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Learn To Think in Systems: Use System Archetypes to Understand, Manage, and Fix Complex Problems and Make Smarter Decisions

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Would you like to have better solutions to your problems? Struggling to understand why things went wrong when you did everything right? Learn to Think in Systems can help you with these problems. Systems surround us and we might not even be aware of it. Your household is a system. The bakery on the corner is a system. Your class at school, your department at work, and Would you like to have better solutions to your problems? Struggling to understand why things went wrong when you did everything right? Learn to Think in Systems can help you with these problems. Systems surround us and we might not even be aware of it. Your household is a system. The bakery on the corner is a system. Your class at school, your department at work, and your weekend soccer team made of wholehearted dads is a system too. You are a vital part of more complex systems like your country, the economy, or the world; learn about their changing nature, and find optimal solutions to problems related to them. The world is more connected than ever thanks to innovations like telephone, television, computers, and internet. The way we sense reality changed significantly. Using conventional thinking to understand the world as it functions today is not enough. We need to know the elements of systems thinking to see beyond simple cause-effect connections. This book will help you to find strategic solutions to every complex, modern problem. Learn To Think in Systems focuses on the nine fundamental system archetypes; our mental models related to them, and the step-by-step implication methods to fix them. Learn to use systems archetypes to solve your problems at work, in your business, in your relationship, and social connections. See through the motivations and understand the drives of contemporary politics, economics, and education. Widen your perspective, think critically, analyze deeply, clear your vision, be more logical and rational just by applying systems thinking. Think differently and get different results. • Learn the language of systems thinking. • Apply the best systems thinking ideas, models, and frameworks in your cognitive and decision-making process. • Learn to understand, design, and find solutions to the main system problems called ‘archetypes.’ Complexity, organizational pathways, and networks gain more and more importance in our interconnected world. Learn To Think in Systems gives you real-life examples to make the adoption process of this type of thinking smooth. Define your problems more accurately, find better, long-lasting solutions to your problems, learn to create strategic plans using systems diagrams, and understand your place and power over the world.


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Would you like to have better solutions to your problems? Struggling to understand why things went wrong when you did everything right? Learn to Think in Systems can help you with these problems. Systems surround us and we might not even be aware of it. Your household is a system. The bakery on the corner is a system. Your class at school, your department at work, and Would you like to have better solutions to your problems? Struggling to understand why things went wrong when you did everything right? Learn to Think in Systems can help you with these problems. Systems surround us and we might not even be aware of it. Your household is a system. The bakery on the corner is a system. Your class at school, your department at work, and your weekend soccer team made of wholehearted dads is a system too. You are a vital part of more complex systems like your country, the economy, or the world; learn about their changing nature, and find optimal solutions to problems related to them. The world is more connected than ever thanks to innovations like telephone, television, computers, and internet. The way we sense reality changed significantly. Using conventional thinking to understand the world as it functions today is not enough. We need to know the elements of systems thinking to see beyond simple cause-effect connections. This book will help you to find strategic solutions to every complex, modern problem. Learn To Think in Systems focuses on the nine fundamental system archetypes; our mental models related to them, and the step-by-step implication methods to fix them. Learn to use systems archetypes to solve your problems at work, in your business, in your relationship, and social connections. See through the motivations and understand the drives of contemporary politics, economics, and education. Widen your perspective, think critically, analyze deeply, clear your vision, be more logical and rational just by applying systems thinking. Think differently and get different results. • Learn the language of systems thinking. • Apply the best systems thinking ideas, models, and frameworks in your cognitive and decision-making process. • Learn to understand, design, and find solutions to the main system problems called ‘archetypes.’ Complexity, organizational pathways, and networks gain more and more importance in our interconnected world. Learn To Think in Systems gives you real-life examples to make the adoption process of this type of thinking smooth. Define your problems more accurately, find better, long-lasting solutions to your problems, learn to create strategic plans using systems diagrams, and understand your place and power over the world.

30 review for Learn To Think in Systems: Use System Archetypes to Understand, Manage, and Fix Complex Problems and Make Smarter Decisions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ronald J.

    A good primer and introduction on the vocabulary of systems thinking, along with some of the theory. The examples are somewhat basic, but there are useful terms, such as: "A system is something more than a collection of its parts. Systems thinking consists of three things: Elements (the actors in the system), interconnections (relationship of the actors with one another), and a purpose (sand on a beach is not a system, since there's no interconnection). Function is used when talking about a non-h A good primer and introduction on the vocabulary of systems thinking, along with some of the theory. The examples are somewhat basic, but there are useful terms, such as: "A system is something more than a collection of its parts. Systems thinking consists of three things: Elements (the actors in the system), interconnections (relationship of the actors with one another), and a purpose (sand on a beach is not a system, since there's no interconnection). Function is used when talking about a non-human system, and purpose for human systems." "Systems thinkers can see both the forest and the trees; one eye on each." A stock can be a bank balance, but also feelings or attitudes, they are not static. Flows are the actions that impact a system. Systems thinking can combine quantitative variables with qualitative ones, such as morale and attitudes. Two types of feedback loops: reinforcing and balancing. Reinforcing often referred to as vicious or virtuous. Balancing work to stabilize the stock at a given level (like a thermostat, they require a response mechanism, like a heater). Supply and demand at equilibrium is another example. To illustrate how success can breed success I did appreciate the joke of a young man approaching Bill Gates to marry his daughter. Gates says, "Who are you? I will only marry my daughter to the CEO of BofA." "No problem," the young man replies. He goes to BofA, applies for the CEO position, the interviewer asks who he is: "I'm the future son-in-law of Bill Gates." Potential can be confused with or sold as achievement. I will continue to check out other books on this topic, as it is fascinating and mostly overlooked, especially in business.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dale Alleshouse

    On the plus side, "Learn to Think in Systems" provides a decent overview of basic systems thinking concepts and adumbrates many system archetypes. Each archetype is accompanied by drawings and examples simplistic enough to be accessible to any reader. The book will serve as a useful introduction for those completely unaccustomed to the topic. In spite of the endearing qualities listed above, the book demonstrates a complete lack of profundity. It is filled with utterly banal observations such as, On the plus side, "Learn to Think in Systems" provides a decent overview of basic systems thinking concepts and adumbrates many system archetypes. Each archetype is accompanied by drawings and examples simplistic enough to be accessible to any reader. The book will serve as a useful introduction for those completely unaccustomed to the topic. In spite of the endearing qualities listed above, the book demonstrates a complete lack of profundity. It is filled with utterly banal observations such as, "In case of needing new employees, we have to estimate precisely how many new employees are needed". Removing similar trivialities would reduce the book to little more than a pamphlet. As a last point of contention, the author presents a Pollyannaish approach to managing unfortunate system phenomena. One such example comes from chapter ten where readers are encouraged to: "Make well-rounded, clear goals and commit to wishing success for all parties." In conclusion, it would be difficult to recommend this book. Those interested in the topic will be better served with "Thinking in Systems" by Donella H. Meadows.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jack Vinson

    A simple primer I picked this up somewhat randomly as someone interested in systems thinking. It’s focus is on using “system diagrams” like what I first saw in Peter Senge’s Fifth Discipline. Essentially this is a primer. And the various archetypes are a nice way or picturing various system dynamics. Unfortunately the writing and editing is poor. Diagrams don’t reflect what is in the text. Words are misspelled. I assume there are other primers that might be better reads, like some of the source ma A simple primer I picked this up somewhat randomly as someone interested in systems thinking. It’s focus is on using “system diagrams” like what I first saw in Peter Senge’s Fifth Discipline. Essentially this is a primer. And the various archetypes are a nice way or picturing various system dynamics. Unfortunately the writing and editing is poor. Diagrams don’t reflect what is in the text. Words are misspelled. I assume there are other primers that might be better reads, like some of the source material.

  4. 5 out of 5

    B. Rule

    I didn't expect much from this but I was still somewhat disappointed. At least it's short. Really could have used a polish for clarity, and the examples are not always illuminating. Further, the possible "solutions" to each systems archetype were weak and too generic for any use. I should have just re-read Donella Meadows' "Thinking in Systems". I didn't expect much from this but I was still somewhat disappointed. At least it's short. Really could have used a polish for clarity, and the examples are not always illuminating. Further, the possible "solutions" to each systems archetype were weak and too generic for any use. I should have just re-read Donella Meadows' "Thinking in Systems".

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mario Sailer

    Learn to think in systems is an introduction to System Thinking. If you know nothing about the matter it may provide some benefit. But in this case I would rather recommend the book of Donella H. Meadows which is cited quite often and which I personally found more profound although there are also some weaknesses.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adolfo Builes

    This book offers a very high level intro to system thinking and its vocabulary, however if you want to go deeper there might be other books better suited for that purpose. It’s a short read and gives you actionable information like a set of archetypes (mental models) that you can start applying in your day to day life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Good Primer for a Novice As part of my full-time job, I teach data analysis and problem solving, and I found a lot of valuable information in this book. In several examples, I found well-worded ways to describe considerations my students should be thinking about, but often struggle with.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Núria Aloy

    This book does a good job of introducing the basics of systems thinking along with several common systems archetypes (patterns of behavior). It is easy to follow because it is written in plain language and it pictures many examples from the real world. These are not always the most illustrating, but in general, I found this to be a good introduction to thinking in systems.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Valuable The only thing I wish it had that it currently does not is a tip for APA citation. I plan to use it as a reference repeatedly, after I figure out how to reference kindle only books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mikal

    Synnart of archetypes for thinking in systems. I didn’t realize this was part of a series I’ll definitely check out more. It’s critical that we understand the interrelated aspects of the problems we solve.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Roberto

    This book is very technical. It worth the read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carl Holmes

    Interesting A brief but valuable look at relationships, personal and business, and how they fall into 9 basic energetic patterns. Overall well done.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Richard Booth

    Briefly... Good sources, well written, but overly simple except for neophytes in Systems Theory. A good start with many helpful references.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Frost

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wong Seow Ling

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mariabruna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jean Marrapodi

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas Desjardins

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Halwani

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pui Sachika

  21. 5 out of 5

    J

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tamilazhagan Raju

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ira Agatstein

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nopadol Sopa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave Elmore

  27. 5 out of 5

    ali darweesh

  28. 5 out of 5

    Branislav Krivy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ramzan Amiri

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tekanyo Tshetlhane

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