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Do Less: The Unexpected Strategy for Women to Get More of What They Want in Work and Life

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A practical and spiritual guide for working moms to learn how to have more by doing less. This is a book for working women and mothers who are ready to release the culturally inherited belief that their worth is equal to their productivity, and instead create a personal and professional life that's based on presence, meaning, and joy. As opposed to focusing on "fitting it a A practical and spiritual guide for working moms to learn how to have more by doing less. This is a book for working women and mothers who are ready to release the culturally inherited belief that their worth is equal to their productivity, and instead create a personal and professional life that's based on presence, meaning, and joy. As opposed to focusing on "fitting it all in," time management, and leaning in, as so many books geared at ambitious women do, this book embraces the notion that through doing less women can have--and be--more. The addiction to busyness and the obsession with always trying to do more leads women, especially working mothers, to feel like they're always failing their families, their careers, their spouses, and themselves. This book will give women the permission and tools to change the way they approach their lives and allow them to embrace living in tune with the cyclical nature of the feminine, cutting out the extraneous busyness from their lives so they have more satisfaction and joy, and letting themselves be more often instead of doing all the time. Do Less offers the reader a series of 14 experiments to try to see what would happen if she did less in one specific way. So, rather than approaching doing less as an entire life overhaul (which is overwhelming in and of itself), this book gives the reader bite-sized steps to try incorporating over 2 weeks!


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A practical and spiritual guide for working moms to learn how to have more by doing less. This is a book for working women and mothers who are ready to release the culturally inherited belief that their worth is equal to their productivity, and instead create a personal and professional life that's based on presence, meaning, and joy. As opposed to focusing on "fitting it a A practical and spiritual guide for working moms to learn how to have more by doing less. This is a book for working women and mothers who are ready to release the culturally inherited belief that their worth is equal to their productivity, and instead create a personal and professional life that's based on presence, meaning, and joy. As opposed to focusing on "fitting it all in," time management, and leaning in, as so many books geared at ambitious women do, this book embraces the notion that through doing less women can have--and be--more. The addiction to busyness and the obsession with always trying to do more leads women, especially working mothers, to feel like they're always failing their families, their careers, their spouses, and themselves. This book will give women the permission and tools to change the way they approach their lives and allow them to embrace living in tune with the cyclical nature of the feminine, cutting out the extraneous busyness from their lives so they have more satisfaction and joy, and letting themselves be more often instead of doing all the time. Do Less offers the reader a series of 14 experiments to try to see what would happen if she did less in one specific way. So, rather than approaching doing less as an entire life overhaul (which is overwhelming in and of itself), this book gives the reader bite-sized steps to try incorporating over 2 weeks!

30 review for Do Less: The Unexpected Strategy for Women to Get More of What They Want in Work and Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I was so disappointed in this book. I am a busy, working mom and I liked the concept of the 14 experiments in doing less- I was hoping for some practical advice on how to simplify and streamline routines and habits to ease stress. There was a little bit of that in some of the experiments- making a weekly instead of daily to do list, for example, is something I will definitely try. But first you have to get through chapters and chapters of nonsense about feminine energy, lunar cycles, menstrual c I was so disappointed in this book. I am a busy, working mom and I liked the concept of the 14 experiments in doing less- I was hoping for some practical advice on how to simplify and streamline routines and habits to ease stress. There was a little bit of that in some of the experiments- making a weekly instead of daily to do list, for example, is something I will definitely try. But first you have to get through chapters and chapters of nonsense about feminine energy, lunar cycles, menstrual cycles, etc. It would almost be worth it to tell my job, after being assigned a task, that I can’t do it this week because I am in a more reflective, introspective phase of my menstrual cycle right now, just to see what the reaction would be. Kate Northrup introduces the book by stating she wants it to be a book for “everyone”- yet goes on to give the most classist, privileged guidance possible. Unless you are a well- off entrepreneur with a solid support system and a great deal of control over your daily schedule (in which case why are you so stressed?) I’d recommending “doing less” by skipping this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Boldon

    Rounding up to two stars because I was curious enough to finish it. This book is a dumbed-down, mystical-female version of Tim Ferriss, with often painful writing. Examples: "If you find yourself wearing your cranky pants six out of seven days of the week, something's gotta give, lady." Sentences that made me wonder if I should stop reading were: "But the craving for chips wasn't coming from a place of emotional emptiness or stress where I was trying to cover something I didn't want to feel with Rounding up to two stars because I was curious enough to finish it. This book is a dumbed-down, mystical-female version of Tim Ferriss, with often painful writing. Examples: "If you find yourself wearing your cranky pants six out of seven days of the week, something's gotta give, lady." Sentences that made me wonder if I should stop reading were: "But the craving for chips wasn't coming from a place of emotional emptiness or stress where I was trying to cover something I didn't want to feel with salt and fat. Nope, it felt really different. The feeling I had about wanting potato chips felt very visceral, like totally primal. It was a very clean feeling, unsullied by my emotional needs." Did this book not have an editor who could have done a search and delete for words like very, really, super, etc? Yet among the dross of low-quality, dashed-off-blog-level prose, there was some good stuff. I connected with this: "Until I became a mother, I'd been able to overcome nearly every adversity I faced by working harder, using my intelligence, using my physical strength, or changing my perspective. But motherhood brought me to my knees with how little of it I was able to control. I'd never felt so out of control before, and, as a result, I was anxious and depressed for a good part of the first year." Similarly, I liked her advice for viewing a day as a circular cycle, not as a linear time line that ends. But is it, as she says, "Game. Changer."? No. She has 14 experiments in useful areas as sleep and asking for help, but the chapters are heavy on anecdotal stories from her online community that she plugs in and after the book, and low on actual detailed experiments. Northrup encourages women to track their cycles and sync their lives with their cycles. Great. But what about the women who don't cycle or whose cycles are irregular, including those who are pregnant, nursing, peri and post-menopausal, transgender, on medication, and more. She says to follow the lunar cycle, but I think a lot of page time is given to this reductive, exclusionary biological advice. I also didn't like her frequent uses of "lady" and "gentlemen." These are classist, sexist, and archaic. As with many "mom" books, if this book ditched its narrow target audience, it could appeal to more than parents, and to more than women. A sharper thematic focus and a good editor could have transformed this book from a meandering collection of ideas for moms to a time and energy management guide for many.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danni

    Sadly, this book just didn't really do it for me. I managed to eek out a couple points that will be useful in my life. Much of it just was too generic, too fluffy, and just wrong for me at this time. The idea of this book is to take tiny experiments in your life revolving around doing less. Sounds like a great concept! The author spends a lot of time sharing experiences from her own life, marriage, and kids. Personal experience can be a profound place to begin a story. I just couldn't connect to Sadly, this book just didn't really do it for me. I managed to eek out a couple points that will be useful in my life. Much of it just was too generic, too fluffy, and just wrong for me at this time. The idea of this book is to take tiny experiments in your life revolving around doing less. Sounds like a great concept! The author spends a lot of time sharing experiences from her own life, marriage, and kids. Personal experience can be a profound place to begin a story. I just couldn't connect to the author in any meaningful way. I found the focus on "femininity" to be over the top. I think my dislike is just a matter of me being the wrong person for this book. It's probably stellar for the right reader; I'm just not confident if I can pinpoint who that is. PS There is a section of this book that hits on a HUGE pet peeve of mine. The author encourages us to become Time Benders and uses physics concepts lightly to illustrate this point. The problem is the author's understanding of physics is clearly limited (which at least she had the decency to admit) and makes the metaphor painful. Again, New Age Authors, please stop trying to talk about physics if you don't understand the math!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christine Fitzgerald

    “The world doesn’t need you busy. The world needs you here. And it’s enough. Do less. Let it be enough. And, as a result, enjoy the miraculous experience of being more of who you are.” Great book, perfect read for all mothers and those who tend to do instead of be.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Perfect for the perfectionist/ recovering-perfectionist mother. As a working mom, I always feel like I’m not doing enough. Not being involved enough with my daughter’s daily enrichment. Not putting in enough hours to be seen as dedicated to my professional growth. Not giving enough of me to by husband and our relationship... This book brings busyness into perspective as not actually the difference maker, reminds us women to work with our natural feminine energy cycles, and gives tangible steps t Perfect for the perfectionist/ recovering-perfectionist mother. As a working mom, I always feel like I’m not doing enough. Not being involved enough with my daughter’s daily enrichment. Not putting in enough hours to be seen as dedicated to my professional growth. Not giving enough of me to by husband and our relationship... This book brings busyness into perspective as not actually the difference maker, reminds us women to work with our natural feminine energy cycles, and gives tangible steps to bring you into the present moment rather than 10 steps ahead. I highly recommend this book to those that feel the pull of so much to do and not enough energy/time to do it all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah K.

    Dear publishers, can we please stop with the "busy mom" books that are really only for wealthy cis white women? I'm going to admit that this was a DNF for me. I stopped reading when one of the suggestions for simplifying was to get rid of your second residence. (Ok, but I'm keeping my super yacht.) Northup talks a lot about your menstrual phases, and how they connect to the moon, and affect your energy. Although it is a little woo-woo, I did find this part interesting. But the tips for how to app Dear publishers, can we please stop with the "busy mom" books that are really only for wealthy cis white women? I'm going to admit that this was a DNF for me. I stopped reading when one of the suggestions for simplifying was to get rid of your second residence. (Ok, but I'm keeping my super yacht.) Northup talks a lot about your menstrual phases, and how they connect to the moon, and affect your energy. Although it is a little woo-woo, I did find this part interesting. But the tips for how to apply it are for someone who has money or control of her time, preferably both. Say I simplify by hiring a housekeeper. What do I do when she is in her new moon phase, which should be dedicated to rest and reflection, and cannot clean your house? Better hope it syncs up with your waxing crescent/"putting in the work" phase!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eve Dangerfield

    Very interesting, I'm still in the process of adapting some of the strategies for day to day life but I really liked this hyper female-focused take on productivity and planning. Very interesting, I'm still in the process of adapting some of the strategies for day to day life but I really liked this hyper female-focused take on productivity and planning.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I don’t even know how I had time to read this book but the authors interview with Marie Forleo had me buy it right away. (Her interview is better than the book) it was interestingly not new information entirely but confirmation on what I already knew was true - women need permission to do everything it seems. White space, unplanning, get rid of tasks that don’t need to be done by you, the moon cycles, your energy cycles, family requests. Her examples all being based around just birthing two kids I don’t even know how I had time to read this book but the authors interview with Marie Forleo had me buy it right away. (Her interview is better than the book) it was interestingly not new information entirely but confirmation on what I already knew was true - women need permission to do everything it seems. White space, unplanning, get rid of tasks that don’t need to be done by you, the moon cycles, your energy cycles, family requests. Her examples all being based around just birthing two kids and her birth experiences were not for me though. I find that topic tiresome a few months after having kids let alone 12 years later. She doesn’t even know what busy is yet in my opinion.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna B

    Not sure why this is in the Parenting section of my local library... The advice Kate gives applies equally to single women, couples, and families. Her thoughts on a cyclical day completely changed my perspective on planning projects and to-do lists. I started following her worksheets for a month and was absolutely shocked at the insight and results from paying more attention to my body. Highly recommend.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anya

    In the pursuit of productivity I am always on the lookout for new, better approaches. While I loved the narrative, research, and methodology presented in this book, I wouldn't call Kate's methods revolutionary. But I am definitely looking forward to implementing some things! In the pursuit of productivity I am always on the lookout for new, better approaches. While I loved the narrative, research, and methodology presented in this book, I wouldn't call Kate's methods revolutionary. But I am definitely looking forward to implementing some things!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Constanza Camacho

    How do we spend our days, how can we identify what is and what is not a good use of our time, and why we shouldn’t be the jack of all trades, master of none, are topics you can read about in this book. Kate Northrup’s do less philosophy is the complete opposite of our current do a lot culture. Here are some key takeaways: 1.- Don’t be a burnout version of yourself. Stress shrinks the brain. 2.- Do less. It frees up time to do more of what matters to you most. 3.- Work on things you love to do, and/ How do we spend our days, how can we identify what is and what is not a good use of our time, and why we shouldn’t be the jack of all trades, master of none, are topics you can read about in this book. Kate Northrup’s do less philosophy is the complete opposite of our current do a lot culture. Here are some key takeaways: 1.- Don’t be a burnout version of yourself. Stress shrinks the brain. 2.- Do less. It frees up time to do more of what matters to you most. 3.- Work on things you love to do, and/or are exceptionally good at. The things that light you up are the things that will lead you to make the most impact in the world. 3.- Rewire your brain about the meaning of achievement. We are raised in a culture that praises achievement over all other human qualities. The following quote is not from the book. To me, it says much of what the world needs right now, yet our priorities are elsewhere. “The plain fact is that the planet does not need more successful people. But it does desperately need more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers, and lovers of every kind. It needs people who live well in their places. It needs people of moral courage willing to join the fight to make the world habitable and humane. And these qualities have little to do with success as we have defined it.” — David W. Orr, Ecological Literacy. 4.- 80% of results come from about 20% of your actions. 5.- It is ok to take a break. Periods of complete inactivity or non-productivity are required to recharge. 6.- Happiness and satisfaction come from going through the process of learning and/or doing something new, something you love, and not from the end result. So enjoy and congratulate yourself on every part of the journey. Kate also recommends a couple of good books on soulful guidance to find meaning and fulfillment in life. I have already read “The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho” and find this other book in my to-do reading musts: “The top five regrets of the dying by Bronnie Ware.” Not to spoil what this book is all about but to prove Kate’s point of doing less and let it be enough mantra, people don’t regret being more successful or having achieved more in life. They regret not living a life that was more true to themselves rather than the life others expected of them.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I bought this book after seeing Kate interviewed on Marie Forleo's MarieTV, and completely connected with every aspect of what she was talking about in terms of the content in her book and the idea that we can create a life where we aren't "doing" to exhaustion, and that our businesses and lives can be MORE successful (even from a financial aspect) by doing less. There were many different facets presented in the interview and each one was a "YES!" moment for me. So I bought the book. The book wa I bought this book after seeing Kate interviewed on Marie Forleo's MarieTV, and completely connected with every aspect of what she was talking about in terms of the content in her book and the idea that we can create a life where we aren't "doing" to exhaustion, and that our businesses and lives can be MORE successful (even from a financial aspect) by doing less. There were many different facets presented in the interview and each one was a "YES!" moment for me. So I bought the book. The book was good and did cover all of the things in the interview, but somehow it didn't totally hit home for me the same way the interview did. There was a lot about following the cycles of the moon and our (female) menstrual cycles, and seasons in terms of when we produce, create, sell, rest, etc... which while there may be some truth to that, many of us don't have the luxury of creating a schedule that can match when the moon is full..etc.. She did suggest just a 10 or 20% shift to those cycles which I can appreciate, but I feel like the book could have been more powerful with a little less of that and a lot more the content she discussed more in her interview. However, if you're feeling overwhelmed, like you work to the death at home and at work and that you can't enjoy your life or you don't know how to begin to even work less without losing income or personal value...then this book is a great starting point for you to begin to untangle that false mental belief and start to try new practices that will definitely work and make space for you to BE more and DO less!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charul Palmer-Patel

    There are some interesting ideas in this book, but mostly her suggestions come from a place of privilege. She has very little awareness of people who don’t have the financial freedom to do her “do less” suggestions. I suppose if you’re a medical doctor, with medical parents, then you can implement her suggestions easily. ...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacquelin

    Interesting approach to time management. I'm using the parts that resonated with me and incorporating them with other tools. Keeping the solid theme of 'doing less to do more' in mind. for example - is my 'to-do' list for the day manageable or am I setting myself up for failure? I think Kate is wonderful and I greatly enjoy her books & blog & social media posts. Interesting approach to time management. I'm using the parts that resonated with me and incorporating them with other tools. Keeping the solid theme of 'doing less to do more' in mind. for example - is my 'to-do' list for the day manageable or am I setting myself up for failure? I think Kate is wonderful and I greatly enjoy her books & blog & social media posts.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    So bad. I tried longer than I wanted to keep reading but couldn't get through it. Nothing concrete, rambling about the cosmos and things with little to no evidence to support. So bad. I tried longer than I wanted to keep reading but couldn't get through it. Nothing concrete, rambling about the cosmos and things with little to no evidence to support.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    An interesting take on how tracking your cycle can allow you to understand yourself better and use your time more effectively. Definitely worth a read, take what you need, leave what you don't. An interesting take on how tracking your cycle can allow you to understand yourself better and use your time more effectively. Definitely worth a read, take what you need, leave what you don't.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Latasha

    When I put this book on hold, I didn’t realize it was for busy moms. I thought it was for busy women. Despite the focus on women with children, there were some helpful things in here. The focus on tracking your entire cycle was helpful. However, the chapters were so story-based (focused on her) that I found myself skimming the start of each chapter so I didn’t have to hear more. She’s a white, wealthy woman with a splash of woo on her side... and that’s not always the most appealing to me. Howev When I put this book on hold, I didn’t realize it was for busy moms. I thought it was for busy women. Despite the focus on women with children, there were some helpful things in here. The focus on tracking your entire cycle was helpful. However, the chapters were so story-based (focused on her) that I found myself skimming the start of each chapter so I didn’t have to hear more. She’s a white, wealthy woman with a splash of woo on her side... and that’s not always the most appealing to me. However, I do think this is a good book if you’re feeling overwhelmed as a female business owner or corporate ladder climber with kids.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Alexander

    She argues that our lives are cyclical, rather than linear. Because of this, we should embrace rest/self-care. It was interesting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Page

    Not really my type of book, so that is probably why the lower rating. Did have some gems in it I will hopefully carry forward. I couldn't get into some of the cycle stuff. May be valid, but I can't buy in. Plus, seems like you would have more ability to schedule you work w your energy as an entrepreneur versus working a corporate job. Maybe that is just an excuse, but couldn't buy into it. Not really my type of book, so that is probably why the lower rating. Did have some gems in it I will hopefully carry forward. I couldn't get into some of the cycle stuff. May be valid, but I can't buy in. Plus, seems like you would have more ability to schedule you work w your energy as an entrepreneur versus working a corporate job. Maybe that is just an excuse, but couldn't buy into it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Loved this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren B

    I loved the information and philosophy, but the writing style wasn’t my jam. It kind of felt like reading a 235 page Instagram caption. Will definitely use the philosophy though!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Baltensperger

    I really enjoyed most of this book. The pieces around “women’s cycles” and “cosmos” I couldn’t connect with, and skimmed through those pieces. But, there were quite a few tangible recommendations that really made me think and I will try to implement.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    A little conflicted on this one. I really wanted to like it and I plan to really do some of the reflection she suggests but I don't consider it "Revolutionary" as expressed on the cover. Overall, take a look at some of the other positive reviews to see if their examples/excerpts interest you before reading but I'm definitely glad I didn't spend hours and hours on this one. Pros: - I think the idea of planning projects/activities around our feminine cycle is interesting but only works for those h A little conflicted on this one. I really wanted to like it and I plan to really do some of the reflection she suggests but I don't consider it "Revolutionary" as expressed on the cover. Overall, take a look at some of the other positive reviews to see if their examples/excerpts interest you before reading but I'm definitely glad I didn't spend hours and hours on this one. Pros: - I think the idea of planning projects/activities around our feminine cycle is interesting but only works for those healthy enough to have a "normal" cycle. Hell, I'll try it. - Some of her stories of being a recovering perfectionist mom are entertaining and relatable Cons: - While marketed as "spiritual", it just seemed a bit "woo-woo" which I don't consider spiritual. Example, she recommends a portion of your To Do List that if for the Universe to take care of it. So put it on your Universe list and you can "manifest" it to get done...I wish. She does say you may have to take small steps towards that to do...Still, no. - As a few mentioned in other reviews, some of the advice does seem very targeted at people with tons of financial and familial support. In the "Simplify" chapter, it's suggested to look at culprits of complexity like "multiple residences" and "extra cars". But not much practical advice exists in that chapter other than paying for services to help with cleaning, laundry and cooking (um, how?) or asking for help from family/friends, etc or bartering services. EDIT: Ok, it's been a week and I tried to plan my month based on the "cycle" energy levels suggested and I can't make it work for my job. I can't brainstorm certain weeks and do work the other weeks. She's right, our lives aren't built around a woman's cycle but I'm not sure I'd want to be fixed into that either. Maybe I can postpone certain home projects based on her recommendations but that's about it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess Howard

    I loved this book! Kate gave me guidance on tracking my menstrual cycle and connecting it with the lunar cycle to see when I had energy and when I didn't and how to respect my body during the latter times. I have now taken that into my every day life and have seen great differences in myself and the relationship with others around me. I loved this book! Kate gave me guidance on tracking my menstrual cycle and connecting it with the lunar cycle to see when I had energy and when I didn't and how to respect my body during the latter times. I have now taken that into my every day life and have seen great differences in myself and the relationship with others around me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz Sawyer

    Part memoir, part self help the overall theories and strategies themselves are food for thought for moms that will cause you to read, pause & decide what resonates with you. Found she is very repetitious in stating almost identical paragraphs throughout first half of book. In her beginning paragraphs she introduces a key foundation for all her values as tied to cosmic (moon cycles) and menstrual-hormonal cycles of women. For some this will be way too woo-woo and might turn off from continuing? S Part memoir, part self help the overall theories and strategies themselves are food for thought for moms that will cause you to read, pause & decide what resonates with you. Found she is very repetitious in stating almost identical paragraphs throughout first half of book. In her beginning paragraphs she introduces a key foundation for all her values as tied to cosmic (moon cycles) and menstrual-hormonal cycles of women. For some this will be way too woo-woo and might turn off from continuing? She also has language at the start to attempt at being very inclusive of those who identify female, but I just wonder if a book specifically titled for mom’s would even be picked up by all those who fall into a mother role? Several of her experiments made me think and reflect which was my purpose in picking up the book in first place so I was satisfied but I’m not running to suggest this to another quite yet. None of her experiments are spelled out, rather just a broad challenge & stories of what she’s experienced. This could be great for some and others will find they want more concrete steps.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abby C

    Basically a glaring ad for her membership site (which I get, a membership is a ton more lucrative than a book...). But some of the concepts were really helpful and the idea that my capacity for creative work might be altered based on where I am in my cycle was a useful thing to grok. I liked the idea of only picking three things to do in a week (rather than a day) but the reality is I need to do a dozen things in a week in order to keep my life and business running. Most productivity books are wr Basically a glaring ad for her membership site (which I get, a membership is a ton more lucrative than a book...). But some of the concepts were really helpful and the idea that my capacity for creative work might be altered based on where I am in my cycle was a useful thing to grok. I liked the idea of only picking three things to do in a week (rather than a day) but the reality is I need to do a dozen things in a week in order to keep my life and business running. Most productivity books are written by old white dudes with assistants who dump all family concerns onto their wives. So this delivered in terms of being an affirming way to look at work as a mom and a business owner. But it still fell into the old-white-dude trap of assuming everyone is running on the same level of privilege the author is, and while I'm close, I'm not totally there.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie Schooler

    I thought this book might be like the many self-help books out there that prescribe exercise, sleep and more vegetables. It did mention those things but what made it different AND interesting was its view of linking menstrual and moon cycles to how we, as women, can most efficiently work and rest. Then the 14 experiments were practical and easy to adopt if you wished to. I liked the first half better than the second half and wished it had ended with a roundup or some sort of high point conclusio I thought this book might be like the many self-help books out there that prescribe exercise, sleep and more vegetables. It did mention those things but what made it different AND interesting was its view of linking menstrual and moon cycles to how we, as women, can most efficiently work and rest. Then the 14 experiments were practical and easy to adopt if you wished to. I liked the first half better than the second half and wished it had ended with a roundup or some sort of high point conclusion, but overall, any tired, busy mama would benefit from reading this book (or even the first half of it).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ida Jagaric

    A thought revolution for approaching your task list and even your life. :) I've burnt out twice in the last year and needed to start doing things differently, more sustainably. I needed revolutionary advice, not just "schedule time for you", "plan better", "manage your time better", "get up earlier" which I've heard A LOT. All that stuff could almost be described as 'Do More' advice. Advice which just fed my productivity obsession that inevitably led to burnout. Anyways this book is a way to loo A thought revolution for approaching your task list and even your life. :) I've burnt out twice in the last year and needed to start doing things differently, more sustainably. I needed revolutionary advice, not just "schedule time for you", "plan better", "manage your time better", "get up earlier" which I've heard A LOT. All that stuff could almost be described as 'Do More' advice. Advice which just fed my productivity obsession that inevitably led to burnout. Anyways this book is a way to look at everything differently. A way to rethink your life, and rethink your beliefs. :) And I've been involved in the Do Less facebook group and it's been such a great community!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lennis Perez

    I really enjoyed this book, it gave me some very useful practical tips that I am incorporating into my day to day life. Paying attention to my hormonal cycle has made a difference and I'm sure it will continue to do so as the months pass. I also love the inward questions she throws at you, great book. I will highly recommend it. On a side note, I would say this book would've not been as useful as few years ago when I was still operating under the "shoulds" and hadn't started my inward and self-re I really enjoyed this book, it gave me some very useful practical tips that I am incorporating into my day to day life. Paying attention to my hormonal cycle has made a difference and I'm sure it will continue to do so as the months pass. I also love the inward questions she throws at you, great book. I will highly recommend it. On a side note, I would say this book would've not been as useful as few years ago when I was still operating under the "shoulds" and hadn't started my inward and self-reflection journey. Now it came at the perfect time.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aislin Noël

    Probably one of the best self help books I have ever read! Kate offers incredibly humble yet insightful advice from the perspective of stepping outside of cultural assumptions about time, productivity, energy and self worth. Beautiful beautiful beautiful! I gotta go now, gonna read this one 8 more times to make sure it sticks! :)

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