web site hit counter The Man of the Forest: American Western Fiction (Illustrated) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Man of the Forest: American Western Fiction (Illustrated)

Availability: Ready to download

This edition of classic western fiction "The Man of the Forest" includes a complete story of this title (Book 1 and 2). Accidentally overhearing a plot to kidnap the niece of a prominent rancher as she arrives from the East, Milt Dale springs into action. He comes out of his splendid isolation to protect Helen and her kid sister, Bo. Leading them away from manmade danger, e This edition of classic western fiction "The Man of the Forest" includes a complete story of this title (Book 1 and 2). Accidentally overhearing a plot to kidnap the niece of a prominent rancher as she arrives from the East, Milt Dale springs into action. He comes out of his splendid isolation to protect Helen and her kid sister, Bo. Leading them away from manmade danger, exposing them to unaccustomed rigor on mountain trails, Dale imparts his rugged philosophy. Beyond the forest, Beasley and Snake Anson are still waiting to carry out their evil plot. The Man of the Forest is one of Zane Grey’s most celebrated nature novels. In a foreword to this authorized edition, his son, Loren Grey, notes that when the book was first published in 1920, “it was said that probably more Americans learned about Darwin’s views from Zane Grey than from all the college textbooks printed about the subject.” Review “No man has employed the Western story formula with better results.” --The New York Times “A story full of the thrills and charms familiar to the readers of Zane Grey.” --ALA Booklist “[Grey is] well up to his mark in this stirring tale.” --The Times Literary Supplement “Fireworks in fiction!” --The New York World


Compare

This edition of classic western fiction "The Man of the Forest" includes a complete story of this title (Book 1 and 2). Accidentally overhearing a plot to kidnap the niece of a prominent rancher as she arrives from the East, Milt Dale springs into action. He comes out of his splendid isolation to protect Helen and her kid sister, Bo. Leading them away from manmade danger, e This edition of classic western fiction "The Man of the Forest" includes a complete story of this title (Book 1 and 2). Accidentally overhearing a plot to kidnap the niece of a prominent rancher as she arrives from the East, Milt Dale springs into action. He comes out of his splendid isolation to protect Helen and her kid sister, Bo. Leading them away from manmade danger, exposing them to unaccustomed rigor on mountain trails, Dale imparts his rugged philosophy. Beyond the forest, Beasley and Snake Anson are still waiting to carry out their evil plot. The Man of the Forest is one of Zane Grey’s most celebrated nature novels. In a foreword to this authorized edition, his son, Loren Grey, notes that when the book was first published in 1920, “it was said that probably more Americans learned about Darwin’s views from Zane Grey than from all the college textbooks printed about the subject.” Review “No man has employed the Western story formula with better results.” --The New York Times “A story full of the thrills and charms familiar to the readers of Zane Grey.” --ALA Booklist “[Grey is] well up to his mark in this stirring tale.” --The Times Literary Supplement “Fireworks in fiction!” --The New York World

30 review for The Man of the Forest: American Western Fiction (Illustrated)

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    For me, the descriptions and scenes in this book came to life including the rugged and magnificent mountain splendor with its pungent smell of pine and cedar to the high octane stage at the blue smoke filled saloon. The complexity of some of the characters was astounding, particularly that of Tom "Las Vegas" Carmichael, a mild mannered Texas cowhand whose temperament transforms into a dangerous gunslinger upon a drink of whiskey. As I read about Tom, I couldn't help but think of an Oscar winning For me, the descriptions and scenes in this book came to life including the rugged and magnificent mountain splendor with its pungent smell of pine and cedar to the high octane stage at the blue smoke filled saloon. The complexity of some of the characters was astounding, particularly that of Tom "Las Vegas" Carmichael, a mild mannered Texas cowhand whose temperament transforms into a dangerous gunslinger upon a drink of whiskey. As I read about Tom, I couldn't help but think of an Oscar winning movie several years ago called "Unforgiven." I was also astounded at the mastery Grey used in describing the emotional and moral conflict of the outlaws in various incidents during the book, which makes the reader understand that most people have both good and evil within their complex natures. Finally, there is a memorable prayer said which should be the hope of everyone on their life journey: "O Lord, blaze the dim, dark trail for them through the unknown forest of life! O Lord, lead the way across the naked range of the future no mortal knows!" Overall not a perfect book, but for me it gets a five.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary Thornell

    Youve no idea how difficult it is to come across a Zane Grey book that is not Riders of the Purple Sage - nothin' wrong with RotPS, but once you read that book (and if you love western books like I do) you thirst for more. Purple Sage just isnt enough. This was the second book of his that I read and not being familiar with his other stories, I was a bit surprised at the laconic way Grey takes his time in telling the story while letting us inside the head of the main character. I had not expected Youve no idea how difficult it is to come across a Zane Grey book that is not Riders of the Purple Sage - nothin' wrong with RotPS, but once you read that book (and if you love western books like I do) you thirst for more. Purple Sage just isnt enough. This was the second book of his that I read and not being familiar with his other stories, I was a bit surprised at the laconic way Grey takes his time in telling the story while letting us inside the head of the main character. I had not expected a 'philosophical' character at all, but I liked it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    B. Morrison

    Although he started out as a cowboy and still occasionally visits the village of Pine, 30-year-old Milt Dale prefers the solitary life of a hunter. Roaming the White Mountains of Arizona accompanied only by his semi-tame cougar, Dale’s woodsmanship is sufficient to supply him with everything he needs. One day, taking refuge from a storm in an abandoned hut, he accidentally overhears Snake Anson and his gang meeting with a local landowner. Beasley hires Anson to kidnap his rival Al Auchincloss’s Although he started out as a cowboy and still occasionally visits the village of Pine, 30-year-old Milt Dale prefers the solitary life of a hunter. Roaming the White Mountains of Arizona accompanied only by his semi-tame cougar, Dale’s woodsmanship is sufficient to supply him with everything he needs. One day, taking refuge from a storm in an abandoned hut, he accidentally overhears Snake Anson and his gang meeting with a local landowner. Beasley hires Anson to kidnap his rival Al Auchincloss’s young niece who is headed west to help her dying uncle run the ranch. Beasley figures that if she disappears his way will be clear to take over Auchincloss’s ranch. After trying unsuccessfully to warn Auchincloss, Dale surprises himself by deciding to pre-empt Anson by catching Helen Raynor before she boards the stagecoach at Magdalena. “He who had little to do with the strife of men, and nothing to do with anger, felt his blood grow hot at the cowardly trap laid for an innocent girl.” Laugh if you want, but I love a good western. Continue reading at http://www.bmorrison.com/blog/

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Roark

    Very well-written, descriptive, and captivating. Grey does well developing several different characters in the story, including Dale, Helen, Bo, and the cowboy Las Vegas. It's interesting how a lot of the hero's role is given to Las Vegas in the climax of the action. The author demonstrates the contrast between a man of the woods and a cowboy. Very interesting. Very well-written, descriptive, and captivating. Grey does well developing several different characters in the story, including Dale, Helen, Bo, and the cowboy Las Vegas. It's interesting how a lot of the hero's role is given to Las Vegas in the climax of the action. The author demonstrates the contrast between a man of the woods and a cowboy. Very interesting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    charley kiel

    Profound & Rewarding Adventure Hooked early with a well constructed drama, the underlying spiritual theme gave pause to how the West was won by the physically determined and morally strong.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I've read several Zane Grey novels and so far this is my favorite. I've read several Zane Grey novels and so far this is my favorite.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve Felt

    (This same review also appears in "Shane.") In the previous week (September 16-23, 2019) I read "The Man of the Forest" by Zane Grey, published 1919, saw the movie "Ad Astra," released 2019, and read "Shane" by Jack Shaefer, published 1949. This review is a reflection on all three stories. All three are adventure stories. They are all set at the edge of civilization and the wild. All three have a military/war context. They all feature a main character, a man, as the one person that has the unique (This same review also appears in "Shane.") In the previous week (September 16-23, 2019) I read "The Man of the Forest" by Zane Grey, published 1919, saw the movie "Ad Astra," released 2019, and read "Shane" by Jack Shaefer, published 1949. This review is a reflection on all three stories. All three are adventure stories. They are all set at the edge of civilization and the wild. All three have a military/war context. They all feature a main character, a man, as the one person that has the unique skills to face the challenge of the moment. All three main characters face a possible transformation as they confront the challenge. Finally, the transformation, is a metaphor for a larger humanity transformation. Adventure stories: Forest - There is a plot to kidnap the young niece, set to inherit her uncle's ranch when he dies, by a greedy, ambitious rancher with low morals. Shane - A free range rancher, willing to use violence, is battling against peace loving homesteaders. Ad Astra - The very existence of our solar system is threatened by power surges coming from Neptune. At the Edge of Civilization: Forest - Set in the wild west of Arizona. People have settled in the area, but there is still plenty of unclaimed land, and plenty of places where one can exist peacefully with nature, namely "Paradise Park." Shane - Set in the wild west of Wyoming. A free range rancher resents the encroachment of homesteaders. Ad Astra - Set at the limits of our solar system (Neptune). Military/War: Forest - Published shortly after World War I ended. Shane - Published shortly after World War II ended. Ad Astra - Features the militaristic "Space Command." Main Character: Forest - Milt Dale, a hunter and loner, more at home in nature than around people. But he has a good heart. Shane - Shane, a gunslinger and fighter (none better) destined to lead a lonely life. Shane also has a good heart. Ad Astra - Roy McBride, an exceptionally calm and capable astronaut. Challenge and Unique Skills Required: Forest - The battle of nature, the wild west, and encroaching civilization. To solve this requires someone with a deep understanding of inherent violence and cruelty of nature who can also interact with the tamer desires of civilization. Shane - The battle between ranchers representing the law of force (if you can take it then it is yours) and the advance of civilization (together we can develop rules for the fair distribution of resources). To resolve this requires someone with the power and courage to act in the manner of evil, but is good at heart. Ad Astra - A mysterious power surge threatens the existence of all human kind. To solve this requires an astronaut of exceptional ability. It also requires an astronaut that is the son of the astronaut threatening civilization. Transformation: Forest - A man is someone who deeply understands the characteristics and morals of the natural order. While recognizing that the natural order can be cruel and violent it is part of a man to be kind and protect those that need help. The protecting warrior finds that there are others of his race worth protecting. Shane - The warrior avenging angel is attempting to give up violence, but, regrettably, finds he cannot. In this case, society is transforming, but Shane cannot participate in that transformation. Ad Astra - A son finally learns to accept and love his father while rejecting the violence, abuse, and abandonment by his father. In this case, the wounded warrior begins the healing journey. Just for fun, I liked the movie “Shane” best, followed by the book “Shane”, then the book “The Man of the Forest,” and finally the movie “Ad Astra.”

  8. 4 out of 5

    Garth Mailman

    Comes a tale from a master story-teller of the old West who died in 1939 but whose stories have inspired scores of Hollywood Movies. This one is set in the White Mountains of Arizona. The American Revolution may have been fought over the issue of British Imperialism but as writers such as Howard Zinn will explain the result was simply the replacement of robber barons in Britain with homegrown entrepreneurs. The western expansion that was to become America’s Manifest Destiny was in part an attemp Comes a tale from a master story-teller of the old West who died in 1939 but whose stories have inspired scores of Hollywood Movies. This one is set in the White Mountains of Arizona. The American Revolution may have been fought over the issue of British Imperialism but as writers such as Howard Zinn will explain the result was simply the replacement of robber barons in Britain with homegrown entrepreneurs. The western expansion that was to become America’s Manifest Destiny was in part an attempt to escape this exploitation and regimentation. Families such as the Ingalls-Wilders moved many times as soon as civilization became too much for them. Others, such as the heroes of this tale took to the forest to escape the cabals of organized society. Heroes have fought on behalf of damsels in distress in sagas as old as history. Sometimes the white knight actually wins the heart of a fair maiden. The descriptive writing here evokes a time and place with loving detail. It is also a tale of greed and betrayal as an aging patriarch is seen as losing the hold he once had on his empire. The central section of the novel becomes rather didactic with long lectures on animal and plant ecology, still relevant but tending to make the story drag. Who knew that Zane Grey was an environmentalist? The advice regarding wolves has worked to great effect since wolves have been re-introduced to Yellowstone not just for the ungulate population but for the forests and flowers as well. To further place this story in time the Mexican Grey Wolf native to Arizona was extirpated around the turn of the 1900’s not to be re-introduced until 1998. The last Grizzly near Mt. Baldy was killed in 1939.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    I read this book as part of my project to read the best-selling book of every year for the past 100 years. This was the best selling book of 1920. I have decided I really like Zane Grey's writing style. This book would not be written today, with the racism and misogyny of the times, and the damsel-in-distress trope is overused, but it was a good story with nature as one of the main characters as well as two independent females who definitely held their own against the bad guys. The message that I read this book as part of my project to read the best-selling book of every year for the past 100 years. This was the best selling book of 1920. I have decided I really like Zane Grey's writing style. This book would not be written today, with the racism and misogyny of the times, and the damsel-in-distress trope is overused, but it was a good story with nature as one of the main characters as well as two independent females who definitely held their own against the bad guys. The message that a modern audience can take from this book is the question of what is important and what should take priority in our lives. Oh, and I also loved the Mormon characters in the book. Some people in the town didn't like them, but everyone respected them and they didn't take themselves too seriously. There were even some super-funny polygamy jokes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Matzke

    This book by Zane Grey was unique in that it involved a number of characters. They were certainly individuals in their personalities but they were all dedicated to doing what was right as they understood it in the Wild West. The ending was pleasingly predictable but it took a series of adventures to get to that point. Grey’s descriptions of the beauty and danger of the west helped the reader to see and feel what his characters we seeing and feeling as they struggled for their lives against the This book by Zane Grey was unique in that it involved a number of characters. They were certainly individuals in their personalities but they were all dedicated to doing what was right as they understood it in the Wild West. The ending was pleasingly predictable but it took a series of adventures to get to that point. Grey’s descriptions of the beauty and danger of the west helped the reader to see and feel what his characters we seeing and feeling as they struggled for their lives against the elements and the tough hombres who wanted to steal the ranch. This was one of the more enjoyable stories by Grey that I have read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark Isaak

    This book paints an idealized picture of the West, which is not realistic but nor intended to be. (It is my first Zane Gray novel, but I gather that such idealization is a common theme of his.) The extremes of virtue vs. vice in the characters was still off-putting for me, as was the casual acceptance of bigotry which, in fairness to Grey, was the norm for that time and place. The writing's strongest point is the descriptions of nature, among the best I have ever seen. This book paints an idealized picture of the West, which is not realistic but nor intended to be. (It is my first Zane Gray novel, but I gather that such idealization is a common theme of his.) The extremes of virtue vs. vice in the characters was still off-putting for me, as was the casual acceptance of bigotry which, in fairness to Grey, was the norm for that time and place. The writing's strongest point is the descriptions of nature, among the best I have ever seen.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Spoiler alert at the end. The man of the forest has a pretty good story and ok character development. However this book could've been half the length and been much better. I don't know if there is an abridged version of this story, but if there is I would recommend it. A little disappointing when "the man of the forest" is not really the hero that saves the ranch. Not sure what Mr. Grey was trying to accomplish with that little switch. Spoiler alert at the end. The man of the forest has a pretty good story and ok character development. However this book could've been half the length and been much better. I don't know if there is an abridged version of this story, but if there is I would recommend it. A little disappointing when "the man of the forest" is not really the hero that saves the ranch. Not sure what Mr. Grey was trying to accomplish with that little switch.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    I love me a good cowboy story, but the spurs didn’t get into this one for me. Enjoyable, but had moments of too simple dialogue and had flat points where the book dragged on. It wrapped up practically perfect as the bad guys left, the guts got the girls, and everyone lived dreamily ever after. Zanes writing is simple, but at the right time, I’m ok with that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    raymond a vielfaure

    I read a lot of western books and I have to say nobody can tell tell a story like Zane Grey. Man of the Forest is one of my favourites....I’ve tried many other authors but always wind up disappointed..Not sure what my next novel will be but I’m kind of leaning towards Lights of the Western Stars?? Haven’t read that one in a couple of years...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bob Rivera

    Zane Grey's prose is so eloquent, that it is easy to imagine that you are right there with a bird's eye view of the story unfolding. Filled with adventure, romance, action, suspense and beauty they draw you back to the old West in the final stages of it's taming by brave men and strong women who love life and live it to the fullest. I really enjoyed this read. You will too. Zane Grey's prose is so eloquent, that it is easy to imagine that you are right there with a bird's eye view of the story unfolding. Filled with adventure, romance, action, suspense and beauty they draw you back to the old West in the final stages of it's taming by brave men and strong women who love life and live it to the fullest. I really enjoyed this read. You will too.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristin King

    Just too dated for me which is surprising since I really enjoy a lot of historical fiction from that era. If you're interested in old views of iconic "man of the west" then this might be up your alley. Just too dated for me which is surprising since I really enjoy a lot of historical fiction from that era. If you're interested in old views of iconic "man of the west" then this might be up your alley.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel B Karnes

    A beautiful portrait of man and nature. Brings out the spirit and romance of the Wild West. You can smell the forest and the plains. And drink in the beauty. This book was as fast paced as a mustang.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexa Steele

    This book was a very pleasant surprise. It was unexpectedly lovely and emotional. It lost a star though for its stereotypical depiction of Native Americans and Mexicans. That's probably how people wrote back then, but I still didn't like it. This book was a very pleasant surprise. It was unexpectedly lovely and emotional. It lost a star though for its stereotypical depiction of Native Americans and Mexicans. That's probably how people wrote back then, but I still didn't like it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Armstrong

    Excellent Beautifully written. Wonderful descriptions of the forest and country side. Very good characters which come alive. Expected ending as it came but would have been disappointed had it ended otherwise.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brenda S

    Flowing, beautiful, thoughtful prose. Paints a picture of the old West that draws you in and helps you understand that rugged, dangerous world. A perfect example of the Western genre. Guns and glory. Rugged, real and beautiful. Lose your self in the old west.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Russell G Edwards

    Living life in the wilderness prepares men and women with Strengths and abilities to resist evil doers, help their friends and surmount obstacles on every hand, winning in the end, love and life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ricky

    A very average western. Should be titled "two girls move out west" because the titular man of the forest, while very interesting, plays a pretty small part of the story. Heck, even Las Vegas plays a bigger role. I also really wised the mountain man's animals saw more action. A very average western. Should be titled "two girls move out west" because the titular man of the forest, while very interesting, plays a pretty small part of the story. Heck, even Las Vegas plays a bigger role. I also really wised the mountain man's animals saw more action.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Written 100 years ago and one of the best Zane Grey books I've ever read. If you ever want to visit northern New Mexico and Northern Arizona without leaving your home read this book or just about any of Zane Grey's books. He was one of the best at describing scenery of any author I've read. Written 100 years ago and one of the best Zane Grey books I've ever read. If you ever want to visit northern New Mexico and Northern Arizona without leaving your home read this book or just about any of Zane Grey's books. He was one of the best at describing scenery of any author I've read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Very good beginning, then it got preachy, then it lost its way, and then it shuffled to an end of sorts. Not a fan. We did an in-depth review on our podcast. https://redcircle.com/shows/gutenberg... Very good beginning, then it got preachy, then it lost its way, and then it shuffled to an end of sorts. Not a fan. We did an in-depth review on our podcast. https://redcircle.com/shows/gutenberg...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    First Audio book to which I have listen.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Lange

    Well paced with wonderful descriptions of the wilderness. Great character development and a nice storyline. The old west was described in detail and you felt like you were there.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clint Wardlow

    This was the first western I have read in a while and it was a pleasant read. It could have kept me more engaged but part of that was my fault.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Baird

    GREAT READ Zane Grey never fails to entertain. His ability to mix nature into his realistic stories always leaves wanting more. All fans of western should read this.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    somewhat idealistic view on life in nature in extreme. Still a very good read, though for me not as good as the Knights.

  30. 5 out of 5

    PJ

    beautiful description and philosophy of nature

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.