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Discovered after more than 40 years, a vintage action-adventure novel set on Domino Island – a Caribbean paradise toppling under murder, corruption and organised crime… ‘Like a dream come true – an undiscovered Desmond Bagley novel … and it’s a great one!’ LEE CHILD Bill Kemp, an ex-serviceman working in London as an insurance investigator, is sent to the Caribbean to verify Discovered after more than 40 years, a vintage action-adventure novel set on Domino Island – a Caribbean paradise toppling under murder, corruption and organised crime… ‘Like a dream come true – an undiscovered Desmond Bagley novel … and it’s a great one!’ LEE CHILD Bill Kemp, an ex-serviceman working in London as an insurance investigator, is sent to the Caribbean to verify a life insurance claim that will make property magnate David Salton’s young widow a very rich lady. As Kemp begins to discover that Salton’s political ambitions had made him a lot of enemies, and that his friends are reluctant to reveal themselves, local tensions around the forthcoming elections spill over into protest and violence on the streets – and murder. Is this all a deliberate smokescreen for an altogether more ambitious plot? And who is the enemy in their midst? As events begin to spiral out of Kemp’s control, even his army training seems feeble in the face of such a determined foe. Discovered after more than forty years, Domino Island is a vintage tour de force by one of the world’s most successful thriller writers.


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Discovered after more than 40 years, a vintage action-adventure novel set on Domino Island – a Caribbean paradise toppling under murder, corruption and organised crime… ‘Like a dream come true – an undiscovered Desmond Bagley novel … and it’s a great one!’ LEE CHILD Bill Kemp, an ex-serviceman working in London as an insurance investigator, is sent to the Caribbean to verify Discovered after more than 40 years, a vintage action-adventure novel set on Domino Island – a Caribbean paradise toppling under murder, corruption and organised crime… ‘Like a dream come true – an undiscovered Desmond Bagley novel … and it’s a great one!’ LEE CHILD Bill Kemp, an ex-serviceman working in London as an insurance investigator, is sent to the Caribbean to verify a life insurance claim that will make property magnate David Salton’s young widow a very rich lady. As Kemp begins to discover that Salton’s political ambitions had made him a lot of enemies, and that his friends are reluctant to reveal themselves, local tensions around the forthcoming elections spill over into protest and violence on the streets – and murder. Is this all a deliberate smokescreen for an altogether more ambitious plot? And who is the enemy in their midst? As events begin to spiral out of Kemp’s control, even his army training seems feeble in the face of such a determined foe. Discovered after more than forty years, Domino Island is a vintage tour de force by one of the world’s most successful thriller writers.

30 review for Domino Island: The unpublished thriller by the master of the genre

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kylie D

    I was quite excited when I found this book, a previously unpublished Desmond Bagley. Having read all his works when I was younger I had to put this one on the reading list. It turns out it's not one of his best, but still enjoyable enough. Bill Kemp is an insurance investigator in London, and he is sent to a Caribbean island when a claim is made after the death of wealthy businessman David Salten. Salten seemed to have quite a few enemies on the island, so is one of them responsible for his death I was quite excited when I found this book, a previously unpublished Desmond Bagley. Having read all his works when I was younger I had to put this one on the reading list. It turns out it's not one of his best, but still enjoyable enough. Bill Kemp is an insurance investigator in London, and he is sent to a Caribbean island when a claim is made after the death of wealthy businessman David Salten. Salten seemed to have quite a few enemies on the island, so is one of them responsible for his death? Or was it his lovely young widow, who is due to inherit his millions? Or was it natural causes like the coroner says? As Kemp investigates he unearths all sorts of secrets and betrayals, yet even he isn't prepared for what he finds, and it all comes together in a finale worthy of Bagley's best. The main problem I had with this book is that it was too slow in parts, with Kemp interviewing too many people. I realise that as an investigator he would have to do this, but in this case it doesn't make good reading. The action scenes are good, and Kemp is a worthwhile character, I just found the dialogue bogged the book down at times. All in all though I'm glad I have read it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    margaret chalmers

    Vintage thriller. Have to confess, I am not a teenager and I remember devouring every Desmond Bagley novel as soon as they came out. I was never disappointed then and it is the same now. Superior writing, thrills and twists aplenty and interesting likeable and despicable characters. Despite it's age it is very up to date in its plot which concerns a suspicious death, a Caribbean island, laundered money, offshore banking, casinos and a population protesting against exploitation. Throw in an ex arm Vintage thriller. Have to confess, I am not a teenager and I remember devouring every Desmond Bagley novel as soon as they came out. I was never disappointed then and it is the same now. Superior writing, thrills and twists aplenty and interesting likeable and despicable characters. Despite it's age it is very up to date in its plot which concerns a suspicious death, a Caribbean island, laundered money, offshore banking, casinos and a population protesting against exploitation. Throw in an ex army Insurance investigator, enigmatic beautiful women and black/ white antagonism boiling over into violence. The writing is spare but good, often humorous and a very likeable hero. As usual there are heart jumping thrills and twists you (or rather, I) do no not expect. Mr Bagley, we mourn your passing. This a master class in intelligent thriller writing. Loved it. Try it, you might love it too, and if you do and are new to the Bagley canon, oh what treats await you. Enjoy!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    They don’t write them like that anymore… When rich businessman David Salton dies, it looks like the Western and Continental Insurance company are in for a big hit – he was insured for half a million pounds. Although the inquest found he had died of natural causes, the circumstances of his death were a little odd, so before they agree to pay out the company sends their best investigator to take a look. Bill Kemp had a career in military intelligence before he went into the insurance industry, and They don’t write them like that anymore… When rich businessman David Salton dies, it looks like the Western and Continental Insurance company are in for a big hit – he was insured for half a million pounds. Although the inquest found he had died of natural causes, the circumstances of his death were a little odd, so before they agree to pay out the company sends their best investigator to take a look. Bill Kemp had a career in military intelligence before he went into the insurance industry, and when the investigation becomes the catalyst for all sorts of shenanigans on the Caribbean island of Campanilla he’ll need all of his skills just to survive… (It occurs to me on writing that blurb that I don’t know why the book is called Domino Island, since the island is called Campanilla – maybe I missed the explanation! Anyway, it doesn’t really matter.) Desmond Bagley was a hugely popular British thriller writer back in the ‘60s-‘80s, and the fact that most of his books are still readily available suggests he’s still got a pretty solid fan base nearly forty years after his death. So when this previously unpublished novel was found in his archives in 2017, more or less complete and with his own notes of the changes he intended to make, the idea of publishing it would have been irresistible. Michael Davies, a lifelong Bagley fan, took on the task of tidying it up and this is the result – and an excellent result it is, too! My inner cynic feared that Bagley or his publishers must have felt it wasn’t good enough to be published, but the editor of this volume explains that in fact it was well on the way to publication when Bagley withdrew it because he’d signed a deal that required him to produce a different novel tied into a movie he had scripted, and he didn’t want the two publications to clash. I don’t know why he never returned to this one, though. The fictional island of Campanilla was part of the British Empire, but has recently gained independence and is now operating partly as a tourist destination and partly as an offshore tax haven, where the wealthy are extremely wealthy and the poor find it extremely difficult to survive because of the inflated prices and property values that wealthy people bring along with them. So there’s political tension between the governing party who see their job as keeping life sweet for the rich, and the opposition, divided between a moderately left party and an extreme left-wing, veering towards communism. David Salton was the leader of the soft-left party, so Kemp wonders if his political opponents may have had something to do with his death. But there are other possibilities too. It transpires that Salton may have been a good man in the world of politics, but he was a philanderer in his spare time, keeping his mistress in a luxury flat while his wife lived in their secluded home in a different part of the island. Then there’s Negrini – owner of a local casino and reputed to have ties to the US Mafia. Salton has promised that if he gets into power he’ll crack down on the gambling industry. The status of the island as a tax haven means that there’s lots of financial skulduggery bubbling beneath the surface, so there are plenty of other people with a vested interest in making sure that a politician who intends to tackle corruption shouldn’t get into power. All these various people and factions don’t want Kemp investigating and stirring around in the murky dealings of the island, and soon he finds that he’s in personal danger at the same time as political tensions on the island are reaching boiling point. It all comes to a climax in a traditional thriller ending, with goodies pitted against baddies, corpses aplenty and an entirely unexpected (by me) but satisfying solution to the mystery of Salton’s death. The writing is very good, and not nearly as dated in attitudes to women as thrillers of this era usually are. It’s years since I read any Bagley and I can’t remember if his females were always treated this well or whether perhaps part of Davies’ tidying-up was to make the tone more acceptable to modern readers. Whatever, the women are pretty good characters, and one of them is even kinda kickass, which I found unexpectedly refreshing. They’ve certainly not been modernised to the extent of not feeling true to the time, however. There are parts where I felt it could have been tighter and a bit faster paced, and maybe Bagley’s final edit would have seen to this, but it never drags. Kemp, who tells the story in the first person, is a likeable and believable protagonist – he’s resourceful but not a superhero. He soon teams up with the forces of law and order in the person of Superintendent Hanna of the island police, another likeable character, and they work well together. The story is both interesting and well told, and although the island is fictional, it feels entirely authentic both politically and culturally. I enjoyed this one very much, and now want to go back and investigate some of his other books – it is sadly true to say that they don’t write them like that anymore, and they really should… NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, HarperCollins. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Cooper

    Desmond Bagley wrote this book in 1972, submitted it to the publishers but then withdrew it from publication. It has lain dormant since then, presumed lost, but was discovered recently among his papers. Bill Kemp is an investigator with a London insurance company. When one of their clients, David Salton, dies in somewhat mysterious circumstances, his life insurance payout is going to be costly for the company and Bill is sent over to the Caribbean to look into the matter. It soon becomes apparen Desmond Bagley wrote this book in 1972, submitted it to the publishers but then withdrew it from publication. It has lain dormant since then, presumed lost, but was discovered recently among his papers. Bill Kemp is an investigator with a London insurance company. When one of their clients, David Salton, dies in somewhat mysterious circumstances, his life insurance payout is going to be costly for the company and Bill is sent over to the Caribbean to look into the matter. It soon becomes apparent that David was heavily involved in the political side of island life and his death is causing some serious unrest among both the population and his rival politicians. He had also made a lot of enemies. The action soon escalates in typical Desmond Bagley style, culminating in an exciting showdown. It is an unusual book as Bagley originally set out to write a classic “whodunnit”, rather than his usual adventure thriller. It has to be said that he was not entirely successful in this venture and soon reverts to type, veering more towards the thriller that he is so well known for. It is a thoroughly enjoyable read, for the most part fast-paced, action-packed and full of tension. The climax is legendary Bagley. The only quibble that I had was that I felt it got a little bogged down in politics for a patch in the middle. Personally I was struggling to stay abreast of who was supporting which party but it all sorted itself out in the end. Sadly I am guessing that there won’t be any more unpublished manuscripts discovered but if you have not read Desmond Bagley before, and you enjoy a good adventure book, I thoroughly recommend both this one and all of his others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robin Price

    Desmond Bagley, like his contemporary Hammond Innes, was one of the great thriller writers of the last century. His books sold millions of copies. This is a real treat. A novel written in the first three months of 1972 then 'lost'for forty-five years. Bagley populated his novels with ordinary people suddenly finding themselves in extraordinary circumstances. His characters were sympathetic & believable. His plots full of action & excitement. Set on a Caribbean island paradise 'Domino Island' is no Desmond Bagley, like his contemporary Hammond Innes, was one of the great thriller writers of the last century. His books sold millions of copies. This is a real treat. A novel written in the first three months of 1972 then 'lost'for forty-five years. Bagley populated his novels with ordinary people suddenly finding themselves in extraordinary circumstances. His characters were sympathetic & believable. His plots full of action & excitement. Set on a Caribbean island paradise 'Domino Island' is no exception. It has the stamp of a master storyteller. Like good wine, this book has matured to a perfect vintage.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Crosby

    When talking with friends about books, we often drift into a discussion of favorite authors. My top five have remained unchanged for forty years: Alistair MacLean, Desmond Bagley, Helen MacInness, Anne McCaffrey and Dick Francis. Unfortunately they have all passed away. I was stunned recently by the publication of a NEW Bagley novel. A completed first draft with notes by both the author and his editor from 1972 has been “completed”. So, how is it? In my mind, Bagley was at his zenith in 1970-1975. When talking with friends about books, we often drift into a discussion of favorite authors. My top five have remained unchanged for forty years: Alistair MacLean, Desmond Bagley, Helen MacInness, Anne McCaffrey and Dick Francis. Unfortunately they have all passed away. I was stunned recently by the publication of a NEW Bagley novel. A completed first draft with notes by both the author and his editor from 1972 has been “completed”. So, how is it? In my mind, Bagley was at his zenith in 1970-1975. The novels published in this era were The Spoilers, Running Blind, The Freedom Trap, Landslide, and The Tightrope Men. I am pleased with this novel. The book is not quite on par with the others named, but is very good. The novel is part murder mystery, part political thriller, and part heist. It is definitely a product of the seventies and should be read as such. I enjoyed the narrator of the audio book. A name I didn’t recognize. Strongly recommended for Kent.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Beswick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a great read, a thriller with an unexpected twist. The book is written from the point of view of Bill Kemp, an insurance consultant who has been sent to the island of Campanilla to check the validity of a life insurance claim for the deceased David Salton. The story begins in the midst of political turmoil on the island, and this shapes the first three quarters of the tale, exploring the possibility that a politically motivated murder may have taken place, rather than an unfortunate acc This was a great read, a thriller with an unexpected twist. The book is written from the point of view of Bill Kemp, an insurance consultant who has been sent to the island of Campanilla to check the validity of a life insurance claim for the deceased David Salton. The story begins in the midst of political turmoil on the island, and this shapes the first three quarters of the tale, exploring the possibility that a politically motivated murder may have taken place, rather than an unfortunate accidental death as first suggested. The book is very well written, despite the potentially heavy content in terms of the politics it is gripping and a definite page turner. The unexpected twist comes towards the end, when it turns out that the murder was not in fact politically motivated, but a case of wrong time/wrong place when Salton stumbled on to the plot of a large theft operation. This is where my slight criticism comes in; the book sets up all the events as though they are part of the political climate and suggests possible motives and suspects, but when the twist is revealed it becomes clear that many of the events had nothing to do with it. Throughout the story members of the government are seen to be bribing/threatening Bill Kemp to keep his nose out of the murder investigation - and in fact another insurance associate is murdered in an attempt to silence him - but when it becomes clear that they didn't actually have anything to do with Salton's death, the lengths they have gone to silence Kemp seem strange and left me feeling like id missed an important plot point. However, the plot twist itself was enjoyable, and I genuinely didn't see it coming - when many books these days seem to follow a formulaic system that is very predictable, this change was very welcome. Great book and I would definitely recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Neil Fulwood

    In 1971, Desmond Bagley made four false starts on novels, abandoning each of them after just a few chapters. He wrote to his publishers, saying that he was going to break the impasse by trying something different: the classic whodunnit. When he submitted the finished manuscript, he noted sardonically that the typical Bagley style had kept breaking in: the novel functioned as a whodunnit for three quarters of its length before morphing into a tense and ultimately explosive thriller. Then very sud In 1971, Desmond Bagley made four false starts on novels, abandoning each of them after just a few chapters. He wrote to his publishers, saying that he was going to break the impasse by trying something different: the classic whodunnit. When he submitted the finished manuscript, he noted sardonically that the typical Bagley style had kept breaking in: the novel functioned as a whodunnit for three quarters of its length before morphing into a tense and ultimately explosive thriller. Then very suddenly, he withdrew it from publication. Quality control was not the issue: ‘Domino Island’ is vintage Bagley. It’s thought that with ‘The Mackintosh Man’, the absurdly retitled film adaptation of ‘The Freedom Trap’, due in cinemas, his American publishers wanted a new novel in the more traditional Bagley vein to promoted alongside it. And so ‘Domino Island’ - under Bagley’s original title ‘Because Salton Died’ (a moniker he exhorted his publishers to find a better alternative for) - lay undiscovered for three and a half decades until Bagley aficionado Michael Davies shepherded it into print. And if I ever meet Mr Davies I’ll happily buy him a pint. The gift of one more Desmond Bagley thriller was as delightful as it was unexpected, and the perfect conclusion to this year’s Bagley retrospective.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tony Nielsen

    Alongside Hammond Innes and Alistair McLean, Desmond Bagley blazed a trail for the modern thriller novel. His first novel "The Golden Keel" was published in 1963 and set the scene for a series of blockbusting thrillers. And then, after his death in 1983, his books continued to sell, but were gradually overtaken by new voices as the thriller genre became even more popular. Forty years on a manuscript was discovered in Bagley's archive, resulting in this publication "Domino Island". The setting is Alongside Hammond Innes and Alistair McLean, Desmond Bagley blazed a trail for the modern thriller novel. His first novel "The Golden Keel" was published in 1963 and set the scene for a series of blockbusting thrillers. And then, after his death in 1983, his books continued to sell, but were gradually overtaken by new voices as the thriller genre became even more popular. Forty years on a manuscript was discovered in Bagley's archive, resulting in this publication "Domino Island". The setting is a Caribbean Island on which Bill Kemp lands to follow up on the death of a local businessman who was a client of the Insurance Company he represents. The situation is more complex than it first appears, with David Salton's young widow a charming and beguiling character who Kemp seeks to understand with the aim of unveiling the truth about the death. Although the story is based in another era it never feels dated or clunky. I guess that's the magic of a writer of Bagley's stature. I reckon that "Domino Island" will revive interest in Bagley's earlier bestsellers. That's where I am heading anyway.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Soozee

    This is apparently a previously lost manuscript from Desmond Bagley, a great thriller writer who died in the 1980s. Bill Kemp, an insurance investigator is sent to a Caribbean island following the unexpected death of one of their claimants - did he die naturally, or was it murder or suicide? However, Salton's death has far more implications for the island, where he was a principal investor and benefactor. Hair-trigger politics and serious crime begin to arise as Kemp appears to be a target for ma This is apparently a previously lost manuscript from Desmond Bagley, a great thriller writer who died in the 1980s. Bill Kemp, an insurance investigator is sent to a Caribbean island following the unexpected death of one of their claimants - did he die naturally, or was it murder or suicide? However, Salton's death has far more implications for the island, where he was a principal investor and benefactor. Hair-trigger politics and serious crime begin to arise as Kemp appears to be a target for many different groups, trying to prevent him finding out the truth. As gripping as any of Bagley's works, this one has been very competently completed after his death, and makes for an exciting read. A real treat for Bagley fans, and for those who have not yet discovered this master writer. Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins UK for allowing me access to the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Schramm

    I can only think that reviewers awarding this novel 5 stars must have not read any of his previous works. “Domino Island” does not begin to compare with Bagley’s best work, thrillers like “The Freedom Trap”, “Running Blind”, or “Flyaway”. I’ve read all 16 of his prior novels and with this one, the Bagley voice is barely there. It is quite apparent that what Bagley had shelved was a very rough draft that was considerably rewritten. There are far too many characters, and it’s a very lackluster, tu I can only think that reviewers awarding this novel 5 stars must have not read any of his previous works. “Domino Island” does not begin to compare with Bagley’s best work, thrillers like “The Freedom Trap”, “Running Blind”, or “Flyaway”. I’ve read all 16 of his prior novels and with this one, the Bagley voice is barely there. It is quite apparent that what Bagley had shelved was a very rough draft that was considerably rewritten. There are far too many characters, and it’s a very lackluster, turgid and stilted affair loaded with tiresome red herrings. Character names are constantly caromed off one another in seemingly endless fashion in a book that reads more like Perry Mason or Lew Archer. Absent is much of Bagley’s clever musings on the human condition and his fascinating insights regarding science and geography. The book reads somewhat like his last two novels which were completed by his widow, particularly the rather tedious and disappointing “Juggernaut”.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Derek Rutherford

    Like many reviewers I was an avid Bagley fan back in the day, when he was my favourite author, and I devoured all of his books at a pace I can only dream of now. And like many reviewers the fact that an unpublished Bagley novel had come to light was very exciting indeed. Alas, it's not up there with his great books. Not even close. Don't get me wrong, it's okay. A book that starts off as a mystery on a Caribbean island and ends up as a thriller. The writing is okay. The characters are stock. It j Like many reviewers I was an avid Bagley fan back in the day, when he was my favourite author, and I devoured all of his books at a pace I can only dream of now. And like many reviewers the fact that an unpublished Bagley novel had come to light was very exciting indeed. Alas, it's not up there with his great books. Not even close. Don't get me wrong, it's okay. A book that starts off as a mystery on a Caribbean island and ends up as a thriller. The writing is okay. The characters are stock. It jogs alone reasonably well. The ending is a bit...ugh. Actually the thing I was most disappointed out was the lack of suspense and tension at the end. It just... ended. If you, like many of us, are avid DB fans then it is a must read, but don't expect a Running Blind, or a High Citadel, or an Enemy. Nevertheless, as the old saying goes, a bad days fishing is better than a good days working, an average Desmond Bagley is still better than most!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Huw Collingbourne

    It sounded too good to be true. An unpublished Desmond Bagley novel finally to be released. Sadly, this is far from being one of his best. It begins with a long and rather dull account of the fictional politics on a Caribbean island. Then it turns into a sort of detective story (who or why dunnit?) and finally, when that runs out of steam, a ludicrously 'thrilling' ending is tacked on. Unlike Bagley's best work which is full of unexpected twists and turns, the story here is pretty much linear an It sounded too good to be true. An unpublished Desmond Bagley novel finally to be released. Sadly, this is far from being one of his best. It begins with a long and rather dull account of the fictional politics on a Caribbean island. Then it turns into a sort of detective story (who or why dunnit?) and finally, when that runs out of steam, a ludicrously 'thrilling' ending is tacked on. Unlike Bagley's best work which is full of unexpected twists and turns, the story here is pretty much linear and rather pedestrian. If this were the only Bagley novel you'd ever read you might wonder why he is considered to be one of the all-time great thriller writers. I can understand why he didn't publish this in his lifetime. It would be an OK book for a lesser author but it does nothing to enhance Bagley's reputation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    Wonderful to have a 'new' Bagley book on the shelf, and such an exciting one too. Exotic Caribbean location, brilliant characterisations, nostalgic setting, action-packed denouement - it's hard to imagine what else you could want from a classic thriller. Not sure how they've managed to turn a raw first-draft manuscript into such a polished published novel, but it's a fantastic addition to any Bagley collection, and all the more impressive coming nearly 40 years after the author's early death. Tr Wonderful to have a 'new' Bagley book on the shelf, and such an exciting one too. Exotic Caribbean location, brilliant characterisations, nostalgic setting, action-packed denouement - it's hard to imagine what else you could want from a classic thriller. Not sure how they've managed to turn a raw first-draft manuscript into such a polished published novel, but it's a fantastic addition to any Bagley collection, and all the more impressive coming nearly 40 years after the author's early death. Truly the master of the genre.Domino Island

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Mccormick

    The late great Desmond Bagley introduced me to adult thrillers in my teens, I read and totally enjoyed everyone of his books. He was a master storyteller of action and adventure thrillers. So imagine my excitement when a previously unpublished novel turned up after forty years. My thanks to the Author's family publishers and NetGalley for providing a Kindle version of this book to read and honestly review. All the old memories of previous classic thrillers came to mind, atmospheric authentic grip The late great Desmond Bagley introduced me to adult thrillers in my teens, I read and totally enjoyed everyone of his books. He was a master storyteller of action and adventure thrillers. So imagine my excitement when a previously unpublished novel turned up after forty years. My thanks to the Author's family publishers and NetGalley for providing a Kindle version of this book to read and honestly review. All the old memories of previous classic thrillers came to mind, atmospheric authentic gripping from first to last page intelligent with superb characters, and clever twists a complete and utter treat. Thanks for memories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Malmberg

    A long lost masterpiece of the Adventure-Thriller genre Desmond Bagley is a Grand-Master of the Adventure-Thriller Genre. As such, he stands shoulder-to-shoulder with the likes of Alistair MacLean, Duncan Kyle, Helen MacInnis, and Hammond Innis. In a review of one of Bagley’s books, MacLean wrote, “He writes better than I do.” While not one of his best books, Domino Island will still keep the reader engaged and turning the pages until late at night.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex ‘BrewCase’ Miller

    A fantastic, class whodunnit thriller. With an air of Ian Fleming-esque writing brought upto date for the modern crime seeker bibliophile who may not yet have had the pleasure of reading a story from this genre legend. You will not be disappointed by this book - surely it will be made into a blockbuster movie!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emilie Thomas

    I kept picking this one up, reading a few pages and then getting distracted by going to find something to eat, or think of a phone call I needed to make... it wasn’t my cup of tea at all. I read this with book club, and it sounds like there were some mixed reviews! Definitely didn’t see the end coming, but it felt quite cheesy. Meeehhhh 🤷🏼‍♀️

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Kumar

    Quite a treat Vintage Bagley - though here and there you do feel that it was not a finished product - but that is a minor quibble - they don’t make them like Bagley anymore. Cannot think of many writers today who would measure to the standards set by him - Parker Bilal, Dan Fesperman - that’s about it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I must admit to avoiding reading this book for a while, as the dated cover illustration put me off. However, having read the flyleaf, I now understand that both the cover and story are of its time. What a great gift for today's reader! Exciting and fast paced, this book will leave you eager to read more of the author's works. What an adventure! I must admit to avoiding reading this book for a while, as the dated cover illustration put me off. However, having read the flyleaf, I now understand that both the cover and story are of its time. What a great gift for today's reader! Exciting and fast paced, this book will leave you eager to read more of the author's works. What an adventure!

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Gilchrist

    My review of 'Domino Island' by Desmond Bagley.. A very Desmond Bagley book, unmistakable style . I would have loved it in 1983. Maybe my tastes have changed I would have preferred to have left this one in the past. My review of 'Domino Island' by Desmond Bagley.. A very Desmond Bagley book, unmistakable style . I would have loved it in 1983. Maybe my tastes have changed I would have preferred to have left this one in the past.

  22. 4 out of 5

    l bagnall

    I must confess that this is the first Desmond Bagley Book I have read. However I thoroughly enjoyed it, and it definitely kept the pages turning. Set on a fictional Caribbean island, it reminded me of a James Bond adventure.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jannc

    Very nostalgic as I was great fan of Desmond Bagley. I could imagine myself in the Bahamas through this story - a mixture of James Bond And Hammond Innes. True to the era in which it was written so no anachronisms. Makes me want to re read some more of his novels.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I must confess that this is the first Desmond Bagley Book I have read. I was so excited to get stuck into it and I was sadly disappointed with the storyline and the ending. The chapters were way too long and it didn’t grip me at all. Unfortunately, I wouldn’t recommend this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julian Walker

    A treat to discover a new Desmond Bagley, and a testament to those who bright it to print, that it has his unique signature. Cracking fun in a modern, yet old school adventure story. Even from the grave he is still the master.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nottk

    Not the best or most imaginative book that Desmond Bagley wrote but worth reading even if it is a bit Boy's Own. If you like easy to read adventure stories then this is just the book to read on the beach. Not the best or most imaginative book that Desmond Bagley wrote but worth reading even if it is a bit Boy's Own. If you like easy to read adventure stories then this is just the book to read on the beach.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Hewitt

    Definitely Desmond Bagley and at his best. The world lost a literary genius far too early. I was concerned about purchasing this as “Juggernaut” and the other finished by others left a sour taste. Lovers of Desmond Bagley will NOT be disappointed. 👍 Stay safe people

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bob Burch

    My first Bagley book. Ending was a bit tame, but throughout the book had me gripped. Great writing style. Strange how some authors have you from the first page whilst others struggle throughout the novel.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    Sadly this is the last book Desmond Bagley wrote. I haven't read all of his books yet but it is a shame that such a great story teller is no longer with us. This book was very good, leading you down one path then another and yet another before you find out what is actually going on. Enjoy Sadly this is the last book Desmond Bagley wrote. I haven't read all of his books yet but it is a shame that such a great story teller is no longer with us. This book was very good, leading you down one path then another and yet another before you find out what is actually going on. Enjoy

  30. 4 out of 5

    cp

    A recently discovered Bagley. What a treat. Back in the world of typewriters and a manually operated telephone exchange.... Brilliant. It has inspired me to reread some of these classics from my youth.

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