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Thousands of business books are published every year— Here are the best of the best After years of reading, evaluating, and selling business books, Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten are among the most respected experts on the category. Now they have chosen and reviewed the one hundred best business titles of all time—the ones that deliver the biggest payoff for today’s busy Thousands of business books are published every year— Here are the best of the best After years of reading, evaluating, and selling business books, Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten are among the most respected experts on the category. Now they have chosen and reviewed the one hundred best business titles of all time—the ones that deliver the biggest payoff for today’s busy readers. The 100 Best Business Books of All Time puts each book in context so that readers can quickly find solutions to the problems they face, such as how best to spend The First 90 Days in a new job or how to take their company from Good to Great. Many of the choices are surprising—you’ll find reviews of Moneyball and Orbiting the Giant Hairball, but not Jack Welch’s memoir. At the end of each review, Jack and Todd direct readers to other books both inside and outside The 100 Best. And sprinkled throughout are sidebars taking the reader beyond business books, suggesting movies, novels, and even children’s books that offer equally relevant insights. This guide will appeal to anyone, from entry-level to CEO, who wants to cut through the clutter and discover the brilliant books that are truly worth their investment of time and money.


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Thousands of business books are published every year— Here are the best of the best After years of reading, evaluating, and selling business books, Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten are among the most respected experts on the category. Now they have chosen and reviewed the one hundred best business titles of all time—the ones that deliver the biggest payoff for today’s busy Thousands of business books are published every year— Here are the best of the best After years of reading, evaluating, and selling business books, Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten are among the most respected experts on the category. Now they have chosen and reviewed the one hundred best business titles of all time—the ones that deliver the biggest payoff for today’s busy readers. The 100 Best Business Books of All Time puts each book in context so that readers can quickly find solutions to the problems they face, such as how best to spend The First 90 Days in a new job or how to take their company from Good to Great. Many of the choices are surprising—you’ll find reviews of Moneyball and Orbiting the Giant Hairball, but not Jack Welch’s memoir. At the end of each review, Jack and Todd direct readers to other books both inside and outside The 100 Best. And sprinkled throughout are sidebars taking the reader beyond business books, suggesting movies, novels, and even children’s books that offer equally relevant insights. This guide will appeal to anyone, from entry-level to CEO, who wants to cut through the clutter and discover the brilliant books that are truly worth their investment of time and money.

30 review for The 100 Best Business Books of All Time: What They Say, Why They Matter, and How They Can Help You

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alok Mishra

    I am happy that Jack and Todd did this! This collection of 100 book reviews of the 100 best business books of all time is a collection that you should not miss if you are interested in knowing about some of the best business books of all time at one place. The reviews are sharp and meaningful at the same time. However, they never let you know the downsides of the books being discussed - well, these are the 100 best books, after all!

  2. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    A cool overview of a rather diverse book selection. A good digest. MIHALY CSIKSZENTMIHALYI - Flow Flow is “the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it. Games, in the broadest sense of the word, contain those elements. Rules provide boundaries. Practice builds skills. And scoring systems offer immediate feedback on your performance. If jobs w A cool overview of a rather diverse book selection. A good digest. MIHALY CSIKSZENTMIHALYI - Flow Flow is “the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it. Games, in the broadest sense of the word, contain those elements. Rules provide boundaries. Practice builds skills. And scoring systems offer immediate feedback on your performance. If jobs were constructed like games, Csikszentmihalyi posits, flow would be reached more often at work. He offers surgeons as an example of workers who reliably achieve flow. DAVID ALLEN - Getting Things Done “The big problem is that your mind keeps reminding you of things when you can’t do anything about them.” PETER F. DRUCKER - The Effective Executive Time. Strengths. Contribution. Concentration. Decision making. STEPHEN R. COVEY - The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People 1. Be Proactive 2. Begin with the End in Mind 3. Put First Things First 4. Think Win/Win 5. Seek First to Understand . . . Then to Be Understood 6. Synergize 7. Sharpen the Saw HARVEY B. MACKAY - Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive Lesson 19, “Show Me a Guy Who Thinks He’s a SelfMade Man and I’ll Show You the Easiest Sell in the World,” is a concise chapter containing only this insight: “All you have to do is make him think it’s his idea.” From the Management section comes Lesson 64, “The Acid Test for Hiring”: “Ask yourself, How would you feel having this same person working for your competition instead of for you?” From the same section is Lesson 44, “Your Best People May Spend Their Most Productive Time Staring at the Walls”: “If you discover one of your executives looking at the wall . . . instead of filling out a report, go over and congratulate him or her. . . . They’re thinking. It’s the hardest, most valuable task any person performs.” GARY KLEIN - The Power of Intuition Klein found that firefighters, U.S. Marine lance corporals, and neonatal nurses don’t make a conscious effort to consider all the options before taking action; instead, they quickly gather information and act. As more information becomes available, these specialists reassess and change course if needed. When asked how they came to such quick decisions, Klein’s subjects used vague, mystical references like ‘“The Force” and “ESP” to describe their abilities. STEVE FARBER - The Radical Leap Extreme leadership is living in pursuit of the OS!M, a catchy acronym for an “Oh Sh*t! Moment.” Edg defines OS!M as the “‘natural, built-in human indicator that you are doing—or about to do—something truly significant, and you are—rightfully so—scared out of your gourd.’” Edg also teaches Steve about LEAP, which stands for: cultivate Love, generate Energy, inspire Audacity, and provide Proof. The stories that Badaracco uses effectively move us past the rote rules most business books offer and more realistically reflect life’s variability. Willy Loman from Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman embodies the very real consequences dreams can have on their holders in Badaracco’s chapter: “Do You Have a Good Dream?” The captain in Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Sharer shows how difficult it is to truly know the answer to the question “Am I Ready to Take Responsibility?” “[S]erious fiction gives us a unique, inside view of leadership.” The Story Factor To help us rediscover our innate talent for storytelling, Simmons presents six different types of stories that have the power to influence others: Who I Am; Why I Am Here; the Vision; Teaching; Values-in-Action; and I Know What You Are Thinking. “Values are meaningless without stories to bring them to life and engage us on a personal level.” The second reason people hold back is that “we are a bunch of control freaks. Losing yourself in the telling of your story means you are not as ‘in control’ as when you are reading bullet points off slides or reading from notes.” You may not win, but you can’t lose. When you are in the middle of serious negotiations and dealing only with facts or rational thinking, you are actually drawing a line in the sand. This gives your opponent the opportunity to say no, to disagree, to prove you wrong. When you use stories, you can sometimes move around that obstacle, and even if you can’t move around it, you can revisit the subject because there is no clear “no.” Power is power. When you tell a powerful story of influence you will feel this rush of power. You will look out at a sea of faces or even into the eyes of one enraptured face and know that you are inside the head of the person listening to you. You have gained access to a secret place where their imagination paints new realities and draws new conclusions based on the stories played there. Although you might not control the whole show, you are one of the stars. AL RIES AND JACK TROUT - Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind “Positioning is an organized system for finding windows in the mind. It is based on the concept that communication can only take place at the right time and under the right circumstances” SCOTT BEDBURY WITH STEPHEN FENICHELL - A New Brand World Bedbury helped launch the “Bo Knows” and “Just Do It” campaigns. In rich detail, he relates stories of internal tension at Nike as it moved from its previous testosterone-heavy, “wimps need not apply” attitude to a brand with enough room for the entire family, and, ultimately, to the leading sports and fitness company. “Just Do It” became a brand that isn’t about sneakers or products but about values and ethos. Want a quick prescription for adding some humanity to your brand? Laugh at yourself; show genuine compassion; stand for something; listen and watch; admit your mistakes; find your soul; and become a more human employer. MARTY NEUMEIER - Zag For example, his depiction of “Marketing” is a man telling a woman, “I am a great lover.” But “Branding” is the woman saying to the man: “I understand you are a great lover.” The difference is subtle but clear: branding is all about what your customer understands about your product or message and has nothing to do with what you are telling the customer. Neumeier presents a process for differentiation by including chapters to help you find, design, build, and renew your zag. Established companies can reposition their brand or learn where to take the brand after launching it. But, Neumeier says, to do that you need to know where your company is within the “competition cycle.” He uses the child’s game of Rock Paper Scissors as an analogy to show the way large, medium, and small organizations go through that cycle. Start-ups are “scissor” companies and grow because of their sharp focus. They grow by taking “white space” from larger “paper” companies because they can move more quickly to market or the large business is too busy to notice. The small business eventually morphs into a “rock” or medium-sized business. Rocks thrive by crushing scissor companies that don’t have the resources to compete. Eventually, rocks become paper companies that use their network and resources to smother rock companies. The Rock Paper Scissors analogy beautifully illustrates how companies of different sizes transition between cycles and how the strengths and weaknesses of those companies change over time. Secrets of Closing the Sale ZIG ZIGLAR Why We Buy PACO UNDERHILL Twenty-five years ago, self-proclaimed urban geographer and retail anthropologist Paco Underhill founded a company called Envirosell that basically observes people shopping. His company then advises organizations, from banks to The Gap, on how to best communicate with their customers and ultimately sell more “stuff,” the goal for all retail organizations. Underhill’s science of shopping involves “trackers,” whom he calls the field researchers of the science. These trackers stealthily follow shoppers through a store, noting on a paper form everything the shopper does. With the help of video, they personally measure “close to nine hundred different aspects of shopper-store interaction.” Their findings are then factored into store design, signage, and product placement. Underhill took this rich material and wrote Why We Buy based on the mechanics, demographics, and, finally, the dynamics of shopping. Purple Cow SETH GODIN The only way you are going to grow your business, get the job you want, or see your cause get traction is to be remarkable, to stand out from the herd. How many experiences did you have today that you are going to tell your five closest friends about? One? None? Now, think about the experiences your customers had today. Will they be raving to their friends? If your answer to the question is not a confident “yes,” then it’s time to do something remarkable. The Tipping Point MALCOLM GLADWELL In social epidemics, Gladwell presents three essentials to the phenomenon: the Law of the Few; the Stickiness Factor, and the Power of Context. The Law of the Few introduces us to three social groups; the Mavens, the Connectors, and the Salesmen. The Mavens are the “databank,” brilliant people to whom we look for answers; Connectors are the “social glue,” those people who know people; and Salesmen are the people who have “the skills to persuade us when we are unconvinced of what we are hearing, and they are as critical to the tipping of word-of-mouth epidemics as the other two groups.” To explain the second essential, the Stickiness Factor, Gladwell offers examples that include my favorite about the television show Blue’s Clues. To make sure the show resonates with the audience, researchers test every show three times before it goes on air, meeting with preschoolers every week to tweak the scripts. I just love the concept of going directly to your audience and using the data to create a product that is memorable, even if the changes are small. The Broken Windows theory is an example of the third essential, the Power of Context, which argues that an epidemic does not occur in a vacuum. In the Broken Window theory, if a window of a building is broken and left unrepaired, people will conclude that nobody cares, nobody is in charge, and, as a result, more windows will be broken, leading to more crime in the vicinity. Gladwell uses David Gunn’s work in overseeing a multibillion-dollar reclamation of the New York City subway system to show the reversal of just such a trend. In the 1980s, crime in NYC was at its highest level in history. The subway system was in a shambles, the cars were often covered with graffiti, and people were afraid to use the system. One of the first things David Gunn did was set up a plan to clean the graffiti off the subway cars and keep it off. The transit workers became almost obsessive about removing the graffiti: no car with graffiti would leave the yard.This cleaning of the cars showed riders that the system, the “broken window,” was being fixed and the momentum of crime was interrupted. “The Tipping Point is the biography of an idea, and the idea is very simple.” As people try to stay in step with a rapidly evolving business landscape, they are turning to journalistic books that bring the big picture into focus, like Thomas Friedman’s The World Is Flat, Gladwell’s next book, Blink, and Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner’s Freakonomics. Naked Economics CHARLES WHEELAN Financial Intelligence KAREN BERMAN AND JOE KNIGHT WITH JOHN CASE The Knowing-Doing Gap JEFFREY PFEFFER AND ROBERT I. SUTTON Hear one, see one, do one.” That’s how surgical residents learn new procedures. The final step of performing the operation proves that knowledge has been acquired and transferred. This training construct matches one used by the U.S. military during simulated drills and livefire exercises to prepare soldiers for combat. Airline pilots, ocean freighter captains, and professional athletes follow the same strategy, but business practitioners seem to favor theory over practice. Six Thinking Hats EDWARD DE BONO White is neutral and objective. The white hat is concerned with objective facts and figures. Red suggests anger (seeing red), rage, and emotions. The red hat gives the emotional view. Black is somber and serious. The black hat is cautious and careful. It points out the weaknesses in an idea. Yellow is sunny and positive. The yellow hat is optimistic and covers hope and positive thinking. Green is grass, vegetation, and abundant, fertile growth. The green hat indicates creativity and new ideas. Blue is cool, and it is also the color of the sky, which is above everything else. The blue hat is concerned with control, the organization of the thinking process, and the use of other hats. The Art of the Start 2.0 GUY KAWASAKI For example, in a list of ways to avoid hiring mistakes, he gives us the Top Ten lies job candidates use, including: Lie: “I’ve never been with a company for more than a year because I get bored easily.” Truth: “It takes people about a year to figure out that I’m a bozo.” Lie: “I am a vice president, but no one reports to me.” Truth: “Any bozo can become a vice president at my company.” More Than You Know MICHAEL J. MAUBOUSSIN “The Consilient Observer.” Consillience—the idea that all knowledge can be unified into a single working system—has heavily influenced Mauboussin’s investing philosophy. Breadth of knowledge creates, rather than opposes, depth of knowledge. Each essay ties an accessible metaphor to a piece of specific research and its implications for investors. Don’t be scared off by the financial angle. The essence of Mauboussin’s work lingers on investigating how humans can make better decisions—something we can all use help with. To dismiss the work as not in your purview would be to miss the richness of sources Mauboussin draws from and miss the very point of using a broader base of knowledge to make better decisions. “There are too many layers of interactions in the brain. The parts don’t explain the whole.” Mauboussin unveils other unpredictable musings through the book: What can Tupperware parties teach us about influence? What can the evolution of Tiger Woods’s golf swing say about finding optimal solutions? The breadth of subjects Mauboussin draws from and his central message that we should never put limits on what we know should inspire each of us to develop more numerous sources of inspiration as we try to make better sense of what we do and of the greater world around us.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Haryati Abd. Halim

    saya tak reti nak review buku...cuma nak senaraikan apa tajuk buku yang dicadangkan kita baca.. 1.Flow: The psychology of Optimal Experience ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi 2. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity ~ David Allen 3. The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide T Getting The Right Things Done ~ Peter F. Drucker 4. How to be a Star at Work: 9 Breakthrough Strategies You Need to Succeed ~ Robert E. Kelley 5. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Person saya tak reti nak review buku...cuma nak senaraikan apa tajuk buku yang dicadangkan kita baca.. 1.Flow: The psychology of Optimal Experience ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi 2. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity ~ David Allen 3. The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide T Getting The Right Things Done ~ Peter F. Drucker 4. How to be a Star at Work: 9 Breakthrough Strategies You Need to Succeed ~ Robert E. Kelley 5. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change ~ Stephen R. Covey 6. How to Win Friends and Influence People ~ Dale Carnagie 7. Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive:Outsell, Outmanage, Outmotivate and Outnegotiate Your Competition ~ Harvey B. Mackay 8. The Power of Intuition: How To Use Your Gut Feelings to Make Better Decisions at Work ~ Gary Klein 9. What Should I Do with My Live? The True Story of People Who ANswered the Ultimate Question ~ Po Bronson 10. Oh, the Places You'll Go! ~ Dr. Seuss/Theodore Geisel 11. Chasing Daylight: How My Forthcoming Death Transformed My Life ~ Eugene O'Kelly 12. On Becoming a Leader: The Leadership Clasic ~ Warren Bennis 13. The Leadership Moment: Nine True Stories of Triumph and Disaster and Their Lesson for Us All ~ Michael Useem 14. The Leadership Challenge ~ James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner 15. Leadership Is an Art ~ Max De Pree 16. The Radical Leap: A Personal Lesson in Extreme Leadership ~Steve Farber 17. Control Your Destiny or Someone Else Will ~ Noel M. Tichy and Stratford Sherman 18. Leading Change ~ John P. Kotter 19. Questions of Character: Illuminating the Heart of Leadership Through Literature ~Joseph L. Badaracco Jr. 20. The Story Factor: Inspiration, Influence and Persusion Through the Art of Storytelling ~ Annette Simmons 21. Never Give In! The Bset of Winston Churchill's Speeches 22. In Search of Excellence: Lessons from America's Best-Run Comppanies ~ Thomas J. Peters and Robert H. Waterman Jr. 23. Good to Great: Why Some Companies make the Leap...and Others Don't ~ Jim Collins 24. The Innovator's Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That ~ Clayton M. Christensen 25. Only the Paranoid Survive: How to exploit the Crisis Points That Challenge Every Company ~ Andrew S. Grove 26. Who Says Elephants Can't Dance? Leading a Great Enterprise through Dramatic Change~ Louis V. Gerstner Jr. 27. Discovering the Soul of Service: The Nine Drivers of Sustainable Business Success ~ Leonard L. Berry 28. Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done ~ Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan 29. Competing for the Future ~ Gary Hamel and C.K.Prahalad 30. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion ~ Robert B. Cialdini 31. Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind ~ Al Rise and Jack Trout 32. Selling the Invisible: A Field Guide to Modern Marketing ~ Harry Beckwith 33. Zag: The #1 Strategy of High Performance Brands ~ Marty Neumeier 34. Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling Disruptive Products to Mainstream Customers ~ geoffrey A. Moore 35. Secrets of Closing the Sale ~ Zig Ziglar 36. How to Become a Rainmaker: The Rules for Getting and Keeping Customers and Clients ~ Jeffrey J. Fox 37. Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping ~ Paco Underhill 38. The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre and Every Business a Stage ~ B. joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore 39. Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable ~ seth Godon 40. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference ~ Malcolm Gladwell 41. Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science ~ Charles Wheelan 42. Financial Intelligence: A Manager's Guide to Knowing What the Numbers Really Mean ~ Karen Berman and Joe Knight with John Case 43. The Balanced Scorecard: Translating Strategy into Action ~ Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton 44. The Essential Drucker: The Best of Sixty Yeras of Peter Drucker's Essential Writings on MAnagement ~ Peter F. Drucker 45. Out of Crisis ~ W. Edwards Deming 46. Toyota Production System: Beyond large-Scale Production ~ Taiichi Ohno 47. Reengineering the Corporation: A Manifesto for Business Revolution ~ Michael Hammer and James Champy 48. The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement ~ Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox 49. The Great Game of Business: Unlocking the Power and Profitablility of Open- Book Management ~ Jack Stack with Bo Burlingham 50. First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Diffrently ~ marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman 51. A New Brand world: 8 Principles for Achieving Brand Leadership in the 21st Century ~ Scott Bedbury with Stephen Fenichell 52. Now, Discover Your Strengths ~ Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clinton 53. The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge into Action ~ Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I Sutton 54. The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadershiup Fable ~ Patrick Lencioni 55. Six Thinking Hats ~ Edward De Bono 56. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockfeller ~ Ron Chernow 57. My years with General Motors ~ Alfred P. Sloan Jr. 58. The HP Way: How Bill Hewlwtt and I built Our Company ~ David Packard 59. Personal History ~ Katharine Graham 60. Moments of Truth: New Startegies for Today Consumer-Driven Economy ~ Jan Carlzon 61. Sam Walton: Made in America-My Story ~ Sam Walton with John Huey 62. Losing My Virginity: How I've Survived, Had Fun, and made a fortune Doing Business My Way ~ Richard Branson 63. The Art of the Start~Guy Kawasaki 64. The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It ~ Michael E. Gerber 65.The Republic of Tea: The Story of the Creation of a Business, as Told Through the Personal Letters of Its Founders ~ Mel Ziegler, Patricia Ziegler and Bill Rosenzweig 66. The Partnership Charter: How to Start Out Right with New Business Partnership (or Fix the One You'll In) ~ David Gage 67. Growing a Business ~ Paul Hawken 68. Guerrilla Marketing: Easy and Inexpensive Strategies for Making Big Profits from Your Small Business ~ Jay Conrad Levinson 69. The Monk and the Riddle: The Art of Creating a Life While Making a Living ~ Randy Komisar with Kent Lineback 70. McDonald's: BehiNd the Arches ~ John F. Love 71. American Steel: Hot Metal Men and the Resurrection of the Rust Bell ~ Richard Preston 72. The Force ~ David Dorsey 73. The Smatest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Ehron ~ Nethany Mclean and Peter Elkind 74. When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management ~ Rower Lowestein 75. Moneyball ~ Michael Lewis 76. Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace ~ Gordon Mackenzie 77. The Art of Innovation: Lessons in creativity from IDEO, America Leading Design Firm ~ Tom Kelley with Jonathan Littman 78. Jump Start Your Business Brain: The Scientific Way to Make More Money ~ Doug Hall 79. A Whack on the Side of the Head: How You Can Be More Creative ~ Roger Von Oech 80. The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It For Life ~ Twyla Tharp 81. The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life ~ Rosamund Stone Zander and Benjamin Zander 82. The Age of Unreason: Reflections of a Reluctant Capitalist ~ Charles Handy 83. Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World ~ Kevin Kelly 84. The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life ~ Richard Florida 85. Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ ~ Daniel Goleman 86. Driven: How Nature Shapes Our Choices ~ Paul R. Lawrence and Nitin Nohria 87. To engineer Is Human: The Role of Failure in Successful Design ~ Henry Petroski 88. The Wisdom of Crowds ~ James Suroweicki 89. Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die ~ Chip Heath and Dan Heath 90. The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels ~ Michael Watkins 91. Up the Organization: How to Stop the Corporation from Stifling People and Strangling Profits, Foreword by Warren Bennis ~ Robert Townsend 92. Beyond the Core: expand Your market without Abandoning Your Roots ~ Chris Zook 93. Little Red Book of Selling: 12.5 Principles of Sales Greatness ~ Jeffrey Gitomer 94. What the CEO Wants You to Know: Using Business Acumen to Understand How Your Company Really Works ~ Ram Charan 95. The Team Handbook ~ Peter R. Scholtes, Brian L. Joiner, and Barbara J. Streibel 96. A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM ~ Thomas J. Watson Jr. 97. Lucky or Smart? Secrets to an entrepreneurial Life ~ Bo Peabody 98. The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization ~ Thomas L. Friedman 99. Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques ~ Michael Michalko 100. More Than You Know: Finding Financial Wisdom in Unconventional Places ~ Michael J. Mauboussin

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    This book would be useful if it were just a list of recommended books to read. It is useful as a collection of book synopses worth the attention of anyone interested in business books. What moves it beyond a presentation of useful ideas in the context of book reviews is that when ideas compete with each other you get a high level comparison and contrast. For example, the review of Steven Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People discusses intellectual differences with Dale Carnagie's H This book would be useful if it were just a list of recommended books to read. It is useful as a collection of book synopses worth the attention of anyone interested in business books. What moves it beyond a presentation of useful ideas in the context of book reviews is that when ideas compete with each other you get a high level comparison and contrast. For example, the review of Steven Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People discusses intellectual differences with Dale Carnagie's How to Win Friends and Influence People. I also liked the references at the end of each review that lead to other books, both in the included 100 and outside. A lot of work went into defining a structure for the book to put related topics together, to making the key ideas easily accessible, and to providing cross-references so the reviews can be approached in many different ways. The selection criteria eliminated books with ideas that are no longer accepted, so the choices are all relevant for today. If you are looking for enough information to implement the ideas from the original books, you won't get what you need here. If your goal is to peek at concepts to decide which books to read, this book can be very helpful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    If you're at all interested in business books, you need this useful volume. CEO-READ owners Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten perform the incredibly useful function of sifting through the 100,000 or so business books that are out there and finding the 100 or so (there are rec's for further reading) that are real show-stoppers. They give the reader a page or two on each book -- just enough to make an intelligent decision about whether or not to read it. And there are all kinds of asides, lists, fac If you're at all interested in business books, you need this useful volume. CEO-READ owners Jack Covert and Todd Sattersten perform the incredibly useful function of sifting through the 100,000 or so business books that are out there and finding the 100 or so (there are rec's for further reading) that are real show-stoppers. They give the reader a page or two on each book -- just enough to make an intelligent decision about whether or not to read it. And there are all kinds of asides, lists, factoids in between the reviews to keep things lively. This is a treasure, and business book readers everywhere are in Jack and Todd's debt.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Having just completed an MBA program, my brain was full of textbook data, yet I knew there were countless other business books that were important for me to read. But, what were they? I certainly didn't want to spend ANY time reading more books that didn't work for me. This book helped. There were some included that I knew were on my list, and this book told me more about those books. There were also many others I was not aware of, and after reading about them in this book, I new they were also Having just completed an MBA program, my brain was full of textbook data, yet I knew there were countless other business books that were important for me to read. But, what were they? I certainly didn't want to spend ANY time reading more books that didn't work for me. This book helped. There were some included that I knew were on my list, and this book told me more about those books. There were also many others I was not aware of, and after reading about them in this book, I new they were also essential for me. The book not only provided direction, it gave me insight toward a personal path -- the book features a sort of 'choose-your-own-adventure' style that lead me to business categories I didn't expect to find myself pursuing. Learning is good!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Vallarino

    I open it and the first book that comes out is "Flow" and I am already reading it. A lot of books on business, managerial, marketing, etc. insight. Tried to read Drucker, will have to get into that mind set. It is still current for these times. It was an enjoyable trip through this book learning about things that I did not know and applying them to life. The Purple Cow book is one of the books listed there. I open it and the first book that comes out is "Flow" and I am already reading it. A lot of books on business, managerial, marketing, etc. insight. Tried to read Drucker, will have to get into that mind set. It is still current for these times. It was an enjoyable trip through this book learning about things that I did not know and applying them to life. The Purple Cow book is one of the books listed there.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Klompas

    I was only able to read the section at the end titled How to Read a Business Book. But this was enough to garner a response. The advice given here is useful for many types of non-fiction and even for fiction, to an extent. I found Satterstein's pointers to be a nice reminder. Follow recommendations, read the introduction and judge by the cover, and don't forget about the index. Then read for an audience, don't be afraid to walk away from a book. And finally, share what you've learned. I was only able to read the section at the end titled How to Read a Business Book. But this was enough to garner a response. The advice given here is useful for many types of non-fiction and even for fiction, to an extent. I found Satterstein's pointers to be a nice reminder. Follow recommendations, read the introduction and judge by the cover, and don't forget about the index. Then read for an audience, don't be afraid to walk away from a book. And finally, share what you've learned.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric Schultz

    Great list, strong summaries How to select and read a book, the last essay, had a number of good tips and was especially good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kieran

    The 100 Best Business Books of All Time is a fantastic book about books and an excellent way to quickly (over around 400 pages) get a snapshot of some of the best modern business books out there. I found it particularly useful in coming up with a reading list for the year ahead. The authors review 100 books across 11 key areas including: management, strategy, self improvement, marketing biographies and others. The reviews are a perfect length, typically 2-3 pages and tend to feel like a combinati The 100 Best Business Books of All Time is a fantastic book about books and an excellent way to quickly (over around 400 pages) get a snapshot of some of the best modern business books out there. I found it particularly useful in coming up with a reading list for the year ahead. The authors review 100 books across 11 key areas including: management, strategy, self improvement, marketing biographies and others. The reviews are a perfect length, typically 2-3 pages and tend to feel like a combination of critique, summary of important ideas and insight into the authors personal use of the book in real world business life. Each review also typically contains some bullet points and comments about the books length, accessibility and practicality. An added bonus is the final section which explains how the authors suggest you read and retain business books. All in all a great book for anyone looking to create a business book 'to-read' list.

  11. 4 out of 5

    WR

    Since I have access to a large business library (though I usually just pick up what's on the business bestsellers or New racks), I thought I would read this book to seek some inspiration on what else I could read. An interesting collection - some to-be-expected titles (7 Habits, Good to Great, etc), but also some surprises (The Monk and the Riddle). But besides the ones that I had already read (or knew about), I only found 3 books that I recorded down in case I should want to look for them at so Since I have access to a large business library (though I usually just pick up what's on the business bestsellers or New racks), I thought I would read this book to seek some inspiration on what else I could read. An interesting collection - some to-be-expected titles (7 Habits, Good to Great, etc), but also some surprises (The Monk and the Riddle). But besides the ones that I had already read (or knew about), I only found 3 books that I recorded down in case I should want to look for them at some point. Ah well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John

    100 "best" business books of all time doesn't mean 100 "good" business books. I didn't enjoy the style of the reviews/synopsis of the books, didn't think a lot of the books really merit a mention... but I did see a few books in there I do want to read 100 "best" business books of all time doesn't mean 100 "good" business books. I didn't enjoy the style of the reviews/synopsis of the books, didn't think a lot of the books really merit a mention... but I did see a few books in there I do want to read

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi Sheikh

    Although it would be hard to say for real whether the reviews herein are actually on point without reading most of them, I found the general summarization of all the books to be quite nice. In some of the summaries, they manage to highlight the main topics and teachings of the books quite well.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dele Omotosho

    A great summary (more a review) of some top-notch books. Reading this will not replace reading the source material itself. This is more of a quick overview to see which you might like a deep-dive into, nicely broken down by genre.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    OK - I just had to know. This did just what it said on the label,and I now have a shortlist of new great books to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Todd Sattersten

    I am going to abstain from a review, given I wrote this one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tony Canas

    I'm a huge business book reader and this has become my guidebook to decide what to read next. They should publish updates for it every few years. I'm a huge business book reader and this has become my guidebook to decide what to read next. They should publish updates for it every few years.

  18. 5 out of 5

    InvestingByTheBooks.com

    As any newspaper publisher knows people love top lists. This entire book is a top list of business books. Jack Covert who is the founder of the business book retailer 800-CEO-READS and publisher of “Jack Covert Reads” has read and reviewed business literature for several decades. Todd Sattersten is the mechanical engineer from General Electric that turned to literature and who previously was the president of the company but now helps business experts realize their dream of writing books. The star As any newspaper publisher knows people love top lists. This entire book is a top list of business books. Jack Covert who is the founder of the business book retailer 800-CEO-READS and publisher of “Jack Covert Reads” has read and reviewed business literature for several decades. Todd Sattersten is the mechanical engineer from General Electric that turned to literature and who previously was the president of the company but now helps business experts realize their dream of writing books. The starting point for all this is that while they help business leaders solve problems there are over 10.000 business books published per year. Obviously, there is a need for some type of screening and these are the 100 titles that according to the authors offer the best help. The books are ranked on the quality of the presented idea, the applicability of the idea to practical business issues and the accessibility of the text. The titles are divided into a number of thematic chapters such as “You”, “Leadership”, “Sales & Marketing”, “Biographies”, “Entrepreneurship” etc. Looking at the total selection of literature it’s obvious that the authors prefer topics centered around leading people, values, inspiration etc. over for example factual texts on processes or technology. They are not number types of persons but instead see more to the - perhaps - easier digested psychological and sociological aspects of management. This is obviously a matter of personality and taste even if I find the exclusion of Michael Porter’s Five Forces of Strategy from the list as not being accessible enough a bit harsh – after all the readers are supposed to be CEOs. A book review gives a critical evaluation of the text. It is a commentary and as such a dialogue with both the author and with the audience on the book’s purpose, thesis, strengths and weaknesses etc. This is in contrast to a book report that is a summary of a text and only marginally comments on the structure and the contents. The authors are expert reviewers and Jack Covert in particular truly delivers a reader- reviewer dialogue with the book as a backdrop for an argument. It is very tempting and effortless to read one more review and then one more. The problem is that after a while I started to feel empty. In a book format I actually would have preferred say fifty book reports of 5 pages each and more thorough summaries of the contents of the books instead of a hundred 2 to 3-page book reviews. The reader never gets enough meat on the bone but instead a multitude of teasers. The 100 Best Business Books of All Time becomes too much of just a list. That said, I had only read about 2/10th of the titles and while another 3/10th would hardly surprise anybody, half the titles were new hunting ground for me and I did find 5 or 6 titles that I will probably purchase in the future. The thematic chapters and the broad coverage of titles in each area gives you as a reader a good remainder of areas that you have thought about looking closer at in the future but then forgot about. This is obviously worth a lot, but spending some time browsing Amazon reviews would serve the same purpose. The thematic approach coupled with a longer description of the content of each book could instead have served to a really good introductory exposé over the business topics at hand. I love the fact that the authors have made a living out of reviewing business literature and wish them all the luck in the future. However, a number of book reviews stacked on top of each other don’t make a very interesting narrative for a business book in itself.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo Xavier

    I too share passion for bussiness books and I stumbled at The100best during my research. At the beginning I believed it could just be a "saved list for references" but the authors surprised me delivering value over the already valued worked. Some of the reviewed books I already read and I can say is not about spoiler either. Each book is explained with rich information with some of the original authors' biograph, history about the time the books was published or written; rasons about read and the I too share passion for bussiness books and I stumbled at The100best during my research. At the beginning I believed it could just be a "saved list for references" but the authors surprised me delivering value over the already valued worked. Some of the reviewed books I already read and I can say is not about spoiler either. Each book is explained with rich information with some of the original authors' biograph, history about the time the books was published or written; rasons about read and the kind problem it will help you solve. Connections to one another. Something about I planned to do for my son. At the end I felt silly because I've findout why I buy a lot of books (most never read) and have this huge "want to read" list (today more than 2oo). It emerge a bad way for select books. But I'm happy because I definitely learned to improved my way about selecting what's next to read. Fantastic! I couldn't stop! just loved!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    This was an odd read - some of the books' summaries seemed like enough to be able to skip the book entirely and still glean all the necessary info (which is a good commentary on business books in general), some were enticing enough for me to want to go read them (ostensibly the goal of this book). Of the latter category, many were books I didn't know anything about (e.g., The Wisdom of Crowds), others were books that I could have guessed existed, but didn't explicitly know about (e.g., a Rockefe This was an odd read - some of the books' summaries seemed like enough to be able to skip the book entirely and still glean all the necessary info (which is a good commentary on business books in general), some were enticing enough for me to want to go read them (ostensibly the goal of this book). Of the latter category, many were books I didn't know anything about (e.g., The Wisdom of Crowds), others were books that I could have guessed existed, but didn't explicitly know about (e.g., a Rockefeller biography). In the end, my takeaway is a list of books, some of which I'll seek out to read, others I might pick up if I'm hurting for a business read. If its sole purpose is a bunch of book recommendations, then I guess I'm happy with this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Willow Rankin

    This is a very interesting book, and it is essentially a list of synopsis of 100 of the best business books. Typically, I wouldn't rate a book of this sort that high, as you can find similar lists all over the internet, youtube, blogs and the like, but for the sheer number of books I have added to my too read list on Goodreads tells me that it was a fairly decent resource for finding out about business books. This is, however, not a dummies guide or cliffs notes version of the books, and instead This is a very interesting book, and it is essentially a list of synopsis of 100 of the best business books. Typically, I wouldn't rate a book of this sort that high, as you can find similar lists all over the internet, youtube, blogs and the like, but for the sheer number of books I have added to my too read list on Goodreads tells me that it was a fairly decent resource for finding out about business books. This is, however, not a dummies guide or cliffs notes version of the books, and instead does require reading of the original resources. For me, this is a one and done book. I've added the ones I like the look of to my goodreads. If you are looking for some recommendations this is a good place to start.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ralph N

    Good overview of some great books applicable to business, from fiction, business concepts, stories of companies, to biographies. You’ll be surprised when you have discovered you’ve read a lot of these already!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Britney Parish

    This is a really good list! I'm excited to read some of the selections! This is a really good list! I'm excited to read some of the selections!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pres

    I read this book because I followed their 800 CEO reads website for book recommendations. Apart from a few books that I made into my TBR list, the book does nothing much else.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    About half way through reading all of them. Love lists!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Holstein

    A great book about books, helping me decide what to read next. Good for skimming, especially the last section on "How to read a business book". A great book about books, helping me decide what to read next. Good for skimming, especially the last section on "How to read a business book".

  27. 5 out of 5

    George Hamilton

    Gave me insight into a lot of great books to read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Hardy

    I've read a fair few of them and I got some good reading ideas for the future too. I've read a fair few of them and I got some good reading ideas for the future too.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Anderson

    Solid listing of well read business books, added about 10 of the 100 to read. That would take me in the 50's so there are more to choose after that. Missing a few recent best sellers but you will learn valuable lessons about business and life reading most of these. The synopsis' are hit or miss but most are engaging enough. Not really a read, more of a browse. Recommended. Solid listing of well read business books, added about 10 of the 100 to read. That would take me in the 50's so there are more to choose after that. Missing a few recent best sellers but you will learn valuable lessons about business and life reading most of these. The synopsis' are hit or miss but most are engaging enough. Not really a read, more of a browse. Recommended.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Irfan Khan

    Excellent book!!

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