web site hit counter Arguing Religion: A Bishop Speaks at Facebook and Google - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Arguing Religion: A Bishop Speaks at Facebook and Google

Availability: Ready to download

Every day, millions of people fight about religion. Whether with friends, family, or on social media, we expend lots of energy, lots of sharp words, and lots of strong feelings. But very few know how to have a good religious argument a rational, respectful, and productive exchange of differing views. Bishop Robert Barron, one of the leading Catholic figures in the world and Every day, millions of people fight about religion. Whether with friends, family, or on social media, we expend lots of energy, lots of sharp words, and lots of strong feelings. But very few know how to have a good religious argument a rational, respectful, and productive exchange of differing views. Bishop Robert Barron, one of the leading Catholic figures in the world and among the most active on social media, has enjoyed thousands of fruitful religious arguments. In this book based on talks delivered at Facebook and Google, he explains why religion at its best opens up the searching mind, and how we all believer and unbeliever alike can share better discussions about God.


Compare

Every day, millions of people fight about religion. Whether with friends, family, or on social media, we expend lots of energy, lots of sharp words, and lots of strong feelings. But very few know how to have a good religious argument a rational, respectful, and productive exchange of differing views. Bishop Robert Barron, one of the leading Catholic figures in the world and Every day, millions of people fight about religion. Whether with friends, family, or on social media, we expend lots of energy, lots of sharp words, and lots of strong feelings. But very few know how to have a good religious argument a rational, respectful, and productive exchange of differing views. Bishop Robert Barron, one of the leading Catholic figures in the world and among the most active on social media, has enjoyed thousands of fruitful religious arguments. In this book based on talks delivered at Facebook and Google, he explains why religion at its best opens up the searching mind, and how we all believer and unbeliever alike can share better discussions about God.

30 review for Arguing Religion: A Bishop Speaks at Facebook and Google

  1. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    This is a short book that Bp. Barron wrote based off the content of his presentations at a few popular tech companies (he's also spoken at Amazon, which funny enough was for the book). His main message is an outcry that it seems like it's getting harder and harder to have real, honest discussions about faith, philosophy, and morality. Oftentimes, I've seen myself that discussions quickly turn into yelling full of ad hominem attacks. There's simply no effort to try and approach from a middle groun This is a short book that Bp. Barron wrote based off the content of his presentations at a few popular tech companies (he's also spoken at Amazon, which funny enough was for the book). His main message is an outcry that it seems like it's getting harder and harder to have real, honest discussions about faith, philosophy, and morality. Oftentimes, I've seen myself that discussions quickly turn into yelling full of ad hominem attacks. There's simply no effort to try and approach from a middle ground and make a solid, real argument. Bp. Barron spends half of the book laying the ground work for how to approach a religious argument from any perspective and the other half is spent introducing a case for a more complex God than the stereotypical 'man in the sky'. My favorite thing of this work in particular is that Bp. Barron despises and criticizes weak or simple arguments for religion, it only gives people more reason to make fun of religion and less reason to take it seriously.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Harazin

    If you're a fan of Robert Barron, subscriber to Catholicism or any Christian denomination, or even a non-religious person who prefers rational debate and discussion across differences vs. the vitriol-filled shouting matches that are so common today, this book is for you. If you're a fan of Robert Barron, subscriber to Catholicism or any Christian denomination, or even a non-religious person who prefers rational debate and discussion across differences vs. the vitriol-filled shouting matches that are so common today, this book is for you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    This is all good stuff. I've seen a trend. We're not talking to one another, and it seems to be getting worse. Robert Barron has some good ideas how to get the conversation going. More, how to make the conversation productive. Recommended. Notes: recommended by Ben Shapiro Kindle "Far from shutting down the mind--as is so often claimed be its critics--religion expands the mind as pushes it ever further, toward a proposition infinite goal." (2) Section One: How to Have a Religious Argument (2) Argum This is all good stuff. I've seen a trend. We're not talking to one another, and it seems to be getting worse. Robert Barron has some good ideas how to get the conversation going. More, how to make the conversation productive. Recommended. Notes: recommended by Ben Shapiro Kindle "Far from shutting down the mind--as is so often claimed be its critics--religion expands the mind as pushes it ever further, toward a proposition infinite goal." (2) Section One: How to Have a Religious Argument (2) Argument as the opposite of conflict (2) Ch. 1: Faith is not Opposed to Reason (6) Preambula fidei= preambles to the faith -- Aquinas Manaductio= leading by the hand (10) The separating claim of the Abrahamic religions -- God has spoken (10) Ch. 2: Overcoming Scientism (17) Ch. 3: Be Intolerant of Toleration (27) Hyper-valorization of tolerance (27) "John Rawls, the massively influential American political philosopher, moved along similar lines. He proposed that a perfectly just society would be one established by public-minded people operating behind what he famously termed, "a veil of ignorance". This means that the constructors of just social arrangements would, as it were, blind themselves to their own private points of view, prejudices, and understanding of the world, so as not to impose illegitimately on others. They would accept only the most abstract principles of fairness that could be reasonable applied to everyone, no matter their particular preference and viewpoints" (31) "Argument is the way to turn fierce opponents into allies" (36) Ch. 4: Avoid Voluntarism (37) Voluntarism is the view that things are true because I want them to be true (37) Personal note: Wow. Barron gives Calvinism as an example of the above. "A God seen as oppressive and arbitration in his freedom..." (39) Ch. 5: Seek to Understand your Opponent's Position (46) Ch. 6: Follow the Example of Thomas Aquinas (51) Nothing is too dangerous to talk about (53) Our religious discussions today would be far more fruitful if all parties would be willing to formulate their opponents' positions as respectfully and convincingly as possible (54) Section Two: Religion and the Opening Up of the Mind (60) Wittgenstein said that much of philosophy consists in "showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle" (65) Ch. 7: An Arguments for God's Existence (66) Barron gives the argument from contingency/first mover Ch. 8: Elijah and the Priests of Ba'al (81) Ultimately, Thomas Aquinas argues, all human agents -- saints and sinners, the compassionate and the wicked -- are motivated by a desire for the joy and peace of beatitudo (89) We are wired for God, but we hook our longing for the infinite good onto some finite object that can never, even in principle, satisfy that longing (95) And so the paradox: happiness is never a function of filling oneself up; it is a function of giving oneself away (98) Chapter 9: The Burning Bush (100) A church that never imposes its point of view but rather proposes it -- with creativity and intellegence (111)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily Montellano

    Very good commentary on HOW to have a religious argument. Very important point: Religion is not based on no evidence whatsoever. Anyone who makes this claim has not read enough. There is absolutely NO sacrifice of the intellect. If anything, religion requests, asks, begs that you use all of your intellect to arrive at the fullness of Truth. He starts with this: Our culture no longer retains the ability to have a religious argument - we just result in yelling and whoever yells the loudest “wins.” Very good commentary on HOW to have a religious argument. Very important point: Religion is not based on no evidence whatsoever. Anyone who makes this claim has not read enough. There is absolutely NO sacrifice of the intellect. If anything, religion requests, asks, begs that you use all of your intellect to arrive at the fullness of Truth. He starts with this: Our culture no longer retains the ability to have a religious argument - we just result in yelling and whoever yells the loudest “wins.” This approach causes minds to shut down and conversation to not even begin. It has resulted in Voluntarism - “I get that that’s your truth and I respect that, but this is my truth.” Bishop Barron asserts that this loss of the quest for Truth has led us down a perilous path. People searching for truth and happiness but stop at their own personal interpretation of it rather than continually searching for the Truth. He makes an important statement that “Nones (the non-affliated)” need to hear: “Have Christians been guilty of being contradictory? Yes. And I say it to our shame.” Bishop Barron is very truthful and upfront about the shortcomings of the Church; He is very well read, a very good writer and articulated his points well. It’s worth your time. This is worth a read for anyone and everyone who is even .001% interested in religion, even if your religion is “I don’t have a religion.” John Henry Newman says, “Faith is the reasoning of a religious mind.” No questions are off limits. Ask away. St. Thomas Aquinas in the 1200s, a friar, posed and responded to the question in his largest work “Summa Theologia” - “Does God exist?” If he can ask that question as part of the religious community, surely you can ask any question. After you read this book I encourage you to checkout Bishop Barron’s site Word On Fire and Catholic.com. It’s a good start for answering any questions you have. Both of these sites have podcasts which are a great resource too. If you want to go straight to the source, the Catechism of the Catholic Church comprises all of the official teachings of the Church with cross references. Happy reading!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liam Byrnes

    Having not heard Bishop Barron's talks at Facebook or Google, I was expecting an accessible text written for a broader audience. Given the title, I was also expecting an extensive dialogue about practical steps for approaching a conversation. This book did not meet either of my expectations. What it was instead was a fascinating summation of major religious thinkers and their arguments for the existence of God. Bishop Barron is an extremely gifted writer and theologian, and he seamlessly distill Having not heard Bishop Barron's talks at Facebook or Google, I was expecting an accessible text written for a broader audience. Given the title, I was also expecting an extensive dialogue about practical steps for approaching a conversation. This book did not meet either of my expectations. What it was instead was a fascinating summation of major religious thinkers and their arguments for the existence of God. Bishop Barron is an extremely gifted writer and theologian, and he seamlessly distills and connects major arguments from philosophers like Paul Tillich, Thomas Aquinas, and C.S. Lewis, to name a few. He does discuss some practical ideas for approaching a religious argument, but this occurs almost exclusively a five-page chapter entitled "Seek to Understand Your Opponent's Position." Ultimately, I was hoping this book would be one I could recommend to religious and non-religious young adults my age to open their mind and consider new religious perspectives. However, the density and lack of colloquial language in this text make that impractical. This book does serve an educational purpose, but it's not the purpose I was anticipating or hoped for.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eileen O'Finlan

    As a huge fan of Bishop Barron's work, I enjoyed reading this book. I appreciated that the impetus for it came from interviews he did with Google and Facebook. In the current social media climate where disagreements quickly devolve into non-productive, potentially damaging insults and name-calling, it is refreshing to have a voice advocating for sensible argument. Not argument in the sense of having a fight, but in the sense of two people who disagree on something (in this case, religion) relati As a huge fan of Bishop Barron's work, I enjoyed reading this book. I appreciated that the impetus for it came from interviews he did with Google and Facebook. In the current social media climate where disagreements quickly devolve into non-productive, potentially damaging insults and name-calling, it is refreshing to have a voice advocating for sensible argument. Not argument in the sense of having a fight, but in the sense of two people who disagree on something (in this case, religion) relating their reasons, thoughts, beliefs, etc. for one another to respectfully and thoughtfully debate like rational, mature adults. My only caveat in recommending this book is that one may need some background in philosophy and/or theology to understand it. It is not a book to whip through, but rather one to take one's time with in order to fully understand and ponder what is written.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Who are you arguing to and how to get your point across Bishop Baron does a wonderful job of explaining the faith with vigor and zeal. But this to me can only be seen because I am of the faith. His introduction states that the book came about through discussions that he had with members of the community at Silicon Valley specifically at Google and Facebook. These individuals live in the world and are of the world and I found the first section to have been overburdened with theological jargon whic Who are you arguing to and how to get your point across Bishop Baron does a wonderful job of explaining the faith with vigor and zeal. But this to me can only be seen because I am of the faith. His introduction states that the book came about through discussions that he had with members of the community at Silicon Valley specifically at Google and Facebook. These individuals live in the world and are of the world and I found the first section to have been overburdened with theological jargon which confused me as to how to open myself to reasoning with people not of the faith. The second section was written more openly to the understanding of the Church and the Church fathers who gave us the clear understanding of what God wants from us and for us.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Benj

    A quick and enjoyable little read. Some big words, some large concepts, but explained in a chewable, digestible sort of way. It’s really a summary and a proposition. A summary of foundational religious arguments. A proposition that we ought to argue religion, and ought to do it in a well meaning, intelligent way. Religious argument has a place at the American dinner table, and this book might be the appetizer needed to get it there. I’d recommend this to any Catholic (or Christian) curious of how A quick and enjoyable little read. Some big words, some large concepts, but explained in a chewable, digestible sort of way. It’s really a summary and a proposition. A summary of foundational religious arguments. A proposition that we ought to argue religion, and ought to do it in a well meaning, intelligent way. Religious argument has a place at the American dinner table, and this book might be the appetizer needed to get it there. I’d recommend this to any Catholic (or Christian) curious of how to begin arguing religion (myself included). I’d recommend it also to the Catholic half-convinced. It’s a delightful and quick read, though heady at times.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Short, succinct, and to the point, but immensely readable like all of Bishop Barron’s books. He has been graced with the ability to encourage each person to seek out the best in life, especially when our culture is leading them down the wrong path. More importantly, if you are tired of the slinging insults so readily thrown in todays landscape of social media and yearn to have a good discussion, read this book. Then pass it on to a friend because a good discussion must needs more than one person Short, succinct, and to the point, but immensely readable like all of Bishop Barron’s books. He has been graced with the ability to encourage each person to seek out the best in life, especially when our culture is leading them down the wrong path. More importantly, if you are tired of the slinging insults so readily thrown in todays landscape of social media and yearn to have a good discussion, read this book. Then pass it on to a friend because a good discussion must needs more than one person!

  10. 5 out of 5

    John

    Written at a fairly high intellectual level, this work thoughtfully discussed the importance of civilized debate and argument at a time society has descended into a culture of shouting, harassing, and a general unwillingness to listen to other points of view. This short work effectively explains what faith is, and what it is not, to the very sophisticated audiences to which this was originally delivered, and to the reader of this expanded transcript of the talks.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    After reading the title, I expected the book to be about how to argue religion. Instead, I felt that it was more about the importance that we continue to argue for religion and what it stands for in our lives. The book was also more philosophical than I expected and required a higher level of thinking than I was prepared for going into it. That is not to say this is a bad book. Barron does a very good job arguing religion. It just was not what I expected.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This book hits an interesting sweet spot of being presented with deep logical arguments to resonate with an academic and intelligent audience. I’m not sure if I’m satisfied with the short and succinct arguments presented but I would assume this was a very strategic choice to get people thinking about religion and God in a new way. Definitely felt like it ended way to soon but surely left me curious.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary A Long

    The Bishop is on to something I am in a lay ministry two year course in NC . I am also studying to become a lay Carmelite. I have been reading Romans and lots of books on Salvation History and I need to learn more about my faith. I am very interested in being able to discuss my faith without fighting. This book gives me hope that I can accomplish this. Very readable book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bernardo Trindade

    Great book for religious and non-religious people alike. Written with great style, it describes the right attitude required to have a proper discussion not only about religion but about anything that matters, and proceedes to show that true faith is indeed grounded on reason spanning from science to how we get to know and trust someone.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Berry

    Brilliant. Short book that captures the sophistication of the Catholic Faith and puts it up against the edge of secularism in presentations at two corporate bastions. With his signature eloquence, Bishop Barron is powerfully compelling as an Ambassador for Christianity and an Evangelist sharing the good news with good-natured argument. Love it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    A revised recitation of talks he gave at Facebook and Google, Bishop Barron presents an intelligent and compelling argument for the public discussion of religious principles, and the ultimate reasonableness of the Christian viewpoint. It's a small book and a quick read, but the deep thinking contained within will likely best be served by regular rereading. A revised recitation of talks he gave at Facebook and Google, Bishop Barron presents an intelligent and compelling argument for the public discussion of religious principles, and the ultimate reasonableness of the Christian viewpoint. It's a small book and a quick read, but the deep thinking contained within will likely best be served by regular rereading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Not an interesting read His expression of his thoughts were complicated and tended to lose me as to the point he was making. If he used simple language it would be easier to follow.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynnette

    A nice collection of Bishop Barron's thoughts on how to have a constructive conversation with those whose beliefs differ from your own, as well as some introduction to philosophy and a few of the reasons he maintains his Christian viewpoint over atheism and secularism. A nice collection of Bishop Barron's thoughts on how to have a constructive conversation with those whose beliefs differ from your own, as well as some introduction to philosophy and a few of the reasons he maintains his Christian viewpoint over atheism and secularism.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dave Hutton

    Excellent read! Bishop Baron is so well educated and a true intellectual. Yet he conveys teachings in a manner so readable and understandable to all. His writings are must read books.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Small but mighty, using Thomas aquinas methods mostly of listening and talking so as to hear the others opinion. Well known Catholic author, worth the read. Has spoken many times to Goggle and Apple staff.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Armstrong

    An eloquent piece of advice about how to be really human...to share our perspectives, our beliefs, our view of the purpose of life with others without resorting to a mute tolerance that defaults on learning,

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek Prior

    Cogently argued and manages to condense a good deal of Thomisitc theology, Classical philosophy and modern thought into a relatively slim volume.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yk

    Intellectually challenging and wonderfully written. The eternal question of uncausing the cause comes to the core of thought of thoughts. Enthralling reading experience for my Christmas of 2018.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annie Crawford

    Bishop Barron is articulate, wise, and winsome. Everything he writes is helpful for those who want to find ways to build bridges between people of faith and our secular culture.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason Townsend

    A surprisingly rich and deep little book about commonsense strategies for arguing religion online and the validity of belief in God which makes this exercise worthwhile.

  26. 4 out of 5

    MJF Graham

    Thought provoking A clear and precise to those who think that religion is irrational and fanatical. As the author states, it can, in fact, open up the mind, in wonderful ways.

  27. 4 out of 5

    DeAnne

    His expression of his thoughts were complicated and tended to lose me as to the point he was making. I was looking for something more practical and less philosophical.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cresta Livingston

    Religion and philosophy combined. Intelligent little read. Thanks Bishop Barron.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Another great read by the great Bishop Robert Barron.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Sadaty

    Excellent! Very well written and researched.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.