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Monolith to Microservices: Sustaining Productivity While Detangling the System

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How do you detangle a monolithic system and migrate it to a microservices architecture? How do you do it while maintaining business-as-usual? As a companion to Sam Newman's extremely popular Building Microservices, this new book details a proven method for transitioning an existing monolithic system to a microservice architecture. With many illustrative examples, insightful How do you detangle a monolithic system and migrate it to a microservices architecture? How do you do it while maintaining business-as-usual? As a companion to Sam Newman's extremely popular Building Microservices, this new book details a proven method for transitioning an existing monolithic system to a microservice architecture. With many illustrative examples, insightful migration patterns, and a bevy of practical advice to transition your monolith enterprise into a microservice operation, this practical guide covers multiple scenarios and strategies for a successful migration, from initial planning all the way through application and database decomposition. You'll learn several tried and tested patterns and techniques that you can use as you migrate your existing architecture. Ideal for organizations looking to transition to microservices, rather than rebuild Helps companies determine whether to migrate, when to migrate, and where to begin Addresses communication, integration, and the migration of legacy systems Discusses multiple migration patterns and where they apply Provides database migration examples, along with synchronization strategies Explores application decomposition, including several architectural refactoring patterns Delves into details of database decomposition, including the impact of breaking referential and transactional integrity, new failure modes, and more


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How do you detangle a monolithic system and migrate it to a microservices architecture? How do you do it while maintaining business-as-usual? As a companion to Sam Newman's extremely popular Building Microservices, this new book details a proven method for transitioning an existing monolithic system to a microservice architecture. With many illustrative examples, insightful How do you detangle a monolithic system and migrate it to a microservices architecture? How do you do it while maintaining business-as-usual? As a companion to Sam Newman's extremely popular Building Microservices, this new book details a proven method for transitioning an existing monolithic system to a microservice architecture. With many illustrative examples, insightful migration patterns, and a bevy of practical advice to transition your monolith enterprise into a microservice operation, this practical guide covers multiple scenarios and strategies for a successful migration, from initial planning all the way through application and database decomposition. You'll learn several tried and tested patterns and techniques that you can use as you migrate your existing architecture. Ideal for organizations looking to transition to microservices, rather than rebuild Helps companies determine whether to migrate, when to migrate, and where to begin Addresses communication, integration, and the migration of legacy systems Discusses multiple migration patterns and where they apply Provides database migration examples, along with synchronization strategies Explores application decomposition, including several architectural refactoring patterns Delves into details of database decomposition, including the impact of breaking referential and transactional integrity, new failure modes, and more

30 review for Monolith to Microservices: Sustaining Productivity While Detangling the System

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    Sam Newman did it again. He has written a very good book on microservices. The one which is technology-agnostic & in the same time - very practical. What I like most is that Sam doesn't try to avoid answering uncomfortable questions - e.g. what to do when we have queries spanning across separate storages. Another positive fact is that we're not getting 100th description of what is CQRS & Eventsourcing. What else? There's no zealotry, no expressed preferences regarding any particular tools (except S Sam Newman did it again. He has written a very good book on microservices. The one which is technology-agnostic & in the same time - very practical. What I like most is that Sam doesn't try to avoid answering uncomfortable questions - e.g. what to do when we have queries spanning across separate storages. Another positive fact is that we're not getting 100th description of what is CQRS & Eventsourcing. What else? There's no zealotry, no expressed preferences regarding any particular tools (except Sam's love towards FaaS ;>), examples presented are good enough (not really deeply into the details, but on a sufficient level). What did I miss? Some more explicit statements regarding data redundancy (pragmatism over normalization), helpful conventions (append-only approach & immutability of selected data - this was partially covered in the chapter about deletes). Strongly recommended. Short, but a very decent book. P.S. The version I've got was sponsored by nginx (2019.10) - it may differ slightly from the version which will be mass-printed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Max Wolffe

    Overall I found this book to be an excellent, practical guide to approaching a monolith decomposition, though I have a few issues with it. The Good: - Newman starts by presenting all of the reasons why you might want to do microservices and how you could solve them WITHOUT doing microservices. This was the main complaint with "Building Microservices" which presents microservices without being too critical about when one would want to avoid microservices. - There's a great section describing how o Overall I found this book to be an excellent, practical guide to approaching a monolith decomposition, though I have a few issues with it. The Good: - Newman starts by presenting all of the reasons why you might want to do microservices and how you could solve them WITHOUT doing microservices. This was the main complaint with "Building Microservices" which presents microservices without being too critical about when one would want to avoid microservices. - There's a great section describing how one might help their organization to make a change to microservices. This section builds nicely on Newman's second chapter of "Building Microservices", "The Evolutionary Architect". - There are some good decomposition patterns, notably: branch by abstraction and the strangler fig pattern. - There is an EXCELLENT section on the growing pains one might encounter when they start adopting microservices. I found this section to be particularly useful because it's leveraging Newman's considerable experience as a consultant, in which he's seen lots of different companies adopt microservices and encounter problems. - Newman focuses on core, long-lived aspects of migrations instead of on specific technologies (which will be outdated in a year), with just enough technology examples to help one connect concepts to real world examples. The Not So Good: - The actual decomposition recommendations almost entirely ignore the issues brought up in the "Growing Pains" chapter. One huge issue which microservices bring up is that network calls have a different guarantee than databases: they may fail, they aren't transactional, they may timeout, etc. This causes big problems with two proposals in the book: - Dual write migrations - A migration strategy in which one writes to both systems using rest calls, migrates data, and then changes reads to the new source of truth. The big issue with this strategy is keeping both stores consistent since calls to either system can fail or timeout. In my experience, this is one of the hardest parts of migrations, and it's barely handled as written. I would have loved to see more examples of how companies handled this, from Newman's experience. - Orchestrated Sagas - A similar issue arises in Orchestrated Sagas. There may be partial failures on any part of the way with both the inbound saga and the "compensating transaction". The book suggests using choreographed transactions where possible but doesn't bring up this danger of orchestrated transactions. I'm wondering if it would have been better to restructure the book to first present the unique issues which microservice architectures encounter and then present decomposition techniques which lead to architectures which are resilient to these issues. - The decomposition examples given are pretty straightforward. This is probably to make the points very clear, but it would have been great to have at least one example of a decomposition which was tricky or which wasn't worth decomposing at all. Newman mentions that such examples exist, but doesn't do any further examination. Overall: Overall, a very practical guide to migrating from a monolith to microservices, and (importantly) why you might not want to.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jakub

    What I liked a most in the book is that is short and dense. It have everything in proper amount of length, giving a good overview of the problems, and provide some of possible solution to them with a bit of “what I would do”. Really good book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    Practical advice on how to move to Microservices. It also discusses the reasons you would want to migrate your app to a Microservices architectural style and even gives alternatives that might help you achieve the same goal without migrating. I liked the realistic examples, trade-off analysis. I enjoyed Chapter 4, on Decomposing the Database the most, because I think that's probably the hardest part when migrating to Microservices (and the one that gets the least amount of coverage in many resour Practical advice on how to move to Microservices. It also discusses the reasons you would want to migrate your app to a Microservices architectural style and even gives alternatives that might help you achieve the same goal without migrating. I liked the realistic examples, trade-off analysis. I enjoyed Chapter 4, on Decomposing the Database the most, because I think that's probably the hardest part when migrating to Microservices (and the one that gets the least amount of coverage in many resources). The patterns cover problems we've all seen in the wild and the solutions are pragmatic and useful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mahmoud Tantawy

    One word: BORING The book is basically 2~3 chapters and bunch of filler chapters. If you have some experience or got your hands dirty already with microservices, then probably the majority of the book is known to you, the material you read and watch online on daily basis covers the majority of the book. If you don't have any experience with microservices AND you've been living in a cave to avoid online material about microservices then it might be a good book for you. One word: BORING The book is basically 2~3 chapters and bunch of filler chapters. If you have some experience or got your hands dirty already with microservices, then probably the majority of the book is known to you, the material you read and watch online on daily basis covers the majority of the book. If you don't have any experience with microservices AND you've been living in a cave to avoid online material about microservices then it might be a good book for you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Denis Romanovsky

    A nice book with lots of recepies, patterns and best practices for breaking monoliths into microservices. Not too detailed into tech stuff, but still good anough.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luboš

    I went through many of mentioned problems in hard way. Anyway, it was a good opportunity to stop and think. I like that this book does not push microservices for everything. Architectonic hints described in the book could be handy for any modular system. I got a free copy via nginx I went through many of mentioned problems in hard way. Anyway, it was a good opportunity to stop and think. I like that this book does not push microservices for everything. Architectonic hints described in the book could be handy for any modular system. I got a free copy via nginx

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Stevenson

    A great thing about this book is that it covers a lot of the non-technical prerequisites that need to be considered within an organization, before even bothering to attempt to migrate to a microservices architecture. Basic questions about “why” an organization would even want to do that are not-so common sense, but essential. Without knowing why your organization wants to make such a move most likely condemns the “IT department” to merely creating the legacy systems of tomorrow. There is also cov A great thing about this book is that it covers a lot of the non-technical prerequisites that need to be considered within an organization, before even bothering to attempt to migrate to a microservices architecture. Basic questions about “why” an organization would even want to do that are not-so common sense, but essential. Without knowing why your organization wants to make such a move most likely condemns the “IT department” to merely creating the legacy systems of tomorrow. There is also coverage of methods to help advocate for such prerequisite organizational change, which is probably not something your average software developer is familiar with, so a very valuable read indeed. The patterns for migrating from monoliths to microservices in Chapter 3 include some that are just useful pattens in any system migration or modification context, but the coverage is clear and reminded me of the times when I’d employed similar techniques myself. As is the case with design patterns, having a common vocabulary for them is a valuable aspect. Chapter four covers decomposition of your classic relational database schemas into more microservices friendly granularity, without glossing over the trade-offs to be understood. The last chapter overviews some types of issues that one might experience during an incremental journey to more and more microservices and perhaps a growing organization (if you are lucky to be part of a successful one!) I read the Building Microservices book first, but found this one useful for its focus on migrating from a monolith / shared database nightmare to microservices. I’ll certainly take care to pull this back up when I’m facing some kind of migration issue, for inspiration or ideas I might forget in the meantime. That said, if you can properly modularize your system(s) then you might be better to not even think about microservices, a point made in both this book and the earlier one. I read the 1st edition - there’s several editing / typo problems throughout (mostly chapters 3 and 4 I think), but not so bad the content can’t be understood.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Xanan

    The book approaches the problem of migrating an existing monolithic architecture to a microservice architecture. The book considers technical as well as non-technical issues involved in the migration. The technical part of the book (Chapters 3 and 4) is still very high level. No programming language is used and no code examples are given. Potential problems and possible solutions are clearly illustrated with pros and cons. The first chapter introduces the monolithic design, its defining characterist The book approaches the problem of migrating an existing monolithic architecture to a microservice architecture. The book considers technical as well as non-technical issues involved in the migration. The technical part of the book (Chapters 3 and 4) is still very high level. No programming language is used and no code examples are given. Potential problems and possible solutions are clearly illustrated with pros and cons. The first chapter introduces the monolithic design, its defining characteristics, its inherent limitations and how microservices can improve that. Chapter 2 highlights the importance of careful planning before embarking on a migration process. It suggests the need to consider implications in terms of team organization, skills, and costs. The author also points out that migration to microservices is not a must and in some situations a monolithic design might actually be a better solution. Chapter 3 discusses several patterns that can be used to incrementally migrate selected functionalities into a microservice. It explores possible alternative solutions to common problems and describes positive and negative aspects of each. Chapter 4 focuses on how a database that backs a monolith affects and is affected by the migration of some functionality to a microservice. Splits and non splits solutions are considered together with repercussions on data access and transactions. Chapter 5 is a sort of troubleshooting summary where potential migration problems are reviewed with solutions. "Building Microservices" is another other book from the author that partly overlaps with this one but discusses microservices from a more general point of view. "Monolith to Microservices" focuses more on the problem of migrating an existing monolithic system to one based on microservices. In the book you will read several times "if you want to know more about this read my other book Building Microservices". I found this very annoying.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Regis Hattori

    This book has some good advice on how to manage an application or database migration in small steps. The first and last chapters are just an introduction to microservices and their problems. Nothing new especially for those who have already read "Building Microservices". The second chapter helps us to plan the migration including the soft skills required. But more interesting than that, it shows us that depend on the problems we are trying to solve there are some easier and cheaper alternatives t This book has some good advice on how to manage an application or database migration in small steps. The first and last chapters are just an introduction to microservices and their problems. Nothing new especially for those who have already read "Building Microservices". The second chapter helps us to plan the migration including the soft skills required. But more interesting than that, it shows us that depend on the problems we are trying to solve there are some easier and cheaper alternatives to microservices that do necessarily involve code. For example, changing the organizational structure or the infrastructure. The third and forth chapters talk about the patterns. This should be the most important part of the book but I didn't like how the patterns were organized. Comparing to other "patterns" books like "Design Patterns" and "Enterprise Integration Patterns", this book is much more disorganized. One of the most valuable thing about the patterns is that when you read about one of them, you can also have a good overview about other related ones. Here, the patterns are sometimes compared only in one way. For example, if patterns A and B are related and B is presented last, the chapter that talks about B will compare it to A but not necessary the other way around. That way, you can only see the relationship among them if you read them in order. Besides that, some patterns seems not to be very useful. The most important ones are listed and explained in this talk was made just before this book release: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9I9Gd... I think it is something between 3 and 4 stars. I will rate as 4 because it is not easy to find material about it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak Hegde

    A well-written book on the different problems that you are likely to encounter when migrating from a monolith to a distributed systems microservices architecture. The book is neatly divided into different parts that cover different technical and non0technical aspects of making the move such as figuring out if microservices architecture is the right path for you (Chapter 1), getting the right team and team structure in place and also management buy-ins (Chapter 2), breaking down code and migratin A well-written book on the different problems that you are likely to encounter when migrating from a monolith to a distributed systems microservices architecture. The book is neatly divided into different parts that cover different technical and non0technical aspects of making the move such as figuring out if microservices architecture is the right path for you (Chapter 1), getting the right team and team structure in place and also management buy-ins (Chapter 2), breaking down code and migrating using different patterns to reduce coupling (Chapter 3), migrating and breaking down datastore and database schemas and patterns to do this (Chapter 4), The likely problems that you will encounter when undergoing the migration (Chapter 5). I like the fact that the book looks at the migration path holistically liberally talking about different kinds of tools, techniques and further reading references. I have done such migrations in the past in my career but I learnt a lot in this book (even if it was the name for the patterns I implemented). The version that I read was sponsored by Ngnix so it might be slightly different from the commercial book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bartłomiej Falkowski

    It's so hard to write a good book about software architecture. I think you have two options: digging deeply into the technical details or trying to be technologicaly agnostic and relying only on "abstractions". This book is of the latter type - word "Docker" is used only once and word "Kubernetess" is used less than five times :) And this is a really good book. What I liked: - Simplicity. All the patterns short and well explained. Moreover, we always have a context of usage - it's easier to put it It's so hard to write a good book about software architecture. I think you have two options: digging deeply into the technical details or trying to be technologicaly agnostic and relying only on "abstractions". This book is of the latter type - word "Docker" is used only once and word "Kubernetess" is used less than five times :) And this is a really good book. What I liked: - Simplicity. All the patterns short and well explained. Moreover, we always have a context of usage - it's easier to put it in the "real-life" scenario. - Pragmatism. I like the idea of slider instead of button for description of making changes. Nothing is for free and we should always look at architecture migration in this way. What I didn't like: - The shallowness of some topics. For example, the phrase "extract your services based on bounded contexts" is in self a topic for multiple books. However, I understand that exploring such problems in this book would increase the number of pages dramatically :) I accept it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Saran Sivashanmugam

    Another great microservices book from Sam Newman. I felt this is a sequel to his earlier book, Building Microservices. Sam updated some concepts from recent microservices evolution such as choreographed vs orchestrated Sagas, added infrastructure evolution such as Kubernetes. I loved the depth he covered the monolith database refactoring and the simple but elegant solutions he proposed using schemas and views in existing database engine for refactoring. I'm a fan of Sam's pragmatic approach when Another great microservices book from Sam Newman. I felt this is a sequel to his earlier book, Building Microservices. Sam updated some concepts from recent microservices evolution such as choreographed vs orchestrated Sagas, added infrastructure evolution such as Kubernetes. I loved the depth he covered the monolith database refactoring and the simple but elegant solutions he proposed using schemas and views in existing database engine for refactoring. I'm a fan of Sam's pragmatic approach when introducing new concepts that works very well for startups and big corporations. He also delved in to details about the organizational aspects of microservices and the distributed systems concerns that microservices might bring. If you liked reading his earlier book Building Microservices, then this is a highly recommended sequel helping in implementing that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Koosh Doc

    This book seems to be a step 1 if an organization is flirting with the idea of moving from a monolith to microservices. I like the fact the author is honest about evaluating your needs before allowing yourself to be swept by the herd. Since I am a part of an organization which has already made the decision to switch to using microservices (and rightly so!!), it's interesting to know that some issues are quite widespread regardless of which organization you work for and actually see them in front This book seems to be a step 1 if an organization is flirting with the idea of moving from a monolith to microservices. I like the fact the author is honest about evaluating your needs before allowing yourself to be swept by the herd. Since I am a part of an organization which has already made the decision to switch to using microservices (and rightly so!!), it's interesting to know that some issues are quite widespread regardless of which organization you work for and actually see them in front of myself. The author has identified those issues and has given solutions which are actually being implemented by my team (eg: Strangler Fig, Shims). But at some point, one might realize that the author has written things that are quite obvious and seemed repetitive (parity with legacy functionality, end-to-end integration testing, breaking changes). It kind of became a drag in the 5th chapter.

  15. 5 out of 5

    adnan rafiq

    Pure excellence - must read It is an amazing book. It covers everything from start to end. If you want to travel the road of Microservices. It’s structured in a way that fits the mental model of monolith developers but to evaluate Microservices architecture. It’s going to serve a glossary of what to do & what not to do when doing Microservices. Starts with simple 3 questions, during the journey you would feel yeah it feels very real. But without single line of code. You will get answers along th Pure excellence - must read It is an amazing book. It covers everything from start to end. If you want to travel the road of Microservices. It’s structured in a way that fits the mental model of monolith developers but to evaluate Microservices architecture. It’s going to serve a glossary of what to do & what not to do when doing Microservices. Starts with simple 3 questions, during the journey you would feel yeah it feels very real. But without single line of code. You will get answers along the way, from people problems, team ownership, tackling database, importance of DDD and suggestions on tool one has to learn along the way. Thanks Sam Newman for writing such an amazing book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fermin Quant

    A very well written book, which shows in every page the experience of the author on the topic. It really puts into perspective the huge task of moving to microservices from a monolith, the most common pitfalls, and provides possible solutions to them. The book is mostly useful as a reference for your journey of moving to microservices, it is not an absolute proven guide of not failing, but more a collection of very well organized experiences that will help you avoid most common problems and kind A very well written book, which shows in every page the experience of the author on the topic. It really puts into perspective the huge task of moving to microservices from a monolith, the most common pitfalls, and provides possible solutions to them. The book is mostly useful as a reference for your journey of moving to microservices, it is not an absolute proven guide of not failing, but more a collection of very well organized experiences that will help you avoid most common problems and kind of guide your decision making. It is good that the author emphasizes at the start that microservices is not for every situation, and spends some time explaining how you can figure this out for your current situation before you start.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Damian Zydek

    Why Sam Newman wrote this book? (IMO) Because as Martin Fowler wrote, "You must be THIS tall to use microservices". When should I move to microservice architecture? What are the pros and cons of microservice architecture? Which module of my system should I move as first? What is the process of refactoring to microservices? What are the best practices for refactoring to microservices? What new problems will occur after moving to microservice architecture? This book will help you grow to "THIS" tall by a Why Sam Newman wrote this book? (IMO) Because as Martin Fowler wrote, "You must be THIS tall to use microservices". When should I move to microservice architecture? What are the pros and cons of microservice architecture? Which module of my system should I move as first? What is the process of refactoring to microservices? What are the best practices for refactoring to microservices? What new problems will occur after moving to microservice architecture? This book will help you grow to "THIS" tall by answering those and other questions.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lazar Dilov

    Honestly in the past years I have read a lot of titles about microservices architecture but this one turned out to be actually useful for me and my job. For the last two years I was desperately trying to get rid of monolithic structured applications and this book gave me the best approaches to do that! It is fairly simple but really practical and useful! Congrats to Newman! Although there were many thing I already knew, there were also some observations and simple advices that can definitely cha Honestly in the past years I have read a lot of titles about microservices architecture but this one turned out to be actually useful for me and my job. For the last two years I was desperately trying to get rid of monolithic structured applications and this book gave me the best approaches to do that! It is fairly simple but really practical and useful! Congrats to Newman! Although there were many thing I already knew, there were also some observations and simple advices that can definitely change your workflow whenever you are facing such issues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Gorski

    This a review for the first chapter of the book... I like the written approach/style of the book. It initiates from core concepts of coupling and cohesion which are the core principle and linked well with microservices decompositions and common scenarios. Thoughts for an extension for the book: I thought this chapter one is a good link to the requirements phase. The requirements being decomposed in the same way as a pre-design phase to then prepare for microservices design.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Tobin-campbell

    Good overview - pretty basic if you’ve had Microservices experience before The first 4 chapters go over patterns of migrating from monolith to Microservices, the pros and cons of Microservices, and other such things. If you’ve done any work with Microservices, much of this will be familiar. I found chapter 5 to be the most interesting chapter. It discusses the growing pains you’re likely to run into, and gives some good advice on how to address those pains.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Viktor Malyshev

    Not really a super technical book. It's about thinking about microservices, resolving problems with it. And thinking about how to solve those problems. Key ideas from the book: give yourself time to get better at building microservices and get enough information before actually deciding to go into MS world. I recommend reading this book to all who are struggling with a monolithic approach where microservices can do the job. Not really a super technical book. It's about thinking about microservices, resolving problems with it. And thinking about how to solve those problems. Key ideas from the book: give yourself time to get better at building microservices and get enough information before actually deciding to go into MS world. I recommend reading this book to all who are struggling with a monolithic approach where microservices can do the job.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ebouks

    Good introductory to transforming a monolith into a microservices-based system. It lays out the main ideas nicely. However, it’s a bit naive and doesn’t touch on real-world systems which are way more complex. Buy the ebook now: Monolith to Microservices: Evolutionary Patterns to Transform Your Monolith 1st Edition Good introductory to transforming a monolith into a microservices-based system. It lays out the main ideas nicely. However, it’s a bit naive and doesn’t touch on real-world systems which are way more complex. Buy the ebook now: Monolith to Microservices: Evolutionary Patterns to Transform Your Monolith 1st Edition

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Good, very practical review of the thought processes and real-world symptoms and consequences when considering a move to microservices. You'll need to think for this one, as the author doesn't hand you the answers, but if you do think through this material, you'll be equipped for the squishy world of actual professional software development. Good, very practical review of the thought processes and real-world symptoms and consequences when considering a move to microservices. You'll need to think for this one, as the author doesn't hand you the answers, but if you do think through this material, you'll be equipped for the squishy world of actual professional software development.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ibrahim Tasyurt

    I loved this book. The author puts together the challenges&opportunities when a transforming monolith to micro-services. Also compiles the patterns to migrate the code and data. The patterns described in this book is not only applicable to micros-ervices transformation but any kind of re-write and migration cases.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Newman compiled a decent survey of the different patterns you can use to break apart a monolith. Unfortunately with this type of book most of the patterns don't apply to your particular situation. Having said that, the patterns were well explained and for visual learners it includes clear diagrams to illustrate designs. I'll report back once we break apart our monolith :) Newman compiled a decent survey of the different patterns you can use to break apart a monolith. Unfortunately with this type of book most of the patterns don't apply to your particular situation. Having said that, the patterns were well explained and for visual learners it includes clear diagrams to illustrate designs. I'll report back once we break apart our monolith :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Great content, very helpful. The meat of the book could have been organized a bit better, and some topics could have used a bit more expansion. Could have used more depth on data migration strategies -- the dual write strategy almost completely ignores possible consistency issues due to partial failures.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Boyan

    Even though I have been working with microservices for the past 6-7 years, reading this book I learnt I lot more. I like the way the author has structured the book with concrete examples for different cases.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Perez Moncho

    Very good book, if you are thinking about microservices you must read it. It explains the different ways you can migrate from a monolith to microservices, but also tries to explain how to understand if this move is right for you. A brief summary would be: "strangler patter" and it's not easy. Very good book, if you are thinking about microservices you must read it. It explains the different ways you can migrate from a monolith to microservices, but also tries to explain how to understand if this move is right for you. A brief summary would be: "strangler patter" and it's not easy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hosein

    A very fundamental book which introduces the problems and approaches of the migration to Microservices. I was already familiar with some topics but enjoyed reading it because there were some edge cases also explained there.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ruturaj Vartak

    I liked the simple thought process that was applied to the this topic, nothing drastic, very objective and cognizant of real-world problems. Its a must read for all devs, specially guys orchestrating things between multiple teams.

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