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A lively, behind-the-scenes look at the historic cohort of diverse, young, and groundbreaking women newly elected to the House of Representatives in 2018 as they arrive in Washington, D.C., and start working for change, by a New York Times reporter with sharp insight and deep knowledge of the Hill. In November 2018, the largest number of women ever was elected to the 116th A lively, behind-the-scenes look at the historic cohort of diverse, young, and groundbreaking women newly elected to the House of Representatives in 2018 as they arrive in Washington, D.C., and start working for change, by a New York Times reporter with sharp insight and deep knowledge of the Hill. In November 2018, the largest number of women ever was elected to the 116th Congress, resulting in a grand total of 87 in the House and 23 in the Senate. Ushered in on a groundswell of grassroots support, diverse in background, age, professional experience, and ideology, the new freshmen immediately began making history—and noise. These include Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to be elected to the House; Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland, the first Native American women in Congress; Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, the first Muslim women representatives; and Abigail Spanberg, a former CIA agent. The Firsts will tell their stories--their triumphs and obstacles, alliances and controversies--as they arrive in Washington, D.C., ready to carry their historic legacy into institutional change.  Veteran Hill reporter Jennifer Steinhauer will follow these women’s attempts to transcend the partisan rancor and dysfunction of Congress from their positions as upstarts and backbenchers in a Democratic caucus directed by leaders old enough to be their grandparents. Moving on from their trailblazing campaigns to the daily work of governance, these women will confront whether a gender and generational shift in the House can overcome institutional inertia. Will they work with their party’s leadership, or will they work to overthrow it? Will their protests of the power structure fizzle, or will they create a lasting legislative framework for their ideas? How will they get on with their older peers, some of whom may feel resentful or pushed aside? What do their new roles mean for their lives back home, and how do they adjust to the weird, exciting, and often toxically seductive trappings of public office in the age of the twenty-four-hour news cycle?  Above all, will Washington change the changemakers—or will these women, many already social media stars and political punching bags, truly rock the boat?  


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A lively, behind-the-scenes look at the historic cohort of diverse, young, and groundbreaking women newly elected to the House of Representatives in 2018 as they arrive in Washington, D.C., and start working for change, by a New York Times reporter with sharp insight and deep knowledge of the Hill. In November 2018, the largest number of women ever was elected to the 116th A lively, behind-the-scenes look at the historic cohort of diverse, young, and groundbreaking women newly elected to the House of Representatives in 2018 as they arrive in Washington, D.C., and start working for change, by a New York Times reporter with sharp insight and deep knowledge of the Hill. In November 2018, the largest number of women ever was elected to the 116th Congress, resulting in a grand total of 87 in the House and 23 in the Senate. Ushered in on a groundswell of grassroots support, diverse in background, age, professional experience, and ideology, the new freshmen immediately began making history—and noise. These include Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to be elected to the House; Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland, the first Native American women in Congress; Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, the first Muslim women representatives; and Abigail Spanberg, a former CIA agent. The Firsts will tell their stories--their triumphs and obstacles, alliances and controversies--as they arrive in Washington, D.C., ready to carry their historic legacy into institutional change.  Veteran Hill reporter Jennifer Steinhauer will follow these women’s attempts to transcend the partisan rancor and dysfunction of Congress from their positions as upstarts and backbenchers in a Democratic caucus directed by leaders old enough to be their grandparents. Moving on from their trailblazing campaigns to the daily work of governance, these women will confront whether a gender and generational shift in the House can overcome institutional inertia. Will they work with their party’s leadership, or will they work to overthrow it? Will their protests of the power structure fizzle, or will they create a lasting legislative framework for their ideas? How will they get on with their older peers, some of whom may feel resentful or pushed aside? What do their new roles mean for their lives back home, and how do they adjust to the weird, exciting, and often toxically seductive trappings of public office in the age of the twenty-four-hour news cycle?  Above all, will Washington change the changemakers—or will these women, many already social media stars and political punching bags, truly rock the boat?  

30 review for The Firsts: The Women Who Shook Capitol Hill

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex T

    My only complaint is that this book wasn’t 500 pages longer. Pls write a sequel

  2. 4 out of 5

    Corrie Campbell

    "The First" tells the story of the 116th Congress with the huge influx of freshman representatives including many women of different races and backgrounds after the 2018 election that gave the Democrats back the House of Representatives. The author is really ambitious in trying to follow 20 of the incoming freshman ranging from the very liberal, AOC & the Squad, to the moderates, Abigail Spahnberger & Elissa Slotkin. While the book keeps a good pace and was a quick read, I kept on waiting for it "The First" tells the story of the 116th Congress with the huge influx of freshman representatives including many women of different races and backgrounds after the 2018 election that gave the Democrats back the House of Representatives. The author is really ambitious in trying to follow 20 of the incoming freshman ranging from the very liberal, AOC & the Squad, to the moderates, Abigail Spahnberger & Elissa Slotkin. While the book keeps a good pace and was a quick read, I kept on waiting for it to go deeper as most of what Steinhauer goes over is public knowledge to people who follow politics (and living in DC it is hard not to!) I almost wish that she had just chosen to follow 4-5 new congresswoman so that we could have gotten really developed profiles of a few of them instead of trying to include information on 20 of them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nichola Gutgold

    My favorite kind of book, so I relished it. Steinhauer does a great job of bringing to life the life of a new Congresswoman and treating them uniquely. I was delighted to read about my own, newly elected Congresswoman, Susan Wild who movingly spoke on the floor about the need for improved mental healthcare after losing her partner to suicide. I have renewed respect for how each of these women turned their lives upside down by running and how much of them truly cares about us. I think as Steinhau My favorite kind of book, so I relished it. Steinhauer does a great job of bringing to life the life of a new Congresswoman and treating them uniquely. I was delighted to read about my own, newly elected Congresswoman, Susan Wild who movingly spoke on the floor about the need for improved mental healthcare after losing her partner to suicide. I have renewed respect for how each of these women turned their lives upside down by running and how much of them truly cares about us. I think as Steinhauer concludes with that the 116th Congress made Congress matter again. I certainly believe that the women who were elected in 2018 have made an impact. Thank you, women, and thank you, Jennifer Steinhauer, for a fine account of the women and the institution.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Review to come (maybe) I wanted to learn more about these women's first year in Congress, especially since so many came from my home state. I found the book to be easy to read and it offered a very good insight.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hestia Istiviani

    I read in English but this review is written in Bahasa Indonesia "It's not about diversity; it's about the fact that finally we are starting to become more representative. There's a difference," Mae Jemison the first female African American astronout... Suatu hari iseng membuka Kobo Store dan menemukan judul menarik. The Firsts: The Inside Story of the Women Reshaping Congress. Membaca sedikit blurb-nya, wah ternyata isinya tentang bagaimana angakatan kali ini di bawah Donald Trump sebagai Pre I read in English but this review is written in Bahasa Indonesia "It's not about diversity; it's about the fact that finally we are starting to become more representative. There's a difference," Mae Jemison the first female African American astronout... Suatu hari iseng membuka Kobo Store dan menemukan judul menarik. The Firsts: The Inside Story of the Women Reshaping Congress. Membaca sedikit blurb-nya, wah ternyata isinya tentang bagaimana angakatan kali ini di bawah Donald Trump sebagai Presiden AS malah punya banyak wanita dengan keunikan mereka masing-masing (dilihat dari agama, suku, dan ras). Tentu saja, selain pola kepemimpinan Trump, para Congresswomen ini juga mendapat sorotan dari beragam media. Termasuk, Jennifer Steinhauer, si penulis. Bagi mereka yang sudah pernah menonton film dokumenter di Netflix yang berjudul Knock the House Down, pasti awam soal bagaimana mereka yang perempuan--bahkan minoritas seperti keturunan Amerika Selatan, Afrika-Amerika, Muslim--berusaha mendapatkan suara dalam pemilihan umum. Itulah yang diangkat oleh Steinhauer dalam buku ini. The Firsts tidak hanya soal Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (atau lebih populer dengan singkatan "AOC"), melainkan juga Congresswomen seperti Ilhan Omar (Congresswomen Muslimah pertama) dan masih banyak Congresswomen lainnya. Steinhauer dengan lugas menjelaskan bahwa memang sudah waktunya tatanan politik di Amerika Serikat mulai mendengar suara-suara perempuan. Steinhauer membuka bukunya dengan keadaan soal bagaimana wanita yang masuk ke ruang Congress dianggap sebagai istri anggota Congress. Pertanyaan yang dilontarkan seringkali, "Siapa wanita itu? Apakah dia istria dari xxx?" Hal itu membuktikan bahwa keberadaan wanita di dalam Congress masih belum menjadi suatu normalitas. Padahal jelas-jelas, apa yang dikerjakan oleh para anggota Congress memengaruhi hidup perempuan. Itu masih satu hal. Ketika Congresswomen ini sudah menduduki jabatannya, perihal berpakaian pun tidak luput dari bahan omongan anggota Congress yang laki-laki. Komentar seperti "pakaian yang tidak semestinya" hingga "lipstik yang terlalu menyala" sudah harus siap didengar oleh para Congresswomen. Menyiratkan bahwa ada saja yang salah ketika perempuan akhirnya bisa masuk ke ranah yang selama ini selalu didominasi oleh laki-laki. This biggest class of women in history contained all sorts of firsts: the first two Muslim women; the two first Native American women; the first female members of Congress from their state or district, or the first black or Latina from their state or district, or the youngest, or a combination of those. Semakin ke belakang, bahasannya semakin menarik. Aku, sebagai orang Indonesia (meskipun memiliki pola pemerintahan yang berbeda dengan Amerika Serikat) merasa bahwa permasalahannya hampir sama. Representasi itu penting. Termasuk mengikutsertakan perempuan dan teman-teman yang juga perlu didengarkan kebutuhannya. Tidak hanya sekadar "memasang" mereka yang kaya dan kulit putih saja. Kalau begitu ceritanya, apa bedanya dengan sistem terdahulu? Secara garis besar, The Firsts bukanlah bacaan yang ringan. Apalagi jika tidak terbiasa mengikuti berita perpolitikan Amerika Serikat. Bisa-bisa malah bingung. Saranku, coba bekali diri dengan informasi mendasar dengan pemerintahan Trump di Amerika Serikat.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    This was a great book. Like "She Said," the writing style often led it to feel like a really long article, which makes sense because Steinhauer, like Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, is a New York Times reporter. As a reader who has consistently followed the news for the last two years, there were times when the recap was fun, and there were times when it felt like revisiting a six-month-old newspaper. But I think the book is well-written and reported and would be a good choice for those who don't This was a great book. Like "She Said," the writing style often led it to feel like a really long article, which makes sense because Steinhauer, like Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, is a New York Times reporter. As a reader who has consistently followed the news for the last two years, there were times when the recap was fun, and there were times when it felt like revisiting a six-month-old newspaper. But I think the book is well-written and reported and would be a good choice for those who don't follow politics as closely and who want to get to know the women who made history in the 116th Congress. (NOTE: listened to this as an audiobook)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ottilee B.

    I'm not politically-minded, but I still wanted to read this book. I loved reading about the inside running of Congress! I admire ALL of these women for their brains and perseverance and yes, their back stories as well. They gave the men hell by BEING SMARTER than expected (stereotypical mensches) and I'm very glad for it. BRAVA!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sage

    This book was a fascinating read. I love how author Jennifer Steinhauer weaved together the history of women in Congress with interviews and recollections of current and past Congresswomen. Such a great read, and I learned a lot — not only about the solidarity of women in Congress and how they seem to form a support network that is vastly different than that of their male counterparts. But also about women in Congress that I had never even heard of, who paved the way for badass women like Ayanna This book was a fascinating read. I love how author Jennifer Steinhauer weaved together the history of women in Congress with interviews and recollections of current and past Congresswomen. Such a great read, and I learned a lot — not only about the solidarity of women in Congress and how they seem to form a support network that is vastly different than that of their male counterparts. But also about women in Congress that I had never even heard of, who paved the way for badass women like Ayanna Pressley, Deb Haarland, Sharice Davids, Abigail Spanberger, AOC, and many more. This was invigorating and hopeful and exasperating and gripping. The parts about a gym for Congresswomen and a BATHROOM for female Senators, and the casual misogyny everywhere we’re just infuriating (that comment directed at former Congresswoman Pat Schroeder was just....wow...WOW.) Also infuriating: Katie Hill’s hasty departure from Congress when MEN like Ken Calvert (R-CA), Duncan Hunter (R-CA) and many more are still in Congress is just....so sad. She deserved better. We deserve better. Also, these quotes were all ones that I want to remember forever (taken from an ARC, fyi) “For women elected in areas where their politics future depends on republicans, the outlook seems less clear. “There are some people who don’t really seem to understand the math of the majority making,” [Abigail] Spanberger told me after a particularly frustrating week on the Hill. “Some people think that we’re out of touch, and that if we just worked hard, more Democrats would come out of the woodwork and so we should just try to say all the things that excite all of the Democrats. Well, you can say that until you’re blue in the face. There are just not that many Democrats in my district.” P. 156 “Having more women in Congress matters, because we are more skilled at building relationships and nurturing them” Ilhan Omar (D-MN) p 167 “At the end of the day, however, Congress is about power. And with every child who gazes upon the new freshmen in awe, with every elderly woman who had never seen a congresswoman of her race or gender in her town, who grabs a female Congress member by the elbow in excitement, that power is amassing and accruing. The congresswomen may not have craved power in the traditional sense of how we think about electoral politics, but they certainly fought for it and intend to keep it. Sometimes simply being there changes the way people in newly represented groups see themselves, and opens the notion of possibilities.” P 196

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

    This was a great book, as the author combined the experiences of not only current women in Congress, but also the history of women serving there. It was interesting to read how far women have come. This was a great behind the scenes book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter Z.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Transcend the partisan rancor? The "squad" IS the partisan rancor. Side note: we don't need a new "legislative framework". The one we have had for nearly 250 years has been working pretty well, better than any in history. Hard to believe this is the work of a reporter; no wonder the media's reputation is on par with common restroom bacteria.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    If you’re interested in today’s extraordinarily interesting political climate, THE FIRSTS is a great read. 4.5 stars. It’s about a period of historic transition. The swearing-in ceremony of 2019 saw more women than ever before coming to Capitol Hill. Eighty-seven female members of the House and 23 in the Senate. This wasn’t just gender-making history, though. The Class of 2019 had a number of remarkable firsts — youngest woman, first two Muslim women, first two Native American women (one openly If you’re interested in today’s extraordinarily interesting political climate, THE FIRSTS is a great read. 4.5 stars. It’s about a period of historic transition. The swearing-in ceremony of 2019 saw more women than ever before coming to Capitol Hill. Eighty-seven female members of the House and 23 in the Senate. This wasn’t just gender-making history, though. The Class of 2019 had a number of remarkable firsts — youngest woman, first two Muslim women, first two Native American women (one openly homosexual), a black woman from a mostly-white Chicago suburb, and a Hispanic woman from a Republican-majority border area. What was America saying by electing these women? What new mandate did they have? And what would their experiences be in Congress? THE FIRSTS shares the story of the hundred women in the Class of 2019 as experienced by the reporting of author Jennifer Steinhauer. Both as a New York Times reporter and a fascinated bystander, Steinhauer followed these women for their first year to give an in-depth and inclusive view of the heart and hardships they faced in the Halls of Congress and back in their home districts. The result, which she says is, “both a celebration and an engaging appraisal of the major moment in American politics and culture,” isn’t just the story of women in Congress. It’s also a timely discovery of generational shifts. Those “Inside Washington” may — or may not — appreciate the firsts even more for how their arrival has changed business as usual. But Steinhauer gives outside-the-Beltway readers a chance to get to know these “firsts” women and their uniqueness with a personal angle. She details their day-to-day as an entertaining civics lesson and reminds those who have experienced Hill life that many in America find it puzzling, albeit intriguing. While Steinhauer gets remarkably close to these women — almost seeming in love with her subjects (especially the progressives) sometimes — she, quite obviously, is loath to share their negatives… which they do have. One the other hand, some aspects of the book which I particularly enjoyed were the chapter about the two new native representatives, a story lesser told in today’s news media. And while there are many features — and much fascination — with the Democratic party, it’s also intriguing to see what it’s like to be a Republican — particularly a Republican woman — in the House today. Some of the new members come across more controversial than others in Steinhauer’s reportage, but it’s true that this new Class is a curious case study for the future of politics. Even before the 2020 Presidential caucuses and elections, this book details firsthand the battle between moderate and progressive Democrats, much as 2016 saw a similar struggle between moderate and uber-conservative (Tea Party) Republicans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This book follows the 35 women who are part of the 116th Congress’s freshman’s class and also provides historical background about women in Congress generally. Even though I had heard the statistic that women make up less than 25 percent of Congress, I had no idea that it was not until relatively recently that women had full use of the Congressional gym, or that it was so controversial to let women wear sleeveless attire. I also didn’t know very much about the women who had been elected to Congre This book follows the 35 women who are part of the 116th Congress’s freshman’s class and also provides historical background about women in Congress generally. Even though I had heard the statistic that women make up less than 25 percent of Congress, I had no idea that it was not until relatively recently that women had full use of the Congressional gym, or that it was so controversial to let women wear sleeveless attire. I also didn’t know very much about the women who had been elected to Congress or the impact of their presence there. In a divided Congress, they do not have significant legislative accomplishments yet, but they have still had an impact by asking pointed questions in Congressional committee hearings, raising awareness about issues that are important to them, and making Congress more representative. Even though I do not agree with many of these women politically, I appreciated the chance to learn more about their backgrounds (which often include really interesting jobs and hardships growing up), challenges as new members of Congress, and what led them to run for office. I also thought it was interesting that parts of their background that some of the women thought would harm them as candidates - such as the fact that they were victims of domestic violence - ended up really helping their campaigns. I also enjoyed the author’s discussion about the role of “Squad” members such as AOC — particularly her early strategy of putting together a progressive movement to unseat moderate Democrats through primary challenges and her staff’s aggressive use of Twitter and its repercussions. Also interesting was the description of Nancy Pelosi’s battle to retain leadership and to keep some control and cohesion among such a diverse group of Democrats.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Chancellor

    A fascinating look into the lives of the liberal freshman congresswoman of the 116th freshman class. I didn’t know very much about the congresswoman featured in the book prior to reading nor do I necessarily line up with them politically but still an important book to understanding the young female leaders trying to make a difference in this country. Especially fascinating was how the media looks at the new social media famous congresswoman (AOC & squad) vs how the more senior members of Congres A fascinating look into the lives of the liberal freshman congresswoman of the 116th freshman class. I didn’t know very much about the congresswoman featured in the book prior to reading nor do I necessarily line up with them politically but still an important book to understanding the young female leaders trying to make a difference in this country. Especially fascinating was how the media looks at the new social media famous congresswoman (AOC & squad) vs how the more senior members of Congress view them. This book reads a bit like a long newspaper article since I found it skipped around a bit on topics. A few facts learned from the book: -Dresscode for woman in congress required sleeves until recent -Famous congresswoman from the past that blazed the way for females today include Shirley Chisholm and Bella Abzug -Until 2008 female senators were not permitted in the senate pool (reportedly due to male senators preferring to swim naked) -Female senators/congresswoman had a separate gym that was much more run down than the males gym -A lot of early congresswoman gained their positions due to their husbands dying in office rather than being elected in. -Women didn’t even have their own bathroom off of the house floor until 2011 -It wasn’t until 2019 that a breastfeeding space was provided to new mothers in Congress And much more was detailed within this book. The author is clearly very liberal which is obvious in the ways she discusses the liberal congresswoman vs the conservative so if you are extremely conservative you may or may not enjoy this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Talley

    3.5-4/5 The idea of this book was really great, and I liked the information that it contained. While I would still suggest this book, it was disappointing that I felt like Steinhauer included a little too much of her own opinion in that some ways she talked about the Congresswomen seemed judgmental and potentially sexist/misogynistic, and I could have done without that. In the chapter basically comparing and contrasting Congresswoman Tlaib and Congresswoman Omar, I felt like Omar was being vilifi 3.5-4/5 The idea of this book was really great, and I liked the information that it contained. While I would still suggest this book, it was disappointing that I felt like Steinhauer included a little too much of her own opinion in that some ways she talked about the Congresswomen seemed judgmental and potentially sexist/misogynistic, and I could have done without that. In the chapter basically comparing and contrasting Congresswoman Tlaib and Congresswoman Omar, I felt like Omar was being vilified for her views against the state of Israel while Tlaib was praised for her less radical views. However, I will say that I am personally extremely progressive/radical and have a background in Gender & Women's Studies, so my thoughts, feelings, and beliefs likely lean to the left of Steinhauer. Additionally, the book could desperately use another edit because there's a lot of basic grammar, spelling, and general mistakes that could have easily been avoided. Overall, I would still suggest reading this book, or at least most of it, because it does give you a good inside look into "The Firsts" first year in Congress and some background of what brought them there in the first place.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    *** 1/2. A quick read, thanks in large part to its informal tone—almost too informal. I felt Steinhauer's descriptors were judgmental at times ("petty," "skittish," and "prone to tears" are some examples). Despite its lack of formality, the book was more informative than I anticipated. New knowledge I love: there's a group of congresswomen with national security or military background who refer to themselves as "the Badasses." New knowledge I loathe: motions to recommit (last-minute measures tac *** 1/2. A quick read, thanks in large part to its informal tone—almost too informal. I felt Steinhauer's descriptors were judgmental at times ("petty," "skittish," and "prone to tears" are some examples). Despite its lack of formality, the book was more informative than I anticipated. New knowledge I love: there's a group of congresswomen with national security or military background who refer to themselves as "the Badasses." New knowledge I loathe: motions to recommit (last-minute measures tacked on to bills to get members of Congress to vote against a bill they otherwise support). As other reviewers have mentioned, Steinhauer covers too many representatives to give you a clear sense of who they are as individuals; however, she successfully conveys the diversity of the freshman congresswomen, which was the point of the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Derek Lynch

    This was a quick, enjoyable read! Pros: It focused on so many women I admire - Ayanna Pressley, Sharice Davids, Lauren Underwood, Veronica Escobar, Deb Haaland, Katie Porter, AOC, Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar in particular were standouts. I also appreciated some history; the book didn’t just focus on “The Firsts” but interlaced stories about Shirley Chisholm, Nancy Pelosi, & Bella Abzug. Cons: I would’ve liked to see more from some women that weren’t included, but I understand practically why that w This was a quick, enjoyable read! Pros: It focused on so many women I admire - Ayanna Pressley, Sharice Davids, Lauren Underwood, Veronica Escobar, Deb Haaland, Katie Porter, AOC, Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar in particular were standouts. I also appreciated some history; the book didn’t just focus on “The Firsts” but interlaced stories about Shirley Chisholm, Nancy Pelosi, & Bella Abzug. Cons: I would’ve liked to see more from some women that weren’t included, but I understand practically why that wasn’t possible. There was also a lot of focus from the author on these women’s hairstyles & fashion choices? Overall: 4/5 stars. I’d read this again. The 116th Congress has a special place in my heart & so I’m happy I own this book now.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christa Van

    A behind the scene look at some of the "freshmen" women elected to the House in 2018. After seeing some headlines about most, it was good to learn a bit more about their elections, the districts they represent and the change they represent. Two Native American's, Muslim, women of color, women with military and national security backgrounds. Will they bring change? Will they accomplish their goals? What will success look like. I was struck by at least one who commented that they didn't know if th A behind the scene look at some of the "freshmen" women elected to the House in 2018. After seeing some headlines about most, it was good to learn a bit more about their elections, the districts they represent and the change they represent. Two Native American's, Muslim, women of color, women with military and national security backgrounds. Will they bring change? Will they accomplish their goals? What will success look like. I was struck by at least one who commented that they didn't know if they would be there in two years so refused to vote against her beliefs system even if to fit into the wider party narrative. Despite some early controversies, they are mostly marching to the beat of their own drummer, sticking together and revising this staid body of legislators.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Laigle

    I listened to the audio version of this book as I took my daily walks. The narrator's voice was slightly robotic, but still my interest was held tightly for the first half of the book. By the second half my mind began to wander a little. Still, I found this to be a valuable account of how women have struggled to get to where they are in Congress, and the challenges that still face them. I never before considered the inequality facing women in Congress, having always assumed that "hey, you made i I listened to the audio version of this book as I took my daily walks. The narrator's voice was slightly robotic, but still my interest was held tightly for the first half of the book. By the second half my mind began to wander a little. Still, I found this to be a valuable account of how women have struggled to get to where they are in Congress, and the challenges that still face them. I never before considered the inequality facing women in Congress, having always assumed that "hey, you made it to Congress. You did it. You found equality. " This was of course an ignorant assumption. I appreciated the author's ability to approach this issue in a fairly unbiased way. At least until the end. I believe people associated with any political party can get a lot out of this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lana Geselbracht

    An interesting look at women in Congress, especially those elected in 2018. Though still only one fourth of the House, a cultural shift is happening. Laws are being discussed that rarely were in the past including family leave, women’s conditions/equity in the work place, women in leadership, racial equity. Fascinating look at how an almost all male body in the House has had to change in renovations in the building itself including allowing women in the House gyms and adding female restrooms in An interesting look at women in Congress, especially those elected in 2018. Though still only one fourth of the House, a cultural shift is happening. Laws are being discussed that rarely were in the past including family leave, women’s conditions/equity in the work place, women in leadership, racial equity. Fascinating look at how an almost all male body in the House has had to change in renovations in the building itself including allowing women in the House gyms and adding female restrooms in the last 40 years. I look for a more in-depth follow up in the years to come.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan Lenci

    I cannot say enough good things about this book and how interesting it was to take a deeper look at the influence of women in politics. I appreciate how it included both historic female figures and the path they created for future figures as well as what current politicians, such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, are doing today as a result of it. I have many students who would be interested in this book and plan to recommend it to many.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    The largest number of women elected to Congress occurred in November 2018. What a diverse group they were, differing in age, background, ideology and background. They included AOC and The Squad, the Badasses who has backgrounds in national security,the first two native American women, and the first two Muslim women. Their experiences in Congress as well as on the campaign trail are described.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mizloo

    I finally got all those first-time congresswomen sorted out, thanks to author. Brilliant analysis of not only the individuals, but the environment into which they have landed. Enlightening, and a quick, clear read. I like my historical analyses succinct.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I enjoyed reading about the women who were elected to Congress in 2018. From their motivation to run in 2018 through the first year the author gives insight into their lives and thoughts about serving in the House of Representatives. These women give me hope.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Novak

    Fun read highlighting some of the key new voices in Congress. Gave some nice historical context.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Esmeralda

    This was an interesting read about current congresswomen. I recommend it to anyone who is fascinated by government and the people, particularly women, who are part of it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Not earth-shattering, but a good look at some of the new Congressional women (and a few pioneers), mostly Dems, whose stories I'm glad to know. 3 1/2? 4?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wade Snowden

    3.5 stars. Very informative on our latest freshman class of congresswomen with a focus on historical perspective. Would be enjoyable to anyone who counts a member of The Squad as a personal hero.

  28. 5 out of 5

    PWRL

    SM

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Halverson

    Ah! A book about politics that doesn't ce term Donald Trump!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aimee Liu

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