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Ghost Tree

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A touching graphic novel about love, loss, and how the past never truly stays dead. Seeking a refuge from an unhappy life, Brandt returns to his ancestral home in Japan to find a haunted tree and the departed souls that are drawn to it, including his Grandfather. Getting more involved with the tree's inhabitants he attempts to heal some of history's wounds but will he be ab A touching graphic novel about love, loss, and how the past never truly stays dead. Seeking a refuge from an unhappy life, Brandt returns to his ancestral home in Japan to find a haunted tree and the departed souls that are drawn to it, including his Grandfather. Getting more involved with the tree's inhabitants he attempts to heal some of history's wounds but will he be able to find any measure of peace for himself when someone special from his past returns?


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A touching graphic novel about love, loss, and how the past never truly stays dead. Seeking a refuge from an unhappy life, Brandt returns to his ancestral home in Japan to find a haunted tree and the departed souls that are drawn to it, including his Grandfather. Getting more involved with the tree's inhabitants he attempts to heal some of history's wounds but will he be ab A touching graphic novel about love, loss, and how the past never truly stays dead. Seeking a refuge from an unhappy life, Brandt returns to his ancestral home in Japan to find a haunted tree and the departed souls that are drawn to it, including his Grandfather. Getting more involved with the tree's inhabitants he attempts to heal some of history's wounds but will he be able to find any measure of peace for himself when someone special from his past returns?

30 review for Ghost Tree

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Eager to escape his rocky marriage, Brandt flies home to Japan and encounters his grandfather's ghost at the Ghost Tree, a willow tree in the forest behind his grandmother's house. I'd never heard of Ghost Tree before it was up for an Eisner award but I decided to give it a shot. Totally worth it. Rooted in Japanese ghost lore, Ghost Tree is the story of men running from their problems. Brandt, like his deceased grandfather, can see ghosts and talk to them at the Ghost Tree. It doesn't sound that Eager to escape his rocky marriage, Brandt flies home to Japan and encounters his grandfather's ghost at the Ghost Tree, a willow tree in the forest behind his grandmother's house. I'd never heard of Ghost Tree before it was up for an Eisner award but I decided to give it a shot. Totally worth it. Rooted in Japanese ghost lore, Ghost Tree is the story of men running from their problems. Brandt, like his deceased grandfather, can see ghosts and talk to them at the Ghost Tree. It doesn't sound that great from my description but Ghost Tree is one of those sensitive little tales, like one of those one issue Sandman stories back in the day. It's about dangers of dwelling in the past and of hiding from hiding from your fears instead of confronting them. The ghost of Brandt's lost love shows him the way and sends him on his merry way. The art reminds me both of Moebius and Stan Sakai. It feels minimalist most of the time but also manages to be intricate. Zero has such a striking design and all the individual ghosts are bursting with character. The writing, specifically the character, drive the story along at a good clip. As I breezed through the pages, dreading reaching the end, both not wanting the story to end and not wanting to see what befell Brandt. Ghost Tree is the best standalone graphic novel I've read in years. Five out of five giant centipedes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amanja

    4.5 stars This review will contain spoilers, however, since the book is only about 100 pages long I will not also be writing a separate spoiler free review. It's okay, a good story is still a good story even if you know what's going to happen. Ghost Tree is a short graphic novel about loss, grief, living in the past, and dealing with cultural differences when you claim more than one home. It is also about what happens when you are too busy finding yourself to nurture those around you. Brandt is a y 4.5 stars This review will contain spoilers, however, since the book is only about 100 pages long I will not also be writing a separate spoiler free review. It's okay, a good story is still a good story even if you know what's going to happen. Ghost Tree is a short graphic novel about loss, grief, living in the past, and dealing with cultural differences when you claim more than one home. It is also about what happens when you are too busy finding yourself to nurture those around you. Brandt is a young man who was born in Japan. When he was a child his Grandfather told him to return to a specific spot in the woods next to their family home exactly 10 years after his death. Brandt makes the return journey to keep that promise and discovers his Grandfather's ghost is waiting for him by the same tree. He discovers he can not only talk to his Grandfather's ghost but to all ghosts at this tree as well. Apparently it is a family trait that he was previously unaware of. He is enjoying spending quality time with his Grandfather as well as attempting to help the many other lost souls he can now form relationships with. We also find out that back home in America he is having relationship troubles with his wife and he may be using his new ghost whispering talent as an excuse to escape said troubles. Brandt recognizes one of the ghosts. It is an ex-girlfriend of his from well before he was married. He had no idea that when she disappeared from his life it was because she had passed. They spend some time reminiscing and longing for a different life. Then the monster arrives. A monster has been terrorizing the ghosts and a mysterious figure in a mask has been trying to keep him at bay but is becoming too weak. Brandt's ex-girlfriend attempts to wear the mask and scare him off but Brandt sees the monster's true self and acknowledges his need to be heard. The monster is able to unburden itself to Brandt's open ears and returns to its original form, an elderly man, before disappearing. Presumably to the afterlife instead of this purgatory. Brandt helps his Grandfather unburden his soul by telling his still living Grandmother everything he wished he could have said while he was alive. He is also then able to cross over. It's quite touching. Brandt takes his newfound clarity with him back to his wife and declares that we will try harder and do better for their relationship. But it's too late. She says he fled the country right when she most needed him to stay. She needed him to try then, not now, and now she's ready to move past their relationship. The book ends with Brandt solemnly smoking a cigarette alone on his porch. I absolutely love this bummer ending and I hope there is not a sequel to tell us what happens next. Sometimes stories just don't have the happy ending. Not all relationships work out. Sometimes you focus on the wrong path and you lose what you were actually after. That's life. This book does a very good job of taking the reader with Brandt on the wrong story. We're so focused on ghosts and monsters we completely missed the real conflict. We're too busy fixing everyone else's problems we miss how to fix our own. My only complaint is that the book feels rushed. I think the emotions could have hit harder if I knew the characters better. I definitely recommend this one, it's a really quick and somber read that anyone is certain to find at least a part of relatable. for more reviews and content please visit my blog amanjareads.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    A young man, Brandt, returns to his family’s home in Japan, partially to honour his dead grandfather’s wish, and partly to run from dealing with his crumbling marriage. He quickly finds he has the ability to see and converse with ghosts, one being his grandfather; he sets some at ease with their past concerns. A former girlfriend is also one of the ghosts he encounters, as well as a demonic creature, and their interactions actually allow him to find some peace with himself. The story’s ending is a A young man, Brandt, returns to his family’s home in Japan, partially to honour his dead grandfather’s wish, and partly to run from dealing with his crumbling marriage. He quickly finds he has the ability to see and converse with ghosts, one being his grandfather; he sets some at ease with their past concerns. A former girlfriend is also one of the ghosts he encounters, as well as a demonic creature, and their interactions actually allow him to find some peace with himself. The story’s ending is a bit of a downer, but in many ways that actually makes the whole journey Brandt goes on as more realistic and sad. The artwork I has a limited palette of colours, reinforcing Brandt’s mental state for much of this story, and the imagery is stunning. This is a lovely, quiet, melancholic story about missed opportunities and missed chances, and is well worth reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Moi Baltazar

    "A life full of ghosts is no life at all." "A life full of ghosts is no life at all."

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This was pretty enjoyable! This is a story of Brandt returning back to his home in Japan to visit family. When he was younger he promised his Grandpa he'd come to visit again once he passed away. See Brandt has the ability to talk to the dead under a tree near his home in Japan. So he does just that but he's dealing with a lot of pressure back home in America too. So between that and now visiting his past through these ghost, Brandt must figure out what he wants in life. I really dug a lot of th This was pretty enjoyable! This is a story of Brandt returning back to his home in Japan to visit family. When he was younger he promised his Grandpa he'd come to visit again once he passed away. See Brandt has the ability to talk to the dead under a tree near his home in Japan. So he does just that but he's dealing with a lot of pressure back home in America too. So between that and now visiting his past through these ghost, Brandt must figure out what he wants in life. I really dug a lot of this. Well crafted, interesting, sad, and beautiful as well. I think what worked best was how honest this was. People are always stuck in the past. So this is the main focus as well as moving on. The ending is sad, but well done. This is something nice to read inbetween all the action comics. A 4 out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I loved the art work and colouring in this story. It is a story of loss, nostalgia, avoiding life and making peace with our past. I took a star off because the ending was not very satisfying and sudden.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    The story follows Brandt into the realm of the dead and he revisits his ancestral home and discovers his intergenerational ability to see the dead. Writer Bobby Curnow illustrates the urge of human beings to dwell in the past and to fear their present problems while also exploring the themes of love, loss, and death, in this refreshing tale dipped in Japanese folklore. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/ The story follows Brandt into the realm of the dead and he revisits his ancestral home and discovers his intergenerational ability to see the dead. Writer Bobby Curnow illustrates the urge of human beings to dwell in the past and to fear their present problems while also exploring the themes of love, loss, and death, in this refreshing tale dipped in Japanese folklore. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  8. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    What an absolute force, what a pleasant surprise, what a freaking book. Lushly illustrated with green hues all over, Ghost Tree is set, for the most part, in a Japanese forest where ghosts gather to voice their unrest and cling on to life, whatever it may be. It's tough to explain the magnificence of this mini-series without piling on quotes from it (the first pages of issue 4 are some of the most simplistically poignant writing and they spoke to me) or just endlessly praising the thick atmosphere What an absolute force, what a pleasant surprise, what a freaking book. Lushly illustrated with green hues all over, Ghost Tree is set, for the most part, in a Japanese forest where ghosts gather to voice their unrest and cling on to life, whatever it may be. It's tough to explain the magnificence of this mini-series without piling on quotes from it (the first pages of issue 4 are some of the most simplistically poignant writing and they spoke to me) or just endlessly praising the thick atmosphere Curnow and his partner in crime Simon Gane create. Both liberating and suffocating, the journey through this tale may be short but it talks about freedom and grief and love and the sum of all our moments, the way life ends and the way it carries on endlessly. It seems strange to see something so profound in a comic that's so light-hearted, closely resembling a Studio Ghibli offering or a Ray Bradbury short story. And yet it's all there, it's not a fluke, because for 4 issues Curno and Gane set the stage and follow through with heavy hitters about loves lost and moments missed. It's a punch in the gut and then some, especially as the ending sneaks up on you and devastates in a way that you don't even see coming.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dávid Novotný

    Beautiful, melancholic and sad story that will touch your heart, with little pinch of supernatural. Art is little rough, but nice. Very pleasant short read

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Bittersweet story about the loss of love and family, with an unexpected ending that stole the show. Tbh, I expected the cheesy happily-ever-after ending and the comic earns a lot of credit for exactly not doing that. Finally, we need to start having slice-of-life comic books that are...realistic. Other than that, it doesn't stand out of hundrend of new-age SoL BDs with the same themes. Art is sweet, not my cup-of-tea though. Bittersweet story about the loss of love and family, with an unexpected ending that stole the show. Tbh, I expected the cheesy happily-ever-after ending and the comic earns a lot of credit for exactly not doing that. Finally, we need to start having slice-of-life comic books that are...realistic. Other than that, it doesn't stand out of hundrend of new-age SoL BDs with the same themes. Art is sweet, not my cup-of-tea though.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    A gentle, moving story about accepting life and death, about fighting for the life you want and not hiding from life, and about not always getting what you want. Dusted with a light (and not always convincing) sprinkling of the supernatural. I thought the ending regarding a certain evil was a bit rote, and felt underwritten. The actual emotional ending I thought was beautiful, and really moved me (which is not an easy task to achieve). I'm a fan of Simon Gane's art, and he does not disappoint. (Rea A gentle, moving story about accepting life and death, about fighting for the life you want and not hiding from life, and about not always getting what you want. Dusted with a light (and not always convincing) sprinkling of the supernatural. I thought the ending regarding a certain evil was a bit rote, and felt underwritten. The actual emotional ending I thought was beautiful, and really moved me (which is not an easy task to achieve). I'm a fan of Simon Gane's art, and he does not disappoint. (Read as four single issues.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    I didn't think it could be done, but this story manages to have both a happy end and a sad one. It focuses on human relationships and feelings. It should be able to draw a tear from anyone who enjoyed the movie Ghost. There's less romance in this one, though. The ghosts are secondary, very much like the Japanese setting, but they work splendidly together. Brandt moved away from Japan in his youth, but felt a strong pull to his roots. Now he has returned 10 years after his grandfather passed away. I didn't think it could be done, but this story manages to have both a happy end and a sad one. It focuses on human relationships and feelings. It should be able to draw a tear from anyone who enjoyed the movie Ghost. There's less romance in this one, though. The ghosts are secondary, very much like the Japanese setting, but they work splendidly together. Brandt moved away from Japan in his youth, but felt a strong pull to his roots. Now he has returned 10 years after his grandfather passed away. His family has always had an affinity for the Ghost Tree, a tree in a forest near their home that is like a magnet for ghosts in purgatory. There is also a darker side to that tree, one that Brandt will have to face by himself. He will also gain a better understanding of his grandparents' marriage and his own which is going through hard times. (view spoiler)[Brandt meets his grandfather's ghost who reveals some of the tree's secrets and warns Brandt to leave before he too develops an unbreakable link to that place. His former girlfriend's ghost also visits him and asks him to help her understand what is happening to the other ghosts. Demons are threatening the ghosts whose protector has grown weaker. Brandt understands what that demon is and manages to bring it the peace it needs to move on. His girlfriend's ghost then becomes the new protector of the ghosts. With renewed hope, Brandt returns home to his wife, but it's to no avail. She doesn't want to work on their marriage any more. (hide spoiler)]

  13. 5 out of 5

    Václav

    (3,8 of 5 for this nice looking supernatural comics about a completely natural topic) For a start, I like that art. Subtle and neat colours with thick ink lines work well for me. Japan setting got some points from me too, although I lacked at least a bit of "japan aesthetics" in the art. But it looks great, kind of reminds me of the B.P.R.D. style with Guy Davis vibe. The story - I liked it, it is kind of melancholic, going back home and exploring your roots thing. It's little bleak (in a good way (3,8 of 5 for this nice looking supernatural comics about a completely natural topic) For a start, I like that art. Subtle and neat colours with thick ink lines work well for me. Japan setting got some points from me too, although I lacked at least a bit of "japan aesthetics" in the art. But it looks great, kind of reminds me of the B.P.R.D. style with Guy Davis vibe. The story - I liked it, it is kind of melancholic, going back home and exploring your roots thing. It's little bleak (in a good way) and bland (in not so good way). But the story kept me interested even if I felt there wasn't too much to it. I appreciate that not all good ends must be necessarily completely happy ones. I enjoyed ghost tree, maybe more art than a story, which is kind of good but insipidly executed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    The art is lovely, especially the panels with forest and foliage. I was going to give it three stars until I got to the ending, which was so perfect to the story that I had to bump my rating up to four.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 Current review score: 3.75 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 Current review score: 3.75

  16. 5 out of 5

    KaitLphere

    I enjoyed the art and the characters. It was a quick read, but I would have liked a little more depth at times. The end was not terribly satisfying for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    RG

    I loved this. This has Lemire style all over it. The stories about family, growing up and life itself. Beautiful artwork and amazing story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    cardulelia carduelis

    At this point we are around 4.5 months into sheltering from the pandemic. As many recent opEds & advice columns have noted, sheltering-in-place has also been very useful for testing cohabitation, isolation, sense of self, and revisiting memories of happier times. Ghost Tree, then, seems oddly timely. On a surface level the book tells the tragic story of an unexpressed love in the late stages of a marriage, cut short by death. Brandt, our protagonist, is able to witness this tragedy when he learn At this point we are around 4.5 months into sheltering from the pandemic. As many recent opEds & advice columns have noted, sheltering-in-place has also been very useful for testing cohabitation, isolation, sense of self, and revisiting memories of happier times. Ghost Tree, then, seems oddly timely. On a surface level the book tells the tragic story of an unexpressed love in the late stages of a marriage, cut short by death. Brandt, our protagonist, is able to witness this tragedy when he learns, like one man in every generation of his family, that he can see ghosts and talks to his grandfather. Brandt must then tear himself away from the diverting stories and problems of the ghosts and focus on his own marriage and life back in the US, vanquishing a demon along the way. Whilst at face-value this is a simplistic spooky story, it quickly becomes clear that its true themes explore nostalgia and the difficulties of growing up. My interpretations of elements of the story: (view spoiler)[ I believe that the ghosts represent our retreat into memory and the grandfather serves as a cautionary tale as to what happens when we dwell or wallow in the past. Brandt gradually meets many relatives, drawn to the ghost tree, and I think that these might also be a metaphor for being drawn to the traditions of the past & the more conservative mindset. Perhaps also it is a reflection of how the expectations of past generations, whilst well-meaning, can ultimately harm you. The demon is the ultimate form of this. A memory or trauma so long repressed and ignored that it has festered into a destructive force, corrupting both the past (other ghosts) and even the present (the demon was also able to affect the living). The mask-wearer, Zero, is able to send demons away because their mask, their emptiness is a metaphor for burying and suppressing emotion or bad memories. However, whilst they can be sent away, they will resurface over and over and only the vigilence of Zero can keep them at bay. Instead, processing & dealing with the trauma (or seeing and acknowledging the demon and then the person behind it) is the way to truly break it down into something manageable that will ultimately dissipate. For Brandt, the ghost of his childhood sweetheart took this to an extra dimension, not only can he immerse himself in the nostalgia of childhood - physically leaving behind his issues in a different country - but he can also compare his current, ailing relationship to the snapshot he has of his old one: forever crystalized in the ghost of his ex. I really loved the ending as it showed Brandt growing up, deciding to reject nostalgia for the present, and still dealing with real consequences on his return. (hide spoiler)] Ghost Tree is beautifully drawn and illustrated with a muted green and brown color palette that brings the attention to the shadows & textures of the forest as well as the wooden house of Brandt's grandparents. The story builds gradually, with small pieces of information about Brandt & his grandfather's relationships gradually revealed along with the mythology of the forest. Brandt, it seems, was raised in Japan till some time in his late teens when he moved abroad. This also lends the story a displaced cultural element that I personally identified with. I say more in the spoilers tab above but the ending is also stellar. What a fantastic book. I'll have to get the hardcopy of this for a reread :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam M

    *read for YA reading challenge 2020* This is a fantastic book that looks at a small family and their ghosts, while dealing with much larger questions of personal identity and self-worth. Brandt revisits his grandparent's ancestral home in Japan from America where his marriage is falling apart. The story is only about 100 pages, but Curnow seems to get a lot of heart and sorrow in that space. It's a well constructed story and the art is really complimentary. It's a softer/muted color pallet and th *read for YA reading challenge 2020* This is a fantastic book that looks at a small family and their ghosts, while dealing with much larger questions of personal identity and self-worth. Brandt revisits his grandparent's ancestral home in Japan from America where his marriage is falling apart. The story is only about 100 pages, but Curnow seems to get a lot of heart and sorrow in that space. It's a well constructed story and the art is really complimentary. It's a softer/muted color pallet and there is a nice flow to the art. This read really quickly for me in the best way as I was genuinely invested and couldn't put it down. Good non-superhero book about life, love and what happens as we grow older and change as individuals.

  20. 5 out of 5

    High Plains Library District

    Ghost Tree is a quick read, and it tells the story of a man, Brandt, who visits his ancestral home in Japan where he discovers he has inherited his grandfather's ability to see and speak with ghosts. The story is somber and reflective as Brandt listens to ghosts and attempts to ease their troubled souls. I don't want to go into much more plot-wise or we'll be getting into spoiler territory. While there is a touch of the supernatural, a monster and a mysterious robed figure in a cyclopean mask, th Ghost Tree is a quick read, and it tells the story of a man, Brandt, who visits his ancestral home in Japan where he discovers he has inherited his grandfather's ability to see and speak with ghosts. The story is somber and reflective as Brandt listens to ghosts and attempts to ease their troubled souls. I don't want to go into much more plot-wise or we'll be getting into spoiler territory. While there is a touch of the supernatural, a monster and a mysterious robed figure in a cyclopean mask, this is not a classic campfire ghost story. It's more a story of a man who learns how to cope with the emotional ghosts in his own life through meeting literal ghosts. The artwork is subdued and synchs well with mood of the story it tells.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Ghost Tree offers a quiet, moderately fantastical look at death, memory, and love. It wears its life lessons on its sleeve - until the very end, when Curnow subverts the whole dang message. I liked that, though. This is a good, if not particularly memorable read, but I think that ending will help it linger in my mind. The artwork is chunky and handsome with excellent coloring. The pacing is deliberate, nearly perfect for a four-issue short story. Curnow could have stretched further, creating a wh Ghost Tree offers a quiet, moderately fantastical look at death, memory, and love. It wears its life lessons on its sleeve - until the very end, when Curnow subverts the whole dang message. I liked that, though. This is a good, if not particularly memorable read, but I think that ending will help it linger in my mind. The artwork is chunky and handsome with excellent coloring. The pacing is deliberate, nearly perfect for a four-issue short story. Curnow could have stretched further, creating a whole series devoted to the ghosts inhabiting the ghost tree, but I appreciate that he kept this one short and sweet.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Brandt runs away from his failing marriage to his old family home, and finds a tree that acts as a beacon for ghosts. There, Brandt finds comfort in helping the ghosts pass on and ignoring his own problem. It's a mature drama with some fantasy elements that remind me of some Miyazaki films. It's rooted in some elements of Japanese folklore and the childish notion of men trying to run from their problems instead of confronting them. It's sweet, it's sad, it's surprising, and it's one of the best Brandt runs away from his failing marriage to his old family home, and finds a tree that acts as a beacon for ghosts. There, Brandt finds comfort in helping the ghosts pass on and ignoring his own problem. It's a mature drama with some fantasy elements that remind me of some Miyazaki films. It's rooted in some elements of Japanese folklore and the childish notion of men trying to run from their problems instead of confronting them. It's sweet, it's sad, it's surprising, and it's one of the best books of 2019 (and one of the best stand-alone mini-series I've read in years).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Beautiful story by Bobby Curnow and Simon Gane. It's a ghost story, but while the ghosts are real and there's a tense moment or two, the emphasis isn't on horror, but the ghosts as metaphor. The main character is a young man named Brandt returning to Japan partially to fulfill an old promise to his deceased grandfather, but also to escape the stress of his failing marriage and try to figure out what he's going to do next. I may not be going through the same issues that Brandt is, but I related t Beautiful story by Bobby Curnow and Simon Gane. It's a ghost story, but while the ghosts are real and there's a tense moment or two, the emphasis isn't on horror, but the ghosts as metaphor. The main character is a young man named Brandt returning to Japan partially to fulfill an old promise to his deceased grandfather, but also to escape the stress of his failing marriage and try to figure out what he's going to do next. I may not be going through the same issues that Brandt is, but I related to his desire to hold onto the past as a way of escaping his responsibilities in the present. I liked the guy and hurt for him and rooted for him to figure things out. And I think the ending is perfect.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I really enjoyed this graphic novel, with its charming artwork (I particularly liked how the home, inside and out, was drawn, and how well the forest was brought to life), and insightful take on life, death and disappointment. It touches on finding purpose in life, on perseverance, regret, grief and hope. All in what I believe was a total of 4 issues. I bought this on a whim while browsing IDW's site, and I am glad I did. I really enjoyed this graphic novel, with its charming artwork (I particularly liked how the home, inside and out, was drawn, and how well the forest was brought to life), and insightful take on life, death and disappointment. It touches on finding purpose in life, on perseverance, regret, grief and hope. All in what I believe was a total of 4 issues. I bought this on a whim while browsing IDW's site, and I am glad I did.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Beautifully colored, and drawn in an style that sometimes reminds me of a pleasantly cartoonish version of Japanese brush painting. I enjoyed its reflections on the allure of memories and the importance of not living in them, and the sweet story of family heritage too. There’s also a nice balance of magical realism and real-world emotional consequence.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Oneirosophos

    This... This is one of the best supernatural stories I've ever read! A true hidden gem, a masterpiece!! Must read for everyone!!! This... This is one of the best supernatural stories I've ever read! A true hidden gem, a masterpiece!! Must read for everyone!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    Ghost Tree is a strange and enchanting novel that blurs the line between life and death.  If you knew that your spirit would still roam after your death, would you invite those still living to help keep you company and settle your soul?  At first, that's what Brandt's grandfather wanted.  But now that he's dead, he realizes what a fool he had been for spending his time so close to such a blurred reality--and doesn't want Brandt to suffer the same fate.  But Brandt has his own problems and reason Ghost Tree is a strange and enchanting novel that blurs the line between life and death.  If you knew that your spirit would still roam after your death, would you invite those still living to help keep you company and settle your soul?  At first, that's what Brandt's grandfather wanted.  But now that he's dead, he realizes what a fool he had been for spending his time so close to such a blurred reality--and doesn't want Brandt to suffer the same fate.  But Brandt has his own problems and reason for escaping: his marriage is in shambles, and he doesn't see how he could possibly make it work.  And even more troubling are the demons who have begun to haunt not only his ancestors, but his dead (and first) girlfriend.   With a fun art style and colorful illustrations, Ghost Tree offers an intriguing look at how the past, present, and future can blur--especially when family and romance are entangled.  Overall, I found this to be a truly interesting look on what happens after life, and who is allowed to be the carrier of such otherworldly burdens.   Review cross-listed here!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    Ghost Tree takes readers on an exploration through human emotion, lifetime regrets, and relationships. The story is set in a beautiful Jaoanese mountain town tucked away in a thriving forest, where one grandson visits his grandfather's ghost and discovers a whole world of spirits working through their own regrets, including ones they haven't identified as regrets yet. I thoroughly enjoyed this comic and highly recommend it. Ghost Tree takes readers on an exploration through human emotion, lifetime regrets, and relationships. The story is set in a beautiful Jaoanese mountain town tucked away in a thriving forest, where one grandson visits his grandfather's ghost and discovers a whole world of spirits working through their own regrets, including ones they haven't identified as regrets yet. I thoroughly enjoyed this comic and highly recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    i p e k

    book 51 out of 75 ebook ↳ read for the reading rush: read a book set on a different continent than where you live I cried while reading this. Yes, I really cried. This story is one of loss, grief, living in the past, and dealing with cultural differences when you claim more than one home. It is also about what happens when you are too busy finding yourself to nurture those around you. I cannot recommend it enough. Please read this. ➼ 4.5 stars

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa (Intotheheartwyld)

    Not overly impressive or under satisfying, this just kind of mulls around In the “ehh it’s alright” phase. It deals with loss, living in the past, and running away from your problems. It’s a simple story, but felt packed for being so short. Also the abrupt ending with no real conclusion was kind of a let down.

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