web site hit counter The Peacegiver: How Christ Offers to Heal Our Hearts and Homes - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Peacegiver: How Christ Offers to Heal Our Hearts and Homes

Availability: Ready to download

What does the atonement mean, practically speaking? How is Christ the answer to a strained relationship with a spouse, child, parent, or sibling? What if I am being mistreated—how can the atonement help me cope with that? How can I discover the desire to repent when I don’t feel the need to repent" And how can I invite others to do the same? These are the challenging, diff What does the atonement mean, practically speaking? How is Christ the answer to a strained relationship with a spouse, child, parent, or sibling? What if I am being mistreated—how can the atonement help me cope with that? How can I discover the desire to repent when I don’t feel the need to repent" And how can I invite others to do the same? These are the challenging, difficult questions of daily life, questions to which the gospel must provide answers if it is to have living, cleansing, redeeming power. The Peacegiver is a book about the answers to these questions. Unlike other books about the atonement, The Peacegiver is written as an extended parable. It tells the story of a man struggling, with the help of a loved one, to come unto Christ. IN reading the rich details of his often difficult journey, we find ourselves embarked on a personal journey of our own. His questions are our questions; his problems, our problems; his discoveries, our discoveries. Along the way, the truths of the gospel are unfolded with surprising clarity and power, illuminating aspects of the atonement that few of us have ever heard or considered before. These surprising implications show us the way to deep and lasting peace in our hearts and homes. "My peace I give unto you," the Savior declared. The Peacegiver explores in a deeply personal way what we must do to receive the peace he stands willing to give.


Compare

What does the atonement mean, practically speaking? How is Christ the answer to a strained relationship with a spouse, child, parent, or sibling? What if I am being mistreated—how can the atonement help me cope with that? How can I discover the desire to repent when I don’t feel the need to repent" And how can I invite others to do the same? These are the challenging, diff What does the atonement mean, practically speaking? How is Christ the answer to a strained relationship with a spouse, child, parent, or sibling? What if I am being mistreated—how can the atonement help me cope with that? How can I discover the desire to repent when I don’t feel the need to repent" And how can I invite others to do the same? These are the challenging, difficult questions of daily life, questions to which the gospel must provide answers if it is to have living, cleansing, redeeming power. The Peacegiver is a book about the answers to these questions. Unlike other books about the atonement, The Peacegiver is written as an extended parable. It tells the story of a man struggling, with the help of a loved one, to come unto Christ. IN reading the rich details of his often difficult journey, we find ourselves embarked on a personal journey of our own. His questions are our questions; his problems, our problems; his discoveries, our discoveries. Along the way, the truths of the gospel are unfolded with surprising clarity and power, illuminating aspects of the atonement that few of us have ever heard or considered before. These surprising implications show us the way to deep and lasting peace in our hearts and homes. "My peace I give unto you," the Savior declared. The Peacegiver explores in a deeply personal way what we must do to receive the peace he stands willing to give.

30 review for The Peacegiver: How Christ Offers to Heal Our Hearts and Homes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Two stars is actually a bit generous, because I had to FORCE myself to finish it. Don't get me wrong; I love this book's message and its insights into understanding Christ's atonement. It really does have the potential to help with practical application of what Christ offers us. But I had an extremely difficult time with the delivery. Ferrell uses the parable method to get his point across, and it's the interaction between the characters in this parable that rub me the wrong way. When Rick's gra Two stars is actually a bit generous, because I had to FORCE myself to finish it. Don't get me wrong; I love this book's message and its insights into understanding Christ's atonement. It really does have the potential to help with practical application of what Christ offers us. But I had an extremely difficult time with the delivery. Ferrell uses the parable method to get his point across, and it's the interaction between the characters in this parable that rub me the wrong way. When Rick's grandfather appears to him in dreams/visions, he tries to teach Rick about Christ by 'taking' him back to watch King David, Job, and Christ to learn from their examples. Well, Rick is just a little too stubborn and slow on the uptake. His constant contrariness to what his grandpa says got old real quick. I was too easily frustrated by Rick's frustration towards his grandfather! So, this is not a book that I would widely recommend. I do, however, widely recommend the subject of this book! I just think that it might be more enjoyably studied in other sources.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annalisa

    Good, insightful, thought-provoking. But in trying to drag out the lesson in order for you learn the most from it, the book would become slow and repetitive. More often than not I would forget the point and remember the dragging on. So the book could have been at least half its size and more impactful, but nonetheless a good read. While I am not a big fan of over-explaining, or in this case spending more time saying you are going to explain than explaining (the book could have been half as long) Good, insightful, thought-provoking. But in trying to drag out the lesson in order for you learn the most from it, the book would become slow and repetitive. More often than not I would forget the point and remember the dragging on. So the book could have been at least half its size and more impactful, but nonetheless a good read. While I am not a big fan of over-explaining, or in this case spending more time saying you are going to explain than explaining (the book could have been half as long), the book struck a chord with me because of my thoughts on pride. The points of the book that I had not considered before were these: * Because Christ atones for others' sins, he takes on not only their pain but the pain they inflict. So when we feel victimized, if we come to Christ and see the Savior as paying for their sins, we offer forgiveness to a perfect being and can give up our right to seek justice more easily. * The parable of the workers in the vineyard receiving the full wage no matter how long they had been there, not only applies to the amount of time we endure to the end, but also our amount of sin. If we see ourselves better than those who have sinned more than us and therefore deserving of a better reward, we deserve less because we are not willing to give mercy and forgiveness to all. * Sin is addictive. The more we sin, the easier it is, the more me give up our agency. It is sin that makes us aware of others' sins. When we sin against someone, in our own discomfort, it is easier to accuse that person of wrong-doing and be unforgiving. If we were perfect, we would be more merciful and loving. There were also some great reminders of offering mercy and forgiveness to everyone, judge least ye be not judged, giving unconditional love despite whether we receive in back, and fully understanding the awesome healing power of the atonement. I would recommend the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book is EXCELLENT. The Atonement is something that I really don't understand - and surely will not in this life. BUT this book helped me to see the power of the Atonement in way I never had before. I actually read it before my book group did, on recommendation and as a gift from a very good family friend. I knew I wouldn't be disappointed because I love and highly respect this person, but it was better than I thought it would be. It is written as a parable, so it's not just straight up (com This book is EXCELLENT. The Atonement is something that I really don't understand - and surely will not in this life. BUT this book helped me to see the power of the Atonement in way I never had before. I actually read it before my book group did, on recommendation and as a gift from a very good family friend. I knew I wouldn't be disappointed because I love and highly respect this person, but it was better than I thought it would be. It is written as a parable, so it's not just straight up (complicated) doctrine, but a story that teaches principles - mostly of forgiveness. The best section for me was "The Implication of Nineveh". In this section our hero, Rick, and his grandpa are watching the scenes of Jonah's life from our day. My favorite lines start on page 96. "Hell is all we could ever hope for, Ricky, if it weren't for the redeeming power of the Savior's atonement. It is only his love offered not because we deserve it but even though we do not, that saves us." Then on page 97 we see Jonah waiting to see something bad happen to Ninevah because of the people's unrighteousness. Grandpa says to Rick, "Whether or not Ninevah is righteous is critical, of course - but only for Nineveh." That last part is so powerful to me. I think about it alot. On page 98-99 Grandpa goes on to explain, "Whether Jonah was better or worse than Ninevah isn't the question at all, is it? And whether you are better or worse than Carol (Rick's wife) isn't the question either. Some laborers work longer, the Savior told us in one of his parables, and others shorter. Each person's payment at the end of the day has nothing whatsoever to do with the work of others. We are each working out our own salvation with fear and trembling before the Lord. And that gift will come to us only if we know in our hearts that we deserve it no more than anyone else." Ok, I'll stop writing my favorite lines. This book is SO excellent. Read it, read it, read it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    This book came to me highly recommended by quite a few people that I really trust. And I would recommend it to others, I suppose. But only as a secondary recommendation. It is a lesser version of the book I read a few months back, "Bonds that Make Us Free." "Bonds" is a very heavy book and difficult to wade through at times, but absolutely worth reading. This book, "The Peacegiver" is an easy read that explores the same concepts. I almost wish I read them in the reverse order than I did. The "st This book came to me highly recommended by quite a few people that I really trust. And I would recommend it to others, I suppose. But only as a secondary recommendation. It is a lesser version of the book I read a few months back, "Bonds that Make Us Free." "Bonds" is a very heavy book and difficult to wade through at times, but absolutely worth reading. This book, "The Peacegiver" is an easy read that explores the same concepts. I almost wish I read them in the reverse order than I did. The "story" that Ferrell hid behind in "Peacegiver" is quite lacking and drove me fairly crazy. But I won't dwell on that, because the book was obviously about the concepts he was trying to portray and not an intriguing fiction novel. If you take each parable by itself in the book and forget about the story, they are quite moving and insightful. I learned at the end of the book, after seeing the "about the author" spot that Ferrel and Warner both work for the same company, the Arbinger Institute, that seeks to help people find and exude peace in their lives. That said, my recommendation is as follows: Read "Bonds that Make Us Free." If you can't get through it, or just don't want to, read "The Peacegiver."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pixie

    I'm not sure how to rate this book because there are things I loved and things I didn't. It does an excellent job of conveying and teaching relatively complex principles in a fun and easy-read kind of way, so if you're not into dense, philosophical literature, you can gain an awful lot from this. But, if I were to critique it as a novel, I would say it is not particularly well written, the dialogue is forced and predictable, and the plot is thin. I was getting impatient with it at times. It's shor I'm not sure how to rate this book because there are things I loved and things I didn't. It does an excellent job of conveying and teaching relatively complex principles in a fun and easy-read kind of way, so if you're not into dense, philosophical literature, you can gain an awful lot from this. But, if I were to critique it as a novel, I would say it is not particularly well written, the dialogue is forced and predictable, and the plot is thin. I was getting impatient with it at times. It's short, so definitely worth your time. For all my annoyance with the writing, I did enjoy the read, and I can't say I didn't benefit from it. And besides, really, how are you supposed to teach about the atonement without being a little predictable and somewhat dry? This makes a pretty darn good stab.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shiloah

    Absolutely wonderful, powerful, life-changing book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    I've been wanting to read this book for years. Literally. I'm not quite sure why it has taken me as long as it has, other than the fact that it's a church book and being the literature heathen that I am, righteous books sometimes stay at the bottom of my often tall stack. However, now that I've read it I can say that I am glad that I did because it changed how I think. I consider myself on the stubborn end of persuadable so that is saying something. The Peacegiver uses a story format with conversa I've been wanting to read this book for years. Literally. I'm not quite sure why it has taken me as long as it has, other than the fact that it's a church book and being the literature heathen that I am, righteous books sometimes stay at the bottom of my often tall stack. However, now that I've read it I can say that I am glad that I did because it changed how I think. I consider myself on the stubborn end of persuadable so that is saying something. The Peacegiver uses a story format with conversation, philosophy, parables and Dickens-esque-out-of-body-experiences to shed light on Christ's atonement. The main character is Rick, a 30-something year-old man who thinks his marriage to Carol is beyond repair but the lessons he leanrs about forgiveness can be applied to any struggling relationship. Using two Old Testament examples, Abigail and David (which, embarrassingly enough, was a story that was previously unknown to me) and Jonah's mission to Ninevah, Rick's grandfather guides him like a Greek philosopher to new understandings about sin, blame, forgiveness and peace. I hesitate to give you the conclusion. I guess I'm being as annoying as Rick's grandfather (and, believe me, he was plenty annoying even as a kind of guiding angel) who wanted Rick to figure out for himself what the the scriptures were teaching instead of simply telling him the big "ah-ha!" but those conclusions are powerful. Without question, it has brought additional peace and harmony to my home, my marriage and my relationships with others in the three weeks since I've read this book. That's exciting. I can't promise ease and enjoyment if you read The Peacegiver. The author uses descriptive similes like a germaphobe uses hand sanitizer (catch that?) and it's very, very slow. Rick's lightbulb takes much longer to turn on than any human I know so it can be frustrated to stay at his pace. However, because the book's reward, an easy and applicable understanding of the most important principle given to us from God, is made possible without first attaining a degree in Old Testament studies OR philosophy...it's worth your time and patience to read this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    It you are comfortable with your bad attitude towards others, especially those who have injured you, do not read this book. (This reminds me of the image in C.S. Lewis' book The Great Divorce of a man who refuses to be unbound from a nasty red lizard pinned to his shoulder). We can become quite comfortable with our dysfunctions. Ferrell writes about how to live peaceably with others by changing your attitude towards them. He imagines a conversation between a midlife married man and his deceased It you are comfortable with your bad attitude towards others, especially those who have injured you, do not read this book. (This reminds me of the image in C.S. Lewis' book The Great Divorce of a man who refuses to be unbound from a nasty red lizard pinned to his shoulder). We can become quite comfortable with our dysfunctions. Ferrell writes about how to live peaceably with others by changing your attitude towards them. He imagines a conversation between a midlife married man and his deceased grandfather who visits in a series of dreams. The grandfather offers marital advice in the form of close reading of various scriptural passages with the aim of teaching about the atonement. Ferrell makes the atonement all about the mighty change of heart in the most banal of domestic settings. The heroics aren't about dramatic save-the-day rescues or sacrifices. The atonement is about choosing to be kind minute by minute in each comment and thought towards those with whom we share our mortality. And he concedes such change is completely impossible -- unless we come unto Christ and give Him our burdens.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    A friend offered to lend us this book on a Friday, with a very high recommendation. Both my husband and I read the whole thing over the weekend: it’s a quick read, and rather hard to put down. I loved it - It was profound and insightful, but in a very real and familiar way. The protagonist is invited to understand forgiveness and mercy through visions faintly reminiscent of Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” except that the scenes he witnesses are from the scriptures, rather than his own life. As the A friend offered to lend us this book on a Friday, with a very high recommendation. Both my husband and I read the whole thing over the weekend: it’s a quick read, and rather hard to put down. I loved it - It was profound and insightful, but in a very real and familiar way. The protagonist is invited to understand forgiveness and mercy through visions faintly reminiscent of Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” except that the scenes he witnesses are from the scriptures, rather than his own life. As the story unfolds, it teaches about the Savior’s Atonement and the role of healing it can play in our relationships.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karly Cahoon

    It took me a few chapters to get in to this book, because it's written with such a different style. At first I didn't know if I liked it? But stick with it! At the end I was crying and felt like I understood better what forgiveness is and what it means to change and allow the Atonement into my life. The lessons I learned from it were practical and incredible. I want to read it again and again, even if the story line is cheesy at times. It took me a few chapters to get in to this book, because it's written with such a different style. At first I didn't know if I liked it? But stick with it! At the end I was crying and felt like I understood better what forgiveness is and what it means to change and allow the Atonement into my life. The lessons I learned from it were practical and incredible. I want to read it again and again, even if the story line is cheesy at times.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This book is very dear to my heart. If there was a list of required reading for life, this book would definitely be on it! Never before has the Atonement been presented so clearly. Through the cleaver use of parable and scripture, we learn how we truely can heal our hearts and homes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig E.

    Ferrell’s Strength in Analyzing Scripture Ferrell is strongest in his retelling of scripture stories and in his deep and insightful analysis and commentary on those stories. In the first section of the book, Ferrell brought to life for me the story of Abigail, David, and Nabal found in 1 Samuel 25. Ferrell is a close reader of scripture, asking questions of the text that yield various levels of meaning. His commentary on Abigail as a type of Christ was beautifully done. His unpacking of Abiga Ferrell’s Strength in Analyzing Scripture Ferrell is strongest in his retelling of scripture stories and in his deep and insightful analysis and commentary on those stories. In the first section of the book, Ferrell brought to life for me the story of Abigail, David, and Nabal found in 1 Samuel 25. Ferrell is a close reader of scripture, asking questions of the text that yield various levels of meaning. His commentary on Abigail as a type of Christ was beautifully done. His unpacking of Abigail’s statement “forgive the trespass of thine handmaid” (1 Sam. 25:28) revealed treasures of insight for me that were stunning and redemptive. He drew from Abigail’s story numerous and exciting insights into the meaning of the atonement and its application to my relationships. In the second section of the book, Ferrell also brought to life the story of Jonah and Ninevah. Ferrell’s analysis of the chiastic structure of Jonah and the Lord’s question at the end helped me appreciate the beauty of this story. At the center of the chiasm is the verse “They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy.” (Jonah 2:8) Ferrell looks closely at this verse and its application to the Lord’s final question, “Should not I spare Ninevah?” He then reveals how this relates to grace and works and the atonement of Christ in a beautiful, accessible, and insightful way–a way that compelled me to look inward and to Christ in regard to my salvation, rather than comparing myself to others. I deeply appreciated these insights. No less impressive was Ferrell’s discussion of sin and abdication of agency in the third section. And his discussion of Gethsemane in the last section was particularly reverent and deep and insightful. What the Atonement Means To Us--The Story Convention Ferrell couches his insights in a story about Rick and Carol and their marital challenges, with Rick’s deceased Grandfather visiting Rick in vision to teach Rick lessons about the atonement that will help Rick save his marriage. For me, this convention was at times deeply effective and even moving, while at other times it bothered me a bit. (As an aside, Ferrell’s use of Grandfather Carlson as a “guardian angel” was quite interesting. Ferrell does not explicitly compare Grandfather Carlson to the angel that guided Nephi in his vision of Christ, but he does hint at such a comparison when Grandfather in one scene says to Rick, “Look” [the word being set off by itself in a paragraph:], a word the angel in Nephi’s vision repeats several times. As a further aside, in the third and fourth sections, it was interesting to read Ferrell’s description of Rick’s visions as Rick reading a heavenly book of scripture. Lot’s of fun stuff to ponder.) I appreciate Ferrell’s convention in using Rick’s story, but it became a little bothersome at times–particularly, in Rick’s occasional inability to formulate answers to basic questions. Grandfather asks a question, the answer to which is pretty clear, but Rick effectively answers, “Ummm, I don’t know.” This allows Ferrell to give us the answers, but I think Ferrell could have achieved his goal more subtly and skillfully. He clearly has the ability and talent. To many of Grandpa’s questions, Rick had to know the answers–he had to know, at least mentally. Ferrell establishes Rick fairly quickly in the story as a smart person, a self-analytical, insightful person. Ferrell paints Rick as a smart guy when Rick insightfully summarizes on a piece of paper the lessons he had learned to that point (a great summary for all readers). That is why this “Ummmm, I don’t know stuff” started to be distracting. Ferrell seems to equate Rick’s emotional weakness with intellectual weakness. Ferrell’s inconsistency in Rick’s intellectual ability jerked me as a reader out of the story several times. At those points, I just skipped the dialogue and fought my way back into appreciating the substance of Ferrell’s insights. A reader should not have to do this. The fact that I did speaks to the power of Ferrell’s underlying message for me. While Rick was a smart guy, whether he knew practical ways to apply his knowledge was another matter (“But how can I do that?” is the correct question Rick asks [p.145:]). And whether Rick was motivated emotionally to implement such practical methods was the final critical issue. Ferrell takes Rick’s experience on that Saturday morning when Carol comes home from helping a neighbor, focuses on the relapse, and then asks the critical question: How does a person use that knowledge written on a piece of paper in a practical way in the heat of battle? I would have enjoyed even more of Ferrell’s insights into the practical ways to look to Christ or to draw on His power when faced with an immediate and overwhelming desire to rage. After the blowup with Carol and the subsequent vision with Grandpa, I would have kept Rick the intellectually sharp guy on the scene. With that, I would, again, enjoy Ferrell’s insights into how an intellectually smart person can reach new levels of emotional understanding–to understanding how he can use his will, his mind, in partnership with the indispensable power of Christ to break the emotional and physical bonds of sin. "How can I do that?” I have developed my own answers to that question. The most tender of mercies for me are those moments when I apply those answers and feel the power of Christ’s atonement in helping me overcome. But it is a constant and increasingly subtle and sophisticated battle we fight. I would welcome Ferrell’s and other’s answers to the question. In brief, in regard to the story convention, while Ferrell has some problem keeping Rick intellectually sharp while emotionally developing, Ferrell’s convention in using Rick’s story was effective because it brought Ferrell’s insights down from a theoretical, theological, scriptural discussion of the atonement to a practical level of application: What married couple has not experienced challenges in their marriage or on a broader level, what person has not experienced challenges in any number of relationships with others? In this sense, Ferrell’s convention was practical, helpful, and interesting to me. Conclusion Although I give more weight in these comments to the weaknesses of Ferrell’s portrayal of Rick, in reality those weaknesses are really minor to me. Ferrell’s depth of feeling and sharp mind and ability to mine gems out of scripture, along with the strengths of the story convention far outweighed for me any minor weaknesses. I deeply enjoyed this book. I was spiritually moved many times as I read, and I felt gratification in learning new things about the scriptures and most importantly the love of Christ and the meaning and application of the atonement. I plan on visiting the book again many times.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    This book is what might result if Deseret Book tasked one of its sundry authors with writing a The Christmas Carol/The Great Divorce themed discussion of the atonement, especially if that author loved books like Tuesdays with Morrie. In this book, depressed husband Ricky Carson repeatedly visits the spirit of his grandfather in various settings from the scriptures. Absurd enough as is the idea of a spectral grandpa dressed in golf clothes discussing his grandson's old baseball games while overlo This book is what might result if Deseret Book tasked one of its sundry authors with writing a The Christmas Carol/The Great Divorce themed discussion of the atonement, especially if that author loved books like Tuesdays with Morrie. In this book, depressed husband Ricky Carson repeatedly visits the spirit of his grandfather in various settings from the scriptures. Absurd enough as is the idea of a spectral grandpa dressed in golf clothes discussing his grandson's old baseball games while overlooking Nineveh, the absurdity is compounded a hundredfold by the author's unflagging earnestness. I know that I can't muster the same level of good will as the general Deseret Book crowd to whom Ferrell is so obviously pandering, but I'd have to think that this book is filled with so many lines like "What does your heart say, Ricky?" that even the most evangelical of saints would have to occasionally roll their eyes. And finally, when Jacob Marley or a ghost in Christmas Carol wants to teach Scrooge something, they do so by showing him or by speaking plainly. Ferrell, on the other hand, finds it necessary for Grandpa Carson to beat every particle of every lesson to death, removing all of the intrigue of learning the lesson as the story develops. I'll give the book 2 stars because it did at least provoke some worthwhile thought on important topics, if only it weren't in such an awkward way.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Just so anyone who plans on reading this knows, the author of this book is not a novelist, he majored in Philosophy, so his writing reflects these facts. This is not a C.S. Lewis or Talmage writing style. It is much more simplistic in its presentation. With that said, I think this is a book I will have to buy for myself and read it on a regular basis. I think we all know the basics of the Atonement, some more than others, but this book helps you see multiple facets of the atonement and how they c Just so anyone who plans on reading this knows, the author of this book is not a novelist, he majored in Philosophy, so his writing reflects these facts. This is not a C.S. Lewis or Talmage writing style. It is much more simplistic in its presentation. With that said, I think this is a book I will have to buy for myself and read it on a regular basis. I think we all know the basics of the Atonement, some more than others, but this book helps you see multiple facets of the atonement and how they can be applied to relationships in your life. It really is remarkable how it can make you want to change your realtionships with others for the better because of how the author helps you see what Christ has done, and continues to do for us. I recommend this book for every single Christian person, whether you are married, single, etc. Read it and then read it over again, keeping in mind that it is not a novel, but a book that anyone can read, from the learned to the unlearned, and from it glean inspiration.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I had read that this was an "easy read" and have to disagree with that. It is not a book to read while your kids are running around in circles! Although it is nice because it is in parable form and compared to a modern day situation, it is still about the atonement and the topic alone makes it a deep concept. I already feel like I need to read it again to understand it more and I felt as I was reading it that just as with the scriptures, I need to stop and ponder all along the way. That being sa I had read that this was an "easy read" and have to disagree with that. It is not a book to read while your kids are running around in circles! Although it is nice because it is in parable form and compared to a modern day situation, it is still about the atonement and the topic alone makes it a deep concept. I already feel like I need to read it again to understand it more and I felt as I was reading it that just as with the scriptures, I need to stop and ponder all along the way. That being said, it was a very enlightening book and made me reflect on my personal spirituality and also my relationship with all of those in my life. I was surprised at the new things I learned that had really been in the scriptures in front of me my whole life. It's always nice to get another's perspective on scriptural interpretation. I would definitely recommend my friends and family to read this when you're looking for a good, motivational, spiritual book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Ok...so I'm not really the type that reads a lot of church books (unless they're fiction with a plot). But my ward highly recommended this one, and I was going through a "blah" stage, so I figured, what the heck. At the risk of sounding cheesy, this was the most uplifting book! I've read it three times since, whenever I need a little extra boost. The author does an amazing job discussing the principals of the atonement in an interesting way....he weaves doctrine and learning experiences into a f Ok...so I'm not really the type that reads a lot of church books (unless they're fiction with a plot). But my ward highly recommended this one, and I was going through a "blah" stage, so I figured, what the heck. At the risk of sounding cheesy, this was the most uplifting book! I've read it three times since, whenever I need a little extra boost. The author does an amazing job discussing the principals of the atonement in an interesting way....he weaves doctrine and learning experiences into a fictional plot. Don't be put off by the fact that the storyline is about a couple who's struggling in their marriage....the theme and lessons go WAY beyond that. Highly recommend it to anyone who wants to feel warm fuzzies and think about the atonement in a way they haven't before.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This book has to be the one of the best LDS books ever written besides the Book of Mormon. It really gives you such amazing insight to the scriptures and explains it in such a way I never thought of before. It taught me that Christ not only forgave us our sins and mistakes but he has already gone through the sins and mistakes of those who has done us wrong and because of that we need to forgive them even though they may have not taken that step to apologize. It's absolutely amazing. A family man This book has to be the one of the best LDS books ever written besides the Book of Mormon. It really gives you such amazing insight to the scriptures and explains it in such a way I never thought of before. It taught me that Christ not only forgave us our sins and mistakes but he has already gone through the sins and mistakes of those who has done us wrong and because of that we need to forgive them even though they may have not taken that step to apologize. It's absolutely amazing. A family man is visited by his Grandfather in a dream and trys to stop what could be a horrible, ugly divorce. However, although this story is on marriage, it is for anyone with ugly thoughts towards anyone who has done something wrong to them. I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laureen

    For just the writing, I'd give this one two stars. But for the purity of the principles, I'd give it five stars. Though the story is a tad on the trite side, there is a universality in the need for healing in a marriage relationship. It is at this point in most marriages when people call it quits. This book shows principles that can make us all dig a little deeper - in ourselves - to bring about change and healing. It unapologetically proposes that the ultimate healing of any relationship comes For just the writing, I'd give this one two stars. But for the purity of the principles, I'd give it five stars. Though the story is a tad on the trite side, there is a universality in the need for healing in a marriage relationship. It is at this point in most marriages when people call it quits. This book shows principles that can make us all dig a little deeper - in ourselves - to bring about change and healing. It unapologetically proposes that the ultimate healing of any relationship comes from principles taught by Jesus Christ, but firmly maintains that that healing is only available when we seek first, and ultimately, only, to apply that healing to ourselves. It's absolutely worth the read, and probably worth re-reading periodically.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hilary S

    This is a wonderful view of the atonement. You look at the atonement not only for your own sins, but in the aspect of those who have harmed or offended you.How you have to forgive their actions; turning those actions over into the loving arms of Christ. If you do not forgive; you then carry that as your sin. Christ suffered for each of us. When we do not forgive others; we are saying that his suffering wasn't enough. For me that was very humbling, do I want to stand before Christ and say "I know This is a wonderful view of the atonement. You look at the atonement not only for your own sins, but in the aspect of those who have harmed or offended you.How you have to forgive their actions; turning those actions over into the loving arms of Christ. If you do not forgive; you then carry that as your sin. Christ suffered for each of us. When we do not forgive others; we are saying that his suffering wasn't enough. For me that was very humbling, do I want to stand before Christ and say "I know you suffered for us, but what about My suffering?" We are each children of our Heavenly Father, imagine the heartache he has for each of us at times. However, he loves us and shows us great mercy. There isn't enough I can say about this wonderful book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    The Atonement is so important to our lives; on that point, Ferrell and I agree. The author's delivery was poor, his writing trite and silly, and in general written with a male focused slant that I found offensive. How odd, that I really disliked a book called "The Peacegiver". The parables were beaten until dead, the main character was stubborn and quite off-putting, and the author parades his professional and church callings in order to sell more books. I know that I missed the point of this bo The Atonement is so important to our lives; on that point, Ferrell and I agree. The author's delivery was poor, his writing trite and silly, and in general written with a male focused slant that I found offensive. How odd, that I really disliked a book called "The Peacegiver". The parables were beaten until dead, the main character was stubborn and quite off-putting, and the author parades his professional and church callings in order to sell more books. I know that I missed the point of this book by giving it a bad rating, but just because a book deals with a very profound and important subject does not mean that I have to like or give praise to a poorly written piece of work.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This story is about a marriage with a conflict. The author uses some old and new testament stories woven in the narrative to help the couple resolve their issues. This book is written by the arbinger institute (a Terry Warner creation--read my review of Bonds that Make us Free). This book is Warner's theory in practice. At times, it's a bit dramatic, but I liked the story and it was easy to read and it really makes you think about your relationships and whether you have adequate humility. This story is about a marriage with a conflict. The author uses some old and new testament stories woven in the narrative to help the couple resolve their issues. This book is written by the arbinger institute (a Terry Warner creation--read my review of Bonds that Make us Free). This book is Warner's theory in practice. At times, it's a bit dramatic, but I liked the story and it was easy to read and it really makes you think about your relationships and whether you have adequate humility.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I usually don't like to mix gospel with fiction, but this is extremely well thought out and insightful. EXCELLENT! I usually don't like to mix gospel with fiction, but this is extremely well thought out and insightful. EXCELLENT!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Saralyn

    Wow. This was really insightful. He brought certain perspectives to scriptures I've read or heard a lot that changed my view of the world. Great book. Wow. This was really insightful. He brought certain perspectives to scriptures I've read or heard a lot that changed my view of the world. Great book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a good book to re-read occasionally. I remember thinking it was very profound the first time I read it. It didn't seem as earth-shattering the second time through, but still as timely and needed. ;) This is a book about forgiveness, repentance, peace, humility, gratitude, our Savior’s infinite love, and His Atonement. None of us are worthy of His selfless offering. It is the only thing that can heal us. As we humbly recognize that and ask for His help to change, He will give us a new hea This is a good book to re-read occasionally. I remember thinking it was very profound the first time I read it. It didn't seem as earth-shattering the second time through, but still as timely and needed. ;) This is a book about forgiveness, repentance, peace, humility, gratitude, our Savior’s infinite love, and His Atonement. None of us are worthy of His selfless offering. It is the only thing that can heal us. As we humbly recognize that and ask for His help to change, He will give us a new heart and help us find peace. This is the story of a broken relationship and the application of the principles of the Atonement of Jesus Christ, as taught in the scriptures. These scripture stories teach us the importance of repentance, forgiveness, and His power to change and heal. Here are a few of my favorite quotes: “‘I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh…’ (Ezekiel 36:26)” “Conflicts between countries are perhaps more dramatic, but the hot and cold wars that fester in the hearts of family members, neighbors, and friends bring more pain and suffering to this earth in a single day than have all the world’s weapons since the beginning of time. If there ever is to be peace on earth, we first must find the way to peace in our hearts and homes (p. ix).” “The Lord’s atonement reaches deep into the trouble of daily life to the very bottom of every dispute and hurt feeling. To the predicament of a heard heart, he offers the promise of a new one. To the pain of hurt feelings, he offers the balm of his love. To utter loneliness, he offers the companionship of the heavens (p. x).” “‘If I did nothing wrong, then why didn’t Joe and I speak for fourteen years (p. 28)?’” “There are ways to be right on the surface and entirely mistaken beneath. That was what the Savior announced to the world. ‘The law, alone, cannot save you… I require the heart (p. 29).’” “That’s what we do to each other—all of us—we mistreat each other, and especially those we live with, for we have more opportunities to mistreat them than anyone else (p. 32).” “Being mistreated is the most important condition of mortality, for eternity itself depends on how we view those who mistreat us (p. 33).” “‘You have saved me from evil this day, which I will never forget (p. 38).’” “Like every long road we walk, these men did not walk it alone. The Redeemer they had hoped for not only lived, he was walking beside them (p. 43).” “Abigail brought to David everything he needed—bread, wine, sheep, and so on—just like Jesus does for us, who is himself the bread of life, the true vine, and the lamb of God (p. 45).” “If the story reveals something about peacemaking…but you yourself have not been brought closer to peace because of it, then either it is a trifling story or you haven’t yet penetrated it—or allowed it to penetrate you (p. 46).” “It’s redemption that I’m interested in (p. 49).” “We sin when our hearts are sinful, no matter what we do on the surface. The law and the prophets hang on the two great commandments of loving God and others because if our hearts fail to love, neither the law nor the prophets, nor anything else—including outward ‘righteousness’—can save us (p. 51).” “We are all sinners, and someone had to bridge for each of us the otherwise impassible chasm between us and eternal life that we have created through sin (p. 53).” “One who didn’t need forgiveness nevertheless asked for it—illustrates something very important about forgiveness…who forgiveness is for (p. 64).” “When we withhold forgiveness from others…we are in effect saying that the atonement alone was insufficient to pay for this sin. We are holding out for more. We are finding fault with the Lord’s offering (p. 66).” “So the Lord in his mercy comes to you and says, ‘The atonement applies as much to Carol as it does to you, my son. I have claimed her sins and taken them upon me. Let it go (p. 67).’” “He has already let it go for you. That is part of his atonement. You just need to allow him to take it from you (p. 70).” “If Jonah demands that everybody gets only what they deserve, then he must also accept what he deserves…. The truth is that there is only one thing we truly deserve, and that’s to be sent to hell—you, Carol, me, Jonah, Nineveh, all of us…. Hell is all we could ever hope for…if it weren’t for the redeeming power of the Savior’s atonement. It is only his love, offered not because we deserve it but even though we do not, that saves us. We don’t want what we deserve, believe me (p. 96).” “We are each working out our own salvation with fear and trembling before the Lord. And that gift will come to us only if we know in our hearts that we deserve it no more than anyone else. What I meant earlier by ‘fleeing to Tarshish’ was just this: persisting in the idea that we are better, more righteous, and deserve more than others. The truth is, we are all, each of us, equally damned without the mercy of the Lord. Eternal life is a gift. I have no cause to feel entitled. I have cause only to feel grateful (p. 99).” “The Lord saved Jonah and Nineveh alike, and on the same terms—repentance (p. 105).” “He is unhappy not because of another’s sins but because of his own…. Our own failure to love another causes us to see the other as being unworthy of love…. How are you demanding justice and therefore denying mercy (p. 120)?” “My greatest hope is that you will see Carol again—as you used to, as the Lord sees her, as she is (p. 122).” “The Lord’s Atonement and Mercy 1. We are each sinners, entitled to nothing but hell and therefore utterly and equally dependent upon the mercies of the Lord. (Jonah) 2. I can receive of the Lord’s mercy—and the happiness, healing, and peace that attend it—only to the extent I extend the same to others. (Jonah) 3. The Lord mercifully removes any justification for failing to extend mercy to others. (Abigail) a. For the Lord has taken the sins of others upon hi sown head and personally atoned for them. (Abigail) b. What possible justification could there be for demanding more for others’ sins than the Lord has given? (Abigail) 4. I can recover mercy by remembering (a) Abigail’s offering, (b) the Lord’s question to Jonah, and (c) my own sins, the memory of which brings me to the Lord and invites me to rediscover his mercy and peace. 5. If I repent of failing to extend mercy, the Lord will supply me with everything I need and more—he will grant me his love, his companionship, his understanding, his support. He will make my burdens light. (Abigail) (p. 127).” “Whether other comes to Christ…will determine their peace but not mine (p. 137).” “What sins are keeping me from Carol and therefore from the Lord? Well, they all are, I suppose (p. 138).” “Agency…is the capacity to choose who we will follow—the Lord of Light or the Lord of Darkness. That is the choice that was at stake in the premortal realm. And it is a choice we retain here, even when bound and gagged (p. 148).” “It is Satan’s will that we not follow the Lord, and he attempts to capture us by enticing or tempting us to act contrary to the Lord’s will (p. 152).” “When we fail to follow the Holy Spirit, we grant Satan power to captivate us through corruptible elements within our bodies—just as the addict loses control to his physical addictions. Sin is an addictive substance (p. 156).” “The transgressor becomes blinded to his responsibility for sin, and he begins to fall into the captivity of the devil, which are the chains—the chains of sin—that keep him from feeling the need or desire to return to the Savior (p. 160).” “Repent, not just of unrighteous acts, but of an unrighteous heart (p. 165).” “The problem of sin is only partially that we engage in sinful acts. The far deeper problem is that by choosing to engage in sinful acts, our hearts become sinful (p. 173).” “In order to redeem us from the chains of sin, the Savior had to take upon himself all of the chains that bind us to sin—in the words of Paul, to be ‘in all points tempted like as we are.’ He had to shoulder ‘the burden of the combined weight of the sins of the world’—our sinful desires, our predispositions and addictions toward sin, our darkened hearts. The scriptures declare that he suffered as well everything that might lead us to sin—our ‘pains and afflictions and temptations of every kind’—so that ‘he might blot out [our] transgressions according to the power of his deliverance (p. 176).’” “We are one with him, not just metaphorically, but in actual fact. The scars man has given him bind us to his flesh for the eternities (p. 182).” “The Lord does not give you a new heart once. He gives you a new heart every time you come to him repentantly, in faith, believing that you will receive. We need the gift of a new heart every day (p. 190).” “Sin is at the door, but there is One more powerful than sin that guards the way if we will let him (p. 194).” “All of this is possible…only because the Lord claimed our sinful hearts as his own, laid himself bare before the forces of evil, and through an eternity’s worth of faithful suffering broke the chains of captivity for all who come to him with a broken heart (p. 195).” “He had never felt so unworthy of her love. And for just that reason, he had never been so likely to receive it (p. 196).” “Her response to his apology wasn’t important. For once in his life, he wasn’t saying something to her in order to elicit a particular response. He was simply loving her (p. 197).”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Adams

    Take a look at Forgiveness from a new perspective. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to overcome anger and resentment toward any of God's children. Rick and Carol are struggling in their marriage. Growing increasingly distant, Rick's grandfather (who happens to be dead) appears in dreams and at the kitchen table to show him a new perspective on Christ's atonement and suffering for all mankind (even the people we are angry with). What I liked: The insights into forgiveness are told Take a look at Forgiveness from a new perspective. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to overcome anger and resentment toward any of God's children. Rick and Carol are struggling in their marriage. Growing increasingly distant, Rick's grandfather (who happens to be dead) appears in dreams and at the kitchen table to show him a new perspective on Christ's atonement and suffering for all mankind (even the people we are angry with). What I liked: The insights into forgiveness are told in a narrative form so the reader doesn't feel overtly preached to. I think most couples who go through disagreements and even drawn-out fights can see themselves in the characters. I also liked the scriptural references. I gained many insights about Bible stories I'd taken for granted most of my life. What I didn't like: If I say I didn't like something, will I go to hell? If there was any failure in the book, it was in my ability to receive its message. It's a quick read. Well worth a few nights to understand the Infinite Atonement of Jesus Christ a little better and how to apply it to our own lives.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    This is a beautiful story that teaches the multiple facets of the atonement. I have never viewed the atonement of Christ in the ways that Ferrell teaches it. It's a story of finding forgiveness for ourselves and others, and a story of healing broken relationships through the atoning power of Christ. "All of this is possible, he thought, only because the Lord claimed our sinful hearts as his own, laid himself bare before the forces of evil, and through an eternity's worth of faithful suffering br This is a beautiful story that teaches the multiple facets of the atonement. I have never viewed the atonement of Christ in the ways that Ferrell teaches it. It's a story of finding forgiveness for ourselves and others, and a story of healing broken relationships through the atoning power of Christ. "All of this is possible, he thought, only because the Lord claimed our sinful hearts as his own, laid himself bare before the forces of evil, and through an eternity's worth of faithful suffering broke the chains of captivity for all who come to him with a broken heart." "The Lord does not give you a new heart only once. He gives you a new heart every time you come to him repentantly, in faith, believing that you will receive. We need the gift of a new heart every day." I loved this book, and will refer back to it to keep the message in my heart.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This book is, for better and for worse: — Quintessentially Mormon: a businessman teaches Sunday School. — As subtle, incisive, and useful as self-help books, in just about every sense. — The epitome of Deseret Book. That isn't to say it's bad; it certainly provides much more food for thought than a typical Sunday School class, and clothes it in relatable garb: the battle for the modern Mormon man's soul is fought in the home, with his own desire to recriminate against his wife. And I know it has bee This book is, for better and for worse: — Quintessentially Mormon: a businessman teaches Sunday School. — As subtle, incisive, and useful as self-help books, in just about every sense. — The epitome of Deseret Book. That isn't to say it's bad; it certainly provides much more food for thought than a typical Sunday School class, and clothes it in relatable garb: the battle for the modern Mormon man's soul is fought in the home, with his own desire to recriminate against his wife. And I know it has been a blessing to many of those who have read it—and I know there are principles taught within that I, of course, have trouble following—but I'm not quite the ideal audience for its style.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    This book gives wonderful perspectives and deep insights into the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the opportunity He gives for forgiveness, healing, and atonement. The author gets at things from many different angles to explore the topic deeply and I believe in order to get readers to think more deeply about the subject. The main character in the book vacillates between feelings of progress and feelings of being trapped by bad ruts, between feeling hopeful and despairing when efforts to improve th This book gives wonderful perspectives and deep insights into the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the opportunity He gives for forgiveness, healing, and atonement. The author gets at things from many different angles to explore the topic deeply and I believe in order to get readers to think more deeply about the subject. The main character in the book vacillates between feelings of progress and feelings of being trapped by bad ruts, between feeling hopeful and despairing when efforts to improve things aren't immediately successful. I admit it took me a while for me to get through it, largely because at times it felt like it was too drawn out (the very aspect of hitting at something over and over from different angles), but I found a few gems of insight toward the end that made it worth it for me. I think it would have been better to have read it over a shorter span of days instead of weeks/months.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Brown

    A beautiful book to help you better understand the atonement of Jesus Christ, that uses a real life example of a man whose marriage is in chaos, as well as wonderful lessons from the scriptures. As this man is taken on a journey of discovery by his deceased grandfather, he learns not only of his own need for the healing power of the atonement, but of all of our dependency on it, and it is only through repenting and seeking forgiveness, that he can finally allow his bitter feelings and anger towa A beautiful book to help you better understand the atonement of Jesus Christ, that uses a real life example of a man whose marriage is in chaos, as well as wonderful lessons from the scriptures. As this man is taken on a journey of discovery by his deceased grandfather, he learns not only of his own need for the healing power of the atonement, but of all of our dependency on it, and it is only through repenting and seeking forgiveness, that he can finally allow his bitter feelings and anger toward his wife get washed away and be healed. I really loved this book. I was given it as a gift years ago, and am so glad I finally read it. It made me think a lot about my interactions with others, as well as my own need to partake of the blessings of the atonement in my own life each day.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Liesl

    I really liked this book! It gave me a new insight into the atonement if Jesus Christ and a way of realizing the way it affects me and others and how we should treat each other. It opened up new thoughts and feelings about all of this. I read it twice in a row to be sure to be able to write down insights instead of them fading away.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.