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The Daemon at the Casement, or, Frankenstein, Part II: The 200-Year Sequel to Mary Shelley's 1818 Classic

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The 200-Year sequel to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) picks up where Shelley left off, with the creature marooned and miserable in the frozen far north. He is not the grunting illiterate of the films, but the agile and erudite beast of Shelley’s book. And here he tells his own story, seizing the chance for a better life, renewing his pursuit of companionship, and juggl The 200-Year sequel to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) picks up where Shelley left off, with the creature marooned and miserable in the frozen far north. He is not the grunting illiterate of the films, but the agile and erudite beast of Shelley’s book. And here he tells his own story, seizing the chance for a better life, renewing his pursuit of companionship, and juggling the civility and savagery within him.


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The 200-Year sequel to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) picks up where Shelley left off, with the creature marooned and miserable in the frozen far north. He is not the grunting illiterate of the films, but the agile and erudite beast of Shelley’s book. And here he tells his own story, seizing the chance for a better life, renewing his pursuit of companionship, and juggl The 200-Year sequel to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) picks up where Shelley left off, with the creature marooned and miserable in the frozen far north. He is not the grunting illiterate of the films, but the agile and erudite beast of Shelley’s book. And here he tells his own story, seizing the chance for a better life, renewing his pursuit of companionship, and juggling the civility and savagery within him.

12 review for The Daemon at the Casement, or, Frankenstein, Part II: The 200-Year Sequel to Mary Shelley's 1818 Classic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Begley

    The first thing the reader should do is put out of his mind any preconceived notion of the Frankenstein monster of the movies. In this novel – and in Mary Shelley’s original – the creature is not a grunting illiterate. Here, he has a name: Franz P. Frankenstein. He is also an intellect on par with an Oxford Don. In both books, the creature got the “right” brain as Igor didn’t drop the correct container. Kennedy picks up where Shelley’s book ended and follows a few threads as he fleshes out the st The first thing the reader should do is put out of his mind any preconceived notion of the Frankenstein monster of the movies. In this novel – and in Mary Shelley’s original – the creature is not a grunting illiterate. Here, he has a name: Franz P. Frankenstein. He is also an intellect on par with an Oxford Don. In both books, the creature got the “right” brain as Igor didn’t drop the correct container. Kennedy picks up where Shelley’s book ended and follows a few threads as he fleshes out the story brilliantly. Originally the creature wanted a female companion. Victor Frankenstein’s breach of his promise to create one is what drove the monster on his murdering rampage and to Victor’s ultimate death. This novel is a classic love story between two societal misfits. An eight foot creature who happens to be a genius and sensitive murderer falls in love with an abused woman who has her own serious and multiple physical challenges. What is love? What is the nature of marriage? Important questions when considered from the point-of-view of Franz; a person with no childhood or puberty. If you don’t want to read Mary Shelley’s brief novel, I’d recommend the 1994 movie directed and starring Kenneth Branagh. One of the screenwriters for “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein” was Frank Darabont who wrote “The Shawshank Redemption.” To enjoy this book it is not necessary to do either or both as Kennedy covers the essential points in about the first ten pages. Kennedy’s pace and plot is more suited to today’s modern novel – but in a remarkable accomplishment – some of the language is similar to Shelley’s style. I found Shelley’s work slow-going at times with its flowery and wordy style. In both novels, letters play an important role. I won’t give away more of the plot, but suffice it to say that there are many dramatic and even cinematic chapters in the book. I’m looking forward to the movie! The author acquired a deep knowledge of horses and carriages for the book and that was an impressive period detail. And do not be put off by the fact that the book is self-published. As the author noted at page 152, there is a distinction between publishers and learned men. This novel is way better than what is on today’s best seller list. Recall Tom Clancy’s first novel, “Red October” and John Grisham’s first self-published book, “A Time to Kill.” I’ve read both and Kennedy’s is way better. This book has my highest recommendation. It is an instant modern classic! — David D. Begley, December 13, 2018

  2. 4 out of 5

    Magnus Smith

    The novel was fairly slow, but pleasant. The characters were compelling and in most accounts true to those of the original novel by Shelley. Overall, it was nice! Nothing particularly special, but a nice story nonetheless.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danél

    If you're going to write a sequel to a classic novel that changed popular culture forever, it helps to have a direction and a justification. Kennedy provides neither, allowing the Monster to survive Shelley's tale only to enter into a domestic life of lifelessly-written, stunning mundanity. Storylines with potential twists are introduced and resolved without any stakes or conflict. The Creature learns how to cook and marvels at his tailor-made new clothes. There's a romance between he and his be If you're going to write a sequel to a classic novel that changed popular culture forever, it helps to have a direction and a justification. Kennedy provides neither, allowing the Monster to survive Shelley's tale only to enter into a domestic life of lifelessly-written, stunning mundanity. Storylines with potential twists are introduced and resolved without any stakes or conflict. The Creature learns how to cook and marvels at his tailor-made new clothes. There's a romance between he and his benefactor's sister that sets up a potentially interesting relationship, but it is unfocused and meandering in its delivery. For that matter, the whole novel meanders, without any suspense -- odd for a sequel to the greatest horror story ever told. I've read plenty of speculative sequels to Shelley's masterpiece -- some superb (Frankenstein's Monster by Susan Heyboer O'Keefe is the one to beat), some trashy (Robert Myers's Sword of Frankenstein has to be read to be believed), some quite bad (Dean Koontz's series had a great set-up but quickly devolved because of lazy writing). Kennedy's attempt, comparatively, does not register at all -- having just finished it, I can't think of a single memorable scene, nor any aspect of it worth recommending, unless you want to know how the Creature likes to prepare his vegetables. Talk about the banality of evil!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    The book starts where Shelley's left off 200 years ago, with Frankenstein stranded in the arctic. This Frankenstein, Franz P, is agile, athletic, and wicked smart. He stows away aboard Robert Walton's ship and returns to London. Walton's plan to exploit Franz and become famous bears no fruit, but he willingly transitions into teaching Franz, the ablest of students. Franz is befriended by Walton's sister, a person disabled by genetics, accident and a lifetime of abuse. Franz is a wondrous mix of The book starts where Shelley's left off 200 years ago, with Frankenstein stranded in the arctic. This Frankenstein, Franz P, is agile, athletic, and wicked smart. He stows away aboard Robert Walton's ship and returns to London. Walton's plan to exploit Franz and become famous bears no fruit, but he willingly transitions into teaching Franz, the ablest of students. Franz is befriended by Walton's sister, a person disabled by genetics, accident and a lifetime of abuse. Franz is a wondrous mix of joyful explorer and sociopath.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shantelle

  6. 5 out of 5

    Camryn Halford

  7. 4 out of 5

    richard

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pitts

  9. 5 out of 5

    Annabel

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  11. 4 out of 5

    matthew fellechner

  12. 5 out of 5

    ARandomHufflepuff

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