web site hit counter Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law

Availability: Ready to download

By the one-time federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, an important overview of the way our justice system works, and why the rule of law is essential to our society. Using case histories, personal experiences and his own inviting writing and teaching style, Preet Bharara shows the thought process we need to best achieve truth and justice in our daily li By the one-time federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, an important overview of the way our justice system works, and why the rule of law is essential to our society. Using case histories, personal experiences and his own inviting writing and teaching style, Preet Bharara shows the thought process we need to best achieve truth and justice in our daily lives and within our society. Preet Bharara has spent much of his life examining our legal system, pushing to make it better, and prosecuting those looking to subvert it. Bharara believes in our system and knows it must be protected, but to do so, we must also acknowledge and allow for flaws in the system and in human nature.      The book is divided into four sections: Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment and Punishment. He shows why each step of this process is crucial to the legal system, but he also shows how we all need to think about each stage of the process to achieve truth and justice in our daily lives.      Bharara uses anecdotes and case histories from his legal career--the successes as well as the failures--to illustrate the realities of the legal system, and the consequences of taking action (and in some cases, not taking action, which can be just as essential when trying to achieve a just result).      Much of what Bharara discusses is inspiring--it gives us hope that rational and objective fact-based thinking, combined with compassion, can truly lead us on a path toward truth and justice. Some of what he writes about will be controversial and cause much discussion. Ultimately, it is a thought-provoking, entertaining book about the need to find the humanity in our legal system--and in our society.


Compare

By the one-time federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, an important overview of the way our justice system works, and why the rule of law is essential to our society. Using case histories, personal experiences and his own inviting writing and teaching style, Preet Bharara shows the thought process we need to best achieve truth and justice in our daily li By the one-time federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, an important overview of the way our justice system works, and why the rule of law is essential to our society. Using case histories, personal experiences and his own inviting writing and teaching style, Preet Bharara shows the thought process we need to best achieve truth and justice in our daily lives and within our society. Preet Bharara has spent much of his life examining our legal system, pushing to make it better, and prosecuting those looking to subvert it. Bharara believes in our system and knows it must be protected, but to do so, we must also acknowledge and allow for flaws in the system and in human nature.      The book is divided into four sections: Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment and Punishment. He shows why each step of this process is crucial to the legal system, but he also shows how we all need to think about each stage of the process to achieve truth and justice in our daily lives.      Bharara uses anecdotes and case histories from his legal career--the successes as well as the failures--to illustrate the realities of the legal system, and the consequences of taking action (and in some cases, not taking action, which can be just as essential when trying to achieve a just result).      Much of what Bharara discusses is inspiring--it gives us hope that rational and objective fact-based thinking, combined with compassion, can truly lead us on a path toward truth and justice. Some of what he writes about will be controversial and cause much discussion. Ultimately, it is a thought-provoking, entertaining book about the need to find the humanity in our legal system--and in our society.

30 review for Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petra-X Off having adventures

    The first third of the book didn't thrill me.> But the rest of the book was ace! Most interesting was how and why prosecutors make decisions and how they proceed with cases. Nothing is free from corruption or politics. It seems that a great deal of time is spent 'flipping' other criminals, getting them to be snitches, grasses, or as the author calls them, "co-operators". A slightly uncomfortable (to me) expression was talking about when these informants came to "proffer". I don't think of the wo The first third of the book didn't thrill me.> But the rest of the book was ace! Most interesting was how and why prosecutors make decisions and how they proceed with cases. Nothing is free from corruption or politics. It seems that a great deal of time is spent 'flipping' other criminals, getting them to be snitches, grasses, or as the author calls them, "co-operators". A slightly uncomfortable (to me) expression was talking about when these informants came to "proffer". I don't think of the word "proffer" in terms of giving up all their cronies misdeeds and blabbing about anything they think might get them an advantage, I had more associated "proffering" with offering something in a very respectful way. I was talking about this with a lawyer friend of mine over lunch the other day, he knows the author which is why the subject came up. My friend said about snitches, that they rush to be the first to give up as much information and names as they can, because the first one gets the biggest advantage, perhaps charged with a lesser crime, or a shorter sentence. Last man in to dish the dirt on their hitherto mates and partners in crime may not be telling the police anything they don't know already and may not get more than a small advantage, or perhaps none. It's all a bit sleazy isn't it? The author does present some very interesting cases studies and his thoughts on the criminals, their crimes, the procedure and ultimate punishment (or not). I enjoyed reading those a lot. What didn't thrill me, in the first third of the book, were chapters I loathed, like the hagiographic one, a paean of praise for a policeman who had really done his duty to the best of his ability and was a good father too. Isn't that what they are supposed to be, do they need praise for that? Are we so used to the media going on about bad cops and abusive fathers that when one is a decent human being he needs praise? Actually the reason for the chapter was because the author had established an award in Officer McCabe's name but I could not see that he was outstaning in any unexpected way. Then there was the chapter on the murderous Menendez brothers and how the author was best friends with their friend and no one could believe they could do such a thing. Well yeah, friends and wives of serial killers are almost always shocked too. These monsters fool us into thinking they are human just like us by looking, acting and sounding like us. If they looked outwardly like the monsters and killers they are, we'd all turn them in. I was also not at all enamoured of the author's feeding into the Mafia-romance that films and books present all the time. They are a vast criminal organisation that exists only so they can live well, be rich and have all the best material goods that life has to offer by depriving people of what they legitimately own, have worked for and wish to enjoy peacefully. They do this by intimation, burglary and worse and murder. So why are we talking about these criminals by their cheery nicknames? However, the book is otherwise excellent and really well-written, it would just have been better (to me) with those chapters cut out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Anderson

    Made me want to sell everything and go to law school. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Mathews

    Of all the books written recently by people who have been fired by President Donald Trump, the one written by former chief prosecutor for the SDNY Federal Court Preet Bharara is the only one that does not focus on the events leading up to said firing. That isn't to say that the book ignores the Trump presidency or that there are no references to it. More than anything, this is book about what it takes to be a good prosecutor, a good attorney, and also, to a large degree, what it takes to be a go Of all the books written recently by people who have been fired by President Donald Trump, the one written by former chief prosecutor for the SDNY Federal Court Preet Bharara is the only one that does not focus on the events leading up to said firing. That isn't to say that the book ignores the Trump presidency or that there are no references to it. More than anything, this is book about what it takes to be a good prosecutor, a good attorney, and also, to a large degree, what it takes to be a good person. I regularly listen to his Stay Tuned With Preet podcast and have constantly been impressed with his level headed approach to the issues of the day. In a world where it is all but impossible to be unbiased, Preet constantly strives to treat everyone fairly, regardless of what side of the law they may be on. This 'do-the-right-thing' attitude is readily apparent in the book as well, making it a very refreshing read in a world that appears to grow more vituperative by the day. The current president may have fired him but it is my sincere wish that the next president sees in Bharara the ideal candidate for our next attorney general.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) tries cases that originate in New York’s financial centers, but also covers high-profile cases that have national and international resonance. Over two hundred lawyers and equally as many support staff work to administer law enforcement oversight to eight New York counties. Its resources, reach, and independence have earned it the nickname “The Sovereign Court” among members of the legal profession. SDNY attracts capab The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) tries cases that originate in New York’s financial centers, but also covers high-profile cases that have national and international resonance. Over two hundred lawyers and equally as many support staff work to administer law enforcement oversight to eight New York counties. Its resources, reach, and independence have earned it the nickname “The Sovereign Court” among members of the legal profession. SDNY attracts capable and driven prosecutors not distracted by limelight. James Comey was once Chief Prosecutor of the SDNY for two years (2002-03) before he became Deputy Attorney General of the U.S. At the start of Donald Trump’s presidency, Preet Bharara was Chief Prosecutor of SDNY. He had taken on the role in 2009, nominated by then-President Obama, and developed a reputation as hard-charging. Bharara was asked to resign his role by Jeff Sessions who had been appointed by the new President Donald Trump to head the Justice Department. Bharara refused. He was subsequently fired, leaving SDNY in March 2017, months into the Trump presidency. New York was Trump’s stomping ground, and the Southern District was the court most likely to prosecute crimes DJT committed, if any, before his ascension to the presidency. Like anyone leading a group of intensely-committed, capable lawyers holding the powerful to account, Bharara had to develop a set of priorities and criterion which could direct his team to choose from among bad behaviors, determining the prosecutable. Every kind of crime has been tried in SDNY, from crimes of treason, terrorism, mob and gang violence to massive fraud and murder. Bharara reflects that “anybody can be guilty of anything.” Divided into four sections, Bharara’s book examines first how successful prosecutors select their cases and prepare the evidence they will use in court. Certainly one consideration was whether a case was winnable or not but Comey, in his time as Chief Prosecutor for SDNY, argued that wasn’t the most important criterion: “If it’s a good case and the evidence supports it, you must bring it,” he said, even at the expense of possibly losing the case and adversely affecting one’s reputation and the reputation of the court. Jesse Eisinger, now a reporter for ProPublica, reported extensively on high-profile cases in his book about the SDNY published in 2017 called The Chickenshit Club. He did not give the credit to Preet Bharara, who he saw as going after “easy” cases featuring insider trading rather than the rampant fraud and financial misconduct that nearly caused the world’s economy to melt down in 2007-08. Bharara doesn’t address Eisinger’s criticisms directly but suggests getting the job done includes building cases that have the best possibility of success, and showing the public the judiciary is working on their behalf. It is hard to argue that Bharara wasn’t tough on crime. While he may not have secured convictions for the worst abuses of the biggest players responsible for the financial crisis, his offices had 85 straight convictions of insider-trading cases before losing one in 2014. Bharara’s office also presided over a string of successes in prosecuting instances of cyber-crime, organized crime activity, art fraud, and instances of public corruption, among other things. Whether or not one thinks he was tough enough, his book is informative for what it tells us about our own justice system when it is performed in the biggest fishbowl in the land. After first introducing the role of prosecutors and some of his cases, Bharara then moves to being effective in a court of law: looking at the importance of preparing the case as though you were arguing for the defendant, judging the judges, reading the court, and expecting unpredictable outcomes and verdicts. “Justice is not preordained.” How badly you want to win the case is often the most important ingredient in winning a case, pushing a prosecutor’s risk-aversion to the dangerous range. Bharara reads the audio of the book himself, allowing him to tell the stories and place emphases where he wishes. The stories highlight what he was working for: providing a measure of justice to the powerless. Bharara’s job in the judiciary is a very important one in our three-legged system of government and he had a very long, uninterrupted run of it. His predecessors’ tenures could be measured in months. His observations are intrinsically interesting. Bharara mentioned the importance of his family several times in the book, and knowing the all-encompassing nature of his job, one expects he missed many important family moments. He recounts a scene in which he proudly presents a laudatory article about himself and his work to his teenaged daughter to read. He waited impatiently while she carefully read and then slowly reread portions of the piece. Eventually she responded to his “Well?” with “You’re such a drama queen, Daddy.” Which may be the most succinct capture of a personality we are likely to enjoy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I saw an interview with Bharara on PBS. I found it so interesting, I bought the book. Preet Bharara is a former federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York. The television show Perry Mason inspired a generation to go into the field of law. This book could inspire another generation to do the same. The book is well written and easy to read. Bharara discusses the law, moral issues, and does so in a conversational tone with interesting anecdotes. The author covers everything from the cr I saw an interview with Bharara on PBS. I found it so interesting, I bought the book. Preet Bharara is a former federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York. The television show Perry Mason inspired a generation to go into the field of law. This book could inspire another generation to do the same. The book is well written and easy to read. Bharara discusses the law, moral issues, and does so in a conversational tone with interesting anecdotes. The author covers everything from the crime mob to insider trading along with other crimes committed by Wall Street. He also goes into the difficult decisions investigators have to make while conducting an investigation. His key example was the investigation into large scale corruption of New York’s elected officials. It is great to have a book discuss the importance of ethics. This is an excellent book and I highly recommend it. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is ten hours and thirty-three minutes. Preet Bharara does a good job narrating the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Char

    Preet Bharara appeared on my radar by getting fired. He was previously head US Attorney of SDNY and he was fired by Donald Trump. He stayed on my radar due to several of his appearances on liberal news media programs. I liked what he had to say, so I requested a copy of the audiobook from my library and here we are. This book is not about politics, though politics do play a part in our justice system. If you're looking to read this book to hear Mr. Bharara trash Trump, you're looking in the wrong Preet Bharara appeared on my radar by getting fired. He was previously head US Attorney of SDNY and he was fired by Donald Trump. He stayed on my radar due to several of his appearances on liberal news media programs. I liked what he had to say, so I requested a copy of the audiobook from my library and here we are. This book is not about politics, though politics do play a part in our justice system. If you're looking to read this book to hear Mr. Bharara trash Trump, you're looking in the wrong place, (though there are some brief comments.) In this book, he is talking about exactly what is written in the title-namely, justice. Only a fool would believe that justice is delivered fairly in this country, but Preet Bharara makes me think at least someone is trying to make that happen. He makes me believe that the majority of people in law enforcement, those working in prisons, those working in our various prosecution offices around the country want justice to be applied fairly. He enumerates a few cases where justice WAS served, but only decades later, and only by crazy coincidences-(one of the prosecutors had nearly a photographic memory, for instance.) SOAPBOX Basically, this entire book boils down to one principle: Do the right thing. Which makes me wonder how many people working in our justice system adopt that principle as their own? Nevertheless, we need a book like this, written by a person like this, to remind us what our goals and principles as a nation actually ARE. Because these days? It is all too easy to forget the tenets upon which this country was founded. It's too easy to forget that our law enforcement agencies and our media all have a job to do and those jobs are the stanchions of our democracy. We depend upon them for our very existence as a country. These aren't popularity contests, there are no alternative facts. There are only facts and the courage to report them, no matter how the president or his henchman and women, (I'm looking at you, Kellianne and Sarah), interpret them. / SOAPBOX I enjoyed listening to Preet Bharara narrate this himself and I recommend this book! *Thanks to my local library for the free audio download. Libraries RULE!*

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read this because I have enjoyed and admired Preet Bharara's public presence as an anti-Trump voice. He's thoughtful and intelligent and the kind of man who is everything Trump isn't. This book wasn't as political as I had hoped, but it was a great overview of the different parts of the justice system and how important ethics are in each of them--and while he doesn't directly say a whole lot about the president, his views on what the right thing to do is often serve as rebuke to the lack of et I read this because I have enjoyed and admired Preet Bharara's public presence as an anti-Trump voice. He's thoughtful and intelligent and the kind of man who is everything Trump isn't. This book wasn't as political as I had hoped, but it was a great overview of the different parts of the justice system and how important ethics are in each of them--and while he doesn't directly say a whole lot about the president, his views on what the right thing to do is often serve as rebuke to the lack of ethics in the current administration. With lots of engaging stories from Bharara's time as a prosecutor, this feels like a real life behind the scenes look at the "law" part of Law & Order. Recommended for anyone interested in justice and the law.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathi

    I love Preet Bharara. I never miss his podcast each week, "Stay Tuned," and I think he is one of the most credible and measured voices in the American landscape today. I was prepared throughout most of the book to give this a four-star rating at the very least, but the last few pages bumped it up to a resounding five stars. Everyone should read this book. I love Preet Bharara. I never miss his podcast each week, "Stay Tuned," and I think he is one of the most credible and measured voices in the American landscape today. I was prepared throughout most of the book to give this a four-star rating at the very least, but the last few pages bumped it up to a resounding five stars. Everyone should read this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    HR-ML

    This was a wonderful look at justice from a former federal prosecutor's POV. He offered many case examples. He worked for the Senate Judiciary Committee, & vetted candidates for federal judgeships for Senator Schumer. President Trump extended his term as US Attorney and then several mos. later, in a political move, fired him. Mr. Bharara is employed as a NYU Law School professor & a CNN legal analyst. Federal prosecutors of the Southern District in New York (SDNY) initiated civil and criminal case This was a wonderful look at justice from a former federal prosecutor's POV. He offered many case examples. He worked for the Senate Judiciary Committee, & vetted candidates for federal judgeships for Senator Schumer. President Trump extended his term as US Attorney and then several mos. later, in a political move, fired him. Mr. Bharara is employed as a NYU Law School professor & a CNN legal analyst. Federal prosecutors of the Southern District in New York (SDNY) initiated civil and criminal cases. Their criminal cases involved high-profile Mafia, terrorists and gang leaders. The author (hereafter P.B.) praised investigators for SDNY, many of whom were former policemen. He gave kudos to hard-working prosecutors & reminded us not to forget the victims of crime. He explained how prosecutors persuaded littlefish criminals, they called "cooperators" to 'flip on' 'big fish' criminals in exchange for a lighter sentence. P.B. returned to SDNY, this time as THE US Attorney for that district. US Atty General was the highest authority. I liked how P.B. emphasized the importance of ethics. He stated "justice is more important than victory (in court)." He cited examples of wrongly accused (WA) who con- tacted his office & w/ evidence, they (WA) were exonerated! And some compensated for incarceration time. He explained if an alleged terrorist posed a public safety risk, the law permitted fed prosecutors/ FBI/ ATF/ local police to delay the reading of the perp's Miranda rights (You have the right to remain silent.....). The rationale: it gave law enforcement a bit of time to build rapport & gather info from the perp. Mr. Bharara, an Indian-American, born in India, stood accused of bias by some of the public toward: race (fill this in), ethnic group (fill in), political party (fill in). Ironically he had some federal cases against Indian- Americans who accused him of being self-loathing for being Indian and biased concerning Indians! Not the case. Some Americans criticized him for not sending to jail more bankers and Wall Street-types related to the 2008 Recession, when SDNY did not have enough proof of intent to defraud consumers. IMO US Republican Congressman caused this crisis by de-regulation of laws governing banks & Wall Street. P.B. & his pregnant wife were victims of crime after using an ATM, it involved assault and they were threatened w/ a knife. She was examined, no major medical issues, then had the baby about 6 wks later. He missed 1 week of work. Mr. Bharara deserved high marks for his ethics and courage. Revised.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carly Friedman

    Preet Bharara, a former prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, wrote an insightful and interesting book about the legal system and how it relates to many aspects of life. I wanted a bit more legal information but overall the book was informative and very enjoyable. In the first section, I enjoyed his perspectives on the fact-finding part of prosecution. He relates it to the importance of asking ALL the question. This can be hard for over-achievers who are used to knowing all the answer Preet Bharara, a former prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, wrote an insightful and interesting book about the legal system and how it relates to many aspects of life. I wanted a bit more legal information but overall the book was informative and very enjoyable. In the first section, I enjoyed his perspectives on the fact-finding part of prosecution. He relates it to the importance of asking ALL the question. This can be hard for over-achievers who are used to knowing all the answers. He also has an interesting reflection on the ethical dilemmas and legal difficulties faced when using informants. In the second part, I liked his discussion on how prosecutors decide whether to move forward with a case - if there is enough good evidence, etc. He also talked about how it can be difficult when your victim is not "innocent", may not appeal to a jury, or has significantly less power than the accused. There was a fascinating discussion of the line between planning and committing a crime. In the third part, I appreciated his exploration of the role of judges and how verdicts are very stressful times for everyone involved. I liked his discussion of how to argue a case as well. You have to create a story and definitely consider the case from the other side's perspective. The last part on punishment discussed the difficult job of deciding on a sentence. The case of Carolina White really drove that point home. He also had a good exploration of the harsh environment of prisons. I found myself taking notes on his points as I listened to the audiobook because it was so interesting and I wanted to remember the important parts. I might read the physical book at some point! Overall, I definitely recommend this book!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lu Han

    I DON'T read non-fiction but I got this book free from work and it was like just lying around staring at me (I swear it was just glaring at me) so I decided to pick it up, and the next thing I knew I was devouring this book. Bharara has this way of grabbing your attention with these really interesting anecdotes, real life cases and his experiences. I was utterly captivated and horrified at times, but enjoying every minute. I also really enjoyed how human Bharara came off, and didn't have a detac I DON'T read non-fiction but I got this book free from work and it was like just lying around staring at me (I swear it was just glaring at me) so I decided to pick it up, and the next thing I knew I was devouring this book. Bharara has this way of grabbing your attention with these really interesting anecdotes, real life cases and his experiences. I was utterly captivated and horrified at times, but enjoying every minute. I also really enjoyed how human Bharara came off, and didn't have a detached uppity air about him as I feel authors of most memoirs do.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    The clunky title sounds like something out of a Family Guy! episode and the cover art is bland and unimaginative but getting past these shortfalls is easy with Bharara's talent for storytelling. His intelligent, thoughtful and thought provoking style reminded me of Atul Gawande's excellent book Complications. Bharara takes the reader through the major facets of the criminal justice system by way of personal reflection and relevant stories. The material is accessible to all readers regardless of t The clunky title sounds like something out of a Family Guy! episode and the cover art is bland and unimaginative but getting past these shortfalls is easy with Bharara's talent for storytelling. His intelligent, thoughtful and thought provoking style reminded me of Atul Gawande's excellent book Complications. Bharara takes the reader through the major facets of the criminal justice system by way of personal reflection and relevant stories. The material is accessible to all readers regardless of their knowledge of criminal law and most stories illustrate well the quandaries faced by the players in the system. Bharara effectively brings the reader into the eighth floor library of 1 Saint Andrews Plaza for the strategy sessions and into the courtrooms at 500 Pearl Street for the drama that unfolds. No background is necessary for the reader to get pulled into the narrative but if you've experienced any of the kinds of moments described about the SDNY the book becomes that much more special.

  13. 4 out of 5

    ❤Marie Gentilcore

    This was a very informative look at the federal prosecutor’s office as experienced by Preet Bharara. What I enjoyed most about this book was the cases Mr. Bharara used to illustrate his message. He starts off with a case that turns out to be the Melendez brothers, who were personal friends of a friend who was certain they couldn't be guilty. It was all very fascinating. This was a very informative look at the federal prosecutor’s office as experienced by Preet Bharara. What I enjoyed most about this book was the cases Mr. Bharara used to illustrate his message. He starts off with a case that turns out to be the Melendez brothers, who were personal friends of a friend who was certain they couldn't be guilty. It was all very fascinating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andy Miller

    Some reviews compare Preet Bharara's book unfavorably to his much followed tweets, after reading this nuanced book long discussion on "Doing Justice" I think those reviews sadly reflect on today's attention span and not on the book. Bharara divides his book into different chapters, each discussing a different phase of the criminal justice system, each reflecting thoughtful analysis based on experience of a prosecutor who has been there. For example, in his chapter on informants he writes "Coopera Some reviews compare Preet Bharara's book unfavorably to his much followed tweets, after reading this nuanced book long discussion on "Doing Justice" I think those reviews sadly reflect on today's attention span and not on the book. Bharara divides his book into different chapters, each discussing a different phase of the criminal justice system, each reflecting thoughtful analysis based on experience of a prosecutor who has been there. For example, in his chapter on informants he writes "Cooperators can be your ticket but also your greatest baggage. They can lie, make things up, repulse the jury. That's why you must painstakingly corroborate what they say even while you question and challenge all of it. The truthfulness of the testimony must be vetted, every stitch of it corroborated. If the cooperator says it was a rainy day, we pull the weather report...." Bharara's quote summarizes what every good prosecutor does and he gives real life examples of the good and bad of using informants. Bharara's writings repeatedly reflect my experience. In discussing charging and arrest decisions he warns "Beware the trigger happy prosecutor or cop," but later writes you should also "worry about the one is gun shy, the one with the foot on the brake." Bharara shows the importance of a prosecutor carefully using the power to charge a defendant, a later dismissal or acquittal still has wreaked havoc on that life, on the other hand, victims of crime have an interest in timely justice and a good prosecutor does not shy from a just case just because it's difficult. Bharara also includes practical advice for prosecutors; the importance of being to tell a compelling story using anecdotes, analogies and always simple language and the importance of preparation quoting District Attorney Henry Stimson that he learned early to "prepare the other fellow's case at least as well as he prepares it, usually better, so that there are no surprises, no nothing"--but follows with an example of not letting preparation take away from following what happens in a trial, in one trial a prosecutor followed a victim's testimony that the defendant had asked the victim to perform oral sex on him by asking "And what happened after the defendant told you to suck his cock?" because the prosecutor had written out the question based on what the victim had said in pretrial interviews. Bharara does not shy away from controversies and challenges of a prosecutor. Particularly interesting was the reaction when his office prosecuted anyone of Asian ethnicity, that many commentators confused other countries with India and assumed there was a back story when an Indian national or Indian American was prosecuted given Bharara's heritage. Bharara also includes decisions he made that he continues to second guess, the case of a woman who kidnapped a baby who was found out 23 years after the fact with different input from the woman who was kidnapped and the parents who lost the joy of raising that child was especially compelling. Bharara also expresses regrets; pretrial comments on the arrests of defendants, a rush to Judgement on a lawyer in Oregon falsely accused of a terrorism crime in Spain. There is so much more to this great book, this great insight into our Justice system today from an experienced prosecutor who is not afraid of the tough issues

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Sciuto

    Mr Preet Bharar served as U.S. Attorney for the famous Southern District of New York from 2009 to 2017. He is famously remembered, recently, for being unceremoniously fired by President Trump, after the President extended his term. The Southern District is known for its independence, and its notoriety for prosecuting some of the biggest, headline making cases in the United States and aboard. They have handled cases involving terrorism, bank fraud, corrupt politicians, drug kingpins and the mob. A Mr Preet Bharar served as U.S. Attorney for the famous Southern District of New York from 2009 to 2017. He is famously remembered, recently, for being unceremoniously fired by President Trump, after the President extended his term. The Southern District is known for its independence, and its notoriety for prosecuting some of the biggest, headline making cases in the United States and aboard. They have handled cases involving terrorism, bank fraud, corrupt politicians, drug kingpins and the mob. A few prominent members of this group of prosecutors have launched successful political careers... And one even became mayor of a big city and has since lost his mind. The Southern District is a tough, no nonsense, underpaid group of prosecutors and law enforcement officials who abide by the rule of law and are unblinking in their pursuit of JUSTICE. "Doing Justice" is a wonderful and insightful study of the criminal justice system and Mr Bharara takes us through the whole process beginning with the investigation of a crime, and ending with the outcome of cases before a jury and a judge. He relies on fascinating stories which makes the book so much more interesting and his writing is clear and exciting and it is a real page turner. Warning to President Trump: If you think Nancy Pelosi and the democrats are after you, wait for you to leave the office, and have to go up against the Southern District Prosecutors who have been waiting to take you and your nefarious family down for a long time and now have all the evidence they need to get it done. I highly recommend.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    I am not really sure what makes American public figures write as if they are preachers or teachers? Why are they constantly on some kind of morality high horse? Why do they treat their reader as if we are at worst, wayward teens, and at best, poor souls who are in serious need of a life coach. James Comey did this in his otherwise fairly interesting book. Michelle Obama did the same in her memoir. And now we have Preet Bharara. It feels like they all have the same editor or the same writing teache I am not really sure what makes American public figures write as if they are preachers or teachers? Why are they constantly on some kind of morality high horse? Why do they treat their reader as if we are at worst, wayward teens, and at best, poor souls who are in serious need of a life coach. James Comey did this in his otherwise fairly interesting book. Michelle Obama did the same in her memoir. And now we have Preet Bharara. It feels like they all have the same editor or the same writing teacher or the same life coach. Bharara, an impressive, smart, articulate man with a great story. But why, oh why, as soon as I got interested in a case that he is describing, Bharara takes out the morality hammer and start banging on my head as if it were a gavel. He bangs you over the head with it till all you just want is to yell back: "Just tell the story, I am a grown woman with no less worldly experience then you! I am perfectly capable of make up my own mind about the morality of it all! " So disappointed. I was looking forward to this book for months. Gave it a chance, but life is too short. Did not finish. PS I really hope Bharara's political life is not over and we find him leading the Justice Department.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I am a great devotée of Bharara's podcast and pre-ordered this book for pub-day Kindle delivery, but I think he's a better speaker and interviewer than writer. The book contains some sophisticated musings on justice (and especially on restraint and mercy) and some engaging stories about prosecuting crimes. It also has cheesy sports metaphors. And the occasional freestanding clause. What I mean is that there is a disconnect between the sophistication of Preet's ideas and his writing that doesn't ex I am a great devotée of Bharara's podcast and pre-ordered this book for pub-day Kindle delivery, but I think he's a better speaker and interviewer than writer. The book contains some sophisticated musings on justice (and especially on restraint and mercy) and some engaging stories about prosecuting crimes. It also has cheesy sports metaphors. And the occasional freestanding clause. What I mean is that there is a disconnect between the sophistication of Preet's ideas and his writing that doesn't exist for him as an extemporaneous speaker. This book is hard to rate since I am overall a five-star fan of his who already has tickets to his in-person appearance in my city. But I think when you consider this book as an independent reading experience, it's three stars, probably four if you didn't listen to his podcast and read articles about legal issues all the time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Interesting observations and anecdotes about law and justice, largely based on Bharara's legal career. My favorite chapter was about the value of asking questions.... even "dumb" questions are useful. Interesting observations and anecdotes about law and justice, largely based on Bharara's legal career. My favorite chapter was about the value of asking questions.... even "dumb" questions are useful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Justin Tapp

    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law by Preet Bharara This may be my favorite book of 2019 thus far. I thought this book might be a screed against the Trump Administration, but it's not; Trump or his associates only occasionally get mentioned. The author is writing as formerly the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York from 2009-2017, where he managed an office of prosecutors. This jurisdiction handles a lot of cases with large firms listed Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law by Preet Bharara This may be my favorite book of 2019 thus far. I thought this book might be a screed against the Trump Administration, but it's not; Trump or his associates only occasionally get mentioned. The author is writing as formerly the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York from 2009-2017, where he managed an office of prosecutors. This jurisdiction handles a lot of cases with large firms listed on the NYSE, so it brought him into contact with a lot of high-profile people. The author intends to introduce to the reader "first principles" of justice and the rule of law. He uses several examples of real cases and life experiences to highlight the difficulties and nuances of pursuing justice. Bharara is very familiar with psychology, economics, and is an avid reader of management and leadership texts, so he borrows vocabulary and understanding from many fields. He points out the role and inescapable nature of various biases, among prosecutors, judges, and the public. He weaves in a lot of leadership advice as he writes. For those looking for political nuggets, there are a few in there. He's critical of the Bush Administration's and CIA's enhanced interrogation program, noting centuries of evidence that the best interrogators build rapport with those they interrogate, rather than use expedient harsh methods. He second-guesses James Comey for making a statement about Hillary Clinton's judgment and character in his famous announcement that there was a lack of evidence to prosecute her for any crimes-- prosecutors most often just say "We're not pressing charges" and that's it. He does have some criticism for specific judges, but also praises them for other aspects. There is some criticism of Paul Manafort and others. Bharara's favorite quote on leadership is one from Jim Collins about how everyone and everything is prone to decline. He repeated that mantra at the SDNY office, always pushing for learning and innovation. He praises many of his subordinates in the book for their courage, ideas, integrity, and hard work. He also points to those who he admired and personally emulated, unsung heroes of justice. The public may remember Bharara for prosecuting a Turkish-Iranian who was laundering money and violating U.S. sanctions against Iran. Bharara knew little about the case until it went public. Erdogan loudly complained to the media and VP Joe Biden because evidence strongly suggested corruption by Erdoğan and his family members. Bharara became a Twitter sensation as many common Turks praised him. He avoids criticizing President Trump for firing all Obama-era prosecutors, but does note the importance of the justice system being non-partisan. (He does not suggest that Erdoğan ultimately succeeded in getting him fired.) Bharara chafes at the American press' racial overtones when he prosecuted someone from Bangladesh as well as Indian media criticism ("'Self-loathing Indian' falsehoods") that he was somehow an "Uncle Tom." Bharara is clearly a patriot who loves America and justice and good management. I learned a lot from this book and took plenty of notes. Five stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Radhika Roy

    Imagine attending a seminar wherein the Keynote Speaker just refuses to stop speaking. That’s how the book feels in its initial stages, i.e. the first two parts. While I’m in definite awe of Bharara for the passion and integrity that he exercises in his position as a US Attorney, I cannot say that I enjoyed the book too much. I hope he’ll appreciate this criticism in true spirit as he himself is a person who does not shy away from speaking the truth. The book is divided into four parts on the li Imagine attending a seminar wherein the Keynote Speaker just refuses to stop speaking. That’s how the book feels in its initial stages, i.e. the first two parts. While I’m in definite awe of Bharara for the passion and integrity that he exercises in his position as a US Attorney, I cannot say that I enjoyed the book too much. I hope he’ll appreciate this criticism in true spirit as he himself is a person who does not shy away from speaking the truth. The book is divided into four parts on the lines of the stages of a criminal justice system in the US: Inquiry, Investigation, Trial and Punishment. Bharara highlights his learnings, not just limited to law, but also value-based concepts, in each of these sections. He gives real-life based examples alongside each pearl of wisdom that he imparts. To be fair, I believe even Bharara himself realised that his book was dragging and this can be exemplified by how the consequent parts keep getting shorter. So, while the first 400 pages just refused to get over, the last 300 were finished in a jiffy. I do want to commend the last part of the book, “Punishment”. By far, it was the most gripping part of the entire reading experience. Bharara’s insight into the functioning of prisons, most importantly the power dynamics between prison guards and prisoners, is outstanding, specially considering the fact that prosecutors rarely go beyond the conviction stage, as pointed out by him. I also appreciate and admire his commitment to delivering justice in the face of criticism and intense opposition. He was fired by the Trump Administration for his very strident upholding of principles. Yet, he continues to espouse the cause of justice, not just in a mechanical manner, but with utmost empathy and care. One should only dive into this if they want to read a self-help book, sprinkled with some interesting anecdotes on the criminal justice system. 3 stars have been given for Bharara as an individual.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I truly cherish Preet Bharara. His podcast is a delight. My enjoyment of this book may suffer from the happenstance that I just re-read Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy immediately before. That is a deep story of someone holding our nation to its creed against titanic forces. Doing Justice is the story of someone who wielded those titanic forces, as counsel to a senator and as the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Preet Bharara did heroic work. He took on corrupt politici I truly cherish Preet Bharara. His podcast is a delight. My enjoyment of this book may suffer from the happenstance that I just re-read Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy immediately before. That is a deep story of someone holding our nation to its creed against titanic forces. Doing Justice is the story of someone who wielded those titanic forces, as counsel to a senator and as the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Preet Bharara did heroic work. He took on corrupt politicians, corrupting mobsters, insider traders, mass murders, and murderous cops. I do not doubt he did it without fear or favor. Bharara, like me, read Hannah Ardent and Clarence Darrow. He heard the call to do justice. He stepped up so much more than most of us. But I craved the deeper level. Bharara wielded power on behalf of the United States of America, a stone throw from the Wall Street Slave Market. He never grapples with that in any meaningful way. He was the United States Attorney for the famed Sovereign District of New York. Why wasn't he holding us to our creed and howling to try the men in Guantanamo? The old protections that FDR imposed after Black Tuesday were taken apart over the years, but some could have been enforced in the wake of the Great Recession. He never discusses why he did not. I know I'm being unreasonable. I do not live up to Bryan Stevenson's standard. Bharara has come so much closer than I have. He faced down the Lord of War and did not flinch from prosecuting the powerful, the people who abuse public power on behalf of the public, or from presidential displeasure. Still . . . I wanted a deeper dive. Hamlet, not Polonius. What would Clarence Darrow and Hannah Ardent Say? Worth the time, albeit learn from me: don't read it right after Just Mercy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Franke James

    In these confusing times, when jaw-dropping crimes by the powerful receive only a light slap on the wrist, while petty crimes by the powerless receive years and years behind bars, I ache for reassurance that there are prosecutors, who really care about doing justice. Preet Bharara's book convinced me there are, and he is one of them. I enjoyed reading "Doing Justice". Preet Bharara's voice is conversational, down to earth, always smart and often funny. The book is divided into four sections: Inqu In these confusing times, when jaw-dropping crimes by the powerful receive only a light slap on the wrist, while petty crimes by the powerless receive years and years behind bars, I ache for reassurance that there are prosecutors, who really care about doing justice. Preet Bharara's book convinced me there are, and he is one of them. I enjoyed reading "Doing Justice". Preet Bharara's voice is conversational, down to earth, always smart and often funny. The book is divided into four sections: Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment, and Punishment. His case stories of how justice is done, and how it sometimes fails, are riveting. I enjoyed his explanation of motive versus intent: "It surprises people to learn that a criminal’s motive—which is what books and movies and police procedurals sometimes obsess over—is generally not an element of the crime. Intent, as I’ve said before, is relevant to guilt and often hard to prove, but intent and motive are distinct concepts. Intent is that you meant to do the thing—pull the trigger, kill your victim—that it wasn’t an accident or a mistake; motive is why you did it." On hearing the 8 words that convinced a jury to convict, "They did their homework. But they cheated too." -- I nodded my head and laughed. This is good stuff that anyone can relate to. "Doing Justice" is a timely and important book that may help you to look at crime, punishment and the rule of law differently. And whether it restores your faith in the rule of law may turn on Preet Bharara's core belief, “The law doesn’t do justice. People do.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ola

    Former Federal Prosecutor Preet Bharara’s nonfiction book Doing Justice was my favorite read of 2019. A unique mix of opinion essays, memoir, history, and even true crime, Bharara reflects on case histories and his personal experiences to explain our current justice system and his critiques of it. If you have even a passing interest in the legal field or the US government, pick Doing Justice up. Bharara covers a wide range of topics divided into four parts, Inquiry, Accusation, Judgement, and Pun Former Federal Prosecutor Preet Bharara’s nonfiction book Doing Justice was my favorite read of 2019. A unique mix of opinion essays, memoir, history, and even true crime, Bharara reflects on case histories and his personal experiences to explain our current justice system and his critiques of it. If you have even a passing interest in the legal field or the US government, pick Doing Justice up. Bharara covers a wide range of topics divided into four parts, Inquiry, Accusation, Judgement, and Punishment. In brilliant format, each chapter describes a separate crime or case which is then broken down into a case study discussing Bharara’s view on topics that include, for example, interrogation techniques, plea deals for witnesses, and a judge’s role. Bharara also does not get political in the book, only very factual and logical. Doing Justice is incredibly well-written; each chapter is clear, concise, and compelling, which is not an easy task when discussing the potentially dry subject matter. I learned a lot from reading this book, read it only two days, and I know I will be rereading it in the future. Doing Justice is an exceptional examination of justice in the United States and all its flaws from the investigation through punishment. I can’t recommend it enough.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Landon

    I listen to Preet Bharara's podcast every week. We have a lot of differences politically, and I don't agree with him on everything, but he is intelligent, respectful, and articulate. He's principled, moral, and very well thought out. His book was great- a very thoughtful and interesting reflection on his time as a federal prosecutor. I listen to Preet Bharara's podcast every week. We have a lot of differences politically, and I don't agree with him on everything, but he is intelligent, respectful, and articulate. He's principled, moral, and very well thought out. His book was great- a very thoughtful and interesting reflection on his time as a federal prosecutor.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Preet Bharara introduces the legal system and walks the reader thru the Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment and Punishment. He brings up the challenges for honest investigators, attorneys, judges, and defenders at each stage. Why I started this book: I knew of Bharara not from his work, but from Donald Trump's pettiness and from Samantha Bee's blanket fort interview. It was enough to get me to pick up this book and I'm glad that I did. Why I finished it: Bahara spends time discussing the particulars bu Preet Bharara introduces the legal system and walks the reader thru the Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment and Punishment. He brings up the challenges for honest investigators, attorneys, judges, and defenders at each stage. Why I started this book: I knew of Bharara not from his work, but from Donald Trump's pettiness and from Samantha Bee's blanket fort interview. It was enough to get me to pick up this book and I'm glad that I did. Why I finished it: Bahara spends time discussing the particulars but it always swings back to the larger picture of what is justice and how can it be obtained, defended and why we need it in a post-truth world. Read with: The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump to understand how the FBI investigates and how the government prosecutes a case.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Harold Zeckel

    I felt like crying when I finished the book. Some people's love for humanity is incredible. I had just read about hunting Eichmann and was thinking about his rationale of just following orders when he sent all those Jews to Auschwitz. There's always at least two sides to every story and it is difficult to try to look at the side with which you disagree. Mr. Bharara's book is an education. The law is a field about which I know very little, but I feel this book taught me a great deal about it, all I felt like crying when I finished the book. Some people's love for humanity is incredible. I had just read about hunting Eichmann and was thinking about his rationale of just following orders when he sent all those Jews to Auschwitz. There's always at least two sides to every story and it is difficult to try to look at the side with which you disagree. Mr. Bharara's book is an education. The law is a field about which I know very little, but I feel this book taught me a great deal about it, all the way through interrogation, accusation, trial, verdict, and sentencing. The cases mentioned were captivating and thought provoking. I hope to be able to incorporate the wisdom I have learned.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Keller

    It pains me to only give this 3 stars. I love Preet. LOVE him. He's the most badass crusader for justice that ever lived. I would vote for him for president in a heartbeat. Heck, I'd probably marry him if he asked. But, I have to admit, the subject matter of this book just didn't hold my attention. Sure, there were some interesting little tidbits from real cases. Particularly Skelos and Silver. But for the most part, it was less than compelling. Any other author would have gotten 2 stars. The ex It pains me to only give this 3 stars. I love Preet. LOVE him. He's the most badass crusader for justice that ever lived. I would vote for him for president in a heartbeat. Heck, I'd probably marry him if he asked. But, I have to admit, the subject matter of this book just didn't hold my attention. Sure, there were some interesting little tidbits from real cases. Particularly Skelos and Silver. But for the most part, it was less than compelling. Any other author would have gotten 2 stars. The extra star is just for being Preet.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    It started off slowly but was a very interesting non-political book about the practice of law. I wish I'd read it in law school (though it didn't exist then). My only complaint was that I wish I could unread the chapter about cannibals though I suppose there is some value in grappling with the particular problems sociopaths when applying the law. “Certain norms do matter. Our adversaries are not our enemies; the law is not a political weapon; objective truths do exist; fair process is essential i It started off slowly but was a very interesting non-political book about the practice of law. I wish I'd read it in law school (though it didn't exist then). My only complaint was that I wish I could unread the chapter about cannibals though I suppose there is some value in grappling with the particular problems sociopaths when applying the law. “Certain norms do matter. Our adversaries are not our enemies; the law is not a political weapon; objective truths do exist; fair process is essential in civilized society.”― Preet Bharara

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I loved this book! I couldn’t put it down. I thought it was a unique take on explaining the justice system without feeling overwhelmed by legal mumbo-jumbo. This book kept me engaged. I hope he writes more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Kurtek

    Damn - what a good book. Highly recommend this one. Really enjoyed reading it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.