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The Last Unknowns: Deep, Elegant, Profound Unanswered Questions About the Universe, the Mind, the Future of Civilization, and the Meaning of Life

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Discover the universe's last unknowns—here are the unanswered questions that obsess "the world's finest minds" (The Guardian) Featuring a foreword by DANIEL KAHNEMAN, Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and SlowThis is a little book of profound questions (only questions!)—unknowns that address the secrets of our world, our civilization, the meaning of life. Her Discover the universe's last unknowns—here are the unanswered questions that obsess "the world's finest minds" (The Guardian) Featuring a foreword by DANIEL KAHNEMAN, Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and SlowThis is a little book of profound questions (only questions!)—unknowns that address the secrets of our world, our civilization, the meaning of life. Here are the deepest riddles that have fascinated, obsessed, and haunted the greatest thinkers of our time, including Nobel laureates, cosmologists, philosophers, economists, prize-winning novelists, religious scholars, and more than 250 leading scientists, artists, and theorists. In The Last Unknowns, John Brockman, publisher of Edge.org, asks "a mind-blowing gathering of innovative thinkers" (Booklist): "What is ‘The Last Question,’ your last question, the question for which you will be remembered?"Featuring the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel JARED DIAMOND • Nobel Prize-winning University of Chicago economist RICHARD THALER • Harvard psychologist STEVEN PINKER • religion scholar ELAINE PAGELS • author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics CARLO ROVELLI • Booker Prize–winning novelist IAN McEWAN • neuroscientist SAM HARRIS • philosopher DANIEL C. DENNETT • MIT theorist SHERRY TURKLE • decoder of the human genome J. CRAIG VENTER • The Coddling of the American Mind author JONATHAN HAIDT • Nobel Prize-winning physicist FRANK WILCZEK • UC Berkeley psychologist ALISON GOPNICK • philosopher REBECCA NEWBERGER GOLDSTEIN • New York Times columnist CARL ZIMMER • MIT cosmologist MAX TEGMARK • Whole Earth founder STEWART BRAND • "Marginal Revolution" economist TYLER COWEN • Anatomy of Love author HELEN FISHER • Noble Prize-winning NASA physicist JOHN C. MATHER • psychologist JUDITH RICH HARRIS • Princeton physicist FREEMAN DYSON • musician BRIAN ENO • environmental scientist JENNIFER JACQUET • Duke economist DAN ARIELY • Oxford philosopher A. C. GRAYLING • Harvard cosmologist LISA RANDALL • anthropologist MARY CATHERINE BATESON • Emotional Intelligence author DANIEL GOLEMAN • Harvard genticist GEORGE CHURCH • Blueprint author NICHOLAS A. CHRISTAKIS • Stanford political scientist MARGARET LEVI • economist ALAN S. BLINDER • publisher TIM O'REILLY • theoretical cosmologist JANNA LEVIN • Serpentine Gallery owner HANS ULRICH OBRIST • Wired founding editor KEVIN KELLY • Cambridge astrophysicist MARTIN REES, and more than 200 others.  


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Discover the universe's last unknowns—here are the unanswered questions that obsess "the world's finest minds" (The Guardian) Featuring a foreword by DANIEL KAHNEMAN, Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and SlowThis is a little book of profound questions (only questions!)—unknowns that address the secrets of our world, our civilization, the meaning of life. Her Discover the universe's last unknowns—here are the unanswered questions that obsess "the world's finest minds" (The Guardian) Featuring a foreword by DANIEL KAHNEMAN, Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and SlowThis is a little book of profound questions (only questions!)—unknowns that address the secrets of our world, our civilization, the meaning of life. Here are the deepest riddles that have fascinated, obsessed, and haunted the greatest thinkers of our time, including Nobel laureates, cosmologists, philosophers, economists, prize-winning novelists, religious scholars, and more than 250 leading scientists, artists, and theorists. In The Last Unknowns, John Brockman, publisher of Edge.org, asks "a mind-blowing gathering of innovative thinkers" (Booklist): "What is ‘The Last Question,’ your last question, the question for which you will be remembered?"Featuring the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel JARED DIAMOND • Nobel Prize-winning University of Chicago economist RICHARD THALER • Harvard psychologist STEVEN PINKER • religion scholar ELAINE PAGELS • author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics CARLO ROVELLI • Booker Prize–winning novelist IAN McEWAN • neuroscientist SAM HARRIS • philosopher DANIEL C. DENNETT • MIT theorist SHERRY TURKLE • decoder of the human genome J. CRAIG VENTER • The Coddling of the American Mind author JONATHAN HAIDT • Nobel Prize-winning physicist FRANK WILCZEK • UC Berkeley psychologist ALISON GOPNICK • philosopher REBECCA NEWBERGER GOLDSTEIN • New York Times columnist CARL ZIMMER • MIT cosmologist MAX TEGMARK • Whole Earth founder STEWART BRAND • "Marginal Revolution" economist TYLER COWEN • Anatomy of Love author HELEN FISHER • Noble Prize-winning NASA physicist JOHN C. MATHER • psychologist JUDITH RICH HARRIS • Princeton physicist FREEMAN DYSON • musician BRIAN ENO • environmental scientist JENNIFER JACQUET • Duke economist DAN ARIELY • Oxford philosopher A. C. GRAYLING • Harvard cosmologist LISA RANDALL • anthropologist MARY CATHERINE BATESON • Emotional Intelligence author DANIEL GOLEMAN • Harvard genticist GEORGE CHURCH • Blueprint author NICHOLAS A. CHRISTAKIS • Stanford political scientist MARGARET LEVI • economist ALAN S. BLINDER • publisher TIM O'REILLY • theoretical cosmologist JANNA LEVIN • Serpentine Gallery owner HANS ULRICH OBRIST • Wired founding editor KEVIN KELLY • Cambridge astrophysicist MARTIN REES, and more than 200 others.  

30 review for The Last Unknowns: Deep, Elegant, Profound Unanswered Questions About the Universe, the Mind, the Future of Civilization, and the Meaning of Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Wineberg

    On Twitter, long threads develop over a question asked by one person. The responses come from a large variety of people, usually with no expertise in the subject matter. In The Last Unknowns, John Brockman asked a gaggle of mostly distinguished academics to come up with a question that had no answer. The result is one short question per page, with the questioner’s name and credentials at the top. Often, the credentials are longer than the question. It’s twitter for the accomplished. Some work to On Twitter, long threads develop over a question asked by one person. The responses come from a large variety of people, usually with no expertise in the subject matter. In The Last Unknowns, John Brockman asked a gaggle of mostly distinguished academics to come up with a question that had no answer. The result is one short question per page, with the questioner’s name and credentials at the top. Often, the credentials are longer than the question. It’s twitter for the accomplished. Some work to game the system, just like on a twitter thread. Their questions are carefully crafted to be impossible or at least impossibly clever: David Chalmers, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, asks: How can we design a machine that can correctly answer every question, including this one? (Ha ha ha) Tyler Cowen, economic guru, asks: How far are we from wishing to return to the technologies of 1900? Rolf Dobelli of Zurich Minds asks: Does this question exist in a parallel universe? So academics can be fun people too. Here are some good ones: Alun Anderson: Are people who cheat vital to driving progress in human societies? Lisa Feldman Barrett: How does a single brain architecture create many kinds of human minds? Andrew Barron: What would a diagram that gave a complete understanding of imagination need to be? They can also be incomprehensible: Amanda Gefter: Is intersubjectivity possible in a quantum mechanical universe? And there the oldies but goldies, like: Why? and: I=we? For all their erudition, not very original I’m afraid. The majority of the questions are in two areas: the human mind, and the cosmos. There is only one question about surviving climate change, if that says anything about the concerns of the intelligentsia. Besides academics, there are a few artists and entertainers. I’m not sure of what use all this is. It seems to be a collection of questions to end conversations with. David Wineberg

  2. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    For the 50th anniversary of "The World Question Center," and for the finale to the twenty years of Edge Questions, I turned it over to the Edgies: "Ask 'The Last Question', your last question, the question for which you will be remembered." – John Brockman, Editor, Edge I'm not familiar with the projects going on at Edge, but as I received an ARC of The Last Unknowns, and as I'm not uninterested to discover what leading thinkers would choose as their (as yet) unanswerable questions “for which (they For the 50th anniversary of "The World Question Center," and for the finale to the twenty years of Edge Questions, I turned it over to the Edgies: "Ask 'The Last Question', your last question, the question for which you will be remembered." – John Brockman, Editor, Edge I'm not familiar with the projects going on at Edge, but as I received an ARC of The Last Unknowns, and as I'm not uninterested to discover what leading thinkers would choose as their (as yet) unanswerable questions “for which (they) will be remembered”, I was pleased to delve into its pages – and it's not quite what I was expecting. It is simply an assemblage of three hundred or so questions; one per page; often with its author's credentials taking up more space than the question itself. Many of the questions were quite intriguing, and many, to me, were not; and overall it felt like there was something missing – the history or context around why these particular questions were being posed. The idea behind the project is still useful (and I'd imagine of particular interest to those who are familiar with Edge), and I am ultimately enlarged by having now read it. (Note: I read an ARC and passages quoted might not be in their final forms.) I've selected a few representative questions, those which I found cheeky: David Christian (Director, Big History Institute, and Distinguished Professor in History, Macquarie University): Will we pass our audition as planetary managers? Rolph Dobelli (Founder, Zurich Minds): Does this question exist in a parallel universe? And those that I found pointless: Laura Betzig (Anthropologist, historian): Will we ever live together in a hive? George Dyson (Science Historian): Why are there no trees in the ocean? Those that I found intriguing: Lorraine Justice (Dean emerita and professor of industrial design, Rochester Institute of Technology): What might the last fully biological human's statement be at their last supper? Barnaby Marsh (Evolutionary dynamics scholar, Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, Harvard University): How much of what we call “reality” is ultimately grounded and instantiated in convincing communication and storytelling? And those that I found too arcane for me to contemplate: Bart Kosko (Information scientist and professor of electrical engineering and law, University of Southern California): What is the bumpiest and highest-dimensional cost surface that our best computers will be able to search and still find the deepest cost well? Alexander Wissner-Gross (Scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, investor): Can general-purpose computers be constructed out of pure gravity? There were several repetitions of theme throughout the questions – how can science be better communicated, how can science (or more specifically, AI) create a more just society, what are the limits of human knowledge – but I think the following was my favourite question; not only the most interesting to contemplate, but the best fit for the brief: Max Tegmark (Physicist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; researcher, Precision Cosmology; scientific director, Foundational Questions Institute; president, Future of Life Institute): What will be the literally last question that will preoccupy future superintelligent cosmic life for as long as the laws of physics permit? I enjoyed my time with this book – though to be fair: it took me longer to review than to read – and I think it's a useful springboard to look into the work of those thinkers who most intrigued me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rossdavidh

    An interesting idea, and there were a few questions that gave me pause for thought, but not quite as good as some of the others in this long-running series of essays (by many thinkers on the same question each year), which now comes to a close. What will replace it? We are told there will be something, but it will be different.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I received this uncorrected proof through Goodreads. It’s a book of questions, by experts in various fields... they run the gambit from just plain cheeky to so deep in their field as to be over anyone else’s head, but the majority are thought provoking and interesting and I enjoyed the reading experience.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    What an insanely thought provoking book. I received this through a giveaway on goodreads and I am so glad that I did. Every single "last question" listed is impactful, enlightening, and encourages the reader to reflect on not only how they would answer, but what their lat question would be. I am very thankful I won this book, and am going to recommend it to all my friends. It'll be a quick read, but will have a lasting impression on you. What an insanely thought provoking book. I received this through a giveaway on goodreads and I am so glad that I did. Every single "last question" listed is impactful, enlightening, and encourages the reader to reflect on not only how they would answer, but what their lat question would be. I am very thankful I won this book, and am going to recommend it to all my friends. It'll be a quick read, but will have a lasting impression on you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This book is very cerebral and I loved it for that .....It really exercised my grey matter ....I'll be using it for an intellectual workout again in the future and will be utilizing some of the very profound questions in conversations with others who enjoy engaging their brain cells in philosophical activity. Kudos to Mr.Brockman for organizing such a wide array of genius and for having the genius idea to do so to begin with ,I feel smarter already for reading this compilation of brilliance . This book is very cerebral and I loved it for that .....It really exercised my grey matter ....I'll be using it for an intellectual workout again in the future and will be utilizing some of the very profound questions in conversations with others who enjoy engaging their brain cells in philosophical activity. Kudos to Mr.Brockman for organizing such a wide array of genius and for having the genius idea to do so to begin with ,I feel smarter already for reading this compilation of brilliance .

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    3.5 ⭐️ So. I received this as an ARC. The questions posed in this book are pretty deep. Some I got, and have actually thought about before, and some were so far over my head I’m surprised my brain didn’t explode while I tried to wrap my little mind around them. Definitely interesting, and one I will recommend to customers looking for something unique for the thinkers in their lives.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter Wolfley

    Stumbled across this curious little book at the library and was intrigued by the premise of an entire book of questions. No answers. Just questions. There are a lot of smart people out there thinking about a lot of really deep things but it seems like most of them are worried about the merging of humans and technology and what that means for the future.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cavak

    Short and sweet book of contemporary curiosities. You could read the entire book in one setting (I did). Ejecting The Last Unknowns from your mind after finishing it would be like reading a samurai's death poem without the context. Or famous last words in general. "Good dog," loses intensity without knowing who said it and why. The Last Unknowns is meant to ponder the unforeseen future through the wonder of scientists, artists, and other imaginative souls. And it is set to be like their last word Short and sweet book of contemporary curiosities. You could read the entire book in one setting (I did). Ejecting The Last Unknowns from your mind after finishing it would be like reading a samurai's death poem without the context. Or famous last words in general. "Good dog," loses intensity without knowing who said it and why. The Last Unknowns is meant to ponder the unforeseen future through the wonder of scientists, artists, and other imaginative souls. And it is set to be like their last words, the lone question they would have if they were to die. What makes the premise intriguing is how little we know about many of these "final questions." It's a humbling reminder that we are learning creatures who have much to dream about the world, even if it may not always be within our control. Thankfully, none of the questions of current unknowns were obvious ones like, "When will we cure cancer?" "Does God exist?" They were directed to be limitless in their interpretations and beg the mind to explore. Yet I wonder if a handful of these questions could be answered within another generation or so rather than the far-flung future. Like artificial intelligence's potential legal rights, the revival of the Riemann Hypothesis, and whether reading and writing comprehension will still be necessary with society's growing reliance on video and audio sources. Then there are the ones that I feel edge towards the subjective, which didn't engage me as much as the others. They're terrific openers for thought-provoking discussions, too. I had a brief chat about one of these questions with a friend and saw another side of them that I didn't know before. Sounds wild, right? If talking isn't your thing, here's hoping those grey cells in your head will get a jolt and consider beyond "the ordinary." Those are always fun experiences to have. I received the book for free through Goodreads Giveaways.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gregg Mellon

    Question. Do you need to read this book? No! Read back cover, and you have it 1/2 read already.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt Heavner

    Just the questions. Fun to go through, not as good as the other Brockman/edge collections, but still good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wendelle

    pithy musings of some of our best and brightest- and then some

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a Goodreads win review. This book is a book of questions where great thinkers from many fields ask their last question. My favorite ones are: Why is it so hard to find the truth?, When will race dissappear?, Is love all you really need?, Have we left the age of reason never to return?, What is the hard limit on human longevity?, and Why are people so seldom persuaded by clear evidence and rational argument? It is a very though provoking book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mityl

    Quite boring.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Some of my favorites: Are moral beliefs more like facts or more like preferences? How do we create and maintain backup options for humanity to quickly rebuild an advanced civilization after a catastrophic human extinction event? Will we ever understand how human communication is built from genes to cells to circuits to behavior? Do the laws of physics change with the passage of time? Can an increasingly powerful species survive (and overcome) the actions of its most extreme individuals? How smart does Some of my favorites: Are moral beliefs more like facts or more like preferences? How do we create and maintain backup options for humanity to quickly rebuild an advanced civilization after a catastrophic human extinction event? Will we ever understand how human communication is built from genes to cells to circuits to behavior? Do the laws of physics change with the passage of time? Can an increasingly powerful species survive (and overcome) the actions of its most extreme individuals? How smart does another animal have to be for us to decide not to eat it? What will happen to religion on Earth when the first alien life form is found? How does a thought become a feeling? What will it take to end war once and for all? What would the mind of a child raised in total isolation of other animals be like? What is the principle that causes complex adaptive systems (life, organisms, minds, societies) to spontaneously emerge from the interaction of simpler elements (chemicals, cells, neurons, individual humans)? How will the advent of direct brain-to-brain communication change the way we think? How much would surrendering our god(s) strengthen the odds of our survival? (My addition: Or, conversely, weaken them perhaps?) How can the few pounds of grey goo between ours ears let us make utterly surprising, completely unprecedented, and remarkably true discoveries about the world around us, in every domain and at every scale, from quarks to quasars? Can we acquire complete access to our unconscious minds? What will courtship, mate selection, length of marriages, and family composition and networks be like when we are all living over 150 years? Can we create new senses for humans -- not just touch, taste, vision, hearing, smell, but totally novel qualia for which we don't yet have words? Can consciousness exist in an entity without a self-contained physical body? Why do we experience feelings of meaning in a universe without purpose? So, before the Singularity...?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda-Has-A-Bookcase

    Each page has a unanswered question on it from someone smart...that's it. That's the book. I could have done this, maybe. This book isn't for me but perhaps my local library will want it. Each page has a unanswered question on it from someone smart...that's it. That's the book. I could have done this, maybe. This book isn't for me but perhaps my local library will want it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Afoxamongstars

    I'm quite angry. When I bought this initially, I had thought it was a collection of essays answering or, at least, debating and theorizing on certain questions. Now, imagine my *shock*™️ as I opened the book and saw it contained *just the questions* 0_0. I'm not saying some of these aren't thought-provoking, but wasting trees on something that could have easily been published as an ebook.... not an outstanding move, my friends. I'm quite angry. When I bought this initially, I had thought it was a collection of essays answering or, at least, debating and theorizing on certain questions. Now, imagine my *shock*™️ as I opened the book and saw it contained *just the questions* 0_0. I'm not saying some of these aren't thought-provoking, but wasting trees on something that could have easily been published as an ebook.... not an outstanding move, my friends.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter Gelfan

    This collection of about 250 ultimate questions from the same number of world-class thinkers from a variety of professions is of course a potent barrage of brain fluid. Some questions are perennial, some completely new to me. Some seem to have obvious answers, which probably means I didn’t understand them. Some seem trivial or inherently unanswerable, which ditto. Most ignite a train of thought that takes you to new places. Each one invites contemplation of the question, its assumptions and impl This collection of about 250 ultimate questions from the same number of world-class thinkers from a variety of professions is of course a potent barrage of brain fluid. Some questions are perennial, some completely new to me. Some seem to have obvious answers, which probably means I didn’t understand them. Some seem trivial or inherently unanswerable, which ditto. Most ignite a train of thought that takes you to new places. Each one invites contemplation of the question, its assumptions and implications, and its possible answers. All great stuff. I’m trying not to feel disappointed. Each question of one sentence is accompanied by a brief résumé of the author. Those, say, 25 words in a large typeface take up a page or two. The entire 300-plus-page book could have been condensed down to perhaps 35 pages of normal type and spacing. Would it be too much to wonder if each questioner could have been asked to add a paragraph or two about the question—what spawned it, possible leads to its answer, wrong answers from the past, etc.? A worthwhile book nevertheless.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Florent Diverchy

    At first I was disappointed to see that the book was just an accumulation of questions, instead of insightful 1 or 2-pager thoughts from the greatest minds alive. Then, I reallized that: * Those questions are mostly as insightful as the papers. Read them, one at a time, just like a Zen Koan, and let it sink in your brain. The more you meditate on each of these questions, the more their meaning and interest will unfold. * This book is a huge inspiration for your GoodRead's "Want to Read" book list! At first I was disappointed to see that the book was just an accumulation of questions, instead of insightful 1 or 2-pager thoughts from the greatest minds alive. Then, I reallized that: * Those questions are mostly as insightful as the papers. Read them, one at a time, just like a Zen Koan, and let it sink in your brain. The more you meditate on each of these questions, the more their meaning and interest will unfold. * This book is a huge inspiration for your GoodRead's "Want to Read" book list! I think I added at least 30 of them while reading it. * Each of the question is the perfect format to launch discussion on your social networks (providing you have curious, open-minded, science lover friends. Just pick one of the question, publish it on your Facebook wall, and see what happens. Can't wait to see on which form Edge will reappear next year!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Craig Evans

    This little 325pg collection of questions posed, at the editors request, by philosophers, novelists, biologists, physicists, information-entrepreneurs, etc. is a treasure-trove into which to delve for ideas for what one want to seek out to read. I did a quick go-through after I'd read all of the questions just to see... of the 280 or so individuals who submitted questions, I've read books by at least 14, have signed copies representative works by two of them (and also met a third), and have perus This little 325pg collection of questions posed, at the editors request, by philosophers, novelists, biologists, physicists, information-entrepreneurs, etc. is a treasure-trove into which to delve for ideas for what one want to seek out to read. I did a quick go-through after I'd read all of the questions just to see... of the 280 or so individuals who submitted questions, I've read books by at least 14, have signed copies representative works by two of them (and also met a third), and have perused the blogs to which 3 other either maintain themselves or contribute to. A quick read, but I stretched it out over several weeks. Disclaimer: I receive my copy of this via a give-away on Goodreads.com

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cj Zawacki

    A book of 332 pages of just questions? Why? John Brockman has presented the reader with very thought provoking questions, in his book The LAST UNKNOWNS. A great way to motivate conversations, or ponder life. The LAST UNKNOWNS has started many good after dinner conversation between our family. Drawing insights to each others thoughts and beliefs. This would be a great teachers book for starting a composition, debate, or a value study of society. It is not a book to just read, but a book to be used A book of 332 pages of just questions? Why? John Brockman has presented the reader with very thought provoking questions, in his book The LAST UNKNOWNS. A great way to motivate conversations, or ponder life. The LAST UNKNOWNS has started many good after dinner conversation between our family. Drawing insights to each others thoughts and beliefs. This would be a great teachers book for starting a composition, debate, or a value study of society. It is not a book to just read, but a book to be used as a tool.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    Ah. I joined goodreads today to rate this book. As a fan of the series, I preordered this book and have been eagerly camping out awaiting it's delivery. What a tremendous abdication of responsibility. John Brockman you can laugh through your years and your dollars, but my last unknown is do I recycle this book, test its combustabilty or shred it and line the beds of my chickens? Ah. I joined goodreads today to rate this book. As a fan of the series, I preordered this book and have been eagerly camping out awaiting it's delivery. What a tremendous abdication of responsibility. John Brockman you can laugh through your years and your dollars, but my last unknown is do I recycle this book, test its combustabilty or shred it and line the beds of my chickens?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Reed

    This book would have been infinitely more interesting if there was a short explanation of the importance and significance of each question to accompany each question. Some of the questions are interesting in and of themselves, but the majority of these questions only make sense if you have a grounding knowledge of the relevant fields to begin with.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Federico Lucifredi

    Unique. A different entry into Brockman's EDGE.ORG series, it plants seeds for you to expand and wonder about — or skip and ignore... answering just a single one of these questions would be a monumental achievent. Unique. A different entry into Brockman's EDGE.ORG series, it plants seeds for you to expand and wonder about — or skip and ignore... answering just a single one of these questions would be a monumental achievent.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aryeh

    Bought this for a plane ride- for some reason, I thought this was a collections of essays. It isn't. It is, however, a cool collection of thought-provoking, conversation-starting questions from smart people. Bought this for a plane ride- for some reason, I thought this was a collections of essays. It isn't. It is, however, a cool collection of thought-provoking, conversation-starting questions from smart people.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Trying to catch up on posting all the books I had read lately (which, admittedly, hasn't been much!) This was interesting, but very strange. Literally just questions that dont yet have answers from big thinkers. Trying to catch up on posting all the books I had read lately (which, admittedly, hasn't been much!) This was interesting, but very strange. Literally just questions that dont yet have answers from big thinkers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sabina VanOrman

    I won this book thru a Good Reads giveaway! It is very simple lay out yet VERY deep! Lots of thoughts to ponder.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Crocker

    Fun, but not up to all those wonderful books of essays.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    For the curious and inquisitive that embrace provocation.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Mackenzie

    Not the way I would have wanted this incredible series to come to an end. While it poses some interesting questions, it lacks any substance. I can't wait to see what comes next from edge.org. Not the way I would have wanted this incredible series to come to an end. While it poses some interesting questions, it lacks any substance. I can't wait to see what comes next from edge.org.

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