web site hit counter Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders (True Crime) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders (True Crime)

Availability: Ready to download

From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, Atlanta, Georgia was held under siege by a serial killer and dozens of victims started to appear. The series of murders, which became known as the “Atlanta Child Murders case,” gripped the city of Atlanta with fear and shocked the nation because most of the victims were children. The fact that the victims were all black a From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, Atlanta, Georgia was held under siege by a serial killer and dozens of victims started to appear. The series of murders, which became known as the “Atlanta Child Murders case,” gripped the city of Atlanta with fear and shocked the nation because most of the victims were children. The fact that the victims were all black and mostly male caused many in Atlanta’s black community to fear that their children were being targeted by a racist conspiracy. In this true crime book you will read about how the Atlanta Child Murders case put a city under siege and how a task force of law enforcement officers from several different agencies eventually captured the killer. You will follow the investigation as the police use what was at the time fairly new techniques of criminal profiling and fiber evidence to capture and convict the killer. For many around the country, once the killer was arrested, it was difficult to accept. The killer was a young, nerdy-looking man named Wayne Williams. To many people his background didn’t seem to indicate he was a serial killer, but the professional profilers knew otherwise! Open the pages of the following book and learn the true story of Wayne Williams and the Atlanta Child Murders. You will learn about how Williams evolved from a nerdy kid who loved electronics into what is perhaps the most prolific black serial killer. You will be horrified by some of the details of this case, but you will not be able to put down this book.


Compare

From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, Atlanta, Georgia was held under siege by a serial killer and dozens of victims started to appear. The series of murders, which became known as the “Atlanta Child Murders case,” gripped the city of Atlanta with fear and shocked the nation because most of the victims were children. The fact that the victims were all black a From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, Atlanta, Georgia was held under siege by a serial killer and dozens of victims started to appear. The series of murders, which became known as the “Atlanta Child Murders case,” gripped the city of Atlanta with fear and shocked the nation because most of the victims were children. The fact that the victims were all black and mostly male caused many in Atlanta’s black community to fear that their children were being targeted by a racist conspiracy. In this true crime book you will read about how the Atlanta Child Murders case put a city under siege and how a task force of law enforcement officers from several different agencies eventually captured the killer. You will follow the investigation as the police use what was at the time fairly new techniques of criminal profiling and fiber evidence to capture and convict the killer. For many around the country, once the killer was arrested, it was difficult to accept. The killer was a young, nerdy-looking man named Wayne Williams. To many people his background didn’t seem to indicate he was a serial killer, but the professional profilers knew otherwise! Open the pages of the following book and learn the true story of Wayne Williams and the Atlanta Child Murders. You will learn about how Williams evolved from a nerdy kid who loved electronics into what is perhaps the most prolific black serial killer. You will be horrified by some of the details of this case, but you will not be able to put down this book.

30 review for Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders (True Crime)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joey R.

    1.5 Stars— I guess my expectations were a little too high for “Child Killer”:The True Story of the Atlanta Child Murders”, but after reading several positive reviews, I was intrigued to read an in-depth treatment of a case I remembered from my childhood. I hoped the fact the book was short would not impact on the thoroughness of the investigation, as I have read magazine articles that were informative and provided good detailed information about a topic. Unfortunately, Jack Rosewood’s book touch 1.5 Stars— I guess my expectations were a little too high for “Child Killer”:The True Story of the Atlanta Child Murders”, but after reading several positive reviews, I was intrigued to read an in-depth treatment of a case I remembered from my childhood. I hoped the fact the book was short would not impact on the thoroughness of the investigation, as I have read magazine articles that were informative and provided good detailed information about a topic. Unfortunately, Jack Rosewood’s book touched only on the well known aspects of the case and provided no real investigative details. It was like reading a long Wikipedia article in which the author tries to give a little information about many different subtopics but never really delves deep enough to hold the reader’s interest. I prefer books such as “In Cold Blood” and “Hester Skelter” that provide background, extensive case details and some independent research that gives additional details that cannot be found on internet articles and blogs about the case. In a final effort to (I guess) make the book longer, the final chapter of the book discusses a few other random black male serial killers with the author giving a few paragraphs to each of these unrelated cases. Good editing and decent writing ability is all that kept me from giving this clunker 1 Star.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steve Tannuzzo

    After watching the excellent second season of Mindhunter, I couldn’t stop thinking about the case of the Atlanta Child Murders which were going on from 1979-1981. I was in eighth grade and I remember the news coverage of Wayne Williams. What I didn’t remember is that he was convicted of the murder of two adults and the child murders were pinned on him as an easy way to close the case. It’s entirely possible he did commit those murders but I’m glad that after all these years, the case was recently After watching the excellent second season of Mindhunter, I couldn’t stop thinking about the case of the Atlanta Child Murders which were going on from 1979-1981. I was in eighth grade and I remember the news coverage of Wayne Williams. What I didn’t remember is that he was convicted of the murder of two adults and the child murders were pinned on him as an easy way to close the case. It’s entirely possible he did commit those murders but I’m glad that after all these years, the case was recently re-opened. This was a very quick read and I liked this book, but it’s more of a laying out of the case than a gripping true crime classic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Kernene

    Jack Rosewood is one of my favorite authors. This book, about the Atlanta Child Murders, was a fascinating look at the child murders in the 80s in Atlanta, GA. These were very interesting to read about. There is some discussion about his claims of innocence. While some of them seem possible, most do not. But some do seem to need to be reinvestigated. But I do believe he is guilty of some of the murders he was convicted of. This book is well researched and easy to read and follow along with. I fo Jack Rosewood is one of my favorite authors. This book, about the Atlanta Child Murders, was a fascinating look at the child murders in the 80s in Atlanta, GA. These were very interesting to read about. There is some discussion about his claims of innocence. While some of them seem possible, most do not. But some do seem to need to be reinvestigated. But I do believe he is guilty of some of the murders he was convicted of. This book is well researched and easy to read and follow along with. I found it fascinating and hard to put down. I recommend it, so you can decide if he is guilty or not.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kay Oliver

    Good book, and editing. I enjoyed this book. It was straight and to the point. However, I didn't feel I could trust the information because it has been so poorly edited--punctuation, spelling, formatting, misused words, etc. Luckily, other sources with much better writing cooperated it all. Chilling and certainly unforgettable. I do wish this book had included more of William's psychology as well as his own statements and interviews. Good book, and editing. I enjoyed this book. It was straight and to the point. However, I didn't feel I could trust the information because it has been so poorly edited--punctuation, spelling, formatting, misused words, etc. Luckily, other sources with much better writing cooperated it all. Chilling and certainly unforgettable. I do wish this book had included more of William's psychology as well as his own statements and interviews.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katie (wife of book)

    This is a well-written, un biased and concise book about the terrible Atlanta Child Murders. I had never heard of this case until it was featured on Mindhunter and I wanted to learn a bit more about it. Rosewood's book is a great place to start and provides a linear narrative of the events without bombarding the reader with information. Rosewood presents the various ideas about the case and provides a list of other books written about it, in case the reader wants a different perspective. It's easy This is a well-written, un biased and concise book about the terrible Atlanta Child Murders. I had never heard of this case until it was featured on Mindhunter and I wanted to learn a bit more about it. Rosewood's book is a great place to start and provides a linear narrative of the events without bombarding the reader with information. Rosewood presents the various ideas about the case and provides a list of other books written about it, in case the reader wants a different perspective. It's easy to see how a Klan conspiracy would be tempting in this instance, but I think it also shows how needlessly complex and badly thought-out most conspiracies are. It's a shame to think that, not only did the police take ages to link the deaths together, but they may have also put victims on the list who were not linked at all. Although Williams is behind bars, how many people got away with murder because they took the opportunity at the right time? Because the book was written about a year ago, the ending of the book left the reader feeling up to date with Wayne Williams and the investigation. I liked that Rosewood addressed the various portrayals of Williams and the investigation in film and TV shows...he told us how each one presented the case and gave a personal opinion too. Unlike some other True Crime, the end of the book didn't feel bloated and left the reader with other sources to explore.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Desiré Oosthuizen

    *Audiobook* This was the first time I have listen to this author and Narrator. Both did a very good job. I enjoyed the narrator and could listen to his voice all day, it sucked me right in and kept my attention at all times. This happened way before my time, so it was very interesting and informative, I haven't gone and done investigation to check facts but it enjoyed the book for what it was. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in these kinds of serial killers story. *Audiobook* This was the first time I have listen to this author and Narrator. Both did a very good job. I enjoyed the narrator and could listen to his voice all day, it sucked me right in and kept my attention at all times. This happened way before my time, so it was very interesting and informative, I haven't gone and done investigation to check facts but it enjoyed the book for what it was. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in these kinds of serial killers story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve Parcell

    I watched and finished the latest 5 part mini series documentary about the Atlanta Child Murders in 79 to 81 on Saturday and wanted to read a book that would give me more information. A book to persuade me that Wayne Williams should be in jail as he is guilty as the documentary gives you everything you need to believe he is NOT. This book didn't do it. It just presented facts and circumstances and worst of all got basic forensic details wrong. The carpet fibres were green NOT red. It also read as I watched and finished the latest 5 part mini series documentary about the Atlanta Child Murders in 79 to 81 on Saturday and wanted to read a book that would give me more information. A book to persuade me that Wayne Williams should be in jail as he is guilty as the documentary gives you everything you need to believe he is NOT. This book didn't do it. It just presented facts and circumstances and worst of all got basic forensic details wrong. The carpet fibres were green NOT red. It also read as though Williams was a Freddie Kruger type monster which reads as quite shallow and vacuous. There is no balance here and alternatives to Wayne's "guilt" are dismissed by the author without any commentary or reasoning. Very disappointing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘The Atlanta Child Murders left a major scar on Atlanta which will more than likely never totally heal.’ Florida author Jack Rosewood inherited his fascination for heinous crimes from his father, a journalist covering major grim crimes such as Ted Bundy. He is fascinated with serial killers – their development psychologically, their preparation for their life of crime, and the details of how they made their bloody black marks on the world. Jack moves away from his intensive studies of serial kill ‘The Atlanta Child Murders left a major scar on Atlanta which will more than likely never totally heal.’ Florida author Jack Rosewood inherited his fascination for heinous crimes from his father, a journalist covering major grim crimes such as Ted Bundy. He is fascinated with serial killers – their development psychologically, their preparation for their life of crime, and the details of how they made their bloody black marks on the world. Jack moves away from his intensive studies of serial killers to explore strange crimes most of which are discoveries for the reader – even the Jack Rosewood reader! As usual Jack opens with an introduction explaining the decision to place these gruesome stories before us: ‘From July 1979 until May 1981, the city of Atlanta, Georgia was subjected to a state of terror by a relentless and sadistic serial killer who preyed primarily on black boys and young black men. By the time the reign was over, twenty-eight children and young adults were dead. Americans in general were shocked, and the people of Atlanta were traumatized. Atlantans were used to a certain amount of crime, but not of the magnitude or type they had experienced during that period. The case became officially known by law enforcement and legal experts as the “Atlanta Murders of 1979-1981,” but was referred to more colloquially as the “Atlanta Child Murders”, due to twenty-two of the victims being under the age of eighteen. By the time the case was over, it had proved to be like none other in American history. One of the most intriguing, and at the time terrifying aspects of the Atlanta Child Murders was that it took place in “real time.” In most cases, it is not revealed that an offender is a serial killer until after he or she has been captured – law enforcement often don’t even know that they have a serial killer on their hands. This was not the case with the Atlanta Child Murders. After the first few cases, the local media began to report on the abnormally high number of black boys who were missing in Atlanta. When their bodies started turning up in vacant lots and wooded areas, national media outlets picked up the case, placing extreme pressure on local law enforcement. The enhanced media scrutiny also led to mobilization by members of the black community, who believed that they were not adequately served by law enforcement since all of the victims were black, which was no doubt partially the result of Atlanta being a symbol of the “Old South”. Atlanta definitely had a recent history that was associated with segregation and organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan, but by the time of the murders it also had a black mayor and a majority black city council. In other words, the racial dynamics surrounding the case were complex at times. As the Atlanta serial murders progressed and politics entered into the equation, a task force was created to catch the killer. The FBI gave assistance to the GBI (Georgia Bureau of Investigation) as well as Atlanta, Fulton County, and Dekalb County law enforcement agencies. With over 100 agents working fulltime on the task force, it was only a matter of time until the serial killer was captured. And when Wayne Williams finally was arrested, many people were surprised. When the first media reports began to surface with Wayne Williams’ name and picture in June 1981, he looked far from what most think of as a serial killer. The slightly overweight, glasses-wearing twenty-three-year-old Williams looked more like a computer nerd than a serial killer. And he was black. Jack manages to outline the various heinous murders at the hand of Wayne Williams, but at the same time he places before us the explosive concept of serial murders of black children by a black man – a subject for consideration and controversy that comes as a surprise. This is yet another extremely fine journalistic examination by Jack Rosewood.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robin Morgan

    After reading enough True Crime books, especially when they’ve been written by a particular author, you slowly become anesthetized; or to use simpler terminology you’re rendered physically insensible regarding how far an individual’s level of depravity can reach. After reading almost two dozen books where the murderer[s] have gone to extraordinary lengths to cover up their unbelievable heinous acts towards men and women, you reach a point where almost nothing they might do would be surprising. Ho After reading enough True Crime books, especially when they’ve been written by a particular author, you slowly become anesthetized; or to use simpler terminology you’re rendered physically insensible regarding how far an individual’s level of depravity can reach. After reading almost two dozen books where the murderer[s] have gone to extraordinary lengths to cover up their unbelievable heinous acts towards men and women, you reach a point where almost nothing they might do would be surprising. However, in this outing, the author of this book, Jack Rosewood, gives his readers a detailed, well-researched look at Wayne Williams, an individual whose dozens of victims, mostly black male children, started to disappear off the streets of Atlanta, Georgia. Given this specific trait of the victims, naturally the anxiety which arose gave the black community and the nation, the idea that these innocent children were being target by a xenophobic individual. These acts of violence became know as the Atlanta Child Murders, and it took an army of trained law enforcement individuals from a multitude of organizations to ultimately apprehend and arrest this mindboggling murderer. And just like the television program “You Are There” [1953-1971] hosted by Walter Cronkite, Mr. Rosewood allows his readers to observe the new investigatory techniques using fiber evidence [simply thin filaments of material that can be either organic or synthetic] that an individual had been at a specific location, and the profiling of individuals in order to identify the likely suspect[s] to a crime. However, Wayne Williams, who instead of his appearance, seemingly to be an unfashionable and socially inept and boringly studious individual; in reality had been the sadistic serial killer they’ve been looking for. And as in all of his books, the author endeavors to tell his readers what had been the possible reason for the transformation from a nerdy child into one of the most copious serial murderers of blacks this nation has known. For giving me and his readers another shocking, page-turning book, I’m giving Mr. Rosewood the 5 STARS he’s garnered.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beth Shuler

    Great read As always this author has done it again! Not only has he put together and written a great book but he's also made sure to include information either I didn't know or completely forgot all about it! I remember reading about this as a child and it was probably the first time I actually read or heard about a serial killer. But of course as a child to me he was a monster in real life! I remember for the first time ever actually being scared of others. I grew up in Florida and so this was e Great read As always this author has done it again! Not only has he put together and written a great book but he's also made sure to include information either I didn't know or completely forgot all about it! I remember reading about this as a child and it was probably the first time I actually read or heard about a serial killer. But of course as a child to me he was a monster in real life! I remember for the first time ever actually being scared of others. I grew up in Florida and so this was extensively covered or so it seemed. But over the years I've read several different books or tried to look up more information on this case. I've heard all the conspiracy theories and so forth but it is my opinion they have the right person locked up. And thank goodness at least this is one killer I don't have to worry about. Out of all the books I have read about the Atlanta Child Murders I think this has got to not only be the best book but it's also got more then enough information to were you can make up your own decision about his guilt or innocence! I think Mr. Rosewood has gotten any and all information available! So if you are looking for a great read then you have found it! And need not to look any further I am sure that you will throughly enjoy reading this book

  11. 5 out of 5

    Píaras Cíonnaoíth

    A gripping account of the Atlanta Child Murders... When we read books of true crime, for some reason we are intrigued. We want to take a peek, a look into the criminal mind, perhaps because it is so different than our own, or maybe it's that dark side we are afraid to explore and yet, we have the curiosity to just take a quick glance. Of course, as soon as we do, we want more information. Even if you are a seasoned campaigner of true crime, Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murder A gripping account of the Atlanta Child Murders... When we read books of true crime, for some reason we are intrigued. We want to take a peek, a look into the criminal mind, perhaps because it is so different than our own, or maybe it's that dark side we are afraid to explore and yet, we have the curiosity to just take a quick glance. Of course, as soon as we do, we want more information. Even if you are a seasoned campaigner of true crime, Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders will surely raise more than a few hairs on the back of your neck. It was a first-class read and the author gave a perspective to these horrific crimes that was both fascinating and intriguing. This was one of the better true crime books that I have read recently. I would highly recommend this read to all fans of the true-crime genre. I’m also a big fan of Jack Rosewood so it’s another 5 Stars from me. Well done again!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Millett

    True Crime Thriller In this latest true crime book by Jack Rosewood, Wayne Williams, the Atlanta Child Murderer is covered in great depth and detail. This book is chilling in it's details of each of the victims, the task force that was formed to solve the murders and the fantastic trial that found Williams guilty on two counts of murder sending him to jail for life. Jack covers the details of this case with accuracy, chilling descriptions and yet empathy for the lives lost as well as the families True Crime Thriller In this latest true crime book by Jack Rosewood, Wayne Williams, the Atlanta Child Murderer is covered in great depth and detail. This book is chilling in it's details of each of the victims, the task force that was formed to solve the murders and the fantastic trial that found Williams guilty on two counts of murder sending him to jail for life. Jack covers the details of this case with accuracy, chilling descriptions and yet empathy for the lives lost as well as the families suffering to survive the loss. He also covers the crime right up until the most recent doings of Wayne Williams in jail and how he has not ever admitted guilt or apologized to his victim's families. This book was hard to put down and I finished it in one sitting. Awesome true crime book by Jack Rosewood.

  13. 5 out of 5

    sweetpeagjyahoo.com

    Interesting read since I've never heard of this Serial killer I'm always looking for true crime novels because I keep going back to the question, nature or nurture. Here's this young man, raised in a two parent home, no signs of bed wetting, animal torture, or physical, mental or emotional abuse. Very much not the typical start for something so heinous as the murderer of children or small adult men. It's a very one dimensional writing style that lacks any emotional or explosive outrage to what's Interesting read since I've never heard of this Serial killer I'm always looking for true crime novels because I keep going back to the question, nature or nurture. Here's this young man, raised in a two parent home, no signs of bed wetting, animal torture, or physical, mental or emotional abuse. Very much not the typical start for something so heinous as the murderer of children or small adult men. It's a very one dimensional writing style that lacks any emotional or explosive outrage to what's been done. It leaves me wanting to ask questions just not about any conspiracy theories. I gave it 4 stars due to the fact that I've never heard about this serial killer just didn't like the writing style or seeming lack of empathy for the innocent victims. I don't care if how they supplement their income, they are children!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    Yikes... Few things manage to boil the collective minds in society; child murderers is one. Killing in and of itself is abhorrent and looked down upon with the most disdain, but when it is a child, it shakes us to the bone. As someone whom is an advent true crimes reader, I'm shocked that the Atlanta child murders escaped under my radar for so long. Before my time, perhaps, not an excuse as many of the most prolific serial killings and gruesome murders in this century have happened before my time, Yikes... Few things manage to boil the collective minds in society; child murderers is one. Killing in and of itself is abhorrent and looked down upon with the most disdain, but when it is a child, it shakes us to the bone. As someone whom is an advent true crimes reader, I'm shocked that the Atlanta child murders escaped under my radar for so long. Before my time, perhaps, not an excuse as many of the most prolific serial killings and gruesome murders in this century have happened before my time, so not an excuse as to why this case isn't as well covered as many other serial killer cases in American History. Perhaps because it does not fit the stereotypical Serial killer troupe? Who knows. Jack Rosewood has managed to breath new life into an old case of one sick man's 2 year murder spree of African American male youths in the inner city of Atlanta, Georgia.

  15. 4 out of 5

    MS. KYM

    Though I have yet to finish this book, which I began reading on 10/2, I'm pondering IF I should, because the 'investigative' reporting is all-over-the place. Unlike the 5-part documentary: “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children”, the novel isn't in sequence... Confusing at times, which is probably due to lack of proofreading. Usually I read a book first, due to it being more detailed, then I'll watch the documentary/movie (if there's one). In this case, though disheartening and brist Though I have yet to finish this book, which I began reading on 10/2, I'm pondering IF I should, because the 'investigative' reporting is all-over-the place. Unlike the 5-part documentary: “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children”, the novel isn't in sequence... Confusing at times, which is probably due to lack of proofreading. Usually I read a book first, due to it being more detailed, then I'll watch the documentary/movie (if there's one). In this case, though disheartening and bristling, the mini-series outlined the serial murders in a manner the viewer was able understand.... And it was objective, unlike the book's author. One star given because of the repetitious usage of words (amazing how many times the word 'hustle' was used to describe the victims), and the arrangement of details.

  16. 5 out of 5

    April

    Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders (True Crime) by Jack Rosewood This is a good recap of the events in Atlanta i the 1979-1981 time period. These started shortly after I got married and we followed along on CNN. It was interesting to look back on events from my early twenties. Jack Rosewood presented the newer listener with a bit of history. The narration was well done. Kevin Kollins is great with this genre. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have Child Killer: The True Story of The Atlanta Child Murders (True Crime) by Jack Rosewood This is a good recap of the events in Atlanta i the 1979-1981 time period. These started shortly after I got married and we followed along on CNN. It was interesting to look back on events from my early twenties. Jack Rosewood presented the newer listener with a bit of history. The narration was well done. Kevin Kollins is great with this genre. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Judith Sentyz

    Disturbing This book has disturbed me greatly. I remember years ago hearing about the Atlanta Child Murders. But I never really heard many details. The author certainly brings them to light. This is the first book of Mr. Rosewood's that I had to stop reading many times. A lot of people have much worse childhoods than Mr. Williams and don't turn out like him. A very good read. Disturbing but good. Disturbing This book has disturbed me greatly. I remember years ago hearing about the Atlanta Child Murders. But I never really heard many details. The author certainly brings them to light. This is the first book of Mr. Rosewood's that I had to stop reading many times. A lot of people have much worse childhoods than Mr. Williams and don't turn out like him. A very good read. Disturbing but good.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Unfortunately, or not, this is most likely the last Jack Rosewood book I read. It isn't cohesive, doesn't make sense at times, and even in this day has spelling, grammar, and punctuation problems. It's more like reading someone else's notes for a paper they may write. Great info but doesn't feel like it's credible with all the bungled writing. Ended up looking up the person online to get the story... Unfortunately, or not, this is most likely the last Jack Rosewood book I read. It isn't cohesive, doesn't make sense at times, and even in this day has spelling, grammar, and punctuation problems. It's more like reading someone else's notes for a paper they may write. Great info but doesn't feel like it's credible with all the bungled writing. Ended up looking up the person online to get the story...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

    I was deeply hooked with the book from the very beginning. This is a true crime book. Here, readers will get to know about the Atlanta Child Murders case in the most possible detail and depth and finally get their hands on the killer. To know what was it all about, grab your copy of this book now & dive in to the true story of Wayne Williams and the Atlanta Child Murders. I was speechless after finish reading the book. Much recommendable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janalyn Prude

    He did it again I am always amazed, no matter how many times a story has been told. If Jack Rosewood tells it he always puts his own spin on it and you know if he is telling it it’s because there is more to know. This is no exception. I thought I knew the whole story of the Atlanta child killer I didn’t know half of it. Jack rosewood must be blackmailing someone because he gets information I have never heard this is why I am obsessed with Jack Rose woodt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Hedden

    Child Killer: The True Story of the Atlanta Child Murders was a good true crime book by Jack Rosewood. This book followed what was known as the "Atlanta Child Murders Case". From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, a serial killer was killing dozens of people in Atlanta, Georgia. Someone was killing many young victims who were part of Atlanta's black community. This was another good true crime read by Jack Rosewood. Child Killer: The True Story of the Atlanta Child Murders was a good true crime book by Jack Rosewood. This book followed what was known as the "Atlanta Child Murders Case". From the summer of 1979 through the spring of 1981, a serial killer was killing dozens of people in Atlanta, Georgia. Someone was killing many young victims who were part of Atlanta's black community. This was another good true crime read by Jack Rosewood.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ana Ortega

    If you like to read true crime and get a deep dive into the details of the case, this is not for you. This book is a high level account of the case with no true insight into detail, motive, or the killer’s mindset. I also didn’t care for the book format. It’s very choppy and I even noticed a misspelling of the Los Angeles name- twice. I also don’t know why the last part of the book discusses other serial killers - I want to know about this case, not others.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    One of the Best Books on the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Case Overall, it is very well written. The author did a great deal of research and has a writing style that delivers mundane details in an interesting way. I removed one star because although the book is good, it could use an editor as there are a few inaccuracies and redundancies. However, don't let that stop you from reading this book. One of the Best Books on the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Case Overall, it is very well written. The author did a great deal of research and has a writing style that delivers mundane details in an interesting way. I removed one star because although the book is good, it could use an editor as there are a few inaccuracies and redundancies. However, don't let that stop you from reading this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alison Fisher pittman

    Not great. I didn’t learn anything new from this book that I hadn’t already learned about the Wayne Williams case. Rosewood writes in a way that defies the “innocent until proven guilty“ idea of American justice. Williams has never been officially convicted of the Atlanta child murders but Rosewood assumes that he is guilty. He also frequently misspells words and many sentences are left without a period at the end of them so the editing is very poor.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This book reads like a textbook style summary of The Atlanta Child Murders. It includes some more recent updates than other books surrounding the case. It also throws a wet blanket on the conspiracy fires that still burn today. Followers of the case won’t gain much new information but will still want this book in their collections. Those looking for a quick introduction to The Atlanta Child Murders will do well to get a copy of this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Geiger

    Interesting This book was intriguing into the case of Wayne Williams and the Atlanta murders. I remember well living in the metro area and seeing time checks on tv in the evenings asking if you know where your children are. Several alternative theories are mentioned and explored as well. ( several grammatical issues )

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emerson

    This is very straight-forward and good for what it is. If you want to know about the facts, as best we can know them, this is your book. If you want deep backgrounds of the killer, their family, the victims, and so on, this isn't for you. I got what I figured it was, so I'm not disappointed. I can say that the follow-up at the end was a very interesting bonus. This is very straight-forward and good for what it is. If you want to know about the facts, as best we can know them, this is your book. If you want deep backgrounds of the killer, their family, the victims, and so on, this isn't for you. I got what I figured it was, so I'm not disappointed. I can say that the follow-up at the end was a very interesting bonus.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Campbell

    Compelling read What can I say, another great read from the excellent author, Jack Rosewood. In this he brings to life Atlanta during Wayne Williams reign of terror and how the city reacted to the brutal murders of young black children and adults. A must read for anyone interested in true crime.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

    I honestly don’t think I’ve ever read a more poorly written piece of work. This would make an excellent assignment for third graders to read to practice their proofreading skills. I don’t even think the topic would be problematic because it is so difficult to piece together what the author is trying to say.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danaka Jedd

    Informative This book is a good read if you like true crime. Kind of just read as factually and doesn't go into great detail. Also a short read. I recommend this book of you are interested in this case and need something fast to catch up on the facts and story of the Atlanta child killings. Informative This book is a good read if you like true crime. Kind of just read as factually and doesn't go into great detail. Also a short read. I recommend this book of you are interested in this case and need something fast to catch up on the facts and story of the Atlanta child killings.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.