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Lucifer, Vol. 3: A Dalliance With the Damned

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From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Lucifer has been busy - creating a universe of his own, in fact, something that has caused ripples and attracted the attention of forces both Above and Below. Join our anti-hero as he journeys to a strange, 18th-century flavoured hell, full of intrigues and back-stabbing; as we meet a poor sinner who is r From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Lucifer has been busy - creating a universe of his own, in fact, something that has caused ripples and attracted the attention of forces both Above and Below. Join our anti-hero as he journeys to a strange, 18th-century flavoured hell, full of intrigues and back-stabbing; as we meet a poor sinner who is raised to power through the machinations of a demoness; and as the Morningstar's creation threatens to renew a war as old as time itself...A war with Heaven... This volume contains: Lucifer #14–20


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From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Lucifer has been busy - creating a universe of his own, in fact, something that has caused ripples and attracted the attention of forces both Above and Below. Join our anti-hero as he journeys to a strange, 18th-century flavoured hell, full of intrigues and back-stabbing; as we meet a poor sinner who is r From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Lucifer has been busy - creating a universe of his own, in fact, something that has caused ripples and attracted the attention of forces both Above and Below. Join our anti-hero as he journeys to a strange, 18th-century flavoured hell, full of intrigues and back-stabbing; as we meet a poor sinner who is raised to power through the machinations of a demoness; and as the Morningstar's creation threatens to renew a war as old as time itself...A war with Heaven... This volume contains: Lucifer #14–20

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 3: A Dalliance With the Damned

  1. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    So I had originally given this volume 4 stars because while I absolutely adore Tryptic and The Thunder Sermon, A Dalliance with the Damned bores me pretty immensely. But after reading it again I realized that despite not really liking 2 issues in this, the rest of it has some of my favorite story lines and quotes from the whole series so let's just call it a 4.5 rounded up. I love how we get to see Lucifer creating his own universe because he literally creates it and then sets it up exactly like So I had originally given this volume 4 stars because while I absolutely adore Tryptic and The Thunder Sermon, A Dalliance with the Damned bores me pretty immensely. But after reading it again I realized that despite not really liking 2 issues in this, the rest of it has some of my favorite story lines and quotes from the whole series so let's just call it a 4.5 rounded up. I love how we get to see Lucifer creating his own universe because he literally creates it and then sets it up exactly like God's universe at first but everyone is playing opposite roles basically. And it's not like he's doing it by accident, the whole thing is on purpose because it's not enough for him to just make his own universe, he has to make like God's only BETTER. And still everything goes exactly the same except how God deals with his creations' 'failings' vs how Lucifer deals with it. I just think it's a very interesting concept because it's not really like Lucifer wants to be worshiped like God or even 'in charge' so to speak but in order for God not to be in charge of him, he has to basically become God and be in charge of everything else. I also love the issue that focuses on Mazikeen because while she is kind of in the background in the first few volumes, she really comes into her own here. It's very fitting that the Triptych issues focuse around Lucifer, Elaine, and Mazikeen because they are definitely the main players in the over-arching plot. Also I love the way Mazikeen wins her fight against the other Lilim because it has a very Lucifer-esque feel to it. They are really very similar in a lot of ways I like their relationship and how they play off each other, but more on that later. The whole Dalliance with the Damned plotline with Lys and Christopher is just very meh to me. I mean I recognize that it's laying important groundwork for later stories, but just reading through it is incredibly dull and also I've gotta roll my eyes a little bit at Lys as the like 'oversexual demon seductress' trope. Although in this series it's honestly not as bad as it usually is because you've got tons of other female characters that aren't like that at all, whereas usually it's like 'oh you get one female character and she's just fan service'. Also, while I don't necessarily dislike Christopher, out of all the main characters in this series he is probably the most boring to me overall, even though he does play an important role. This second picks up a bit towards the end when Lucifer and Mazikeen shows up, but it's still one of my least favorite parts of the series. The Thunder Sermon is probably one of my favorite issues in the whole series [next to The Yahweh Dance, but that is much later]. I like the twist it throws into Lucifer and Mazikeen's relationship and also Lucifer's conversation with Michael is very illuminating as to where they both stand going forward in the series. And those last few pages hit me hard every time because it's just like #classicLucifer. Some highlights: First mention of Lilith! Can't wait til we get to her backstory issues. As I mentioned before, I absolutely love Mazikeen's fight here. One of several of my favorite quotes from this series. Obligatory mentions of will. #LoveIt Obligatory mention of will Pt 2. I just love how Lucifer is like 'mmm I think we're supposed to dress up' and Mazikeen is like 'ask me if I give a fuck'. Another of my favorite quotes with the 'no one's good at everything' bit. Why you really shouldn't tell Lucifer he can't do something Exhibit 1. That bottom right panel is another of my favorite quotes from the series and I think also a pretty good representation of Lucifer's overall character.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    The first arc in this volume, "Triptych", was actually pretty good. But then, sadly, it all went to hell (literally). And I have to give Mike Carey some credit here, not every writer can write hell in such a boring way. Basically all that happens there is some murderer gets to boink a babe with huge knockers for a couple of issues, and then there is a party. I'm not even joking. Lucifer is very badly written. The dialogue is so stale and so lifeless, the book actually feels much more dated than S The first arc in this volume, "Triptych", was actually pretty good. But then, sadly, it all went to hell (literally). And I have to give Mike Carey some credit here, not every writer can write hell in such a boring way. Basically all that happens there is some murderer gets to boink a babe with huge knockers for a couple of issues, and then there is a party. I'm not even joking. Lucifer is very badly written. The dialogue is so stale and so lifeless, the book actually feels much more dated than Sandman ever did, despite being a more recent series. And the story is just all over the place. It doesn't feel like the plot is going anywhere, it's all just tons and tons of dry exposition and random events. The artwork also got uglier since the last two volumes. Weird anatomy, ugly faces, primitive shapes. It's just not nice to look at. Anyway, I am done with the series. And I probably will avoid Mike Carey's books from now on. If this is his best stuff, I don't want to read the rest.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Triptych is a great arc. I like how each issue focuses on one of our main characters Elaine Belloc, Mazikeen, and Lucifer, advancing each of their stories. A Dalliance with the Damned is much less interesting. Seeing a bunch of demons try and mimic the royalty of medieval Europe was ultimately just as boring as the time period they were mimicking. The Thunder Sermon is one of my favorite issues so far. It's such a great ending to this story. It really sums up Lucifer in a nutshell.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cheese

    Fantastic series. If it continues like this it’ll be in my top 10 easily

  5. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    things are getting intense and I'm rEADY for it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Zec

    “Must I Sin once... and repent forever?” Existential musings in a comic about the devil... who’d have thought? Mike Carey is a genius. Really enjoying this. A lot happens in this book plot wise. Mazikeen becomes leader of the Lilim, Elaine learns more about her powers and meets Duma, Lucifer does his own rendition of Adam and Eve, a man who has spent centuries in hell thwarts a conspiracy and shows a hedonistic demon (who collects ad revels in the pain of the souls being tortured) what pain reall “Must I Sin once... and repent forever?” Existential musings in a comic about the devil... who’d have thought? Mike Carey is a genius. Really enjoying this. A lot happens in this book plot wise. Mazikeen becomes leader of the Lilim, Elaine learns more about her powers and meets Duma, Lucifer does his own rendition of Adam and Eve, a man who has spent centuries in hell thwarts a conspiracy and shows a hedonistic demon (who collects ad revels in the pain of the souls being tortured) what pain really is - leaving her with a profound sense of guilt and regret Lucifer also kind of declares war on heaven by refusing to cede control of his newly created universe. No matter how much happens with the plot, this series is consistently philosophical and searching for meaning. Borne out of the legacy of The Sandman, Lucifer continues in the same vein of entertaining stories with depth and carves out its own tone and style. Similar to The Sandman in quality while being very definitely it’s own thing. One of the many things I really like about Mike Carey is that he’s almost always telling a compelling story and arranging the pieces for the next story at the same time. Looking forward to the point when everything converges. A lot has been said about the plot, but his characters are what make the plot great. It is fascinating whenever we see things from Elaine’s POV as she’s the only main character who’s new to all this. I really enjoy the evolving dynamic between Mazikeen and Lucifer. Rudd was decent, am very interested in how Lys will feature in future arcs.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Most of the book was about characters I didn't care about at all doing things that I didn't care about at all. It wasn't intriguing or enjoyable. I don't understand what Carey was doing with this one. I've had very hard time with this series, I'm still not seeing the appeal. There are high points but they're few and far between. But I can get the books from the library so I might get the next one someday.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    Interlude that is detached a little bit from the story so far. Definitely shows more characters and set ups the future plot. Yay, for the next one!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

    Very gripping. some twisted little side plots, all sorts of intrigue in hell, and an awesome chance for Lucifer to play out a new take on the garden of Eden story. Also, everyone wants a piece of Lucifer's new Creation so things seem to be working towards a Season Of Mists sort of scenario. I'm not sure how I feel about that - Season Of Mists was stunning in concept and execution - right up until the too-easy resolution. I hope Carey takes this in a different direction, and Lucifer's seeming dis Very gripping. some twisted little side plots, all sorts of intrigue in hell, and an awesome chance for Lucifer to play out a new take on the garden of Eden story. Also, everyone wants a piece of Lucifer's new Creation so things seem to be working towards a Season Of Mists sort of scenario. I'm not sure how I feel about that - Season Of Mists was stunning in concept and execution - right up until the too-easy resolution. I hope Carey takes this in a different direction, and Lucifer's seeming disinterest in negotiating with any of the factions who want a portion of his pie seems to point in that direction. We shall see. In the meantime, this continues to be pretty damned excellent storytelling.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    Fantastic. The faux-historical setting of Effrul and the demons playacting at being human has always been a favourite of mine, complete with the archaic diction and Christopher and Lys's story, which somehow manages to be both a hilarious riff on the fake period style and a uniquely painful tangle of desire and betrayal. I also love how Mazikeen is starting to emancipate herself. And Peter Gross's art is just perfect for Lucifer, all clean and sharp and elegant as the man himself.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hennie

    Love the tv show! Love the graphic novel! What else can I say?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    Norman Mailer once said that The Sandman series by Neil Gaiman is a “comic book for intellectuals”. If ever he’d read the Lucifer graphic novels by Mike Carey, I bet he’d say the same comment about it. A Dalliance with the Damned is the third volume that chronicles the adventures of the Lightbringer from the pages of The Sandman, Lucifer Morningstar. For the majority of this tome, the dashing devil takes the backseat while the readers are “toured” further in Carey’s well-crafted universe and deep Norman Mailer once said that The Sandman series by Neil Gaiman is a “comic book for intellectuals”. If ever he’d read the Lucifer graphic novels by Mike Carey, I bet he’d say the same comment about it. A Dalliance with the Damned is the third volume that chronicles the adventures of the Lightbringer from the pages of The Sandman, Lucifer Morningstar. For the majority of this tome, the dashing devil takes the backseat while the readers are “toured” further in Carey’s well-crafted universe and deeper into the personalities and histories of secondary characters. I love the concept of the Effrul, a city in hell reminiscent of ancient London, full of pseudo-royalties that bask in eternal pleasure provided by the damned and other demons. This is a sick concept and all, and it got me going “It’s unfair! Fiends and devils that enjoy good fortune in hell? There must be a deeper kind of inferno where these creatures should be punished!” The drug called “pain”, extracted from the actual tormenting of the damned souls and materialized into powder, is an object of addiction among these royalties. The whole idea is genius, contributing greatly in the gradual world-building of this series. Like its preceding compilation it has a lot going on: Ellain Belloc, the archangel Michael’s offspring with a human, goes to Effrul in attempts to find the spirit of her friend Mona; Mazikeen seeks the help of her kin, the Lilim, when Lucifer refuses to restore her face; Lady Lys, a royalty in Effrul, takes a damned lover to satisfy her needs only to get unexpected results; and Lucifer folds the gateways of his universe in space and time after God announces that no one else can make another version of the Creation. The action is already at its full-swing, and I’m expecting the plot to thicken some more in the next volumes. I admit that some issues are dropping a notch when the antihero is not present, and this is maybe because the other characters where the spotlight is shining on are not as interesting as the Fallen One himself. With the remarkable storylines of each issue, though, I guess that could be forgiven. Risque parts are to be expected, what with the nature of the majority of this volume (hint: look at the title), and I'm giving a thumb up for the artists and writer for doing their jobs tastefully. In general, this is a good page-turner. I’m stoked to read the next tome!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carol A

    This is an incredibly dark book but masterfully done. This is technically a re-read but I'd forgotten enough that it was as delightful a re-read as the initial read was. Michael reports that God is gone and Lucifer returns his niece and her friend to life in another universe where they are unworshipped gods. Lucifer is not cruel, but he is precise and it is delightful to see him with Elaine and her friend. I just love this series so much.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Unfortunately, this is going to be less a review and more of a highlights. So, without further adieu (since I still have Volume 4 to read and it's due back at the library tomorrow): Lucifer as God; Angels as Demons Still enjoying the inversion that's going on here. Lucifer makes his realm and his only command is Bow down to no one. Worship no one. Not even me. Do you understand? So beautiful. And then of course one of the angels comes to the man in the form of a serpent, inspiring doubt in the man's Unfortunately, this is going to be less a review and more of a highlights. So, without further adieu (since I still have Volume 4 to read and it's due back at the library tomorrow): Lucifer as God; Angels as Demons Still enjoying the inversion that's going on here. Lucifer makes his realm and his only command is Bow down to no one. Worship no one. Not even me. Do you understand? So beautiful. And then of course one of the angels comes to the man in the form of a serpent, inspiring doubt in the man's (the man's! gender-bender) about Lucifer's role as creator as well, the paradox (so popular in Christian mythology) of freedom in slavery to a deity, polarizing opinions of good and evil, the philosophy that the end (or, in his words, the intent) justifies the means, the nature of desire, and other things of a philosophical nature that I wish I had the time to more thoroughly think about. Still. Gender-bendery goodness, nature of good and evil, all good stuff. Mazikeen Yesterday, I enthused how Mazikeen didn't tie herself down to Lucifer and how she went off on a journey and how I still liked it, regardless of how much the reader saw of her journey or not. Well. I'm here to tell you that Mazikeen's journey was bad ass. She goes to find her identity, and is instead elected leader of the Lilim after she outwits her trial (since her fellows thought she had betrayed them by staying with Lucifer). And when in hell, someone introduces her as Lucifer's consort? Oh no. She's having none of that. Also, I really love how she refused to play act by costuming to the period that Hell had set as its desktop. I also think I want her t-shirt: normal consciousness will be resumed. I think I know my next Halloween costume. Oh yes. So, in volume 2 she left to find her face -- a quest for identity. And then she found her identity in a role of leader of the Lilim. And when Lucifer refused to ally himself with them -- she didn't stay again. She left with her people. I think that's so great. Pain As A Drug One of the things I've learned in my writing class is that people -- and especially writers -- thrive off the misfortune of others. We love to gossip about it. Etc. I've often thought about this -- noticing the little ways I myself take pleasure in the pain or discomfit of others (I can only speak for myself, but I think every individual has their own private bit of themselves that enjoys the non-happiness of others in their own unique way). And that was illustrated (heh, pun) here, with the pain powder that was...orgasmic. But it was orgasmic because it wasn't true pain, not like he later describes: One of the nobility of hell has picked me out to be her toy. Compared to you I am happy indeed. But somehow it rings like false coin. Do you remember the first lad or lass you loved? When you felt your chest was too narrow to hold your heart? When it seemed the world was made anew by your passion? And do you remember the fear that comes with love? The fear that it cannot last? The fear that you cannot be worthy of it? Truly we were not. none of us. But did it not come anyway? How we have poured our souls into another's lips and eyes. How we have died and been born again in the ebb and flow of their breath. All gone. The flesh you loved is dust. The words you whispered stir no echoes. And it may e that the one you loved most dearly sits at supper now with angels, and has forgotten your name. They think they mortify us with whips and wheels. But then, they have neither lived, nor loved. In truth -- they know nothing of pain at all. I found that an interesting concept. Lucifer as Anti-hero There's this problem, see, with anti-heroes in stories. Anti-heroes walk a fine line. They can't be too base because then they'd make poor protagonists and then nobody would like them anymore. Sometimes writers try to avoid this by defanging or declawing them, as it were. Spike sort of went through something similar (unfortunately). It's difficult because you don't want them to stagnate and be boring, but they can't really be someone whom they're not at the same time (I fancy all characters have this problem, it's just really obvious and more noticeable with anti-heroes in my experience). So, there are these two scenes where Lucifer is a magnificent anti-hero -- and the writers could have shied away and had him done something more palatable. But they didn't. First, he gives a demon a soul. I mean that's just. Wow, that's just cruel. And I'm in awe of it and yet, at the same time, that's...cruel (well, I suppose one doesn't become lord of hell for nothing). But yet - it's a testament to the multi-facetedness of the character. The second bit was when some kids snuck into his house -- and prayed to God. Of course, he wouldn't save them for that. It reminded me of those people who are like -- and thank god my loved one survived this terrible accident when, in reality, it was because someone was a damned good doctor who gave a shit about his job. So I really enjoyed that scene as a writer -- because Lucifer's still an anti-hero here instead of bowing out and taking the noble option -- and as a person who is appreciative of social commentary, wherever it can be found.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    This volume of everybody's favourite anti-hero contains three apparently unrelated triptychs, a story of what's going on in Hell and a short after-story where Michael confronts Lucifer again. This volume didn't really do an awful lot for me. The three triptychs were interesting, the first being being Mazikeen's story of trying to "fix" her face. After being an almost-illegible face in a mask for two volumes, it's nice to see her get fleshed out a bit, and her story is taken up again in the final This volume of everybody's favourite anti-hero contains three apparently unrelated triptychs, a story of what's going on in Hell and a short after-story where Michael confronts Lucifer again. This volume didn't really do an awful lot for me. The three triptychs were interesting, the first being being Mazikeen's story of trying to "fix" her face. After being an almost-illegible face in a mask for two volumes, it's nice to see her get fleshed out a bit, and her story is taken up again in the final segment of the volume. Elaine's story of trying to find her friend, a journey that takes her to Hell and back, was probably the least interesting of the three, while the final triptych showing Lucifer's Garden of Eden and the serpent that appears there had a marvellous irony to it. The second story, showing a power-play going on in Hell seemed like a side-show, with no real purpose other than to fill space. I liked the conceit that in a particular region of Hell, the fashion amongst demons has become to take on the aspect of Humans of the Renaissance period, and what comes of that, but the central story seemed weak, even if Christopher Rudd was quite a cool character. The final, short, segment shows us the petitioners who come to Lucifer to try and gain entrance to his new Creation and how he deals with them, while simultaneously showing us two young people who are drawn to it and sneak in. I'm sure their fate is symbolic, but I'm not sure what of, other than showing just how callous Lucifer can be. I'll continue reading, as I find the arc plot interesting, but this volume of shorts seemed more like punctuation in the story rather than the next chapter.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    Every time I see that there is a section illustrated by Dean Ormston I feel a little annoyed and disgusted like I have to walk barefoot through grass where I know there are snails. There was a lot of him in this trade paperback. I'm glad Mazikeen has her whole face now so that I don't have to guess at her gibberish (although she's not too happy about having flesh covering her entire skull). I liked the bit with Elaine traveling through different realms, felt very Alice-in-Wonderland-y. I think I en Every time I see that there is a section illustrated by Dean Ormston I feel a little annoyed and disgusted like I have to walk barefoot through grass where I know there are snails. There was a lot of him in this trade paperback. I'm glad Mazikeen has her whole face now so that I don't have to guess at her gibberish (although she's not too happy about having flesh covering her entire skull). I liked the bit with Elaine traveling through different realms, felt very Alice-in-Wonderland-y. I think I enjoyed this trade a little less than the first two, but it's still solidly good. Perhaps the side story, "A Dalliance with the Damned" (after which this trade is named) was the focus for longer than it should have been. I'm glad that the trade ended with more of the main story arc; I'm really excited to see where it leads.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I'll confess that I don't particularly care about Christopher Rudd and his adventures in Hell. For me, at least, it's the low point of the series, as there's just so little at stake watching a bunch of demons stabbing each other in the back. It's a shame too, because this volume really gives Mazikeen a chance to shine, and it also contains Lucifer's first attempt at creation. And what a great idea that is. Lucifer, as a character, has always been opposed to God, but how often has he actually been I'll confess that I don't particularly care about Christopher Rudd and his adventures in Hell. For me, at least, it's the low point of the series, as there's just so little at stake watching a bunch of demons stabbing each other in the back. It's a shame too, because this volume really gives Mazikeen a chance to shine, and it also contains Lucifer's first attempt at creation. And what a great idea that is. Lucifer, as a character, has always been opposed to God, but how often has he actually been given a chance to act independently? To stop back-seat driving, get behind the wheel, and take us where he wants to go?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    At this point I'm completely enthralled with this series. Every detail in every storyline is so perfect, every character so thoroughly imagined (even ones that get killed off almost immediately), that you feel a total understanding for this completely alien world Mike Carey has created. In this volume we get Lucifer's selfish take on Creation, a bunch of demons who behave like 1800s English nobility, and a look into the incredibly twisted, inhuman world Lucifer surrounds himself with. As with pr At this point I'm completely enthralled with this series. Every detail in every storyline is so perfect, every character so thoroughly imagined (even ones that get killed off almost immediately), that you feel a total understanding for this completely alien world Mike Carey has created. In this volume we get Lucifer's selfish take on Creation, a bunch of demons who behave like 1800s English nobility, and a look into the incredibly twisted, inhuman world Lucifer surrounds himself with. As with previous volumes, each story represents its own micro-narrative within the much larger series, but gives a lot of information about the grander schemes at play. It's must-read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

    Mazikeen goes looking for a new face, Elaine goes looking for her ghost friend Mona, and Lucifer goes looking for trouble in Effrul in this third trade collection. As a series, LUCIFER just keeps getting better and better. Mike Carey has written something really special.

  20. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    A graphic novel definitely made for adults since there is some nudity and sexual situations in the book. I was inspired to read this series after seeing the TV show Lucifer which is based on characters from these graphic novels. The title character was not in the novel very much and just made short appearances here and there, which was disappointing, but the many different little stories all meshed together in an interesting way and there was plenty of plot. Maybe I shouldn't have started with b A graphic novel definitely made for adults since there is some nudity and sexual situations in the book. I was inspired to read this series after seeing the TV show Lucifer which is based on characters from these graphic novels. The title character was not in the novel very much and just made short appearances here and there, which was disappointing, but the many different little stories all meshed together in an interesting way and there was plenty of plot. Maybe I shouldn't have started with book 3, but when I searched my library catalog and this one came up, I didn't realize it was a series until finishing the book and seeing the others listed in the back. *sheepish shrug* I thought Christopher Rudd was a great character and his little victories made me happy. Lys, a villainous bitch, actually had some clever lines that I shall appropriate for myself. :) And what's custom? Only the canvas on which we paint. She said this to her manservant when he reminded her it wasn't customary to do what she was doing. He he he. Economy must be our watchword this season. I resolve not even to scratch unless I can still two itches at once. This one reminds me a little too much of myself. Hey, I'm thrifty, not a villainous bitch. :) Christopher Rudd brings another great line. ...a frank face may hide a false heart. But a full codpiece never lied yet. He he he. Rudd knows how to get on a lady's good side, I guess. A great insult: Intellectually as well as socially. you always arrive when everyone else has left the room. Overall, very clever writing and an intricate plot, intrigue, and wonderful characters alongside great artistry and creative demon visages made this a great read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    Mike Carey needs a shrine on my bookshelf. That said, I'm not sure I really cared so much for the "human history as a trend in hell" thing here. Seemed kind of goofy. I did, however, really love the parallel stories when they would emerge. The young pair trying to enter Lucifer's building was a pretty good one and Mazikeen's own story of reclaiming a place among the Lilim kept me turning pages. It is kind of weird reading these books somewhat anew, as I don't remember much from the time in my lif Mike Carey needs a shrine on my bookshelf. That said, I'm not sure I really cared so much for the "human history as a trend in hell" thing here. Seemed kind of goofy. I did, however, really love the parallel stories when they would emerge. The young pair trying to enter Lucifer's building was a pretty good one and Mazikeen's own story of reclaiming a place among the Lilim kept me turning pages. It is kind of weird reading these books somewhat anew, as I don't remember much from the time in my life I had read them before.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Raija

    I would have probably enjoyed this one more if I had known this wasn't the first. Things were a bit confusing most of the time. But all in all this was still a good read. Shame that our library haven't got the rest of the series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Catalano

    At this point I don't know if I'm already enjoying this series, I think I am. I have to admit the idea of a man damned in hell being set free is very interesting. Also Lucifer doing his own Creation is very clever.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Not a fan of Dalliance, it reeked of filler and mediocre world building. Maybe something good will come from these flat characters? The first and the last arcs, though, those really got me going! I just wish Dean Ormston could've drawn it all, you guys.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I'm liking the series more as it continues. Not nearly as good as Sandman itself, but it well written and fits in the world well. I liked this story the best so far.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    I love this series and I have no idea where it's going. Who can ask for more?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Wow!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Loving this series the scope and epicness that Mike Carey has created for Lucifer is amazing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James

    A look at how one level of Hell's nobility is dealing with Lucifer's changes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    sammy

    my favorite of the series so far. wow.

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