web site hit counter The Ottoman Empire: A History From Beginning to End - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Ottoman Empire: A History From Beginning to End

Availability: Ready to download

The Ottoman Empire * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Over the course of just two hundred years, the Ottoman Empire grew from a small, obscure Anatolian state into the most powerful Muslim nation in the world, controlling vast swathes of the Middle East, Eastern Eu The Ottoman Empire * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Over the course of just two hundred years, the Ottoman Empire grew from a small, obscure Anatolian state into the most powerful Muslim nation in the world, controlling vast swathes of the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and North Africa. Within the empire science, medicine, technology, and art flourished, and the Ottoman army became one of the most feared and efficient fighting forces in existence. Then came a period of gradual decline. Beset by external enemies and torn apart by conflicting elements inside, over the next three hundred and fifty years the Ottoman Empire lost power, territory, and prestige until it became “the sick man of Europe.” Inside you will read about... ✓ Emergence of the Ottoman Dynasty ✓ The Fall of Constantinople ✓ Selim the Grim and Suleiman the Magnificent ✓ Sultanate of Women ✓ The Crimean War ✓ Decline Until World War I And much more! This is the dramatic story of the rise, fall, and eventual disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, of its conquests and defeats, and of its sultans who ranged from the grandeur of Suleiman the Magnificent to the obsession and confusion of Mustafa the Mad. The story begins with the dream of the first Ottoman sultan, Osman I, in 1300, and ended with the nightmare of the last sultan, Abdulmejid II, in 1922. This is the story of the Ottoman Empire, from beginning to end.


Compare

The Ottoman Empire * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Over the course of just two hundred years, the Ottoman Empire grew from a small, obscure Anatolian state into the most powerful Muslim nation in the world, controlling vast swathes of the Middle East, Eastern Eu The Ottoman Empire * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Over the course of just two hundred years, the Ottoman Empire grew from a small, obscure Anatolian state into the most powerful Muslim nation in the world, controlling vast swathes of the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and North Africa. Within the empire science, medicine, technology, and art flourished, and the Ottoman army became one of the most feared and efficient fighting forces in existence. Then came a period of gradual decline. Beset by external enemies and torn apart by conflicting elements inside, over the next three hundred and fifty years the Ottoman Empire lost power, territory, and prestige until it became “the sick man of Europe.” Inside you will read about... ✓ Emergence of the Ottoman Dynasty ✓ The Fall of Constantinople ✓ Selim the Grim and Suleiman the Magnificent ✓ Sultanate of Women ✓ The Crimean War ✓ Decline Until World War I And much more! This is the dramatic story of the rise, fall, and eventual disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, of its conquests and defeats, and of its sultans who ranged from the grandeur of Suleiman the Magnificent to the obsession and confusion of Mustafa the Mad. The story begins with the dream of the first Ottoman sultan, Osman I, in 1300, and ended with the nightmare of the last sultan, Abdulmejid II, in 1922. This is the story of the Ottoman Empire, from beginning to end.

58 review for The Ottoman Empire: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suwitcha Chandhorn

    หนังสือเล่าให้เราฟังเรื่องของประวัติ​จักรวรรดิ​นี้ตั้งแต่ต้นจนจบแม้จะไม่ละเอียด​นักแต่ก็ตอบโจทย์​ตามข้อจำกัดเรื่องความยาวได้ดี ทำให้รู้ว่าจักรวรรดิ​นี้มีเรื่องราวน่าตื่นเต้นผกผันมากมาย ทั้งรุ่งเรืองและตกต่ำ ประวัติศาสตร์​ตอนนี้ยังแสดงให้เห็น​ว่าการติดอยู่กับอดีตและกลุ่ม​อำนาจเก่าทำลายรัฐได้อย่างรุนแรง​เพียงใด

  2. 4 out of 5

    George Luft

    Clear History Good introduction to a great empire. Western history only seems to refer to the Ottoman Empire as some how mysterious. Little discussion of its impact on the world. Let alone it's successes. Clear History Good introduction to a great empire. Western history only seems to refer to the Ottoman Empire as some how mysterious. Little discussion of its impact on the world. Let alone it's successes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Young Kim

    The book presents balanced history of Ottoman Turk. The author introduces so many references and historians throughout pages. Besides, a lot of terms are introduced in Turkish with easy explanations in plain English. If you read this book thoroughly, you'd know the author does understand the people and society of Ottoman Empire with such expertise. This book definitely goes deeper about Ottoman Turk than other normal books in the West, which are, in general, simply go with an event after another i The book presents balanced history of Ottoman Turk. The author introduces so many references and historians throughout pages. Besides, a lot of terms are introduced in Turkish with easy explanations in plain English. If you read this book thoroughly, you'd know the author does understand the people and society of Ottoman Empire with such expertise. This book definitely goes deeper about Ottoman Turk than other normal books in the West, which are, in general, simply go with an event after another in chronological order. Although it is really a good book, there are lines the author must edit for the readers. (Kindle Location 377) According to Shai Har-El in "Struggle for Domination in the Middle East: The Ottoman-Mamluk War, 1485-91," Bayezid I had been simultaneously waging war against the Mamluk sultan, which was the most powerful Muslim ruler, and encroaching on Timur's sphere of influence. When Timur reappeared in Anatolia, the clash with the Ottomans was inevitable. At this point, the Ottoman Empire's centrally organized vassal principalities collapsed. Anarchy and political disorder took hold for a decade during an interregnum. Once Mehmed Celebi I emerged as the sole Ottoman ruler in 1413, a new era of cautious imperialism set in for the Ottoman Empire. The years must be 1385-91: This confuses the readers a lot unless they already know about the man or are willing to research it themselves. However, a good writer does not expect this; one must be a reader oneself. (Kindle Location 561) ...In 1918, King Faisal delivered his speech proclaiming independence from the Ottomans in 1918. Sir Lawrence of Arabia and Gertrude Bell had convinced Winston Churchill to appoint the former King of Syria Faisal as the first monarch of Iraq. She earned the nickname of "The Uncrowned Queen of Iraq" as a result of her influence. Her death was mostly interpreted as a suicide in 1926. More about her life can be found in the biography by Janet Wallach "Desert Queen" and in the portrait in her own words in "A Woman in Arabia: The Writings of the Queen of the Desert." “Sir Lawrence of Arabia and Gertrude Bell had convinced Winston Churchill to appoint the former King of Syria Faisal as the first monarch of Iraq.” Correction: They convinced Churchill to appoint one of King Faisal's daughters, Princess Faisal, known as the “Desert Queen.” And there are some more confusing sentences that need to be revised, such as: (Kindle Location 599) Yet the multicultural world of the Ottoman Empire cast a stone not only at Muslims without a figurehead but at the dreams they were built on that hadn't considered the consequences of their rule and expansion on those it aimed to protect... With these mistakes properly revised and edited, this fine book will be even better, so I could recommend it to others interested in the subject.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    Poised between Europe and Asia, the Ottoman Empire has been a dominant presence in European history. At its peak, the empire stretched to incorporate the Adriatic, Black, and Aegean Seas. From North Africa to the Balkans, Crimean Peninsula, and far into Central Europe and Russia, to north of the Danube and up the Volga Rivers, the Ottoman spread its power and influence. The Ottoman Empire is a cacophony of lifestyles, traditions, races, and religious beliefs, making it an interesting melting pot Poised between Europe and Asia, the Ottoman Empire has been a dominant presence in European history. At its peak, the empire stretched to incorporate the Adriatic, Black, and Aegean Seas. From North Africa to the Balkans, Crimean Peninsula, and far into Central Europe and Russia, to north of the Danube and up the Volga Rivers, the Ottoman spread its power and influence. The Ottoman Empire is a cacophony of lifestyles, traditions, races, and religious beliefs, making it an interesting melting pot of European, African, and Middle Eastern cultures. Spanning from the Middle Ages to modern-day Turkey, the empire has been at the forefront and witnessed from the sidelines, the turmoil that has ravaged Europe and the Middle East. Today Turkey is just a relatively small remnant of what it once was, but it remains an open portal from East to West. This is my least favorite edition of Hourly History. I found the information sketchy and the prose lacking in flow, making reading slow and painful. The narrative starts with the European perspective of the Ottoman Empire and promises to state the Turkish side as the book progresses; a promise unfulfilled. I think it is a shame that such an interesting, influential, political, and cultural entity, in such a volatile region could be so incompletely summarized. I think it might have to do with biting off more than one can chew. The author admits that size constraints prevent certain major aspects of the empire to be covered. I suppose one could compare it to a very brief history (+/= 50 pages) of Europe from medieval times to Britain’s Brexit from the European Union; just too much to chew.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Reid Brooks

    Incredibly superficial and outright wrong on several key points. “In general people lived well under the Ottoman Empire”. What utter nonsense—the author means that Muslims were largely religiously tolerant during the middle of the millennium. But the ottomans were brutal and horrendously oppressive to the people of the Balkans, engaging in ritual impalements en masse—they likely impaled close to 100k people during their occupation. They enslaved people, forced them into starvation, stole their m Incredibly superficial and outright wrong on several key points. “In general people lived well under the Ottoman Empire”. What utter nonsense—the author means that Muslims were largely religiously tolerant during the middle of the millennium. But the ottomans were brutal and horrendously oppressive to the people of the Balkans, engaging in ritual impalements en masse—they likely impaled close to 100k people during their occupation. They enslaved people, forced them into starvation, stole their male children and forced them to convert to Islam and join the Janissaries, they were utterly tyrannical and unforgivably oppressive. The fact that the author is unaware of that totally undermines any semblance of credibility. The author also seems to look at the severance of the Balkans states from the Ottoman Empire wistfully, as though they were taken always from some beloved Turkish family. They got out via revolution after hundreds of years of brutal oppression. It’s just baffling to me how little the author knows about what the people who were subjects of the empire went through.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lanko

    I like these summarized books, as they can get to the meat of things without being boiled down and that they usually present a further list of books in case one wishes to pursue specific subjects further. I say usually because while the book cites various works throughout its chapters, this is one of the rare examples that a Further Reading section is both mentioned and promised and... it seems the author actually forgot about it...

  7. 5 out of 5

    فيصل كركري

    A very good well written book that follows the style of the great Hourly History series of books. If you are interested in the history of the Ottoman empire, obviously this is wont suffice, still you can read it as a starting point to get wormed up for the full, colorful history of this once great empire. The short body of the book makes it easier for the readers to read it again and to use it as a refresher of whatever information you believe relevant to you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    You can hardly sum up the vast sweep of a 600 year empire in an 'hour' but it really is quite a good primer for greater research. Although, again, the book only touches on the subject, but it's hard to reconcile that while Islam is considered regressive by many, it drove so many advances in the early stages of the last millennium. You can hardly sum up the vast sweep of a 600 year empire in an 'hour' but it really is quite a good primer for greater research. Although, again, the book only touches on the subject, but it's hard to reconcile that while Islam is considered regressive by many, it drove so many advances in the early stages of the last millennium.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Felicity Fields

    Excellent big picture overview HourlyHistory does an excellent job of providing high level yet interesting overviews of people, empires, and events. I've known about the Ottoman Empire for some time, but didn't know much about its rise and fall. The was a short but thorough history of where the empire came from and why. Excellent big picture overview HourlyHistory does an excellent job of providing high level yet interesting overviews of people, empires, and events. I've known about the Ottoman Empire for some time, but didn't know much about its rise and fall. The was a short but thorough history of where the empire came from and why.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David W.

    Turk Good explanation of the events - internal & external - that caused the decline of this historical empire. Would have liked to have had more detail & specifics of the late 1800’s & early 1900’s leading to its present day status.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Atwell

    Where are they now? The author did a good job in portraying one groups desire for world conquest and how they went about it. As we procede into our present day you have to ask yourself, where are they now?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

    The Ottoman Empire is one of the largest empires in history. In existence for 600 years, at its peak it included what is now Bulgaria, Egypt, Greece, Hungary, Jordan, Lebanon, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Macedonia, Romania, Syria, parts of Arabia and the north coast of Africa.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Muñoz

    Good context for a better understanding of the currebt reality! History of the Ottoman Empire in brief, helps to understand those reasons behind things are as they are, nowdays in economy, religion and geopolitical power in middle east, Europe and world wide.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nuno Godinho

    I really like these books from Hourly History. Short and fast read, with enough details to understand each civilization. The only reason I don't give 5 stars is because I think it misses a few more details or stories about the day by day culture. I really like these books from Hourly History. Short and fast read, with enough details to understand each civilization. The only reason I don't give 5 stars is because I think it misses a few more details or stories about the day by day culture.

  15. 4 out of 5

    josette ringuette

    Quick history lesson Good read. For me it was a very good lesson in Ottoman history. Easy to read and it kept me interested.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kico Meirelles

    Another good book of this series of relevant history in good summaries. With relevant highlights of the 600 years of history and its influence in modern days.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Noreen

    A summary of the breakup of the Ottoman empire, from around late 1800's through the end of WWII. Which parts went to which country. Surprised to find Russian/German/British/Arab's in the mix. A summary of the breakup of the Ottoman empire, from around late 1800's through the end of WWII. Which parts went to which country. Surprised to find Russian/German/British/Arab's in the mix.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rita_suriayahoo.Com

    Powerful ottoman I read about the powerful ottoman who expanded its empire. It took many years to get defeated. People who are interested in history are welcome to read this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Historia basica Es un recuento muy breve de la historia del imperio otomano util para tener un panorama muy basico del desarrollo historico de este imperio.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anirudh

    This is a book about the Ottoman Empire as part of the concise Hourly History series. This book starts with the establishment of the empire by the Turkic tribes led by Osman which eventually overthrows the Byzantine Empire and takes over the city of Constantinople (present day Istabanbul) and establishes the Ottoman Empire; a realm which at its height expanded from Belgrade to Baghdad. The book started with the establishment of the empire, the eventual expansion to the Balkans and Arabia, how the This is a book about the Ottoman Empire as part of the concise Hourly History series. This book starts with the establishment of the empire by the Turkic tribes led by Osman which eventually overthrows the Byzantine Empire and takes over the city of Constantinople (present day Istabanbul) and establishes the Ottoman Empire; a realm which at its height expanded from Belgrade to Baghdad. The book started with the establishment of the empire, the eventual expansion to the Balkans and Arabia, how the empire embraced pluralism and the influence exerted by the Jews and the Armenians (till the genocide), broad description of various critical battles during the course of the Ottoman Empire such as the Battle of Lepanto (against the Holy League) and the Crimean war against Russia. It eventually went on describing the role of the Empire in the First World War; the defeat which led to the dissolution of the Empire leading to the Treaty of Sevres subsequently overwritten by the Treaty of Lausanne thereby ending the Ottoman Empire and forming the secular Turkish republic. The book was effective in bringing about the lifestyle and the system of guilds, the role of religion in the society and also touched upon some of the important events throughout the course of the existence of the empire. However, I was surprised to see certain misses, such as the sanjak system which was effective in controlling such vast diverse territory or about the ruthless janissary battalions or as to how the Ottomans expanded to Greece and how the Sultan actually made efforts to incorporate Greece as a part of Turkey by actually shifting base to Greece and I might have perhaps liked it if there was at least a mention of conversion of Hagia Sophia to a mosque after the Ottoman takeover. However, not all these could have been covered in an hour but certain compromises could have been done to the highly elaborate description on guilds and instead, one of these could have been incorporated. On the whole, the book satisfied the objective of passing on a lot of information in an hour and I guess it has served its purpose. I would award the book a rating of three.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Parker

    A man’s ambitious dream In the end, this refusal to embrace much-needed change doomed the Ottoman Empire. Unable to stay ahead in the latest military technologies, the empire was helpless to resist external threats. Unwilling to change the way in which its subjects were governed, the empire was also vulnerable to internal unrest. This combination of internal and external threats first eroded and then destroyed the once mighty Ottoman Empire.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Enjoyable A easy to read overview of the Ottoman Empire. I like that there are other sources listed for further reading. I found it very enjoyable

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

  24. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Hammad

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Tackett

  26. 5 out of 5

    arvind

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Pearcey

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael D. Shows

  29. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Williams

  31. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  32. 4 out of 5

    Norman R DeLamar

  33. 5 out of 5

    Steve Martinson

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cliff

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  36. 5 out of 5

    Neil f Brandt

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

  38. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  39. 5 out of 5

    Brett

  40. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  41. 4 out of 5

    Delta

  42. 5 out of 5

    Gary Simpson

  43. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  44. 4 out of 5

    Carolann

  45. 4 out of 5

    Vera Mottino

  46. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Feierstein

  47. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Nichols

  48. 5 out of 5

    Robert Neff

  49. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed

  50. 4 out of 5

    hamza

  51. 5 out of 5

    Therese Brown

  52. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Carson

  53. 4 out of 5

    chris fladlien

  54. 4 out of 5

    Al Peers

  55. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Murphy

  56. 5 out of 5

    vijay G

  57. 4 out of 5

    John Bradley

  58. 5 out of 5

    Chris Elvish

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.