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INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER Discover #1 New York Times bestselling author David Bach’s three secrets to financial freedom in an engaging story that will show you that you are richer than you think. Drawing on the author’s experiences teaching millions of people around the world to live a rich life, this fast, easy l INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER Discover #1 New York Times bestselling author David Bach’s three secrets to financial freedom in an engaging story that will show you that you are richer than you think. Drawing on the author’s experiences teaching millions of people around the world to live a rich life, this fast, easy listen reveals how anyone—from millennials to baby boomers—can still make his or her dreams come true. In this compelling, heartwarming parable, Bach and his bestselling coauthor John David Mann (The Go-Giver) tell the story of Zoey, a twenty-something woman living and working in New York City. Like many young professionals, Zoey is struggling to make ends meet under a growing burden of credit card and student loan debt, working crazy hours at her dream job but still not earning enough to provide a comfortable financial cushion. At her boss’s suggestion, she makes friends with Henry, the elderly barista at her favorite Brooklyn coffee shop. Henry soon reveals his “Three Secrets to Financial Freedom,” ideas Zoey dismisses at first but whose true power she ultimately comes to appreciate. Over the course of a single week, Zoey discovers that she already earns enough to secure her financial future and realize her truest dreams—all she has to do is make a few easy shifts in her everyday routine. The Latte Factor demystifies the secrets to achieving financial freedom, inspiring you to realize that it’s never too late to reach for your dreams. By following the simple, proven path that Henry shows Zoey, anyone can make small changes today that will have big impact for a lifetime, proving once again that “David Bach is the financial expert to listen to when you’re intimidated by your finances” (Tony Robbins, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Money: Master the Game).


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INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER Discover #1 New York Times bestselling author David Bach’s three secrets to financial freedom in an engaging story that will show you that you are richer than you think. Drawing on the author’s experiences teaching millions of people around the world to live a rich life, this fast, easy l INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER Discover #1 New York Times bestselling author David Bach’s three secrets to financial freedom in an engaging story that will show you that you are richer than you think. Drawing on the author’s experiences teaching millions of people around the world to live a rich life, this fast, easy listen reveals how anyone—from millennials to baby boomers—can still make his or her dreams come true. In this compelling, heartwarming parable, Bach and his bestselling coauthor John David Mann (The Go-Giver) tell the story of Zoey, a twenty-something woman living and working in New York City. Like many young professionals, Zoey is struggling to make ends meet under a growing burden of credit card and student loan debt, working crazy hours at her dream job but still not earning enough to provide a comfortable financial cushion. At her boss’s suggestion, she makes friends with Henry, the elderly barista at her favorite Brooklyn coffee shop. Henry soon reveals his “Three Secrets to Financial Freedom,” ideas Zoey dismisses at first but whose true power she ultimately comes to appreciate. Over the course of a single week, Zoey discovers that she already earns enough to secure her financial future and realize her truest dreams—all she has to do is make a few easy shifts in her everyday routine. The Latte Factor demystifies the secrets to achieving financial freedom, inspiring you to realize that it’s never too late to reach for your dreams. By following the simple, proven path that Henry shows Zoey, anyone can make small changes today that will have big impact for a lifetime, proving once again that “David Bach is the financial expert to listen to when you’re intimidated by your finances” (Tony Robbins, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Money: Master the Game).

30 review for The Latte Factor: Why You Don't Have to Be Rich to Live Rich

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deedi Brown (DeediReads)

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Honestly, I wanted to throw this book out a window. The bones of good financial advice are there — invest for retirement, prioritize what matters, pay yourself first — but the execution is gendered, plays into harmful stereotypes, and also potentially toxic. This book is about a young girl named Zoey who has, gosh darn it, just never been good at money. She works for a tra Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Honestly, I wanted to throw this book out a window. The bones of good financial advice are there — invest for retirement, prioritize what matters, pay yourself first — but the execution is gendered, plays into harmful stereotypes, and also potentially toxic. This book is about a young girl named Zoey who has, gosh darn it, just never been good at money. She works for a travel magazine but has no money to travel. One day, after randomly contemplating the 9/11 Memorial on her way to work (?), she has lunch with her boss, Barbara (a boring, non-fashionable woman who brings her lunch). Barbara tells her to talk to Henry, the guy at the coffee shop Zoey goes to each morning. What ensues is a week of Zoey learning valuable life and financial lessons from a 70-year-old man (that she just can't put her finger on it, but man, he's just so likeable, what could it be, could it be that a MAN wrote this book and this is how he would like to think young women look at old men??). He's apparently a human calculator (contrasting nicely with Zoey's inexplicable inability to do math) and can calculate the effect of 10% returns on $5 a day in his head. He also does weird things like holding onto her hands and staring into her eyes as she's trying to leave to tell her that she can change her destiny by paying herself first. I could go on and on. I highlighted so many creepy and sexist sentences. Yes, stereotypes exist for a reason, but playing into them like this is NOT the way to address them. Now let's talk about the idea that giving up your daily latte can make you a millionaire by the time you retire. UM, NO. Maybe giving up your coffee can help you save for a vacation, but you only have one coffee — that one coffee isn't going to solve all your financial problems. The book tries to address this by saying it's a metaophor; it's not about depriving yourself, it's about giving up what you don't really need in service of your future self. Well, I completely agree with that. But not by making people question every single latte they buy. That just breeds guilt. Also, what about the people who come from less privilege who legitimately cannot buy lattes? What's your magic pill for them? ALSO ALSO, just the idea of "give up your daily latte" is inherently gendered advice. Men don't usually buy lattes because society has told them it isn't manly to do so. So do you tell those tech bros to give up their Friday six-pack of beer? I didn't think so. Ultimately, this was creepy and oversimplified and tone-deaf and problematic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Pandering nonsense. A couple of middle-aged men explaining to women why "we're so bad with money" (say that quoted part in baby voice, please). You know, because we just can't skip our $5/day habit of a latte that if invested in the stock market would become something REAL. Let's make sure to keep it a latte, or a frappe, or some other nonsense that a MAN would never buy. Let's not make it craft beer, or tech gadgets, or sporting events, or cars/motorcycles/trucks that MEN buy. They even charmin Pandering nonsense. A couple of middle-aged men explaining to women why "we're so bad with money" (say that quoted part in baby voice, please). You know, because we just can't skip our $5/day habit of a latte that if invested in the stock market would become something REAL. Let's make sure to keep it a latte, or a frappe, or some other nonsense that a MAN would never buy. Let's not make it craft beer, or tech gadgets, or sporting events, or cars/motorcycles/trucks that MEN buy. They even charmingly formatted this as the male barista mansplaining the whole plan to the bad-with-money woman. (Do I even need to add the "bad-with-money" part? Isn't that a given?) I'll also say, I do plenty of investing, and I've never seen the returns that would make a$5/day habit turn into a million dollars. (Also, I don't buy $5 coffees.) How this book got published is beyond me. How it got any good reviews is even more amazing. There's much, much, much better lit out there for financial wellness and planning.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Gillies

    This is a fiction-style book with the purpose of sharing advice on how to save money and become rich. While I did gleam a couple of tips that I'll be putting into practice, unfortunately I found the MC irritatingly thick and the people giving advice incredibly patronizing (" I know you wouldn't really understand this, you're only in your twenties"... um, okay...). That being said , the MC was so stupid and lacking in even the most basic financial literacy that this was probably necessary. She do This is a fiction-style book with the purpose of sharing advice on how to save money and become rich. While I did gleam a couple of tips that I'll be putting into practice, unfortunately I found the MC irritatingly thick and the people giving advice incredibly patronizing (" I know you wouldn't really understand this, you're only in your twenties"... um, okay...). That being said , the MC was so stupid and lacking in even the most basic financial literacy that this was probably necessary. She doesn't seem to realise that automatic payments are a thing, and doesn't understand what this "latte factor" people keep ranting about (while saying how saving $5 a day with compound interest adds up over time, and literally crunching numbers on it!)could possibly be (later she talks about the three coffees she buys everyday. Also, lets just ignore the fact that coffee buying is something older generations are on millennials' backs for ALL THE TIME). This aside, I do understand this is a book to inform, not entertain with amazing plot or characters. And yes, I did glean a couple of tips/ reminders from it :(view spoiler)[ set up automatic payments into savings and Kiwisaver (The New Zealand version of a 401k) , invest once I have enough (hide spoiler)] ; many however seemed out of touch with the people hes trying to address (view spoiler)[ "don't rent, buy a house". Yeah cool, and that's a possibility once my $5 a day has multiplied, but that's a long way off, even if my money does add up to $2000 a year) (hide spoiler)] , and others out of touch with reality as a whole (view spoiler)[ where are these 10% savings accounts? I will give him this one however, as you could invest elsewhere and maybe get these returns. "You don't really need to earn more money". So I completely get that habits are make or break in savings and money making. However, I work several jobs alongside my full-time study for a reason- I live in New Zealand's most expensive city, and the money I am loaned (yes, loaned, not handed) because I am a student is not enough to cover my basic living costs. If I could change my working arrangements through habits, I would, and this sort of situation isn't recognised. (hide spoiler)] . All in all I do understand that this book was a quick snapshot of tips and not supposed to be in depth, so room should be made for that. There's enough over-explanation in here not to add in explaining that there isn't really a one size fits all finance solution. I can see this book being useful to someone with very little (like, close to zero) financial literacy, or maybe a teenager starting to think about what their relationship with finance as an adult may look like. I suppose in summary, I think this book just needs a bit of an edit, making the characters less ridiculous and prioritizing what does and doesn't need explanation . I am grateful as I've mentioned for the reminders on prioritising savings and things that are important to me in life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Bergmann

    As an intelligent, grown up woman reading a book about finance (even a short, simple parabola like this one, that I expected to be super simplified), I felt insulted. Sexist and full of old, destructive stereotypes. I understand that the author is trying to do good here. Sharing good advice and trying to help people that are struggling with the basics of money management. It is supposed to be for beginners and suitable for anyone, very simple language, didactic, all that. And it does have good si As an intelligent, grown up woman reading a book about finance (even a short, simple parabola like this one, that I expected to be super simplified), I felt insulted. Sexist and full of old, destructive stereotypes. I understand that the author is trying to do good here. Sharing good advice and trying to help people that are struggling with the basics of money management. It is supposed to be for beginners and suitable for anyone, very simple language, didactic, all that. And it does have good simple advice for beginners. But it is more patronising than helpful. It feels like the author thinks that everyone that doesn’t know what he is ‘teaching’ here has to be super dumb, therefore needs to be treated like one. The 27-year-old lady that you’re supposed to connect with if you’re looking to learn something here looks like a clueless child in relation to money and her interactions with people. Every little thing she is taught (because that is the only way she could learn something, of course!) seems like the most incredible thing anyone could ever think of, even when they are quite obvious given the context. It is interesting, as she seems quite successful at her job, which suggests that she is not as dumb as her thoughts or conversations show. But.. hey, about money? Completely brainless. Also, of course she is a woman. And gets advice from a wise old man. I understand that we still live in a world where women are less stimulated to take real ownership of their financial lives and as a consequence struggle more with money management, but to describe adult woman in an infantilised and idiotic way doesn't really help fix that, let alone connect with them. The regular 27-year-old woman may not be great at saving and investing, like most people in the world (man AND woman), but it doesn't make them stupid or incapable of understanding things without being taught like children. If that is the way you want to teach your techniques, at least use a child as your main character and leave the adult woman alone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Read in about two hours. A lot of fluff to explain three principles - this would be good for a teenager just learning about money management.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alysson

    Thank you to netgalley for the free copy of this week in exchange for an honest review. In general, it has solid financial advice (pay yourself first, don’t budget—make it automatic, live rich now). HOWEVER, I felt like I was being #mansplained throughout this. The girl, Zoey, has never been good at money. She meets a guy named Henry who apparently IS good at money. He gives her some financial advice that she apparently could not have figured out her own. Essentially, this book is focused on a ma Thank you to netgalley for the free copy of this week in exchange for an honest review. In general, it has solid financial advice (pay yourself first, don’t budget—make it automatic, live rich now). HOWEVER, I felt like I was being #mansplained throughout this. The girl, Zoey, has never been good at money. She meets a guy named Henry who apparently IS good at money. He gives her some financial advice that she apparently could not have figured out her own. Essentially, this book is focused on a man explaining to a woman why we aren’t good with money (just skip your latte!) and that we should invest in the stock market instead.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mridu aka Storypals

    I am not big on non-fiction, self-help books reading. This one intrigued me, yeah mostly because of the subtitle 'Why you don't have to be rich to live rich' I had to pick it up. Now, this wasn't like any non-fiction book or well the ones I have read. It is basically fiction with lessons and suggestions through and through. That is what got me intrigued and helped me to continue reading the book. Now my problem with most self-help books is that they advertise a problem on the cover one picks it up I am not big on non-fiction, self-help books reading. This one intrigued me, yeah mostly because of the subtitle 'Why you don't have to be rich to live rich' I had to pick it up. Now, this wasn't like any non-fiction book or well the ones I have read. It is basically fiction with lessons and suggestions through and through. That is what got me intrigued and helped me to continue reading the book. Now my problem with most self-help books is that they advertise a problem on the cover one picks it up in the hopes of finding a solution and when they start reading, they generally tell that the solution is out there somewhere in the horizon and we will get to it but let's talk about the problem first, which goes on for almost half the book. Then there is some solution to it with a website attached, where you go and check and then you have to spend more money in hopes of finding a solution because talking about that problem so much has made me believe it is the end of the world. HATE THAT. There are also some books which give you a solution but then you don't know and you think you can't put them in practice. This book, on the other hand, will take you through a story of a girl who will face the problems that you are facing, ask the questions that might pop in your head and in the end she will also question the same thing- good solution but how do I do it? I am not accustomed to it and the author provides with a solution to that-- and that is the part I loved. I was able to relate and then put my plan of action in place. I was able to take away from the book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    It's not really a book, more like a Sophie's World of Finance for Dummies (or what you should have learned in Economics class in high-school). It's OK if you really don't know that retirement accounts exist for a reason (so you can retire when you can't work any more, get it?) and that using credit cards and taking out loans for things you don't need is a bad idea. It doesn't really explain anything, so you can't learn more than an excel sheet will tell you. Maybe there are people in the US who It's not really a book, more like a Sophie's World of Finance for Dummies (or what you should have learned in Economics class in high-school). It's OK if you really don't know that retirement accounts exist for a reason (so you can retire when you can't work any more, get it?) and that using credit cards and taking out loans for things you don't need is a bad idea. It doesn't really explain anything, so you can't learn more than an excel sheet will tell you. Maybe there are people in the US who have no idea that drinking expensive coffee and eating lunch in a restaurant every day uses up a lot of their personal income that doesn't go towards paying off loans. Now I'm just glad that in Europe we don't have a choice and contribute by default to at least a public retirement fund (plus all the private ones we can afford). I never thought I could be a millionaire, but it seems like if I follow my common sense, I may one day be one. To conclude, don't read this book unless you are really helpless and you hate money (so much that you can't make it stick to your wallet long enough to get you your own home and life in order).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nopadol Rompho

    What I love the most about this book is that the idea is so simple yet practical. It just shows you how you can live rich now and get rich later. I know many people will doubt it but to me it doesn't hurt to follow this book's advice. Read it, it will take only several hours since it is very short one. What I love the most about this book is that the idea is so simple yet practical. It just shows you how you can live rich now and get rich later. I know many people will doubt it but to me it doesn't hurt to follow this book's advice. Read it, it will take only several hours since it is very short one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erica Fraser

    Do not bother with this book. It is poorly written and seems like a money magazine article that someone tried to stretch into a book. There are many other books on saving that are much better than this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lance Eustache

    The Latte Factor is the book I wish was available when I started reading money books. While David Bach's Latte Factor theory is not new, this is the first book of his that focus on that strategy with some short mentions of the other things that was discussed in Mr. Bach's other books such as The Automatic Millionaire. The Latte Factor is the perfect first book for people who want to learn financial literacy or it can be refresher to those who have already read a money book or two. The Latte Factor is the book I wish was available when I started reading money books. While David Bach's Latte Factor theory is not new, this is the first book of his that focus on that strategy with some short mentions of the other things that was discussed in Mr. Bach's other books such as The Automatic Millionaire. The Latte Factor is the perfect first book for people who want to learn financial literacy or it can be refresher to those who have already read a money book or two.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Mercifully it was a short read and I'm also glad I checked it out from the library instead of spending my latte money on it. Mercifully it was a short read and I'm also glad I checked it out from the library instead of spending my latte money on it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rose Xue

    This was a couple hundred pages of fluff that could’ve essentially been condensed down into 3 bullet points that were nothing unique or particularly insightful.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Allysia K

    I get where this book was going, and the financial advice was good for someone like me who doesn't know the first thing about investing. The story was just so cartoony that I felt silly listening to it. I'm not even that much older than the target audience of the 27-year old woman. I just felt like the book treated me like I was a big dummy - which I kind of am on this topic, but I still don't appreciate being talked to as such. Yet I found myself adding another of Bach's books to my "to read" l I get where this book was going, and the financial advice was good for someone like me who doesn't know the first thing about investing. The story was just so cartoony that I felt silly listening to it. I'm not even that much older than the target audience of the 27-year old woman. I just felt like the book treated me like I was a big dummy - which I kind of am on this topic, but I still don't appreciate being talked to as such. Yet I found myself adding another of Bach's books to my "to read" list. I guess it isn't all bad!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Wasserman

    Please pause what you are doing and go read this book. It will only take a couple hours and it’s only $14 on Amazon. Reading it will get you excited to own your financial life and will be worth millions to you...literally!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    A waste of time unless you legitimately have no clue about your finances. The same common sense advice, repackaged and told in a drawn out story with fictional characters.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This was a good, quick financial read told in the form of a parable. I wasn't sure I'd like to read about finances through a fictional story, but I ended up enjoying the format! Zoey is a young career professional who constantly feels broke... which feels familiar to me and I'm sure many others in my generation. Frustrated by never having money for what she wants, her boss advises her to speak to Henry, a local barista. Through their new friendship, he reveals his “Three Secrets to Financial Fre This was a good, quick financial read told in the form of a parable. I wasn't sure I'd like to read about finances through a fictional story, but I ended up enjoying the format! Zoey is a young career professional who constantly feels broke... which feels familiar to me and I'm sure many others in my generation. Frustrated by never having money for what she wants, her boss advises her to speak to Henry, a local barista. Through their new friendship, he reveals his “Three Secrets to Financial Freedom,” which are: 1. pay yourself first, 2. make it automatic, and 3. live rich now. This book had good, solid advice with graphs and charts to demonstrate various things such as compound interest. Though it wasn't necessarily anything new to me, it was presented in an interesting way and was motivating and inspiring (which is what I generally look for in a finance book). All in all, I liked it. It offered some basic advice for beginners, and some that I'll take to heart and use myself. Some of the topics, like investing, will need to be explored further than what the book offered, but it got me thinking, which I appreciated.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for making the book available for me. I have read it and so has my husband. It looks like many of the characters in the book are fictitious. They Iive in New York City so it is always a basis for good story. My husband and I have been investing our savings for decades now. He even started long before I met him so he is very familiar with most aspects of personal finance and the power of compounded interest and investing money into a 401 (k). We both have read Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for making the book available for me. I have read it and so has my husband. It looks like many of the characters in the book are fictitious. They Iive in New York City so it is always a basis for good story. My husband and I have been investing our savings for decades now. He even started long before I met him so he is very familiar with most aspects of personal finance and the power of compounded interest and investing money into a 401 (k). We both have read numerous books about personal finance. We know that there is a lot of money to save but not buying a latte every day, bringing your own lunch to work (with some exceptions), etc. As a result, we did not really learn anything new in the field of personal finance from this book. This said, the book is well written and is easy to read. It can be a very good book for someone in his/her 20's and 30's to realize how important it is to take control of our finances. The information can be found in textbooks but this format is fun to read because it reads like a novel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Did anyone else hate this book as much as I did? It's no surprise that David Bach and John David Mann both happen to be Baby Boomer white men. Good God, I'm shocked they actually had the gall to frame their message as some sort of allegorical impartition of wisdom to a doe-eyed, twenty-something, latte-chugging woman. I'm horrified to see young women portrayed as this money-stupid, and I'm even more horrified to read them being "made smarter" by some older white men. I wonder what Jean Chatzky a Did anyone else hate this book as much as I did? It's no surprise that David Bach and John David Mann both happen to be Baby Boomer white men. Good God, I'm shocked they actually had the gall to frame their message as some sort of allegorical impartition of wisdom to a doe-eyed, twenty-something, latte-chugging woman. I'm horrified to see young women portrayed as this money-stupid, and I'm even more horrified to read them being "made smarter" by some older white men. I wonder what Jean Chatzky and my other money gurus think of this book. Boiled down: 1. Stop drinking $5 lattes and eating $10-15 lunches each day. 2. Keep your eye on big goals. 3. Save automatically / "pay yourself first." Simple enough. This book didn't require a Starbucksy narrative to draw me in, either-- wish Bach had assumed that level of intelligence among his readers. Wasn't this a best-seller? SMH.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Having read one of his other financial books, I was interested in reading this one as he had mentioned the "Latte Factor" elsewhere. This book takes the form of a story of a young woman with some financial struggles to showcase the financial and life principles the author wants to share with his audience. The book was a quick and easy read and I think he gets across his message fairly well. I like the use of wrapping up his financial/life principles in a full story as I think it may help people s Having read one of his other financial books, I was interested in reading this one as he had mentioned the "Latte Factor" elsewhere. This book takes the form of a story of a young woman with some financial struggles to showcase the financial and life principles the author wants to share with his audience. The book was a quick and easy read and I think he gets across his message fairly well. I like the use of wrapping up his financial/life principles in a full story as I think it may help people see themselves in a similar situation and see how his principles can help.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    I read an online preview of this book via NetGalley, and sit in awe of David Bach's ability to tell impactful, meaningful stories. THANK YOU David. I needed to read this right now, as I face a retirement that will not provide for our dreams unless we make immediate changes. This book is at the core of our 'how.' Highly recommended! If you're in high school or college, start applying this book's principles today - they will make all the difference down the road. I read an online preview of this book via NetGalley, and sit in awe of David Bach's ability to tell impactful, meaningful stories. THANK YOU David. I needed to read this right now, as I face a retirement that will not provide for our dreams unless we make immediate changes. This book is at the core of our 'how.' Highly recommended! If you're in high school or college, start applying this book's principles today - they will make all the difference down the road.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Culbertson

    The Latte Factor is quite possibly the best finanybook I have ever read. It is 10% about financial principles and 90% about vulnerability! That’s where real change starts to happen!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Wood

    Amazing book. Should be on everyone’s shelves ready to be referenced or given away when needed. It’s literally the only book you’ll need for a happy financial life.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    UGH. So. Much. Mansplaining. Let's not even discuss Bach's long-documented inability to generate believable numbers. It was optimistic 20 years ago, now he just looks like an idiot. UGH. So. Much. Mansplaining. Let's not even discuss Bach's long-documented inability to generate believable numbers. It was optimistic 20 years ago, now he just looks like an idiot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Condescending. Just read Sallie Krawcheck and Ellevest articles. This is frustrating because the idea behind the book is solid: use your money to bring you joy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    The needs to be required reading in order to graduate high school and then again after college and then again after graduate school and then again after you have kids.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Such a simple concept that I definitely need to put into practice. Pay yourself first is rule one in this book about how simple it is to start saving with just the cost of your morning latte. I really enjoyed the easy flow of the chapters and how Zoey was a normal mid twenties woman who had no idea how to save money. I felt this was the first book I've read that didn't lecture but told a story instead. I definitely learned a lot that I'll start to use regularly. Such a simple concept that I definitely need to put into practice. Pay yourself first is rule one in this book about how simple it is to start saving with just the cost of your morning latte. I really enjoyed the easy flow of the chapters and how Zoey was a normal mid twenties woman who had no idea how to save money. I felt this was the first book I've read that didn't lecture but told a story instead. I definitely learned a lot that I'll start to use regularly.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jania Hoover

    Very quick and easy read. If you’re a complete beginner, you could start here. If you know more about personal finance, you can skip it. It’s a more engaging style than Bach’s other books, so I guess that’s the influence of Mann. I enjoyed the story, but didn’t learn any new information. I finished in a couple of hours, so no harm, no foul. My biggest takeaway is that I need to identify my latte factor. Even though I know that principle, I need reminders to tell my money where to go so I don’t w Very quick and easy read. If you’re a complete beginner, you could start here. If you know more about personal finance, you can skip it. It’s a more engaging style than Bach’s other books, so I guess that’s the influence of Mann. I enjoyed the story, but didn’t learn any new information. I finished in a couple of hours, so no harm, no foul. My biggest takeaway is that I need to identify my latte factor. Even though I know that principle, I need reminders to tell my money where to go so I don’t wonder where it went.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Jenkins

    This book gave me outrageous happiness. If you feel you are doing terribly with money, and not living life the way you would have expected by this time in your life, this book will give you both a simile AND a sense of hope. Finance told in an unexpected, creative way.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ying Ying

    Please watch my 3-minute book summary/review on Youtube: https://youtu.be/sOJE2tp6M3g Please watch my 3-minute book summary/review on Youtube: https://youtu.be/sOJE2tp6M3g

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