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The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read: But Is Too Embarrassed to Ask

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What do you think about your pastor? Do you chew over his sermons and wonder if they are clear and helpful? Do you feel he spends enough time with you? In fact, do you ever catch yourself wondering what he does all day? The truth is, often we think, "What can my pastor do for me?" Far less often do we think, "What can I do for my pastor?" Former seasoned pastor, Christopher What do you think about your pastor? Do you chew over his sermons and wonder if they are clear and helpful? Do you feel he spends enough time with you? In fact, do you ever catch yourself wondering what he does all day? The truth is, often we think, "What can my pastor do for me?" Far less often do we think, "What can I do for my pastor?" Former seasoned pastor, Christopher Ash, urges church members to think about pastors not just in terms of what they do—how they lead and pray and preach and teach and so on—but what about who they are. He encourages us to remember that pastors are people and to pray for them as they serve us. Paradoxically, caring for our pastor will be a blessing to us as well as to them, and create a culture of true fellowship in our church family.


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What do you think about your pastor? Do you chew over his sermons and wonder if they are clear and helpful? Do you feel he spends enough time with you? In fact, do you ever catch yourself wondering what he does all day? The truth is, often we think, "What can my pastor do for me?" Far less often do we think, "What can I do for my pastor?" Former seasoned pastor, Christopher What do you think about your pastor? Do you chew over his sermons and wonder if they are clear and helpful? Do you feel he spends enough time with you? In fact, do you ever catch yourself wondering what he does all day? The truth is, often we think, "What can my pastor do for me?" Far less often do we think, "What can I do for my pastor?" Former seasoned pastor, Christopher Ash, urges church members to think about pastors not just in terms of what they do—how they lead and pray and preach and teach and so on—but what about who they are. He encourages us to remember that pastors are people and to pray for them as they serve us. Paradoxically, caring for our pastor will be a blessing to us as well as to them, and create a culture of true fellowship in our church family.

30 review for The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read: But Is Too Embarrassed to Ask

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    What a brilliant little book. Though the term “must-read” is overused, this truly is a must-read for every church member. Read it soon.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nathan White

    I must admit that I don't like the title. If a pastor is too embarrassed to recommend a book to his flock then he probably doesn't have the relationship with them that he ought to have. I'd even go so far as saying that the book isn't embarrassing, but the title is! Haha! Nevertheless, the book itself is helpful. On one hand, much of this material should be basic common sense to a faithful church member. If the pastors/church have done a good job of setting expectations for members, including the I must admit that I don't like the title. If a pastor is too embarrassed to recommend a book to his flock then he probably doesn't have the relationship with them that he ought to have. I'd even go so far as saying that the book isn't embarrassing, but the title is! Haha! Nevertheless, the book itself is helpful. On one hand, much of this material should be basic common sense to a faithful church member. If the pastors/church have done a good job of setting expectations for members, including their responsibilities and commitments to the congregation (and to the pastor(s) as well), then nothing here is particularly new or groundbreaking. But on the other hand, we live in a day where so many professing Christians have a consumeristic approach to the church. Or, to many, the church is nothing more than a glorified social club, an event to attend on Sundays, or a place to meet people who are just like us. In such a context, including the context where folks just see the pastor as an employee or a figurehead, this book can be extremely helpful. After opening chapters entitled 'pastors are people too', and 'why would you want to care for your pastor?', 7 chapters follow, detailing 7 virtues he advocates in response: 1. Daily repentance and eager faith. 2. Committed belonging. 3. Open honesty. 4. Thoughtful watchfulness. 5. Loving kindness. 6. High expectations. 7. Zealous submission. Then he concludes with an exhorting chapter on the necessity of knowing your pastor (well, really, on how important is that someone in the congregation knows the pastor well because the pastor needs that sort of friendship. Here I'd differ with the author and argue that if you don't know your pastor, then he's not really your pastor. Everybody should know their pastor well). All in all, I bought a few copies to hand out. I recommend it as a book that can be helpful understanding and loving your pastor and fulfilling your duties in church membership.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Manchester

    A surprisingly helpful book on a subject rarely read or written about. SUMMARY Christopher Ash gives seven ways to help encourage and care for our pastors: 1. Daily repentance and eager faith 2. Committed belonging 3. Open honesty 4. Thoughtful watchfulness 5. Loving kindness 6. High expectations 7. Zealous submission THE GOOD This book was wonderful. The sections on honesty, watchfulness, and kindness were my favorite. These chapters are helping reshape how I encourage and care for my pastor. Ash A surprisingly helpful book on a subject rarely read or written about. SUMMARY Christopher Ash gives seven ways to help encourage and care for our pastors: 1. Daily repentance and eager faith 2. Committed belonging 3. Open honesty 4. Thoughtful watchfulness 5. Loving kindness 6. High expectations 7. Zealous submission THE GOOD This book was wonderful. The sections on honesty, watchfulness, and kindness were my favorite. These chapters are helping reshape how I encourage and care for my pastor. Ash is an amazing writer. In fact, if you haven't read all of Ash's books, you're missing out. His commentary on Job, Job: The Wisdom of the Cross, is one of the best commentaries out there. He writes on this subject from both a pastoral perspective and a (more recent) church member perspective. It all works together to be a well-balanced and thoughtful book. THE CHALLENGES The only bumps were in the final chapters. Ash deals with submission to church authority, and while most of it was biblical advice, my soul heard nails on a chalkboard at certain parts. I don't know yet if Ash is wrong or if my previous church's leadership hurt me so bad that I can't be unbiased when hearing advice on this subject. However, the second challenge was when talking about accusations against a pastor. I felt it needed to quote Ash here: "Paul goes on to say, “Do not entertain an accusation against an elder unless it is brought by two or three witnesses” (v 19). In other words, our pastors should be paid properly and protected from false accusations. A church leader is particularly vulnerable to rumors, gossip and false accusations, especially in our litigious age. Paul invokes a principle from Old Testament law, which said that an accusation must be properly checked and double-checked, to make sure it is really true. So, when we hear a tidbit of gossip about our pastor, how should we respond? Check that it’s true. “So, who did you hear this from? Have you spoken to the pastor directly about this to check it out? No? Well, then you are joining in with malicious gossip. So, how about you and I meet the pastor and say we have heard this rumor? Let’s see what explanation there might be.” I don't see how this helps or handles cases of pastoral abuse (physical, sexual, etc). It's a weird gap in practicality for me. I didn't expect this section since the book was written recently, in light of the #metoo movement, the Catholic and SBC abuse cases, Jeffrey Epstein + co, etc. I agree that we investigate before we formally accuse, but sending people back to their (possible) abuser is not right. We show love for our leadership by having an explicit and clear investigation process. There's words about the pastor being a sinner just like us (agreed!) but not a word on pastors who are predators. In my opinion, it is love for my leadership that I don't completely trust them. Ash somewhat talks about this when mentioning not to put pastors on pedestals, but I thought it should've gone further. There should of been either a chapter or section on "church vigilance". (And no, this section wasn't under the "Thoughtful watchfulness" chapter. It was under "High Expectations".) CONCLUSION This is a book that at least every elder needs to read. I'd encourage every church member to read it. It is extremely practical and started changing how I support my (new) pastor as I was reading it. I'm really grateful that this book was written and I'm really thankful that I read it. Four stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Reading this book will help you care for and encourage your pastor. It's spot on. (And very encouraging for me as a pastor as I was reminded of all the people in my church who are just like this.) Reading this book will help you care for and encourage your pastor. It's spot on. (And very encouraging for me as a pastor as I was reminded of all the people in my church who are just like this.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Schultz

    I love ideas for how to better care for pastors, staff, and ministry leaders

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Gow

    This is good - better than I thought it would be because it's more than just a reminder that pastors are people. It's also a challenging call to zealously follow Jesus by loving the church. A few theological assumptions that I don't agree with make it hard to rate, but it's very helpful This is good - better than I thought it would be because it's more than just a reminder that pastors are people. It's also a challenging call to zealously follow Jesus by loving the church. A few theological assumptions that I don't agree with make it hard to rate, but it's very helpful

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jesvin Jose

    We often read books where the pastor is told how to care for the church. I haven’t come across many books which talk about how the local church must care for their pastor. This book by Christopher Ash helps us understand the need to care for our pastors, by giving us seven virtues we could learn to help the pastor serve with joy. Yes, the pastor needs our care if he is to care well for us. Read the rest of the review here: https://jesvinjose.home.blog/2020/03/... We often read books where the pastor is told how to care for the church. I haven’t come across many books which talk about how the local church must care for their pastor. This book by Christopher Ash helps us understand the need to care for our pastors, by giving us seven virtues we could learn to help the pastor serve with joy. Yes, the pastor needs our care if he is to care well for us. Read the rest of the review here: https://jesvinjose.home.blog/2020/03/...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    This is a short book that’s easy to read. What Ash does in a thoroughly Biblical but also deeply relatable way is raise the questions we should be asking about our responsibility towards those the Lord has placed in authority over us. Ash returns often to Hebrews 13:17 to ask, in various ways, how our submission will lead to their joy, which in turn will lead to our advantage.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alysia

    Excellent, practical book on how to care for, encourage and foster relationships with our pastors. A must read!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Really easy to read and helpful to see the different experiences of how people in the church impact their pastors. Useful and honest tips, examples and insights.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I wish our church members had read this book two decades ago. We may have averted many of the issues we struggled through for so long. All church members need to read this book and take it to heart.

  12. 5 out of 5

    T.A. Ward

    This book is very easy to read, and is a great conversation starter about how to love our pastors better (a topic that is too often overlooked). As I read it, I could not help but think that this book would be both beneficial for congregants and pastors alike to read. Are we as congregants and pastors really fulfilling Hebrews 13:17: "Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with This book is very easy to read, and is a great conversation starter about how to love our pastors better (a topic that is too often overlooked). As I read it, I could not help but think that this book would be both beneficial for congregants and pastors alike to read. Are we as congregants and pastors really fulfilling Hebrews 13:17: "Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you." I appreciated the push for us to really "know" our pastors. Who are they outside of the ministry? Who are they as men, and as people? How will these things impact their ministry toward us? Who are their elders? I wish that there would have been a greater focus on the spiritual care of the pastor. That, being the most important piece, got muddled up with the other general cares. Given that this book was so brief, however, this is not an exhaustive look at the topic, but a good conversation starter. ----- p.s. If you're hoping that this book will pertain to your unique denominational setting, it probably won't. Being confessionally Presbyterian, it was sometimes annoying how the responsibility of the elders were being discussed as if anyone could or should do them. Be mindful of the differences, and read charitably so that the book may be of some benefit. p.s.#2: Also this is not a book for a church in crisis. If you're looking for a book that will tell you how to fix the problems in your pastor's ministry, look elsewhere. This is a book for an overall healthy church, or a church struggling with a some overly controlling/ungracious parishioners (which we all can be at times). The book must be taken for what it is, not for what it is not. It is brief and cannot address every "what if" situation we think of as we read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I thought this book would be an easy, good read. It was too easy that it was tough to finish, and it just wasn't that good. Don't get me wrong, Ash makes excellent points. But after reading the intro, all the other chapters that I read were the same thing the intro had, or just weren't relevant to the point of the book. The book isn't that long either, and because of the writing style and paragraph structure, it's not a hard read, if I had really forced myself, it would probably have taken me an I thought this book would be an easy, good read. It was too easy that it was tough to finish, and it just wasn't that good. Don't get me wrong, Ash makes excellent points. But after reading the intro, all the other chapters that I read were the same thing the intro had, or just weren't relevant to the point of the book. The book isn't that long either, and because of the writing style and paragraph structure, it's not a hard read, if I had really forced myself, it would probably have taken me an hour to finish the whole thing. A friend of mine put it best, it seems like something that could have been (or was) a blog post but his publisher wanted it as a book so he added filler. For instance, in a few chapters, he'd cover the point the chapter was setting out to make in 2 paragraphs, then the rest would go on to something else relating to being a good Christian. As far as I could tell, almost everything boiled down to "come to church and don't be a jerk. Keep coming to church and remember your pastor is human and be a part of community because that makes the pastor happy." which ultimately boils down to "your pastor is happy when you're doing what we're called to do". The paperback is about 130 pages, and both the kindle and paperback versions go for about $8, and aren't worth that. It's a long blog post. I try to see the best in books, and this book has good in it. But there's no reason it had to be a book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Helpful, practical, and short - all the things I'm looking for in a how-to book. If you want to take care of your pastor but are unsure how, this is the book for you. I wish in a couple of places the author would have provided a couple of solid examples, but it is a very good book. I wish I could buy a copy for everyone in my church. Helpful, practical, and short - all the things I'm looking for in a how-to book. If you want to take care of your pastor but are unsure how, this is the book for you. I wish in a couple of places the author would have provided a couple of solid examples, but it is a very good book. I wish I could buy a copy for everyone in my church.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peter Butler

    I suspected what Christopher Ash’s book, The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read (But is Too Embarrassed to Ask), and I was right – in a good way. Ash begins by introducing us to ten ministers – pastor who sin, who have insecurities, who get overwhelmed, and so forth. The point being that “pastors are people too.” Then he asked why a parishioner should want to care for his pastor. The answer is found is Hebrews 13:17 – if your pastor is overburdened, he won’t be of any benefit to you. The bu I suspected what Christopher Ash’s book, The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read (But is Too Embarrassed to Ask), and I was right – in a good way. Ash begins by introducing us to ten ministers – pastor who sin, who have insecurities, who get overwhelmed, and so forth. The point being that “pastors are people too.” Then he asked why a parishioner should want to care for his pastor. The answer is found is Hebrews 13:17 – if your pastor is overburdened, he won’t be of any benefit to you. The bulk of the book is “seven virtues of church members that impact our pastors.” 1. Daily repentance and eager faith. Come to your pastor with your struggles and sin and be desirous of instruction from God’s Word and tell the pastor when he has done or said something right or helpful. 2. Committed belonging. We are not primarily consumers, but providers in our local church. So, as often as possible, we are to be involved in everything our church does, including the worship service. 3. Open Honesty. Be open and honest between church members and the pastor, and as much as possible, face to face. 4. Thoughtful Watchfulness. We are to keep a concerned watch – not a watch seeking to see the pastor fail – over the pastor’s life and doctrine. Not just inquiring of him and listening to his sermons, but allowing him time to read, to go to conferences, to have a study leave, a day(s) off, and vacations. 5. Loving kindness. The ministry takes a toll on a person. Our care for the pastor should reflect in his pay and housing. 6. High expectations. We ought to expect and example of striving after holiness and the presentation of biblical doctrine from our pastors. God holds them to higher standards and so should we. We out also protect them from false accusations. 7. Zealous submission. We ought to zealous follow our pastor’s lead (so long as it is biblical). Ash then recommends that several people in the congregation self-consciously get to know the pastor and his family – befriend him – be a sounding board – people to have times of casual acquaintance with. In this chapter, he includes several questions that someone in the congregation should be able to answer about their pastor. In the final chapter, he suggests that some churches will respond well to his thoughts, and others will rebel or be angry. For the latter, the pastor may find it time to move on. This is both a sobering and encouraging book as I considered what I have done well and not well and how I perceive the same in my congregation. I will never forget – not to long into my ministry – when I asked the congregation to pray for me and for my striving after holiness during the sermon – and one dear woman, who I know cares for me very much, came up to me after worship and said, “I never thought about praying for you.” There is a misperception of pastors being anywhere from sluggards to social workers to holy men – all of which are wrong. We need to fight for a correct understanding of the ministry, fight, as pastors to be holy and good undershepherds, and to teach our congregation how to care for us and why it is necessary. This book is a great place to start. Interestingly, he says that most people should never know what the pastor’s salary is because that could cause unrealistic expectations (79). I’m not sure what I think of that. My salary and benefits have always been broken down in detail in our budget. Read this book. Think it through. And then consider getting it for the congregation – even if it causes you some embarrassment. [This review appears on my blog, Amazon.com, and Goodreads.com.]

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    The book features a veiled reference to the antinomian heretic Tullian Tchivdijian on page 91. Or does it? In any case, it would fit if he were being described there. On page 38, there is some disturbing words regarding legalism and mind-reading: Ryan and Steph conformed outwardly to Christian beliefs, but showed no sense of deep heart work, no feeling that they really wanted to be wholehearted disciples of Jesus—in a word, no evidence of genuine repentance and lively faith. But, in the second, a The book features a veiled reference to the antinomian heretic Tullian Tchivdijian on page 91. Or does it? In any case, it would fit if he were being described there. On page 38, there is some disturbing words regarding legalism and mind-reading: Ryan and Steph conformed outwardly to Christian beliefs, but showed no sense of deep heart work, no feeling that they really wanted to be wholehearted disciples of Jesus—in a word, no evidence of genuine repentance and lively faith. But, in the second, although the problems were crushing—and I did feel the pain Of them—in Nicole's heart there was a joy in the Lord Jesus, a quiet determination to walk with him through whatever life had in store, and a gritty and very real trust. The author showcases a confidence that he can read the thoughts of others through their actions. This can lead to an authoritarian outlook that dismisses alternate possible explanations. It is sad when caring for the pastor "enough to challenge him" is met with flippant derision from the pastor and when the search for truth is dismissed as trolling rather than iron sharpening iron.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rohan

    As my dad's a pastor, didn't really think I needed to read it, but wanted a glimpse from the "outside". In the end it gave me very helpful reminders too. The chapter headings give a good summary of the things I should be doing as a lay member: - Daily repentance and faith (Be a growing Christian) - Belonging to the church (Be a committed member of the church body/family) - Open Honesty (If you have problems with the pastor, or with your own sin) - Thoughtful watchfulness (Support the pastor to grow As my dad's a pastor, didn't really think I needed to read it, but wanted a glimpse from the "outside". In the end it gave me very helpful reminders too. The chapter headings give a good summary of the things I should be doing as a lay member: - Daily repentance and faith (Be a growing Christian) - Belonging to the church (Be a committed member of the church body/family) - Open Honesty (If you have problems with the pastor, or with your own sin) - Thoughtful watchfulness (Support the pastor to grow in their own faith) - Loving Kindness (Do small acts of kindness to show your love) - High Expectations (Expect high standard of holiness, as this shows you care) - Zealous Submission (The pastor is the leader, so let them lead) I especially valued the prayers at the end of each chapter, asking God to help me put these things into practice.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tori Samar

    Although this book's title and cover are nothing to write home about, the message within its pages is a needful one. The books about how a pastor relates to his congregation far outweigh the books about how a congregation relates to their pastor (I've never even read one addressing the latter before). Both sides of the coin matter for the health of the church. Using Hebrews 13:17 as the springboard, Ash explains seven virtues church members should cultivate so that their pastor's work is a joy r Although this book's title and cover are nothing to write home about, the message within its pages is a needful one. The books about how a pastor relates to his congregation far outweigh the books about how a congregation relates to their pastor (I've never even read one addressing the latter before). Both sides of the coin matter for the health of the church. Using Hebrews 13:17 as the springboard, Ash explains seven virtues church members should cultivate so that their pastor's work is a joy rather than a burden. The seven virtues are: daily repentance and eager faith, committed belonging, open honesty, thoughtful watchfulness, loving kindness, high expectations, and zealous submission. I highly recommend that all church members read this book and prayerfully consider how they can better demonstrate these virtues toward their pastors.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Yem

    This short and easy to read book was very helpful in articulating practical attitudes church members should have to encourage and care for their church leaders. I think that any church member who cares about their church leader (or wants to care for them) should read this book. While it covered some basic concepts, the practical outworking were helpful and the reminder that our faith and growth is an encouragement to our leaders. I found this book engaging, particularly the examples at each chapt This short and easy to read book was very helpful in articulating practical attitudes church members should have to encourage and care for their church leaders. I think that any church member who cares about their church leader (or wants to care for them) should read this book. While it covered some basic concepts, the practical outworking were helpful and the reminder that our faith and growth is an encouragement to our leaders. I found this book engaging, particularly the examples at each chapter of how people have both succeeded and failed in each aspect of caring for their pastor. The 7 virtues of church members that impact their leaders: daily repentance and eager faith, committed belonging, open honesty, thoughtful watchfulness, loving kindness, high expectations, zealous submission.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Mccollum

    A useful little book. Many books are written for ministers to help them pastor; not many are written for congregants to help their relationship with their minister. Some of what is said would need to be adapted slightly to a Presbyterian context and some is a little overstated. It might have been improved by emphasising that love to God is the real motivation. Nevertheless, there is lots that is thought-provoking and so the book is worth reading. I feel that my own congregation cares for me well A useful little book. Many books are written for ministers to help them pastor; not many are written for congregants to help their relationship with their minister. Some of what is said would need to be adapted slightly to a Presbyterian context and some is a little overstated. It might have been improved by emphasising that love to God is the real motivation. Nevertheless, there is lots that is thought-provoking and so the book is worth reading. I feel that my own congregation cares for me well - if that were not the case I may have given it a higher rating as I would have considered it more necessary!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Locke

    Ash has written a short and practical book to help you engage in pastoral care. No, not the way you're used to using those terms as recipients of care from the pastor - this is a book about how members can care for their pastors. Ash does a good job "humanizing" the pastor at the beginning of the book by sketching out the potential mindsets of ten pastors on a Monday morning. He reminds people that pastors aren't perfect and they have histories and challenges in their lives, just like everyone e Ash has written a short and practical book to help you engage in pastoral care. No, not the way you're used to using those terms as recipients of care from the pastor - this is a book about how members can care for their pastors. Ash does a good job "humanizing" the pastor at the beginning of the book by sketching out the potential mindsets of ten pastors on a Monday morning. He reminds people that pastors aren't perfect and they have histories and challenges in their lives, just like everyone else. He then gives a series of practices that members can do individually or together to encourage their pastors and make their work a joy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Moore

    Loving a pastor well is not just challenging, it’s something a lot of us don’t often think about. This books attempts to set that straight. I particularly liked that there was a balance of biblical references and reasoning, followed by practical examples and suggestions. Rather than just showing us WHY, the author kindly shows us HOW. He also avoids unnecessary wordiness or weird biblical grammar. This is a properly accessible book. My one criticism is that it’s quite brief. I feel that such an im Loving a pastor well is not just challenging, it’s something a lot of us don’t often think about. This books attempts to set that straight. I particularly liked that there was a balance of biblical references and reasoning, followed by practical examples and suggestions. Rather than just showing us WHY, the author kindly shows us HOW. He also avoids unnecessary wordiness or weird biblical grammar. This is a properly accessible book. My one criticism is that it’s quite brief. I feel that such an important and under-explored topic could have done with a more in depth study.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jds

    A wonderfully subversive little book that lures you into thinking it will hep your pastor, but does so by actually helping you see areas of growth in your own life. Highly recommend. ONE NOTE: this is written in British English and occasionally words lack comparable meaning, this is most clearly the case with the word diary - it refers to a calendar in American English, not a daily book of thoughts more akin to a journal.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gareth Farrow

    I was given this book and for that I am thankful. Having now read it, I believe that anybody who attends a Church regularly should read this book. It's very interesting in the views it gives and thoughts that as a non-leader I found useful. There are many bits from this book that are great but I particularly liked this, “the church is a hospital for sick sinners; it is no place for self-righteous hypocrites” (Ash, p.65). Great book. If your Christian then read it. I was given this book and for that I am thankful. Having now read it, I believe that anybody who attends a Church regularly should read this book. It's very interesting in the views it gives and thoughts that as a non-leader I found useful. There are many bits from this book that are great but I particularly liked this, “the church is a hospital for sick sinners; it is no place for self-righteous hypocrites” (Ash, p.65). Great book. If your Christian then read it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Willis

    'I know of no other book like this,' said Tim Keller of this book. Nor I; it's certainly overdue. Christopher Ash graciously and wisely points to ways in which the 'regular' church member can help make it a pastor's delight, and not a chore, to shepherd him/her. Easy to read (120-odd pages) and plenty to work out how to put into practice - there's a prayer at the end of each chapter to help with the latter. 'I know of no other book like this,' said Tim Keller of this book. Nor I; it's certainly overdue. Christopher Ash graciously and wisely points to ways in which the 'regular' church member can help make it a pastor's delight, and not a chore, to shepherd him/her. Easy to read (120-odd pages) and plenty to work out how to put into practice - there's a prayer at the end of each chapter to help with the latter.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nona

    Pastors are people too having all the same struggles with self, and family that we do, with the added responsibility of the church body. We as God’s people should be a blessing and encouragement to the men that shepherd us. This little book encourages us to pray for our pastors and gives some practical ways in which we may be a blessing and not an undue burden.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Corne Kooyman

    This great little book just reminds us again that pastors are not super human, above it all people. They are normal people, dealing with normal problems needing normal individuals to help them as members of their church and as friends to help them lead the church by supporting, encouraging and sometimes confronting them when the need is required.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    A gem of a book! While it is short, the book packs a lot of thought-provoking content. Content that Ash, a former pastor and now a church member, is uniquely well placed to write. How do we support our pastors? The book lists down 7 areas. Many of them, if not all, speaks to the situation in many churches (including mine). I wish more faithful church members will read this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Micah

    A great quick-read with practical ideas for how to serve your pastor. It made me think more deeply about the struggles my pastor faces in his ministry and how I can encourage him to remain faithful and find joy in the ministry.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Haro

    If you go to a church, if you have a pastor, read this book!!! It's a short and easy read but do full of helpful information for caring for your pastor in a way that is actually helpful. Every church goer should read this. If you go to a church, if you have a pastor, read this book!!! It's a short and easy read but do full of helpful information for caring for your pastor in a way that is actually helpful. Every church goer should read this.

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