. But when a big-shot banker with a hidden past collapses there and later dies, she suspects foul play. Was it an accident or murder? Soon new Prohibition Agent James Burton raids the Oasis, threatening to shut it down if Sammy doesn't talk. Suspicious, he pursues Jazz, but she refuses to rat on Sammy. As turf wars escalate between two real-life rival gangs, Sammy is accused of murder. To find the killer, Jazz must risk her life and career, exposing the dark side of Galveston's glittering society.


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"Boardwalk Empire" meets "The Great Gatsby" in this soft-boiled "Jazz Age" mystery, inspired by actual events. Prohibition is in full swing in 1920s Galveston, Texas: the "Sin City of the Southwest." Jasmine Cross, a young society reporter, feels caught between two clashing cultures: the seedy speakeasy underworld and the snooty social circles she covers in the Galveston G "Boardwalk Empire" meets "The Great Gatsby" in this soft-boiled "Jazz Age" mystery, inspired by actual events. Prohibition is in full swing in 1920s Galveston, Texas: the "Sin City of the Southwest." Jasmine Cross, a young society reporter, feels caught between two clashing cultures: the seedy speakeasy underworld and the snooty social circles she covers in the Galveston Gazette. During a night out with her best friend, Jazz witnesses a bar fight at the Oasis--a speakeasy secretly owned by her black-sheep half-brother, Sammy Cook. But when a big-shot banker with a hidden past collapses there and later dies, she suspects foul play. Was it an accident or murder? Soon new Prohibition Agent James Burton raids the Oasis, threatening to shut it down if Sammy doesn't talk. Suspicious, he pursues Jazz, but she refuses to rat on Sammy. As turf wars escalate between two real-life rival gangs, Sammy is accused of murder. To find the killer, Jazz must risk her life and career, exposing the dark side of Galveston's glittering society.

30 review for Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play

  1. 5 out of 5

    bella

    In Galveston, Texas, lives a young reporter, Jasmine “Jazz” Cross. Jazz’s life is caught between the underworld of Galveston and the socialites of the upper classes. Her worlds collide when she decides to investigate a murder–not only to help Sammy, her half brother, but to prove herself as a journalist. Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play reads just like a 1920s murder mystery with bar fights, gangsters and lots of mayhem and mystery. I’m fascinated by historical cozy mysteries, and I admit to having In Galveston, Texas, lives a young reporter, Jasmine “Jazz” Cross. Jazz’s life is caught between the underworld of Galveston and the socialites of the upper classes. Her worlds collide when she decides to investigate a murder–not only to help Sammy, her half brother, but to prove herself as a journalist. Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play reads just like a 1920s murder mystery with bar fights, gangsters and lots of mayhem and mystery. I’m fascinated by historical cozy mysteries, and I admit to having a particular fascination with the prohibition scene. There has been some great debuts on this subject this year (see A Lack of Temperance by Anna Loan-Wilsey) and Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play easily adds to that list of great debuts. From the first page I was wrapped up in the town of Galveston, Texas, where Jazz and her half-brother reside. It was a suspenseful ride as Jazz tries to track down the killer, before her half-brother ends up in jail or she herself becomes the next victim! I liked the mix of characters in Galveston, with some very seedy and interesting characters it was a fun read. There was no cliffhanger, but I was still left wanting more Jazz adventures, especially with the hint of romance that was in the air. I hope there will be many more murder and mayhem from the town of Galveston to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Audra (Unabridged Chick)

    Now and then, I like a cozy mystery: no gore, a bit of drama, a big personality in our heroine, and a plot that doesn't require much but is still fun. Collier's new series, set in 1927 Galveston, Texas, hit the spot for me, and is a fluffy, entertaining bit of summertime escapism. Jazz Cross, 21-years old, a flapper, and society reporter for the Galveston Gazette, has aspirations of being a 'real' reporter. Her male colleagues think she's just a pretty face, good only for making coffee and report Now and then, I like a cozy mystery: no gore, a bit of drama, a big personality in our heroine, and a plot that doesn't require much but is still fun. Collier's new series, set in 1927 Galveston, Texas, hit the spot for me, and is a fluffy, entertaining bit of summertime escapism. Jazz Cross, 21-years old, a flapper, and society reporter for the Galveston Gazette, has aspirations of being a 'real' reporter. Her male colleagues think she's just a pretty face, good only for making coffee and reporting on the Garden Club. When she witnesses the death of a local banker at the Oasis, she decides to investigate it, and unsurprisingly, things are hardly straightforward. The Oasis is owned by Jazz's half brother Sammy, an illegitimate son of her father's who is unwelcome in her family but for whom she has some affection and loyalty, and she wants to ensure Sammy doesn't get any blame. A Treasury Department agent takes a keen interest in the Oasis -- and Jazz -- which complicates things. Galveston in the 1920s is seedy and rough (it was nicknamed Sin City of the Southwest!) and Collier conveys that gritty roughness from the start, balanced out by our brazen, spunky heroine. There are some wonderful historical details peppered throughout the story as well as a heavy dose of 1920s slang, which was refreshing -- I didn't feel like I was reading a modern story simply set back in the Prohibition. There's a brief preface at the start in which Collier details a little about Galveston at this time and shares links to two slang dictionaries to help readers. Collier's writing is straight-forward, moving the story along briskly, but with a kind of bounce that matches Jazz's terrier-like determination. (You can read an excerpt of the first chapter at Collier's website.) This was just the light read I needed this last month, with my brain like a sieve and my energy low -- Jazz was a sweet and fierce heroine to tag along with and I'm looking forward to her next adventure.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    This was such a fun read! Normally I'm a bit skeptical of the first person point of view, because it's been used so much. Especially in YA. But this uses first person, and I absolutely loved it, and I can't imagine now that it would have been as entertaining of a read without it. The slang and the dialogue between the characters was so entertaining and I loved that I felt like I had just dived right into an old movie. I could easily picture the settings and the people. Phrases like "and how!" and This was such a fun read! Normally I'm a bit skeptical of the first person point of view, because it's been used so much. Especially in YA. But this uses first person, and I absolutely loved it, and I can't imagine now that it would have been as entertaining of a read without it. The slang and the dialogue between the characters was so entertaining and I loved that I felt like I had just dived right into an old movie. I could easily picture the settings and the people. Phrases like "and how!" and "you said it" were so frequent that I caught myself saying, "You said it" at work the other day. And I had my misgivings at first; I thought that maybe the jargon would be very obvious in the beginning then die off, but I was proven wrong. It stayed consistent all the way through and wasn't overdone. Since our heroine is living during the Prohibition era, everything she encounters surrounds alcohol. I actually learned some really interesting facts from reading this, most notably that our government allowed for methane and kerosene to be put in alcohol to get people to stop drinking. And that the phrase "blind drunk" comes from people who would drink so much that the methane in the alcohol would make them go blind. It was fascinating, and as my first book that takes place in this time period (aside from Great Gatsby in high school) I really feel like Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play was an awesome way for me to start the genre. It was a fun read and kept me interested. The mystery was fairly predictable, but I didn't care. Some parts of it surprised me, but the overall plot I guessed pretty early on. The thing is, it was still fun! The story kept my interest the whole time and it proved to be thoroughly entertaining. It's well worth a read. (I received this in a First Reads giveaway.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kimmie

    Flappers, Flasks, and Foul Play was such a fun read. Filled with murder and mystery, I had hard time setting this book down! I adored all the different characters in this book. I thought Jazz was a great main character, she was really easy to relate to and she also had a wonderful personality. Another character I liked a whole lot was Nathan. I thought he was sweet and charming, and was just a really good friend to Jazz. One of my favorite things about this book was the setting. I loved that it wa Flappers, Flasks, and Foul Play was such a fun read. Filled with murder and mystery, I had hard time setting this book down! I adored all the different characters in this book. I thought Jazz was a great main character, she was really easy to relate to and she also had a wonderful personality. Another character I liked a whole lot was Nathan. I thought he was sweet and charming, and was just a really good friend to Jazz. One of my favorite things about this book was the setting. I loved that it was set in the 1920's in Galveston, Texas. I like reading about places that I have actually been to and I've visited Galveston before. Another thing I really liked about this book was how much detail the author put into everything. I could clearly picture everything she was describing in my mind. I also have to add that I loved the way everyone talked. Overall, I thought this was a wonderful read and I will most certainly be reading this author's next book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Metz

    Clever, authentic, and such a good read! It's hard to write in a time period other than your own, but Ms. Collier does it effortlessly. The dialogue was authentic and the author's attention to detail was so perfect I felt like I'd stepped into the 1920s. The Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play characters and setting are genuine and intertwined so well into the story, the movie in my head was vivid and real. I loved main character Jazz--a strong, independent woman with a lot of moxy, but all of the ch Clever, authentic, and such a good read! It's hard to write in a time period other than your own, but Ms. Collier does it effortlessly. The dialogue was authentic and the author's attention to detail was so perfect I felt like I'd stepped into the 1920s. The Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play characters and setting are genuine and intertwined so well into the story, the movie in my head was vivid and real. I loved main character Jazz--a strong, independent woman with a lot of moxy, but all of the characters are well developed and true to life. Even small characters have unique qualities that add to the story. Ms. Collier's description of Galveston makes readers feel they've been there. The combination of authenticity, mystery, and bit of romance make this book a winner. I highly recommend it. And I'm wasting no time in starting the second book in the series. I can't wait to see what Jazz does next. I loved this book!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Jazz Cross,an aspiring reporter in Prohibition-era Galveston,refuses to stay within the limits of the society beat. Her spunky curiosity and loyalty to her friends lead her into dangerous involvement with bootleggers and the criminal gangs on the island. Good thing that handsome Treasury agent is keeping his eye on her! This lighthearted mystery, based on the true history of the period, is the perfect read to take with you to Galveston. You'll be longing for a jazz orchestra and a tango compact Jazz Cross,an aspiring reporter in Prohibition-era Galveston,refuses to stay within the limits of the society beat. Her spunky curiosity and loyalty to her friends lead her into dangerous involvement with bootleggers and the criminal gangs on the island. Good thing that handsome Treasury agent is keeping his eye on her! This lighthearted mystery, based on the true history of the period, is the perfect read to take with you to Galveston. You'll be longing for a jazz orchestra and a tango compact and someone to tell you that you look like "the bee's knees" while you sip your perfectly legal cocktail at the Hotel Galvez!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Ellen Collier's novel is set in one of my favorite locations, Galveston, Texas, during an era when the town was one of the wildest on the Texas Gulf Coast. Spunky society reporter Jasmine (Jazz) Cross gets involved with murder right off the bat, and her breezy voice carries the narrative along at a bright clip. Great period setting and atmosphere. Check it out. Ellen Collier's novel is set in one of my favorite locations, Galveston, Texas, during an era when the town was one of the wildest on the Texas Gulf Coast. Spunky society reporter Jasmine (Jazz) Cross gets involved with murder right off the bat, and her breezy voice carries the narrative along at a bright clip. Great period setting and atmosphere. Check it out.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fast read, exciting historical details, fun characters, has a real twist ending like a mystery should have.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    What a great read! I loved the rich historical detail and the "who dunnit" vibe so characteristic of film noir. Review on the blog soon. What a great read! I loved the rich historical detail and the "who dunnit" vibe so characteristic of film noir. Review on the blog soon.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    What a blast. I loved the characters, from Jazz to Nathan to Agent Burton (and Sammy and Amanda!) and I loved reading this. It instantly transported me to the Jazz Age without feeling like an information dump, and I was hooked enough to keep reading as quickly as possible. I am still no better at reviewing things than I was, but I really enjoyed this romp. I can't wait to read the rest of the series! What a blast. I loved the characters, from Jazz to Nathan to Agent Burton (and Sammy and Amanda!) and I loved reading this. It instantly transported me to the Jazz Age without feeling like an information dump, and I was hooked enough to keep reading as quickly as possible. I am still no better at reviewing things than I was, but I really enjoyed this romp. I can't wait to read the rest of the series!

  11. 5 out of 5

    TAMMY CUEVAS

    Welcome to Galveston! It's 1927 and the Jazz Age is going strong. The joints are jumpin', the booze is flowin', and Prohibition hasn't slowed it down. If anything, it's made things livelier. The two rival gangs, the Beach Gang and the Downtown Gang, control the alcohol distribution and the speakeasies. Jasmine, a society reporter with dreams of being the next Nelly Bly, is enjoying a night out at her half-brother Sammy's speakeasy, the Oasis, when she witnesses a man's death. The new Prohibition Welcome to Galveston! It's 1927 and the Jazz Age is going strong. The joints are jumpin', the booze is flowin', and Prohibition hasn't slowed it down. If anything, it's made things livelier. The two rival gangs, the Beach Gang and the Downtown Gang, control the alcohol distribution and the speakeasies. Jasmine, a society reporter with dreams of being the next Nelly Bly, is enjoying a night out at her half-brother Sammy's speakeasy, the Oasis, when she witnesses a man's death. The new Prohibition Agent in town, handsome James Burton, threatens to shut down the Oasis if Sammy does not cooperate with his investigation. After Sammy is accused of murder, Jasmine is determined to clear his name. A couple of months ago, I had the pleasure of reviewing Ms. Collier's second book, Bathing Beauties, Booze and Bullets, and enjoyed it. She was kind enough to offer me the opportunity to review the first in the series. I enjoyed seeing how the characters were introduced. Jasmine is a wonderful example of a 1920s modern woman who is enjoying the new freedoms available to women and still wanting more. While she is happy to have landed a job at the local newspaper, she wants to be taken seriously as a reporter. The setting and dialogue are half the fun in this novel. The descriptions of the speakeasies, dances and the clothing bring the story to life. The mesh bags, compacts, and perfume lamps sound like great accessories and the 1920s slang is entertaining. In other words, it's the bees' knees! 5 stars Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  12. 5 out of 5

    Haskell Morris

    From the beginning I was hooked. "Jazz" , a want to be crime reporter, can't seem to stay out of trouble, but hangs in there to help solve the intricate puzzle. I was born in Galveston so all the locations are very familiar to me. Honestly I loved every minute of it. I walked around with it in my hand so wherever and whenever I sat I read. Exciting, enticing and well, just a wonderful read. I can't wait to get he next one in my hands. From the beginning I was hooked. "Jazz" , a want to be crime reporter, can't seem to stay out of trouble, but hangs in there to help solve the intricate puzzle. I was born in Galveston so all the locations are very familiar to me. Honestly I loved every minute of it. I walked around with it in my hand so wherever and whenever I sat I read. Exciting, enticing and well, just a wonderful read. I can't wait to get he next one in my hands.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Summer Lane

    Jasmine longs to be taken seriously as a journalist. With her connections to the underworld of speakeasies and rum-runners during the Prohibition, she certainly has the sources to come up with some sensational stories. But when she accidentally stumbles upon a web of mystery, murder and deceit, things take a turn for the adventurous. With the help of her friend Nathan and the handsome Prohibition Agent Mr. Burton, Jasmine may just get to the bottom of the mystery and land her first big scoop. El Jasmine longs to be taken seriously as a journalist. With her connections to the underworld of speakeasies and rum-runners during the Prohibition, she certainly has the sources to come up with some sensational stories. But when she accidentally stumbles upon a web of mystery, murder and deceit, things take a turn for the adventurous. With the help of her friend Nathan and the handsome Prohibition Agent Mr. Burton, Jasmine may just get to the bottom of the mystery and land her first big scoop. Ellen Collier has a talent for pulling you into the era of the Prohibition and keeping you there for a few hours. I love mysteries, so I had to keep reading this book to get to the bottom of the plot. I mean, you simply can't read about a murder - or two - without waiting to see the end of the book and watch the loose ends get tied up. My favorite supporting character was Nathan, Jasmine's best friend from the newspaper. He's cute, sweet and always there for Jasmine when she needs him. Another thing I really liked about the book was the era-approrpiate slang. Phrases like 'Jeepers,' and "the cat's meow," the cutest things! :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christoph Fischer

    “Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play (A Jazz Age Mystery #1)” by Ellen Mansoor Collier “ is an elegant and hugely entertaining mystery novel set in Prohibition times and the Jazz Age of Southern Texan Galveston of 1920s. With great style and a fantastic sense of authenticity this book pulls out all fun registers of those days. Young newspaper employee Jasmine, Jazz, Cross, has big plans. Drawn into a murder investigation and trapped between legal and illegal alliances she is a great protagonist for th “Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play (A Jazz Age Mystery #1)” by Ellen Mansoor Collier “ is an elegant and hugely entertaining mystery novel set in Prohibition times and the Jazz Age of Southern Texan Galveston of 1920s. With great style and a fantastic sense of authenticity this book pulls out all fun registers of those days. Young newspaper employee Jasmine, Jazz, Cross, has big plans. Drawn into a murder investigation and trapped between legal and illegal alliances she is a great protagonist for the action that involves illegal boozing murder and gang war. Gossip and romantic interests come into play as well when handsome young Prohibition Agent James Burton raids her brother’s establishment. This is great fun in a setting that almost never fails to entertain and that fuels our imagination and nostalgia, regardless of the crimes. This novel utilises those trump cards, but besides all that it is well written, cleverly plotted and very enjoyable.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula Ratcliffe

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I got this book as part of a book tour in July and loved this first book. It opens we meet Jasmine Cross know as Jazz who is a society reporter trying to get her big break in the newspaper industry but in the meantime does society articles. She has a brother named Sammy who runs a speakeasy and when the coppers are around it's a dinner. Early in this book a local banker winds up dead but Jazz thinks something is up with Mr. Andrews. To make matters worse the death happens in Sammy's speakeasy and I got this book as part of a book tour in July and loved this first book. It opens we meet Jasmine Cross know as Jazz who is a society reporter trying to get her big break in the newspaper industry but in the meantime does society articles. She has a brother named Sammy who runs a speakeasy and when the coppers are around it's a dinner. Early in this book a local banker winds up dead but Jazz thinks something is up with Mr. Andrews. To make matters worse the death happens in Sammy's speakeasy and Jazz finds herself knee deep in mucky waters where bootlegging is happening. We also meet Agent James Burton who seems to fancy the young reporter. I loved everything about the jazz era, the language they use the clothes they wore and just everything about the time era was great to read it in a book. Definitely a great spin on cozy mysteries I can't wait to read the next one in the series!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leslie aka StoreyBook Reviews

    The roaring 20's in Galveston Texas...who knew that there were gangs in the town controlling the liquor despite prohibition? Jazz (Jasmine) is a society reporter trying to get in on the big news action but it is hard to do as a woman. Nathan is the hotshot photographer and Jazz's pal. Then there is Burton, the hunky Federal Agent trying to shut down the illegal liquor that is killing people. The story has several murders that tie in quite a few characters but it is easy to keep them straight. The The roaring 20's in Galveston Texas...who knew that there were gangs in the town controlling the liquor despite prohibition? Jazz (Jasmine) is a society reporter trying to get in on the big news action but it is hard to do as a woman. Nathan is the hotshot photographer and Jazz's pal. Then there is Burton, the hunky Federal Agent trying to shut down the illegal liquor that is killing people. The story has several murders that tie in quite a few characters but it is easy to keep them straight. There wasn't a real big "reveal" with "whodoneit" but it left the story open for the next installment in this series. Enjoyable and am looking forward to going back in time and experiencing the 20's with the next book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Morseman

    I love book clubs and contests because you get to explore new authors and genres. While I always thought fondly of the Roaring 20's I was excited to get into this mystery to explore their world a little more. Collier brings the reader into the world of gangsters and speak easys through the eyes of Jazz, a sassy young dame who works for the daily paper as a society reporter but ends up much more of a crime reporter as batches of rotgut alcohol make their way into clubs putting anyone and everyone I love book clubs and contests because you get to explore new authors and genres. While I always thought fondly of the Roaring 20's I was excited to get into this mystery to explore their world a little more. Collier brings the reader into the world of gangsters and speak easys through the eyes of Jazz, a sassy young dame who works for the daily paper as a society reporter but ends up much more of a crime reporter as batches of rotgut alcohol make their way into clubs putting anyone and everyone at risk. I love this spunky young character and enjoyed spending time with her in Gavelston, TX during the height of Prohibition.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    First I would like to say thank you as I won this book through goodreads giveaways. Flappers Flasks and Foul Play was such a great book, Ellen Collier did an awesome job with this book. This is one of those books that would make a good movie. If you enjoy reading stuff from back in the prohibition era with mystery, murder and gangs mixed in than this is the book for you, you will not be disappointed I had a very hard time putting this book down.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Noreen Marcus

    If you like murder mysteries and the flapper era, give this a try. It's fun and suspenceful and moves along at a good clip. Ellen Collier has created a reporter heroine, Jasmine, a proto-feminist who is highly relatable. Her cliff-hanger style keeps you moving. Hard to put down. If you like murder mysteries and the flapper era, give this a try. It's fun and suspenceful and moves along at a good clip. Ellen Collier has created a reporter heroine, Jasmine, a proto-feminist who is highly relatable. Her cliff-hanger style keeps you moving. Hard to put down.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Cotterill

    A wonderful mystery set in Prohibition era Texas. Heroine Jazz is a young and ambitious journalist who finds she needs to apply her skills of observation to a rather different sort of problem when her brother gets mixed up in a murder investigation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lonny Johnson

    4.5 stars. I'm a sucker for '20's and '30's books and this is a pretty darn good mystery. It could have used a bit of an epilogue, but perhaps that will lead off Book 2. I will be looking for that one soon. 4.5 stars. I'm a sucker for '20's and '30's books and this is a pretty darn good mystery. It could have used a bit of an epilogue, but perhaps that will lead off Book 2. I will be looking for that one soon.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kimberlee Gibbs

    http://www.girllostinabook.com/2013/0... http://www.girllostinabook.com/2013/0...

  23. 4 out of 5

    George Ashmore

    Truly interesting & diverting. Sort of a Southern Noir mystery--not the usual thing but quite good. Interesting characters that are brought to life for your enjoyment. A Good Read!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I was on vacation in Galveston and wandered into the Galveston Bookshop. They had a shelf of books from local artists and this book caught my eye. I’m a huge fan of mysteries and like the Jazz Age, so this book seemed perfect. I LOVED this book. I read the whole thing in one afternoon. I really liked the characters and it’s obvious the author knows Galveston history. It’s fun to see names of places that still exist today. I’m glad I picked up three other books in this series (the store didn’t ha I was on vacation in Galveston and wandered into the Galveston Bookshop. They had a shelf of books from local artists and this book caught my eye. I’m a huge fan of mysteries and like the Jazz Age, so this book seemed perfect. I LOVED this book. I read the whole thing in one afternoon. I really liked the characters and it’s obvious the author knows Galveston history. It’s fun to see names of places that still exist today. I’m glad I picked up three other books in this series (the store didn’t have the newest release) because I can’t wait to start book two. If you are a fan of historical fiction and mysteries, I highly recommend this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Reminiscent of the old time movies. I enjoyed the history of a local place near me as well as the wonderful tale of a young female reporter innocently making her name and the slang of the time period. Felt as if I was right there with her every step of the way. Can't wait to get the next book by E. Collier, Bathing Beauties, Booze And Bullets Reminiscent of the old time movies. I enjoyed the history of a local place near me as well as the wonderful tale of a young female reporter innocently making her name and the slang of the time period. Felt as if I was right there with her every step of the way. Can't wait to get the next book by E. Collier, Bathing Beauties, Booze And Bullets

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    A fun read! Mystery and history!! I love Galveston and enjoyed the history of this era in Galveston!

  27. 4 out of 5

    June

    FLAPPERS, FLASKS AND FOUL PLAY by Ellen Mansoor Collier Genre: Historical Mystery Kindle Edition, pages About the book: Jasmine "Jazz" Cross is determined to make her mark on the newspaper business. But in order to do that, she needs to move up from typing the society columns to writing the front page news. But that won't be easy to achieve for a gal in 1927 Galveston, Texas. Prohibition is in full swing and Galveston is the home of speakeasies, bootleggers and gangsters. Secret codes and passwords ar FLAPPERS, FLASKS AND FOUL PLAY by Ellen Mansoor Collier Genre: Historical Mystery Kindle Edition, pages About the book: Jasmine "Jazz" Cross is determined to make her mark on the newspaper business. But in order to do that, she needs to move up from typing the society columns to writing the front page news. But that won't be easy to achieve for a gal in 1927 Galveston, Texas. Prohibition is in full swing and Galveston is the home of speakeasies, bootleggers and gangsters. Secret codes and passwords are a passport to a different life after dark. Jazz can't keep away from a certain speakeasy, the Oasis. It is exciting to watch the guys and dolls dance the Charleston, have drinks in china teacups and sing songs like "Ain't We Got Fun?". She feels safe since the owner has "friends on the force". Then a man falls dead-was it a natural death or was it murder? Jazz's latent reporter skills take over, putting her into the path of federal agents and gang leaders alike. My thoughts: GREAT COVER!!I liked the plot line a great deal and felt that I learned a little something about the Prohibition era and Galveston's history, it certainly piqued my interest! I absolutely loved the Preface, beginning with: Before Las Vegas, Galveston, Texas reigned as the "Sin City of the Southwest"—a magnet for gold-diggers, gamblers and gangsters. Inspired by real people and places, FLAPPERS, FLASKS AND FOUL PLAY is set in 1927 Galveston, where businessmen rubbed elbows with bootleggers and real-life rival gangs ruled the Island with greed and graft. And in the novel, bits of a long-ago past helped pin the time-frame down: "deep drag off his Camel cigarette" " communal candlestick phone" " an elevator operated by an old Negro man in a red uniform and hat" + beautiful descriptions: "Under the mirrored ball, I watched a few elegant couples glide across the dance floor, the ladies in flowing beaded gowns shimmering in the muted lights. I couldn't take my eyes off one couple, the woman in a sleek backless bias-cut gold gown and matching beaded headdress with long pearls and blonde spit curls across her forehead, dancing with her movie star-handsome date. He reminded me of the suave actor Ramon Novarro, with his thin moustache and slicked-back hair." + Jazz-Age slang liberally used through-out the story: "Palooka!" "Clodhopper!" "Bohunk!" "bees knees" "pitching a little woo" "dumb Dora" all added up to a very, satisfactory story. occasional profanity I did enjoy the story. You should read it and let me know what you think! I was not monetarily compensated for this review in any way. I won a free copy of this book by being randomly selected. All opinions are 100% my own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    4 STARS It took me a few chapters to like some of the characters, but by the end of the book I really did like them. It was during prohibition and the times were wild. I learned some new things and was shocked by some events are government did. Jasmine Cross is 21 year old society reporter who goes hangs out it a speakeasy. She is familiar with most of the workers there. She wants to be a real reporter but no one takes her seriously. She is around a few crime scenes first so she starts to dig i 4 STARS It took me a few chapters to like some of the characters, but by the end of the book I really did like them. It was during prohibition and the times were wild. I learned some new things and was shocked by some events are government did. Jasmine Cross is 21 year old society reporter who goes hangs out it a speakeasy. She is familiar with most of the workers there. She wants to be a real reporter but no one takes her seriously. She is around a few crime scenes first so she starts to dig in. The speakeasy is owned by her black-sheep half-brother Sammy Cook. Which is a secret. Prohibition Agent James Burton raids Oasis a few times. He looks like a creep at first. He is interested in getting to know Jasmine. He also wants to know she is at the Oasis a lot and so interested in what happens to Sammy. Sammy Cook owns the Oasis. A speakeasy. He is arrested for murder that happened right in front of the Oasis. He does not want it known that Jasmine is his half-sister to protect her. The setting is Galveston, Texas during prohibition. There are two gangs that are trying to claim territory. Someone is passing bad moonshine around that is causing deaths. This is the first book in the series and the first part of story has a slow set up letting us learn about the characters and what the time was like. After that the story moves along at a good pace. Full of drama, action, crime and letting us see what that time period was like. I was given this ebook to read for purpose of reviewing it and give my honest opinion of the story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    3.5 I really enjoy this book. I loved the writing, the setting, and the glossary of 1920's slang in the back. It was so atmospheric and I felt like the story was more historically accurate then some of the books set in this time. It would've gotten a higher score, but I don't think murder mysteries are for me. Most books have a kind of mystery in it, but I don't feel for the victim during mysteries and so I don't really get caught up in the story or want to know who the killer is. The mystery was 3.5 I really enjoy this book. I loved the writing, the setting, and the glossary of 1920's slang in the back. It was so atmospheric and I felt like the story was more historically accurate then some of the books set in this time. It would've gotten a higher score, but I don't think murder mysteries are for me. Most books have a kind of mystery in it, but I don't feel for the victim during mysteries and so I don't really get caught up in the story or want to know who the killer is. The mystery was pretty good and I Jazz is a very good character. I think she is stronger then she realizes and the people around her realize. I did feel like there was too many guys hitting on her through out the story. I wish Nathan was just a friend with no flirting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    An enjoyable cozy mystery set during the Prohibition Era. I really liked the main character Jazz - a feisty young woman for the time period. I might have liked this book more if I hadn't recently watched an Australian TV mystery series set during this same time period on Netflix; it had me constantly making comparisons. I did feel that the author tried a little too hard to incorporate 1920's era lingo into her dialogue, but I thought the story and the characters more than compensated for it. An enjoyable cozy mystery set during the Prohibition Era. I really liked the main character Jazz - a feisty young woman for the time period. I might have liked this book more if I hadn't recently watched an Australian TV mystery series set during this same time period on Netflix; it had me constantly making comparisons. I did feel that the author tried a little too hard to incorporate 1920's era lingo into her dialogue, but I thought the story and the characters more than compensated for it.

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