web site hit counter Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus

Availability: Ready to download

From the pages of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman graphic novels...With his mission to rescue the spirit of Elaine Belloc successfully completed, The Morningstar must now face a new challenge. God's departure has left behind both an empty throne in Heaven and the powers that accompany it, and defending the status quo against a pair of wouldbe usurpers requires cooperation betwee From the pages of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman graphic novels...With his mission to rescue the spirit of Elaine Belloc successfully completed, The Morningstar must now face a new challenge. God's departure has left behind both an empty throne in Heaven and the powers that accompany it, and defending the status quo against a pair of wouldbe usurpers requires cooperation between angel and devil alike. After weathering their attempted coup, Lucifer decides to take preventative measures in his own creation, and decrees that all immortals must leave immediately or learn about mortality the hard way. Not everyone plans to go quietly. SUGGESTED FOR MATURE READERS. This volume contains: Lucifer #42–44 & #46–49


Compare

From the pages of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman graphic novels...With his mission to rescue the spirit of Elaine Belloc successfully completed, The Morningstar must now face a new challenge. God's departure has left behind both an empty throne in Heaven and the powers that accompany it, and defending the status quo against a pair of wouldbe usurpers requires cooperation betwee From the pages of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman graphic novels...With his mission to rescue the spirit of Elaine Belloc successfully completed, The Morningstar must now face a new challenge. God's departure has left behind both an empty throne in Heaven and the powers that accompany it, and defending the status quo against a pair of wouldbe usurpers requires cooperation between angel and devil alike. After weathering their attempted coup, Lucifer decides to take preventative measures in his own creation, and decrees that all immortals must leave immediately or learn about mortality the hard way. Not everyone plans to go quietly. SUGGESTED FOR MATURE READERS. This volume contains: Lucifer #42–44 & #46–49

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus

  1. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    Kind of running out of steam reviewing these so I think I will mostly let the pictures speak for themselves this time. I absolutely love the first half of this volume with Lucifer and Michael defending heaven. The second half is decent enough but has never really been my favorite part of the series so that's why this gets 4 stars instead of 5. Some highlights: I just love 'duplicity and deceit are the same thing'. Possibly my favorite panel in the entire series. Lots of parallels between Michael/Luc Kind of running out of steam reviewing these so I think I will mostly let the pictures speak for themselves this time. I absolutely love the first half of this volume with Lucifer and Michael defending heaven. The second half is decent enough but has never really been my favorite part of the series so that's why this gets 4 stars instead of 5. Some highlights: I just love 'duplicity and deceit are the same thing'. Possibly my favorite panel in the entire series. Lots of parallels between Michael/Lucifer and Lucifer/Yahweh in this one. GET IT! Can't wait for Lilith's story next volume! Mentions of will in this volume: Also I just love these two covers:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Airiz

    The complexity of this series is building up, but with Carey you can never really tell if it’s already the zenith or not yet. The story of Exodus, seventh volume of the Lucifer series, is spun from the last plot-thread hanging at the end of The Mansions of Silence: God has gone from His throne. I don’t know how that can be, but that is clear enough after His vis-à-vis with Lucifer (or sweet, savage Samael, as God prefers to call him) and Michael. The newsbreak produces expected results: “every g The complexity of this series is building up, but with Carey you can never really tell if it’s already the zenith or not yet. The story of Exodus, seventh volume of the Lucifer series, is spun from the last plot-thread hanging at the end of The Mansions of Silence: God has gone from His throne. I don’t know how that can be, but that is clear enough after His vis-à-vis with Lucifer (or sweet, savage Samael, as God prefers to call him) and Michael. The newsbreak produces expected results: “every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into [God’s] shoes.” Lucifer makes his mind to protect Heaven from wannabee-usurpers, so whether he likes it not, he is going to fight alongside the angels. I can tell that the plot is at its thickest, but I’m anticipating more because that’s just how Carey rolls. Two titans are the first to attempt to snatch the vacant throne, and the damage to the Silver City is nowhere near just scratches. Even Lucifer himself toils at first, until his cunning shines through again to finish off the battle. There are a lot of behind-kicking moments here, and the one that takes the cake is Mazikeen barging into Heaven to inform Lucifer of the titan’s schemes. She doesn’t give a toss about how all the angels there are shooing her away, being a former denizen of Hell and a daughter of the sinful Lilith. She just marches in with Beatrice, the titans' conduit and an ex-waitress from Lucifer’s nightclub in Los Angeles. There’s a small caterwaul precipitating Mazikeen's entrance, and she makes the best retaliation by committing blasphemy in that holy place: the showcasing of passion. Mazikeen is officially the most badass heroine in these graphic novels yet. Elaine Belloc follows suit in ranking. In the end of the previous volume she is made the inner guardian of Lucifer’s new cosmos. I like how Carey handled her character, an entity that ricochets between cold logic and childish temperament. In the end of The Mansions of Silence you’d think there’s nothing more to tell of Elaine’s story, but Carey’s being his secretive tale-spinner self, and that fact alone can make a reader go all thirsty for the next issues. This is unusual for me, but the best story in this volume is the one about Thole the stichglass weaver and the boy Martin. It sounds like a cute dark fairytale, but one that is stained with darker metaphors resonating directly with the reality of love’s complexity. Their story is brief but tightly packed with bittersweet morals. I loved it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    poor beatrice. i too know what it feels like to be gay for mazikeen :(

  4. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    i liked it - but more really liked it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    In Exodus, volume 7 of Carey's series showing sympathy for the Devil, God's gone and there are no shortage of beings looking to apply for His vacant position. In order to beat back the applicants, Lucifer himself suits up in defense of Heaven. No, I never thought I'd see the day, either. The first half of the book dedicates itself to the epic battle between Lucifer and the titans who seek his Father's throne. The second offers a softer story, set up by the Devil's practical decision to boot any i In Exodus, volume 7 of Carey's series showing sympathy for the Devil, God's gone and there are no shortage of beings looking to apply for His vacant position. In order to beat back the applicants, Lucifer himself suits up in defense of Heaven. No, I never thought I'd see the day, either. The first half of the book dedicates itself to the epic battle between Lucifer and the titans who seek his Father's throne. The second offers a softer story, set up by the Devil's practical decision to boot any immortal who might make a play for Heaven out of his realms, and features the world's most sympathetic and adorable spider demon thingiee named Thole. It's an unusually sweet tale for this series, offering what may be the only positive depiction of family Carey allows in his extended tale of disharmony between Father and Son, and all the more touching for its uniqueness of tone. That Lucifer can still offer such emotional surprises this far into his series explains precisely why I won't be leaving it any time soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    As I read this series, I feel like I can physically see Mike Carey becoming a better writer. I'm over halfway through this series that started out with huge, fantastical ideas, and now here we are 50 issues later and everything is starting to feel even fresher and more tightly woven than before. In this volume we get a wild, metaphysical exploration of what happens when the Titans (Ancient Greek creation gods) try to take over and rule the world again. It's at times hilarious and others frighten As I read this series, I feel like I can physically see Mike Carey becoming a better writer. I'm over halfway through this series that started out with huge, fantastical ideas, and now here we are 50 issues later and everything is starting to feel even fresher and more tightly woven than before. In this volume we get a wild, metaphysical exploration of what happens when the Titans (Ancient Greek creation gods) try to take over and rule the world again. It's at times hilarious and others frightening, but it constantly feels new and interesting. I can see why this series is so revered.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lil

    Second book in a row where Lucifer has to delegate and leave others to carry out his orders. I'm missing him a bit here but really enjoying the adventures of his scoobies. Also finding that as I read further in this series, my favourite characters shift and change. Adoration for Gaudium continues unabated, but it's joined here by love of Thole and Elaine of the Sisters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The previous volume of Lucifer gave out a bit of a whopper one what God's plan was: create a universe, get it up and running, and then leave it in the hands of His preferred son. This turned out to be Lucifer, who was never down with that sort of thing and rebelled. This revelation in turn forces Michael away, and now God's not in the Silver City. Reality is up for grabs. As Lucifer notes, it will only be a matter of time before someone realizes this and takes a shot at it. And so, the first are The previous volume of Lucifer gave out a bit of a whopper one what God's plan was: create a universe, get it up and running, and then leave it in the hands of His preferred son. This turned out to be Lucifer, who was never down with that sort of thing and rebelled. This revelation in turn forces Michael away, and now God's not in the Silver City. Reality is up for grabs. As Lucifer notes, it will only be a matter of time before someone realizes this and takes a shot at it. And so, the first are a pair of not-particularly bright Titans. The two are powerful, but dumb, and it falls to Lucifer to save the city he abandoned. To do that, he needs a former hostess of his former restaurant. Mike Carey is nothing if not someone who can pull back even the most marginal of characters and make them important in some way. After this, Lucifer decides he doesn't want any immortals in his own personal reality and opts to force them out. Most go willingly. For the few who don't, he asks Elaine to deal with them, along with a group she handpicks herself. Elaine is clearly growing here, showing how she handles things differently than Lucifer (who would have just wiped the immortals out), showing mercy and compassion as often as possible, including to what could best be described as a baby Swamp Thing and the world's least scary and most sympathetic spider-demon. The last page introduces a new character who's presence has been lurking in the background since the story began, and a major adversary for the future. Lucifer predicted the Titans were just the warm-up, with far more dangerous and deadly opponents still to come. He was right. They show up in the next volume.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

    Two titans storm the Silver City hoping to fill the void left by God when He left for parts unknown. It's up to Lucifer to stop them from taking the throne, but to do that he'll need his reluctant brother Michael's help. All immortals are ordered to leave Lucifer's new cosmos to make sure they don't try the same thing the titans did, which affords the reader an opportunity to see Elaine, Mona, Mazikeen, and the fallen cherubs in action on their own (these side characters are quickly becoming fav Two titans storm the Silver City hoping to fill the void left by God when He left for parts unknown. It's up to Lucifer to stop them from taking the throne, but to do that he'll need his reluctant brother Michael's help. All immortals are ordered to leave Lucifer's new cosmos to make sure they don't try the same thing the titans did, which affords the reader an opportunity to see Elaine, Mona, Mazikeen, and the fallen cherubs in action on their own (these side characters are quickly becoming favorites of mine). In the midst of all this, Mike Carey tells the touching tale of the creature Thole and his human friend from the other side of Lucifer's gate, once again showing that even monsters have hearts. I mentioned before how much I like it when minor characters from previous arcs reappear in greater roles, but another thing I'm really liking in this series is how each arc leads seamlessly into the next.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Shehu

    A fantastic take on Lucifer, the fallen one, and his stance towards both god and Michael his brother. A tale that both adds to the meaning of Sandman, but draws heavily from it too. While retired, Lucifer undertakes a job from Heaven, which grants him a letter of passage. This sets the universe on course for its end, and results with a new Creation, Lucifer's one, the death of Michael, but also the transfer of his powers into Elaine Belloc and of course Yahwehs quitting of his role, leaving his p A fantastic take on Lucifer, the fallen one, and his stance towards both god and Michael his brother. A tale that both adds to the meaning of Sandman, but draws heavily from it too. While retired, Lucifer undertakes a job from Heaven, which grants him a letter of passage. This sets the universe on course for its end, and results with a new Creation, Lucifer's one, the death of Michael, but also the transfer of his powers into Elaine Belloc and of course Yahwehs quitting of his role, leaving his position void, which makes the Universe unmake itself, only for Elaine to become God. This grants Samael, the freedom he so much desires.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    The light relief volume of Lucifer. It starts off with Brothers in Arms, which is decent; the two titans become omnipotent in a way which doesn't seem to make much sense in the light of God's power not seeming to be tied to belief in the Vertigo universe, yet they are pretty funny although they never convince of a threat. Then, in issues #46–49, Mazikeen, Elaine and the others clear house in Lucifer's world. This includes the sweet and funny Thole, king of stictchglass who is one of my favourite The light relief volume of Lucifer. It starts off with Brothers in Arms, which is decent; the two titans become omnipotent in a way which doesn't seem to make much sense in the light of God's power not seeming to be tied to belief in the Vertigo universe, yet they are pretty funny although they never convince of a threat. Then, in issues #46–49, Mazikeen, Elaine and the others clear house in Lucifer's world. This includes the sweet and funny Thole, king of stictchglass who is one of my favourite characters, despite his brief appearance. My rankings of the Lucifer volumes: 3 (best), 6, 8, 4, 11, 2, 10, 1, 7, 9, 5 (worst)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book, as the title implied but I didn't notice until I was done, was more of a transition to a bigger plot. It was good, I enjoyed it, but I don't feel like it got anywhere. But I didn't take off any stars for that, since it wasn't pointlessly so. I can tell it's going somewhere and I prefer when a story isn't rushed just because the book needs to fit a certain size.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Brilliant, as always. amazing sotrytelling, amazing story and concepts. Just love it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zec

    Stories: Brothers in Arms, Stitchglass Slide, and Wire, Briar Limber Lock. God has left and things are slowly escalating. I was intrigued by the story line in Brothers in Arms where two beings try to take the throne and almost succeed in the deification of themselves. Unfortunately it was not as huge as I expected it to be. I really enjoyed the Stitchglass Slide, the concept of harvesting emotions has been presented in this series before and it was exciting to explore more of this concept. I like Stories: Brothers in Arms, Stitchglass Slide, and Wire, Briar Limber Lock. God has left and things are slowly escalating. I was intrigued by the story line in Brothers in Arms where two beings try to take the throne and almost succeed in the deification of themselves. Unfortunately it was not as huge as I expected it to be. I really enjoyed the Stitchglass Slide, the concept of harvesting emotions has been presented in this series before and it was exciting to explore more of this concept. I liked that the kid had a bittersweet ending. Anything with Elaine or Mazikeen is good, so seeing them interact at length for the first time was a thrill. Really enjoy Elaine’s relationship with Gaudium. Nothing really amazing happens here, but the series remains remarkably consistent. Lucifer’s stories often revolve around cosmic consequences and existential themes, while Elaine, Mazikeen and others revolve around more personal exploration, trauma and growth. Few series are able to satisfyingly deal with one, let alone two.

  15. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    The picture of Lucifer draped over his father's throne was hilarious. I loved the Lucifer-in-heaven scenes and think it is hilarious how seriously his angel brothers think of themselves while they totally don't get Lucifer's sarcasm. I didn't like the banishment of all immortals from Lucifer's universe. I agree with Elaine that is wasn't nice, but Lucifer usually has a reason for these things and we may find out 10 books in the future. :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Keeloca

    I once accosted a flight attendant and asked for his picture, because he looked exactly like Lucifer on this cover (sans the armour). He kindly obliged - but I no longer have it. Am sad. Since I am a fan of reluctant team-ups, I kind of love it when Lucifer and Heaven joins forces. Also - fuck yes, sisters of mercy! Oh, and hello Beatrice!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    God has left our existence and Lucifer.....must defend heaven? Simply brilliant....

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    A strong volume. The supporting cast carries most of the weight here and there are a few strong story lines explored. I enjoyed it and looking forward to the next few volumes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    James

    Enemies become allies.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    What I loved of Sandman just popped right up in this one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    The other immortals vying for God's throne was kinda meh as a story arc. I enjoyed the story about Thole the stitchglass weaver, very creative. His mean mate was pretty funny.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    (view spoiler)[Remember that time when God abandoned Creation, and two Titans conspired to take his place, which ended with Lucifer fighting for Heaven while Michael kind of skulked because his entire belief system has been upended and he was having a bit of an existential crisis? Then, on the streets of Heaven, Mazikeen kissed a hot waitress and flipped off the whole of the angelic host? Yeah, it was awesome. (hide spoiler)] Exodus is not about one departure, but many. It is the beginning of the (view spoiler)[Remember that time when God abandoned Creation, and two Titans conspired to take his place, which ended with Lucifer fighting for Heaven while Michael kind of skulked because his entire belief system has been upended and he was having a bit of an existential crisis? Then, on the streets of Heaven, Mazikeen kissed a hot waitress and flipped off the whole of the angelic host? Yeah, it was awesome. (hide spoiler)] Exodus is not about one departure, but many. It is the beginning of the aftermath of God’s departure from his creation. It is the forced migration of immortals from Lucifer’s creation, a caution he exercises after seeing the chaos brought by those seeking to fill God’s shoes. It is a story about gods and what happens if they were to suddenly not be around any more. It is a story about a universe—our universe—upon every molecule of which God has written his name, and what happens when that name begins to fade. The events of Lucifer’s seventh collected edition are what will drive the story relentlessly towards its final climax and conclusion, with the fate of both Lucifer’s creation and our own at stake. There is also the introduction of the final major variable to Carey’s story, the long-awaited arrival of Lilith, Adam’s willful first wife and the mother of the Lilim. Though she is only seen in the final pages, the reader already knows that a legendary figure such as Lilith is not going to sit passively by and watch the universe(s) end. The storytelling remains at the top of its game, and Exodus is filled with memorable moments: Lucifer claiming the seat of the Primium Mobile for himself (sort of) before heading out to face the Titans. Elaine’s moment of profound compassion regarding the lives of an immortal monster and his human foster child. Mazikeen’s confrontation with her mother. Gaudium becoming a beacon of joy and peace. With Exodus, the world is (or in this case worlds are) changing quickly and permanently. It serves as both a powerhouse of a self-contained story and as the opening battle of Carey’s grand finale. From here on out, nothing will ever be the same again…and the creative team’s fearlessness in tackling such a controversial subject and cast truly takes shape as a masterwork of storytelling.

  23. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    God has departed Heaven, and, as Lucifer says, "every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into his shoes." Thus, once again, Lucifer finds himself on the side of the angels as the first usurpers try to attain the throne. I have difficulty liking this story arc due to the antagonists, the Titans. I just really didn't feel that they added to the complexity of the plot nor are they a match to the host The ending of the battle in the City of Light was a bit predictable but I did love Mazik God has departed Heaven, and, as Lucifer says, "every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into his shoes." Thus, once again, Lucifer finds himself on the side of the angels as the first usurpers try to attain the throne. I have difficulty liking this story arc due to the antagonists, the Titans. I just really didn't feel that they added to the complexity of the plot nor are they a match to the host The ending of the battle in the City of Light was a bit predictable but I did love Mazikeen's last line, "Passion is blasphemy in this holy place. And I have a great need to blaspheme." Having rescued God's granddaughter Elaine from the Mansions of the Silence, Lucifer is now intent on exiling all deities and demons from the alternate universe he created. Lucifer's own realm holds thousands of immortals who might be plotting, so Elaine, Mazikeen, and a small handful of assistants, on Lucifer's orders, must banish the immortals--or kill them if they resist. (Which begs the question of how one kills an immortal.) But not all of them are willing to go quietly. What redeemed "Lucifer Vol. 7: Exodus" to me was the side story of the weaver Thole. Poignant. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 7: Exodus Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    God has left his creation, possibly forever. Two Titans spot that there is a vacuum at the heart of Creation and attempt to usurp his power for themselves. Lucifer and his brother Michael must combine their forces and join with that of the Host of the Silver City to try and defeat them. Later, for reasons not yet explained, Lucifer decides to purge all immortal beings from his own Creation, and dispatches the Elaine Belloc of the Sisters of Mercy to ensure that it is done. This second part of th God has left his creation, possibly forever. Two Titans spot that there is a vacuum at the heart of Creation and attempt to usurp his power for themselves. Lucifer and his brother Michael must combine their forces and join with that of the Host of the Silver City to try and defeat them. Later, for reasons not yet explained, Lucifer decides to purge all immortal beings from his own Creation, and dispatches the Elaine Belloc of the Sisters of Mercy to ensure that it is done. This second part of the book tells the story of some of the encounters that Elaine and her team have while carrying out the Maker's commands. This is very much a book of two halves. The first is epic on a grand scale, with the fate of Creation at stake, while the second is much more personal and, for me, the better half of the book. That is narrated by one of the immortal creatures to be evicted and his story, along with that of the Human boy that be befriends, is poignant and moving. And the cliffhanger at the end of the book is certainly one that I wasn't expecting. After a slow start, the Lucifer books have become fast-paced and gripping with a deep internal mythology that draws not only on the Judeo-Christian tradition, but that of other cultures as well. They make for great reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

    In a comic interlude, a couple titans from Greek mythology, Garamas and Gyges, think they should take over God’s throne. Lucien and Merv Pumpkinhead from the Sandman make cameos this time, as well as an alternate version of Swamp Thing. Due to the trouble caused by the titans, Lucifer decides to kick all immortals out of his creation, which doesn’t make a lot of sense since the titans came from God’s creation. Anyhow, not all of the immortals go willingly. I liked that Gaudium hurt a demon by tr In a comic interlude, a couple titans from Greek mythology, Garamas and Gyges, think they should take over God’s throne. Lucien and Merv Pumpkinhead from the Sandman make cameos this time, as well as an alternate version of Swamp Thing. Due to the trouble caused by the titans, Lucifer decides to kick all immortals out of his creation, which doesn’t make a lot of sense since the titans came from God’s creation. Anyhow, not all of the immortals go willingly. I liked that Gaudium hurt a demon by transforming back into his old cherub self and radiating peace and love at it. One of the immortals in Lucifer’s creation is a spinner, a giant spider-like creature who spins webs out of emotions and accidentally poisons a boy on earth by using the gate between creations as a dumping ground for emotional waste. Strangely, Lucifer’s universe seems to consist of a single planet in this volume even though it was supposed to be an entire universe before. If you skip this volume, you won’t be missing much.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    Starting to feel a bit silly gushing about favourites, but there's no helping it - The Weaving is my favourite side plot ever. I love Thole's POV and how his and Martin's story fits into the greater arc. They also hit all my chosen family buttons. Gyges and Garamas' little usurpation attempt would be an amusingly absurd side-trek all on its own, but then you add in Beatrice and her helpless love for Mazikeen and there we go again with all the feelings. (Also, snogging another woman in full view Starting to feel a bit silly gushing about favourites, but there's no helping it - The Weaving is my favourite side plot ever. I love Thole's POV and how his and Martin's story fits into the greater arc. They also hit all my chosen family buttons. Gyges and Garamas' little usurpation attempt would be an amusingly absurd side-trek all on its own, but then you add in Beatrice and her helpless love for Mazikeen and there we go again with all the feelings. (Also, snogging another woman in full view of all the angels just to piss them off may be super-petty but boy was it fun :D) And finally, Elaine and Mazikeen working together is like a dream come true (though I am sorry it was such a short quest). They are such opposites and I love Mazikeen's determination to stay standoffish versus Elaine's determination to be her friend. (view spoiler)[Soz, Maz, gonna lose this one. (hide spoiler)] Art was fab as usual.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Mike Carey, Lucifer: Exodus (Vertigo, 2005) God has departed Heaven, and, as Lucifer says, “every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into his shoes.” Thus, once again, Lucifer finds himself on the side of the angels as the first usurpers try to attain the throne. Worse, Lucifer's own realm holds thousands of immortals who might be plotting, so Elaine, Mazikeen, and a small handful of assistants, on Lucifer's orders, must banish the immortals-- or kill them if they resist. (Which begs t Mike Carey, Lucifer: Exodus (Vertigo, 2005) God has departed Heaven, and, as Lucifer says, “every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into his shoes.” Thus, once again, Lucifer finds himself on the side of the angels as the first usurpers try to attain the throne. Worse, Lucifer's own realm holds thousands of immortals who might be plotting, so Elaine, Mazikeen, and a small handful of assistants, on Lucifer's orders, must banish the immortals-- or kill them if they resist. (Which begs the question of how one kills an immortal.) While Carey's series has never quite gotten to the complexity level of Gaiman's original Sandman, he's always excelled at plotting, character, and writing, and this is no exception. Another strong entry in the series. ****

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    One of the things I like best about this series is the idea that reality is a tenuous thing, at best. It's here in Exodus where that idea really seems to come to the fore. God is God because he says he is, and when someone else (or multiple someones) say they are God, then that becomes so. Immortality and mortality have more to do with whim than anything else. And of course, Lucifer's bombshell at the end of the book that without the will of God to make it so, reality is becoming much less real. One of the things I like best about this series is the idea that reality is a tenuous thing, at best. It's here in Exodus where that idea really seems to come to the fore. God is God because he says he is, and when someone else (or multiple someones) say they are God, then that becomes so. Immortality and mortality have more to do with whim than anything else. And of course, Lucifer's bombshell at the end of the book that without the will of God to make it so, reality is becoming much less real. But the real truth of the matter is that Lucifer seems to have taken a backseat in the last few volumes, and the story suffers for it. His supporting cast is still enjoyable, but Lucifer himself needs to show up a bit more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    Part 1 Brothers in Arms, God has gone, abandoning his creation to the care of Lucifer and Michael, and leaving a power vacuum which many are eager to fill. Eventually the brothers are forced to work together to protect it all from the Titans. In the second part of the book Lucifer charges Elaine Belloc and her chosen companions to rid his creation of Immortals by death or exile and this they do, down to the last , which has ramifications for Mazikeen. As Lucifer notices the portals he created begi Part 1 Brothers in Arms, God has gone, abandoning his creation to the care of Lucifer and Michael, and leaving a power vacuum which many are eager to fill. Eventually the brothers are forced to work together to protect it all from the Titans. In the second part of the book Lucifer charges Elaine Belloc and her chosen companions to rid his creation of Immortals by death or exile and this they do, down to the last , which has ramifications for Mazikeen. As Lucifer notices the portals he created beginning to shrink he realises that without God's creative force holding the universe together , it will dissipate into nothing, and passes that knowledge on to his brother and fellow Guardian Michael. Of all the volumes so far this has been the weakest in terms of storytelling.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rena Sherwood

    I read this last week and I'm still haven't taken it all in yet. I'm giving it three stars today but may change my mind tomorrow. It is very original (yes, I suppose that's ungrammatical but Lucifer the series is far more than the word "original" encompasses) and the artwork is luscious. There's just enough explanation to keep the stories arching along but just enough is left unexplained in order to pique your interest. You do have to read this series in order to understand what's going on. That' I read this last week and I'm still haven't taken it all in yet. I'm giving it three stars today but may change my mind tomorrow. It is very original (yes, I suppose that's ungrammatical but Lucifer the series is far more than the word "original" encompasses) and the artwork is luscious. There's just enough explanation to keep the stories arching along but just enough is left unexplained in order to pique your interest. You do have to read this series in order to understand what's going on. That's about the only negative criticism I can think of. I'm also not sure why those who try to become gods always wind up doing something incredibly stupid to spoil their plans, but perhaps that's just part and parcel of trying to be god.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.