web site hit counter Poisoned Bread : Translations From Modern Marathi Dalit Literature - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Poisoned Bread : Translations From Modern Marathi Dalit Literature

Availability: Ready to download

Silenced for centuries by caste prejudice and social oppression, the Dalits of Maharashtra (formerly called ‘untouchables’) have only in the last forty years found a powerful voice in Marathi literature. The revolutionary social movement launched by their leader Dr Ambedkar was paralleled by a wave of writing that exploded in poetry, prose, fiction and autobiography of a r Silenced for centuries by caste prejudice and social oppression, the Dalits of Maharashtra (formerly called ‘untouchables’) have only in the last forty years found a powerful voice in Marathi literature. The revolutionary social movement launched by their leader Dr Ambedkar was paralleled by a wave of writing that exploded in poetry, prose, fiction and autobiography of a raw vigour, maturity, depth and richness of content, and shocking in its exposition of the bitterness of their experiences. One is jolted, too, by the quality of writing by a group denied access for long ages to any literary tradition. This important collection is the first anthology of Dalit literature. The writers more than eighty of them—presented here in English translations, are nearly all of the most prominent figures in Marathi Dalit literature, who have contributed to this unique phenomenon.


Compare

Silenced for centuries by caste prejudice and social oppression, the Dalits of Maharashtra (formerly called ‘untouchables’) have only in the last forty years found a powerful voice in Marathi literature. The revolutionary social movement launched by their leader Dr Ambedkar was paralleled by a wave of writing that exploded in poetry, prose, fiction and autobiography of a r Silenced for centuries by caste prejudice and social oppression, the Dalits of Maharashtra (formerly called ‘untouchables’) have only in the last forty years found a powerful voice in Marathi literature. The revolutionary social movement launched by their leader Dr Ambedkar was paralleled by a wave of writing that exploded in poetry, prose, fiction and autobiography of a raw vigour, maturity, depth and richness of content, and shocking in its exposition of the bitterness of their experiences. One is jolted, too, by the quality of writing by a group denied access for long ages to any literary tradition. This important collection is the first anthology of Dalit literature. The writers more than eighty of them—presented here in English translations, are nearly all of the most prominent figures in Marathi Dalit literature, who have contributed to this unique phenomenon.

30 review for Poisoned Bread : Translations From Modern Marathi Dalit Literature

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh

    Historically significant Dalit Literature from the Marathi Dalit Literature Movement that began with the first Conference of Dalit Writers in 1958.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil

    A well-curated collection of Dalit writings that were part of the Dalit Literary Movement in the 60s-80s, and translated from the original Marathi. Much of the writing is excellent: the short stories and autobiographical excerpts are particularly good. The short stories are enjoyable to read, tautly paced, with explosive plots that stand on their own merits regardless of the context of their creation. Focused on urban and rural poverty, and the humiliations that this poverty and caste create, th A well-curated collection of Dalit writings that were part of the Dalit Literary Movement in the 60s-80s, and translated from the original Marathi. Much of the writing is excellent: the short stories and autobiographical excerpts are particularly good. The short stories are enjoyable to read, tautly paced, with explosive plots that stand on their own merits regardless of the context of their creation. Focused on urban and rural poverty, and the humiliations that this poverty and caste create, the stories nonetheless transcend what could have been the narrow confines of socialist realist propaganda. The poetry and essays are of more mixed quality (this may also reflect that they are harder to translate). Some of the poems (e.g., Under Dadar Bridge) are really superb, but others are basically agitprop. I understand the importance of poetry that names your oppressor, names your oppression, and calls you to arms to fight it; it just gets a little bland to read 50 such poems in a row. Besides Ambedkar’s speech, the essays were a wash (Ambedkar, unlike the other essayists, is a skilled rhetorician). The essays were primarily interested in Marxist historiography of South Asia or debates on socialist realist vs. less constrained aesthetics, neither of which are that interesting. The discussion of Black Arts vs. Dalit Literature was interesting, though much of the Dalit authors understanding of race was incorrect and rooted in now debunked “scientific” understandings of race. Likely a reflection of the original movement itself, this text is gendered. The authors are almost all male, as are their characters, as is their understanding of the oppression of Dalit women (rape as lost honor or undone family structure more than traumatic violence), and as is the aesthetic/political sensibility advanced (I.e., male citizens claiming full citizenship). I would be interested in more collections/examples of Dalit women’s writings, as I suspect they would add more nuance to these texts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kookie

    The short stories in this volume were exceptional.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amaan Pirani

    Really powerful short stories, poems, and literature on indian casteism

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kasturi Dadhe

    an emphatic read..

  6. 4 out of 5

    Raunak Bose

    Magnificent piece of work. Dalit poetry has had few anthologies better than this one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Themreichon L

    stories of social oppressions and castes prejudice. a heart wrenching stories of social woes and the struggles of the Dalits. Good book .

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ruia

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jubi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pranjal Srivastava

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tejas Harad

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tanu Sharma

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sriya

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julia Schreder

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vimal Navlani

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jatin Kelkar

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aditi

  18. 4 out of 5

    Manju Ujnam

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bhanuj Kappal

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yashpal

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shamsu Panamanna

  22. 4 out of 5

    Youze da Funk

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vishwa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

  25. 5 out of 5

    R P

  26. 4 out of 5

    GODOT

  27. 5 out of 5

    Priyanka Kanhekar

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandhya Deepthi

  29. 5 out of 5

    T S

  30. 5 out of 5

    Milien Mampra

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.