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Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps: A Landmark Reassessment of Booth's Social Survey

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In the late nineteenth century, Charles Booth’s landmark social and economic survey found that 35 percent of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Booth’s team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed th In the late nineteenth century, Charles Booth’s landmark social and economic survey found that 35 percent of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Booth’s team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed the basis of Booth’s color-coded social mapping (from vicious and semi-criminal to wealthy) and his seventeen-volume survey Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People of London, 1886–1903. Organized into six geographical sections, Charles Booth’s London Poverty Maps presents the hand-colored preparatory and printed social mapping of London. Accompanying the maps are reproductions of pages from the original notebooks, containing anecdotes and observations too judgmental for Booth to include in his final published survey. An introduction by professor Mary S. Morgan clarifies the aims and methodology of Booth’s survey and six themed essays contextualize the the survey’s findings, accompanied by evocative period photographs. Providing insights into the minutia of everyday life viewed through the lens of inhabitants of every trade, class, creed, and nationality, Charles Booth’s London Poverty Maps brings to life the diversity and dynamism of late nineteenth-century London.


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In the late nineteenth century, Charles Booth’s landmark social and economic survey found that 35 percent of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Booth’s team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed th In the late nineteenth century, Charles Booth’s landmark social and economic survey found that 35 percent of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Booth’s team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed the basis of Booth’s color-coded social mapping (from vicious and semi-criminal to wealthy) and his seventeen-volume survey Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People of London, 1886–1903. Organized into six geographical sections, Charles Booth’s London Poverty Maps presents the hand-colored preparatory and printed social mapping of London. Accompanying the maps are reproductions of pages from the original notebooks, containing anecdotes and observations too judgmental for Booth to include in his final published survey. An introduction by professor Mary S. Morgan clarifies the aims and methodology of Booth’s survey and six themed essays contextualize the the survey’s findings, accompanied by evocative period photographs. Providing insights into the minutia of everyday life viewed through the lens of inhabitants of every trade, class, creed, and nationality, Charles Booth’s London Poverty Maps brings to life the diversity and dynamism of late nineteenth-century London.

39 review for Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps: A Landmark Reassessment of Booth's Social Survey

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Saddington-Wiltshire

    Fantastic read, really couldn't recommend any more. Provides such a fascinating insight in to Victorian London, particularly the East End. Fantastic read, really couldn't recommend any more. Provides such a fascinating insight in to Victorian London, particularly the East End.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Arran krelle

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hana Faber

  4. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Mottram

  5. 4 out of 5

    Austin

  6. 4 out of 5

    David

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daiana Stanciu

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Gusev

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frank Ryan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thom Deane

  11. 4 out of 5

    V

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tim Robinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Carpenter

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dominik

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  16. 4 out of 5

    村松 崇

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chip

  20. 5 out of 5

    Timon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joe Antognini

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Mason-D'croz

  23. 5 out of 5

    David

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maria Lewis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lukas

  26. 4 out of 5

    Javier

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aytul

  28. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tahrana

  31. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  32. 5 out of 5

    Angelica

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ruthie Tane

  34. 4 out of 5

    Marta Santolaria

  35. 5 out of 5

    Freya

  36. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  37. 4 out of 5

    Asis Rodríguez

  38. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  39. 5 out of 5

    Les

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