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From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Cast out of heaven, thrown down to rule in Hell, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his post and abandoned his infernal kingdom for the mortal city of Los Angeles. But retirement means only opportunity for Lucifer's many and varied enemies, all of whom have bitter and long memories, and it's going to take m From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Cast out of heaven, thrown down to rule in Hell, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his post and abandoned his infernal kingdom for the mortal city of Los Angeles. But retirement means only opportunity for Lucifer's many and varied enemies, all of whom have bitter and long memories, and it's going to take more than quick wits to survive the coming storm. As Lucifer bids to reclaim his lost wings, so his mortal vulnerability is revealed, and from the grim tapestry of his past the agents of chaos gather, ready to feast on his damned soul! This volume contains: Lucifer #5–13


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From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Cast out of heaven, thrown down to rule in Hell, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his post and abandoned his infernal kingdom for the mortal city of Los Angeles. But retirement means only opportunity for Lucifer's many and varied enemies, all of whom have bitter and long memories, and it's going to take m From the pages of Neil Gaiman's multi award-winning Sandman series...Cast out of heaven, thrown down to rule in Hell, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his post and abandoned his infernal kingdom for the mortal city of Los Angeles. But retirement means only opportunity for Lucifer's many and varied enemies, all of whom have bitter and long memories, and it's going to take more than quick wits to survive the coming storm. As Lucifer bids to reclaim his lost wings, so his mortal vulnerability is revealed, and from the grim tapestry of his past the agents of chaos gather, ready to feast on his damned soul! This volume contains: Lucifer #5–13

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 2: Children and Monsters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    The House of Windowless Rooms This is where all the cool gods and foreign dimensions begin to come in that make this series so interesting. As we see here, underestimate Lucifer at your regret, even when he's at his most vulnerable. I love how manipulative Lucifer is. We also get to see what's behind Mazikeen's mask. Children and Monsters This is where Carey really begins to set up the story that will carry through the end of the series. Carey is excellent at planning ahead and building stories ato The House of Windowless Rooms This is where all the cool gods and foreign dimensions begin to come in that make this series so interesting. As we see here, underestimate Lucifer at your regret, even when he's at his most vulnerable. I love how manipulative Lucifer is. We also get to see what's behind Mazikeen's mask. Children and Monsters This is where Carey really begins to set up the story that will carry through the end of the series. Carey is excellent at planning ahead and building stories atop stories. It's what make this series so satisfying. This book also gives us the art team that will carry through most of the rest of the series. Peter Gross and Ryan Kelly with Dean Ormston filling in between the bigger arcs. Mike Carey and Peter Gross establish a creative relationship that carries over the next 20 years to The Unwritten, The Highest House, and now The Dollhouse Family.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    The hardest part of rereading this series is stopping long enough to write a review before moving on to the next volume. Well, that and trying to think of something to say besides 'you know what I love about this? EVERYTHING' This volume has two storylines in it and is a bit longer than volume 1. The first part is The House of Windowless rooms, which I love for a couple of reasons. First I love how this series seamlessly blends all different types of mythology together and how there are many dif The hardest part of rereading this series is stopping long enough to write a review before moving on to the next volume. Well, that and trying to think of something to say besides 'you know what I love about this? EVERYTHING' This volume has two storylines in it and is a bit longer than volume 1. The first part is The House of Windowless rooms, which I love for a couple of reasons. First I love how this series seamlessly blends all different types of mythology together and how there are many different gods and pantheons and afterlives so it cool to get a glimpse of that here. Second I love when people underestimate Lucifer - either because he is temporarily powerless for some reason or just because they're that fucking stupid - because it always means they are going to get their asses handed to them in the best way. The second storyline is Children and Monsters, and it really starts setting up the plot that will carry us through the entire series. It continues with Elaine's story and also introduces Michael and some great one-off characters. I like how there's always like 2 or 3 simultaneous threads going at once because it keeps it interesting. If it was just all about Lucifer all the time I think it would get old pretty fast, but this series has a really great extended cast. Even characters that are only there for an issue or two feel like real well-rounded characters and stick with you after you've finished reading. Continuing my task this time around of marking every place that 'will' is talked about, a few less than last time but still very much present in the overarching plot: I figured fate is kind of like ...I don't know, the antithesis of free will most of the time I guess, although Lucifer has certainly turned that around to serve his purposes instead: I just really like this page: This I love because Jill pretty much just breaks down all of his character flaws in one sentence and he's just like 'yeah, what about it?'. At least he's self-aware lol And then this is one of my favorite quotes from this series, and also very indicative of things to come:

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

    I read the first Lucifer tpb quite a while back; it didn't do too much for me either way. It didn't seem to be much beyond the rather cutesy premise of making Lucifer and Mazikeen open a nightclub in LA. This volumes seems a lot more epic, cosmic even, and I do like my horror-oriented narratives to have a cosmic touch. Carey begins building his own universe for real here, even if he uses loads of elements from Gaiman's. In fact, considering what happens by Volume 3 it's tempting to think that Ca I read the first Lucifer tpb quite a while back; it didn't do too much for me either way. It didn't seem to be much beyond the rather cutesy premise of making Lucifer and Mazikeen open a nightclub in LA. This volumes seems a lot more epic, cosmic even, and I do like my horror-oriented narratives to have a cosmic touch. Carey begins building his own universe for real here, even if he uses loads of elements from Gaiman's. In fact, considering what happens by Volume 3 it's tempting to think that Carey is to Gaiman as Lucifer is to the Lord of Hosts. A couple of fascinatingly twisted subplots weave around Lucifer's mysterious maneuvers, and an angelic army attempts to launch a war against Lucifer. I like Carey's take on Lucifer. He is definitely diabolical - a shrewd, deep schemer who will use you for all you're worth in a long-term game that don't even realise you are a pawn in. He is Satanic without descending to the level of a pantomime devil - that sort of behaviour is reserved for several of the lesser demons, gods and other entities he deals with. The story itself is sufficiently complex and I am not yet sure what stakes Lucifer is actually playing for, but there is enough of a payoff in various subplots and enough intrigue to keep me hooked for the moment at least.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Something I forgot to mention in my review of book one that bears note. This series does a masterful job of interweaving mythologies. In just the first couple books, you get Judeo-Christian, Navajo, Sumerian, Japanese, Norse.... If you're a mythology geek like me, it's lovely. It's everything I love woven into something new and strange and lovely.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Štěpán

    oh boy, Lucifer you winged bastard, well played.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    When a spark of plan ignites in the mind of God’s former lamplighter, there’s nothing that can stop him from incinerating it to action. That’s what’s proven in the second volume of Mike Carey’s The Sandman spin-off, Lucifer: Children and Monsters. After coercing the Basanos (a magical deck of tarot cards created by the angel Meleos) to give him a reading, Lucifer moves to execute a clandestine scheme. Heaven has given him a “letter of passage”, the payment for his last cleanup job in Devil in the When a spark of plan ignites in the mind of God’s former lamplighter, there’s nothing that can stop him from incinerating it to action. That’s what’s proven in the second volume of Mike Carey’s The Sandman spin-off, Lucifer: Children and Monsters. After coercing the Basanos (a magical deck of tarot cards created by the angel Meleos) to give him a reading, Lucifer moves to execute a clandestine scheme. Heaven has given him a “letter of passage”, the payment for his last cleanup job in Devil in the Gateway. He turns the letter into a portal to the Void, the vacuum outside existence that is not under control of anyone—even of the heaven. This new creation attracts unwanted attention, and as we move further, we realize that Lucifer does not want to play neutral or wallow in the easy luxuries of the mortal world anymore… and we’re given a glimpse of his proud heart that caused his Fall. Children and Monsters is a good follow-up to volume one, as Carey is now beginning to cook up a very intriguing, plot-driven story. In retrospect, Lucifer had magnetized attention by abandoning his realm; he did it again, but this time by creating a new territory. As it is in Sandman, various mythologies are beginning to incorporate themselves with the story. I find the Japanese pantheons of the Afterlife fascinatingly grotesque, and I’m simply in awe about the new things I’m learning from here. The series is becoming more and more reminiscent of The Sandman series, only this time with Lucifer in the shoes of Morpheus. In that setup, we can that these characters are poles apart. In Season of Mists, Lucifer gives Morpheus the key to Hell and the dream lord’s new ownership attracts attention from different realms; likewise in The House of Windowless Rooms issue, where Lucifer opens the void and all sort of beings want to have access to it. Morpheus goes to Hell in Preludes and Nocturnes to get his helm of office back; in THOWR, Lucifer goes to the desert-like Japanese version of inferno to collect his wings. Note that both things possess power that is significant to their owners. There are stunning episodes of contests of wit in both graphic novels where the protagonists win, closing with the defeated swearing to destroy the winner. We all know what happened to The Sandman. Somehow, I want Lucifer to survive what the Japanese pantheons have in store for him in the end. There are a lot going on in this volume like Mazikeen losing her demon half-face; the appearance of the archangel Michael, Lucifer’s brother; involvement of a girl with an important parentage; and ultimately, Lucifer’s first steps in defying predestination. I hope this series gets better, or the next volume will be on par with this volume. :D I’m beginning to love it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Lucifer in mortal peril, among a pack of deceitful and clever Japanese gods? Yes, I think this is what's required to give us a sense that our anti-hero is actually in enough danger to make the read worthwhile. And even better, while Lucifer has abandoned his HQ with a tempting target, all manner of threatening folk come skulking about to take it over? Hmm, maybe Carey was just having a little first-book jitters in the last volume and now he's finally found his feet. As the first storyline comes ne Lucifer in mortal peril, among a pack of deceitful and clever Japanese gods? Yes, I think this is what's required to give us a sense that our anti-hero is actually in enough danger to make the read worthwhile. And even better, while Lucifer has abandoned his HQ with a tempting target, all manner of threatening folk come skulking about to take it over? Hmm, maybe Carey was just having a little first-book jitters in the last volume and now he's finally found his feet. As the first storyline comes near its climax, Carey teases us with three or four storylines, each teasing out a couple of pages at a time and then switching to the next. Letting us know there's some further torment or reveal just out of reach. This is the same technique Tolkein used in his LotR to heighten and stretch out the drama, and it works just as well here. The second storyline was agonizing to read - I don't mean in any pleasant way, but that it took me at least six sittings to get through it, and each time was a chore to will myself to face the book once more. The story itself was slow as molasses, with very little tension and just a lot of langorious thoughts spilling from many heads and mouths. It sure didn't seem to be leading anywhere in particular, nor did it capture my imagination (even despite the little throwaway lines that Carey conjured in the ways that these weird creatures spoke to each other). The final climax was a little too short for all the power that was drawn together all at once, and while the way it resolved was rather clever and unexpected, right now only ten minutes after finishing it, I'm pretty sure it wasn't worth it. I'm so conflicted over this story - I've enjoyed others of Carey's works (Hellblazer, X-Men Legacy) and I've appreciated his approach to exploring characters. For some reason, here I'm dying for him to really let Lucifer loose and he's doing everything in his power to use Lucifer's abilities as little as possible. It's supremely frustrating to me, and while I can see what he's doing from a craftsmanship point of view, it's not really any easier for me as a reader to enjoy him dragging this out and torturing me. Perhaps if Carey took the Heaven-versus-Lucifer battle off the table permanently, it would be easier to enjoy the meandering journey this is taking. I'm going to take a break from this series - focus on other stuff that gives me more immediate gratification. I'm sure I'll regret it and come back to Lucifer soon enough, but for now I need to reconcile my frustration with the different kind of storytelling. Mike's synopsis - plot points I need to remember for later volumes:(view spoiler)[Mazikeen is Lucifer's girlfriend. Lucifer opened a gate to the void beyond creation. Retrieved his wings from Izanami, Japanese god of death. Mazikeen was "healed" by Jill Presto and her cards of Basanos. Amendiel rallies angels against Lucifer. Elaine's grandmas give her warnings. Elaine is Archangel Michael's daughter. Lucifer defeated Amendiel by bringing Michael back from the Sandalphon's pocket world where he was breeding angels in Michael's torso. Elaine is the first of those to be born fertile. (hide spoiler)]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zec

    Contains the arcs: The House of Windowless Rooms + Children and Monsters. The House of Windowless Rooms: Lucifer hasn’t really been challenged in the previous arcs thus far, so to see him at a physical disandvantage and having to use his guile and cunning to outwit his enemies at each turn is very absorbing. Seeing more of Mazikeen and Jill and learning more about their powers was fun. Children and Monsters: Another fantastic arc. Mike Carey takes the flavour of Sandman, adds a dash of treachery and Contains the arcs: The House of Windowless Rooms + Children and Monsters. The House of Windowless Rooms: Lucifer hasn’t really been challenged in the previous arcs thus far, so to see him at a physical disandvantage and having to use his guile and cunning to outwit his enemies at each turn is very absorbing. Seeing more of Mazikeen and Jill and learning more about their powers was fun. Children and Monsters: Another fantastic arc. Mike Carey takes the flavour of Sandman, adds a dash of treachery and a whole lot of good plotting. I love that every arc so far builds upon what was established in previous ones. Elaine is my favourite character so far.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I liked this volume better than the first one, though I'm still not a big fan of the series yet. The individual storylines didn't feel terribly complete in and of themselves. (Is there a word for the books within the books that they do in comics? Like how this one had The House of Windowless Rooms and Children and Monsters.) But I finally started to get a sense of where the overall story arc is going, or at least that it's going somewhere, and it's intriguing me a bit more. Enough that I do want I liked this volume better than the first one, though I'm still not a big fan of the series yet. The individual storylines didn't feel terribly complete in and of themselves. (Is there a word for the books within the books that they do in comics? Like how this one had The House of Windowless Rooms and Children and Monsters.) But I finally started to get a sense of where the overall story arc is going, or at least that it's going somewhere, and it's intriguing me a bit more. Enough that I do want to get the next volume. So far it was still just kind of interesting, and kind of a lot of work to plow through, but it wasn't fun yet. I did like that it again included mythologies other than the Judeo-Christian that I expected, that was interesting. And the art was an interesting change too. I thought I didn't like the art in the last book that much, but it turns out in hindsight that I prefer it. I liked some of the images I remember a lot, like the stuff with the tarot cards. I'm a fan of Peter Gross's art from the Fables series, so I should have liked the switch to his work here. But I don't think it worked that well for this series, I preferred the grittier, darker, less polished, less pretty work that was in volume one. The colors here were much too bright, the demons were too pretty, things were too round, too soft, too cute. It's not a deal breaker or anything, I just didn't find Gross and his team to be a good match for Lucifer or the story. I think the art should have been darker, edgier, cooler.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    I really thought this was much better than the first volume. The set-up and exposition of the first trade give way to the face-off between Lucifer and the hosts of heaven in this one. The storylines which are established in the previous collection are picked up and continued with here, with the writers managing to interweave them all with skill and lucidity. The often surprising nature of the storylines in Sandman are continued in its spin-off, as well; I don't think anyone would have been ready I really thought this was much better than the first volume. The set-up and exposition of the first trade give way to the face-off between Lucifer and the hosts of heaven in this one. The storylines which are established in the previous collection are picked up and continued with here, with the writers managing to interweave them all with skill and lucidity. The often surprising nature of the storylines in Sandman are continued in its spin-off, as well; I don't think anyone would have been ready for the revelation that a certain someone is actually the child of the Archangel Michael. The take which the authors have on heaven and its hosts have already been established in Sandman, but are continued here in a way that I'm sure a lot of people would find subversive, and even incredibly offensive, but which I really like. Lucifer is calculating and unpredictable and always compelling, with a plan that can only be described as ineffable and a line in snark that I really, really admire. The artwork in this is also a marked improvement on the previous TPB, and I think on Sandman as a whole. I'm really looking forward to being able to afford volume three.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Re-read 21-06-2103 Good Story - Average Art The first one with the Bolton art was better, but still, the story makes it a worthwhile read. « Picking up where LUCIFER: DEVIL IN THE GATEWAY ends, this trade paperback has Lucifer continuing his plans for a new revolution as he attempts to reclaim his wings from a hell not his own. And as this mission ends, Heaven, Hell and Earth all quickly feel the repercussions. Suddenly old enemies and allies such as the cabaret star Jill Presto, the hybrid angel E Re-read 21-06-2103 Good Story - Average Art The first one with the Bolton art was better, but still, the story makes it a worthwhile read. « Picking up where LUCIFER: DEVIL IN THE GATEWAY ends, this trade paperback has Lucifer continuing his plans for a new revolution as he attempts to reclaim his wings from a hell not his own. And as this mission ends, Heaven, Hell and Earth all quickly feel the repercussions. Suddenly old enemies and allies such as the cabaret star Jill Presto, the hybrid angel Elaine Belloc, and the living Tarot deck known as the Basanos cross paths with Lucifer as he draws closer to the apocalyptic showdown that he desires and its resultant new chapter in the history of creation. » Original review (still stands) : From the pages of Sandman comes the on-going saga of everybody favorite lil' devil, Lucifer. Yeah, I liked this book. I just wish this series had been given a better format, such as a Deluxe Hardcover, or, at the very least, better paper.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Valeska

    3.5 I enjoyed it as much as the first volume, yet it took me ages to finish it and I hateeee that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    I think I liked this trade paperback even more than the first. So much imagination went into making this--the Japanese underworld is a good example, I really loved that as a setting. Musubi was an especially fun character from that realm. There were a lot of plot threads going on here, and I actually liked how much and how abruptly the stories switched, it kept things interesting. The entire trade was sitting-on-the-edge-of-your-seat enthralling. The main criticism I have is that some of the major I think I liked this trade paperback even more than the first. So much imagination went into making this--the Japanese underworld is a good example, I really loved that as a setting. Musubi was an especially fun character from that realm. There were a lot of plot threads going on here, and I actually liked how much and how abruptly the stories switched, it kept things interesting. The entire trade was sitting-on-the-edge-of-your-seat enthralling. The main criticism I have is that some of the major plot points are not explained very well. This seems intentional--maybe to allow for more creative freedom in future issues? Maybe to give the story an air of mystery? Maybe to leave room for the reader to add their own interpretation to the work, making it more personal? Who knows. One other negative for me is that I don't really like the illustration style of Dean Ormston, so the pages he illustrates kinda break me out of the story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keeloca

    Actual sore: 4,25 This is the first Lucifer comic I read, finding it at the store and being SO EXCITED to find something that appeared to feature my favourite character from Sandman. (I did read Sandman out of sequence as well, and while it fuddled the plot somewhat, I never actually found it to be confusing - or to lessen my enjoyment of the comic.) I loved it then, I love it still, but the first arc is one of the Lucifer stories I enjoy the least (The House of Windowless Rooms). Bit too gory, a Actual sore: 4,25 This is the first Lucifer comic I read, finding it at the store and being SO EXCITED to find something that appeared to feature my favourite character from Sandman. (I did read Sandman out of sequence as well, and while it fuddled the plot somewhat, I never actually found it to be confusing - or to lessen my enjoyment of the comic.) I loved it then, I love it still, but the first arc is one of the Lucifer stories I enjoy the least (The House of Windowless Rooms). Bit too gory, and the Japanese pantheon holds no interest for me in this particular form. The second arc, where Elaine's origin (despite her protests) are revealed, is a damn treat, though. Also, Mazikeen goes off on her own! (I mean, I totally ship her and Lucifer, but they only work for me when they are no slightly more equal footing.) Amenadiel, you still need to die, you stupid prick.

  15. 5 out of 5

    One Flew

    3.5 stars Lucifer carefully and cleverly prepares for an assualt from the Heavens. This is the last volume of the Lucifer I'm going to read. I really enjoyed this book, it just has its limitations. There are no real stakes, Lucifer as a character is ambigiously neither good nor evil, the outcome is a given from the start and the rules are made up along the way. On the plus side, it is a well crafted story that builds nicely. The plot is interesting, the artwork is varied and great, the world it is 3.5 stars Lucifer carefully and cleverly prepares for an assualt from the Heavens. This is the last volume of the Lucifer I'm going to read. I really enjoyed this book, it just has its limitations. There are no real stakes, Lucifer as a character is ambigiously neither good nor evil, the outcome is a given from the start and the rules are made up along the way. On the plus side, it is a well crafted story that builds nicely. The plot is interesting, the artwork is varied and great, the world it is set in is cool and Lucifer is a good protagonist. Enjoyable or not, two volumes in the series already feels repetitive.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Miles McCoy

    It's Book 2 and things are really starting to heat up for Lucifer in this one: as he places his pieces on the board, other forces position themselves to get what they want from the Morningstar - one way or another. I've started this right after completing the Sandman series - the amazing comic book series penned by Neil Gaiman, and from which our main character is from; to be perfectly honest, when I began I was not sure if this series would be able to meet my expectations set by the Lord of Dre It's Book 2 and things are really starting to heat up for Lucifer in this one: as he places his pieces on the board, other forces position themselves to get what they want from the Morningstar - one way or another. I've started this right after completing the Sandman series - the amazing comic book series penned by Neil Gaiman, and from which our main character is from; to be perfectly honest, when I began I was not sure if this series would be able to meet my expectations set by the Lord of Dreams, in terms of complexities. I'm ecstatic to say how surprised I was that this volume exceeded all expectations and then some. I can't wait to start the next.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Akkisuitok

    Ok, fine, I admit it: This is an excellent series and everyone should go read it. That's all. (Also, I'm watching the TV series right now and I think it's hilarious that it should be called an adaptation at all, when the characters themselves and the entire tone are completely different between the two works.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    A great stroll back down "when Vertigo was great" lane brings in cameos from The Dreaming (Lucien and Merv), as well as the ponderous, grandiose passion play of angels and demons in the second volume.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zachariah

    Lucifer 2: 2 Hell 2 Lucifer Lucifer Into Darkness Lucifer: Age of Ultron's Civil War Lucifer Reloaded, Revisited, and Gag Reel Lucinado: Mo' Angels, Mo' Problems Luxorcist Origins and Creation ....it was good was my point.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lucía

    I don’t want to anger the Lucifer (tv show) fandom but after watching the show and reading this immediately afterward I feel like it could’ve been so much darker and so much better. Is it too soon for a reboot ?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Catalano

    Bettter than the first volume, as the stoy has finally taken form. The Gaiman influence is extremely palpable. I still don't like the way that Lucifer just does stuff without any explanation and those unexplained acts have unexplained consequences.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    Just an awesome story and series....

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I'm liking the series more as it continues. Not nearly as good as Sandman itself, but it well written and fits in the world well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet Jay

    Still interesting me enough to keep reading sometimes, but is sorta similar plot

  25. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    Another great graphic novel. Detailed pictures, a winding plot, and witty text make this an entertaining read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    James

    Lucifer starts to create amidst many other challenges.

  27. 5 out of 5

    sammy

    lucifer not having a dick is INFURIATING to me. whats the point of being the devil if you can’t FUCK

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matko

    Can’t believe it’s been sixteen years already. In the world of Mark Carey and his Lucifer sixteen years is of no consequence at all. Creatures that inhabit these pages exist on a much grander scale. They think in eons, exist for a millennia or more, they plot and weave threads of destiny with cunning patience and brilliance of mind. Sixteen years is nothing to them. Even a speck of dust holds greater value. Still, we’re neither demons nor angels, we’re not creatures of the dark nor echoes of uni Can’t believe it’s been sixteen years already. In the world of Mark Carey and his Lucifer sixteen years is of no consequence at all. Creatures that inhabit these pages exist on a much grander scale. They think in eons, exist for a millennia or more, they plot and weave threads of destiny with cunning patience and brilliance of mind. Sixteen years is nothing to them. Even a speck of dust holds greater value. Still, we’re neither demons nor angels, we’re not creatures of the dark nor echoes of unintelligible voices in dark rooms across the universes. We’re humans. For us, sixteen years is so much more than a calendar number. Sixteen years is history. In the world of pop-culture, even an ancient one. Then again, there’s global history and then there’s personal one. Whatever you might think, they do not coincide that often. Lucifer exists in both, like many things do. It’s just that he exists in a slightly different manner. My personal history recognizes him as an afterthought. As something I read after finishing Sandman. This history does not speak of Volume One in loud, overpraising manner. If it speaks at all, it speaks of it as a mere, dear curiosity. It remembers it fondly, fully aware that fondness is nothing but a reflection of Sandman’s brilliance. History stopped right then and there. Other venues opened and Lucifer’s name was all but forgotten. Few days ago I remembered what Lovecraft used to write, how beings that are not dead may never die. Back in the thirties he wasn’t thinking of Lucifer (well, at least not about the one we speak of now) but he might have as well. From some corner of my mind, from that chaotic realm of personal history came a subtle thought nudging me towards second volume of Lucifer’s saga. “Children and Monsters” as title would have it. Once again that feeling of fondness swept over me. I was glad that I’m back in that world of demons and angels I visited so many years ago. Even more because I rarely revisit Sandman. I’m scared of spoiling the memory. Things you used to love tend to spoil over time. In that sense Lucifer was a safe bet. It never was a real memory to begin with so there was no danger of corrupting it. Going through the pages of Lightbringer’s saga, reading about the ultimate will and search for freedom, about breaking the chains of deterministic ritual (both man-made and divine) I realized that Mike Carey can’t really give me anything. In many a page he tries to mimic Gaiman’s grasp of epic fantasy/fairy-tale, he tries to write in a voice that would echo in the reader’s mind, luring and hinting, promising of things to come; hidden things; fabulous things; things that only a fairy-tale of ultimate libertarian can deliver. Yet his words are failing him, and his artists are failing him too. Much like him, they are too straightforward in their art, too literal, too mundane for such an endeavor. “Children and Monsters” flow nicely but that flow is limited; it stops short right before the entrance of the river of imagination, never quite daring to make that final leap. Just like Lucifer’s fight – it plans, it plots, it struggles, it even wins on an occasion (prelude to “Children and Monsters” is really, really good) but it never becomes more than it is. An Angel fallen from the grace of God.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    “Fate’s a slippery sort of concept...Most of the time it’s just an excuse for doing what you want to do anyway.” Like Sandman, who has to recover his objects of power at the beginning of his series, Lucifer likewise has to get his wings back. In order to do this, he needs to go to the Shinto version of hell. While Lucifer is there, Mazikeen has to guard the gate into the void outside creation from the Jin En Mok, creatures left over from a previous creation who speak of “the freedom that comes fr “Fate’s a slippery sort of concept...Most of the time it’s just an excuse for doing what you want to do anyway.” Like Sandman, who has to recover his objects of power at the beginning of his series, Lucifer likewise has to get his wings back. In order to do this, he needs to go to the Shinto version of hell. While Lucifer is there, Mazikeen has to guard the gate into the void outside creation from the Jin En Mok, creatures left over from a previous creation who speak of “the freedom that comes from total surrender”. The Jin En Mok aren’t the only ones who want the gate. The host of heaven also wants to take it from Lucifer. Characters from The Sandman who make an appearance in this volume include Choronzon and Susano-O-No-Mikoto. We also meet Izanami, another largely silent character like Duma, the voiceless gods, and Mazikeen from the previous volume. “Blood is salt water, and in our hearts there is a lightless ocean.” Another storyline in this volume features Erishad of Uruk, a woman cursed by the Chaldean gods to have a miscarriage every day for four thousand years. Like Element Girl in The Sandman, she’s an immortal who desperately wants to die, but can’t. She also happens to be friends with Naramsin, another Sandman character. The format of this story, focusing on a new character with the title character hardly appearing, is something we saw The Sandman do quite a bit, but I think Lucifer does this better since the one-off stories get incorporated into the overall narrative rather than simply existing for their own sake. I think it’s interesting how many father figures Elaine has in her life. In addition to her biological father, she has an adopted father, the husband of her biological mother, Sandalphon who ultimately created her, and of course Lucifer who she looks up to like a father. The scene where we see Cal with a Playboy right after we’re told he has no genitals is odd. I guess some people really do just like them for the articles. There are a lot of gruesome moments in this volume. There’s a scene where one character is cutting off extra fingers that are growing out of his chest, another scene in which a character stabs herself in the eye, another in which brains leak out of someone’s eyes, etc. It really disturbed me the first time I read it and almost made me stop reading the series. I counted three times in this volume where Lucifer negotiates with someone by offering them death, and they accept because it turns out they want to die. Also, the way Lucifer carelessly destroys the life work of Sandalphon that took thousands of years to accomplish is reminiscent of the way he destroyed the life work of Melios in the previous volume. John Constantine (from the Hellblazer comic, which Mike Carey will go on to write), makes a cameo appearance in this volume. Lucifer and Constantine are quite similar in that they both callously put allies in harm’s way to achieve their own ends. They both go around tricking people without caring about how many enemies they make along the way. Lucifer may ultimately be derivative of The Sandman and Hellblazer, but that’s not a bad thing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really liked this one, especially in light of traditional Christian portrayal of Lucifer. For example, it's continuously stated throughout the text that Lucifer is too proud to lie, which is in direct opposition to texts like Paradise Lost that portray Lucifer as the great deceiver (I really want to write about that but I'm afraid it's going to have to wait, cry cry cry). My rebellious, atheistic spirit also appreciated the parallel of Lucifer to Christ: three days in "hell" -- with a kind of re I really liked this one, especially in light of traditional Christian portrayal of Lucifer. For example, it's continuously stated throughout the text that Lucifer is too proud to lie, which is in direct opposition to texts like Paradise Lost that portray Lucifer as the great deceiver (I really want to write about that but I'm afraid it's going to have to wait, cry cry cry). My rebellious, atheistic spirit also appreciated the parallel of Lucifer to Christ: three days in "hell" -- with a kind of resurrection. I think it's good to have antagonistic characters like Lucifer - it keeps people on our toes about what we think of as good and evil. I also enjoyed the portrayal of the angels as major assholes without a care who gets caught in the crossfire in their desire to eradicate Lucifer and expand the domain of heaven (wow, sounds almost human). In fact, one of the characters even calls them "scumbags." Again, I think this challenge of what people typically consider good is an excellent way to keep people examining their value systems. Finally, even though she wasn't a really player in this volume, I really appreciated the character Mazikeen. Throughout the books, she's constantly shown with a mask over her face (I don't remember if the reader ever saw her without the mask in the Sandman volumes or not), and finally, in this Lucifer volume, the reader gets to see how the other half of her face looks like. Well, throughout the course of the action, a well-meaning character manages to heal her entirely -- in other words, her face is now completely healed. In fact, she is beautiful. But it isn't her face, and Mazikeen is very resentful of that someone took it from her. I really like this on several levels. One, her identity is not rooted in her level of attractiveness. So many times there are these stories that show women pursuing this societally constructed definition of beauty, in fact, rooting their identity in such a cause (I'm thinking of flicks like the Princess Diaries where you having the ugly duckling transformed into the beautiful swan and somehow finding herself in the journey from average jane to stunning sex-bot). I find Mazikeen's a delightful twist on this particular trope in literature. Two, for a long time she has served Lucifer. However, she refuses to wait for him to help her and, when he is busy with his own plots and schemes, she goes off on her own to find her face. To find her identity. I don't know how much of her journey the reader will see, but that she just went off on her own was such a delightful and unexpected example of women going off on their own journeys. So many times, women are presented as sacrificing their own identities in order to help men along on their own coming-of-age journeys, and it was just so nice to see something different and empowering. I am seriously crushing on Mazikeen. Not beautiful Mazikeen, but masked Mazikeen. Just the inversion of so many tropes - so many times, masks are seen in literature as personas that hide a true identity. Yet Mazikeen uses the mask to express her identity - it is a part of her. Yes. Much love to Mazikeen.

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