web site hit counter King of the Mole People - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

King of the Mole People

Availability: Ready to download

Paul Gilligan's smart and funny illustrated middle grade series stars Doug, King of the Mole People, who struggles to balance chaos both in school and in the underworld. "The Wimpy Kid's got nothing on the King of the Mole People—he's got more laughs and more mud."—Kirkus Reviews Doug Underbelly is doing his best to be normal. It's not easy: he's bad at jokes, he's lousy at Paul Gilligan's smart and funny illustrated middle grade series stars Doug, King of the Mole People, who struggles to balance chaos both in school and in the underworld. "The Wimpy Kid's got nothing on the King of the Mole People—he's got more laughs and more mud."—Kirkus Reviews Doug Underbelly is doing his best to be normal. It's not easy: he's bad at jokes, he's lousy at sports, and he lives in a creaky old mansion surrounded by gravestones. Also Magda, the weird girl at school, won't leave him alone. And if that weren’t enough, he recently got crowned King of an underground race of Mole People. Doug didn't ask to be king—it's a job he can't really avoid, like the eel sandwiches his dad makes for him (with love). If he thought dealing with seventh grade was tricky, it's nothing compared to navigating the feud between Mole People, Slug People, Mushroom Folk and Stone Goons, not to mention preventing giant worms from rising up and destroying everything. How will Doug restore order? It's all a matter of diplomacy! Christy Ottaviano Books


Compare

Paul Gilligan's smart and funny illustrated middle grade series stars Doug, King of the Mole People, who struggles to balance chaos both in school and in the underworld. "The Wimpy Kid's got nothing on the King of the Mole People—he's got more laughs and more mud."—Kirkus Reviews Doug Underbelly is doing his best to be normal. It's not easy: he's bad at jokes, he's lousy at Paul Gilligan's smart and funny illustrated middle grade series stars Doug, King of the Mole People, who struggles to balance chaos both in school and in the underworld. "The Wimpy Kid's got nothing on the King of the Mole People—he's got more laughs and more mud."—Kirkus Reviews Doug Underbelly is doing his best to be normal. It's not easy: he's bad at jokes, he's lousy at sports, and he lives in a creaky old mansion surrounded by gravestones. Also Magda, the weird girl at school, won't leave him alone. And if that weren’t enough, he recently got crowned King of an underground race of Mole People. Doug didn't ask to be king—it's a job he can't really avoid, like the eel sandwiches his dad makes for him (with love). If he thought dealing with seventh grade was tricky, it's nothing compared to navigating the feud between Mole People, Slug People, Mushroom Folk and Stone Goons, not to mention preventing giant worms from rising up and destroying everything. How will Doug restore order? It's all a matter of diplomacy! Christy Ottaviano Books

30 review for King of the Mole People

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Benzine

    Check out this and other reviews on my website, The Lamp Post! Review: Doug is trying super hard to be a normal kid. He moved to a new school for seventh grade, and he’s trying to join clubs and make friends and eat normal things for lunch and wear non-muddy clothes and not have grubs or mushrooms all over him. But as hard as he tries to be normal, weirdness seems to be attracted to him… which is probably why he was crowned King of the Mole People a couple of weeks ago. So now in addition to tryin Check out this and other reviews on my website, The Lamp Post! Review: Doug is trying super hard to be a normal kid. He moved to a new school for seventh grade, and he’s trying to join clubs and make friends and eat normal things for lunch and wear non-muddy clothes and not have grubs or mushrooms all over him. But as hard as he tries to be normal, weirdness seems to be attracted to him… which is probably why he was crowned King of the Mole People a couple of weeks ago. So now in addition to trying to fit in with the other kids in his grade, he has to figure out how to rule the Mole Kingdom, and maybe save the world from being destroyed by Mega Worms. Honestly, I saw the cover of this book and decided I needed to read it before I even found out what the plot was. Paul Gilligan both wrote and illustrated King of the Mole People, and his illustrations were so hilariously on point. It’s perfect for kids in late elementary school, and will hit shelves just in time for back-to-school. Look for it on August 27th! Favorite Passage: “‘The crown must be worn at al times while in the Mole world,’ said Ploogoo. ‘But look at it, it’s ridiculous! Why is it so tall when you all live in low-ceilinged tunnels? It keeps getting knocked off my head by stalactites!’" – 3 : Underground [This passage was quoted from an ARC; as such, it may change before final publication.] What I Loved Most: This book was funny enough to make me laugh out loud more than once, but it also addresses serious issues. Doug is trying to figure out his identity. He wants so badly to fit in, but can’t quite seem to achieve the level of normality that he wants. King of the Mole People is a great book exploring the social-emotional learning pillar of self-awareness, but does so in a way that doesn’t hit kids over the head with the message of accepting who you are. It’s funny enough to keep kids interested, while also low-key encouraging them to embrace their own brand of weirdness. Read this book if you like: Heavily-illustrated books, super weird storylines, being okay with who you truly are

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alli-Oops

    Two stars if you ask me, but the boys found some of the drawings hilarious. So an extra star for the fact that I got to hear Wylie snort-laugh.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Faith Hurst-Bilinski

    King of the Mole People is written in a very popular style. The voice is very informal and easy for students to both read and relate to. If you've read any of the Wimpy Kid Stories you know the style. First person narrative with a lot of pictures, diagrams, etc, get the kids involved. They make the story almost interactive. What I saw here was the beginning of a series I think my students will enjoy. The vocabulary is fairly easy, so it would be good for upper and middle grade students even if t King of the Mole People is written in a very popular style. The voice is very informal and easy for students to both read and relate to. If you've read any of the Wimpy Kid Stories you know the style. First person narrative with a lot of pictures, diagrams, etc, get the kids involved. They make the story almost interactive. What I saw here was the beginning of a series I think my students will enjoy. The vocabulary is fairly easy, so it would be good for upper and middle grade students even if they struggle with reading. Just good fun.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Finley

    I received a free advanced reader copy of this from the publisher through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads. King of the Mole People by Paul Gilligan is a very fun book. Doug Underbelly wants to be a normal student, but weirdness just seems to follow him. Not only does he live in a spooky old house surrounded by graves with a father who makes as many means as he can out of eels, but he's recently been made king of the Mole people who live underneath the ground! His original plan is to do a bad enoug I received a free advanced reader copy of this from the publisher through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads. King of the Mole People by Paul Gilligan is a very fun book. Doug Underbelly wants to be a normal student, but weirdness just seems to follow him. Not only does he live in a spooky old house surrounded by graves with a father who makes as many means as he can out of eels, but he's recently been made king of the Mole people who live underneath the ground! His original plan is to do a bad enough job that the throne is taken back from him and he can focus on doing normal kid things, like getting a best friend and having a crush on popular girl Becky Binkey, but the Moles seem so fond of him, or really anything from the human world, that they seem to think anything and everything he does is great. Even though his subjects and royal guards love him, though, his royal advisor seems to have other plans for the Mole people that do not include Doug staying king, and as he soon learns, may even put the whole world, above and below ground, in danger. This book was a delight to read, and I can definitely see it becoming a new kids' best seller in the same vein as Diary of a Wimpy Kid. The story is silly and fun, and combined with the frequent illustrations, it would likely be attractive to hesitant readers who would find other books overwhelming. However, this story should not be underestimated. Behind the seemingly simple narrative is a sweet story about learning how to be yourself and to bring people together instead of letting your differences keep you apart. It does an excellent job of showing how people's differences are often their biggest strengths without seeming preachy, and it also makes clear use of plenty of literary devices, such as foreshadowing and simile, that middle schoolers may be beginning to learn about, and would therefore be right at home in any classroom library as much as it would in a middle schooler's personal book collection. I can foresee it receiving high praise once it reaches mass release, and I will happily contribute to that praise any chance I am given.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Fazio

    Gosh, where do I start with this? I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and decided I might as well give it a shot. I went in not knowing what to expect, and was pleasantly surprised by the end of the book. Not only is this a story of an awkward, bullied and misunderstood kid, it also has hidden nuggets within the book such as references of Shakespeare, A Streetcar Named Desire, and more. The plot itself is developed around the “caste system” where humans, in the Up-world are on top (literally Gosh, where do I start with this? I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and decided I might as well give it a shot. I went in not knowing what to expect, and was pleasantly surprised by the end of the book. Not only is this a story of an awkward, bullied and misunderstood kid, it also has hidden nuggets within the book such as references of Shakespeare, A Streetcar Named Desire, and more. The plot itself is developed around the “caste system” where humans, in the Up-world are on top (literally), and the mole people, mushrooms, worms, and other creatures reside below them both literally and within the caste. It was the dream of the former Mole king to unite these beings and live peacefully amongst one another, essentially eliminating the caste system. When a tyrannical Mole King Advisor manipulates the Mole people and starts an all-out war against the different castes, it is up to Doug Underbelly to save these creatures from the war, and giant worms. I don’t typically spend my time reading children’s books, but I will say this one held quite the comedic elements within its pages. I’d most definitely recommend this book to kids, mainly boys ages 8-15, as well as anyone who wants an easy laugh.

  6. 5 out of 5

    BreeAnn (She Just Loves Books)

    This book was provided to my son by the author in exchange for his honest review. He was very adamant that he get to write the review, so below are his honest thoughts. My Son's Thoughts: What He Loved: He loved that there were pictures in the book "about every two pages". It helped him to visualize what the author was trying to convey. One of his favorite parts was the form of respect by throwing grubs at people. He thought that was hilarious and silly! He loved that this book was at his reading This book was provided to my son by the author in exchange for his honest review. He was very adamant that he get to write the review, so below are his honest thoughts. My Son's Thoughts: What He Loved: He loved that there were pictures in the book "about every two pages". It helped him to visualize what the author was trying to convey. One of his favorite parts was the form of respect by throwing grubs at people. He thought that was hilarious and silly! He loved that this book was at his reading level too. He said it felt like he was reading with a friend. How He Felt: He said he felt happy through the entire book. "I'm a reading guy, and that book is an especially good book to make me visualize the story." To Read or Not To Read: People that enjoys stories with laughs, action, adventure, and surprise will like this book. It had all of these things. My Thoughts: What I Loved: This book is full of humor, making my child, and even me, laugh! I loved the illustrations, which were created by the author, making this book even more special. How I Felt: I was so pleased to see the under lying tone in this book focused on children learning to accept themselves for who they are. I loved that this quirky, funny main character could really show kids that it is ok to be just who you are. To Read or Not To Read: My son is in 3rd grade and this book was perfect for him. I would say that any child 3rd through the rest of elementary school would really enjoy this story. It's an adventure filled with funny moments making them laugh out loud. What's This Book About Anyway? Doug Underbelly doesn't seem to have everything going his way. He finds himself living in a creepy old house with his family. His dad makes meals out of eels. He has a cemetery for a back yard. He is bullied at school. Finally, he is King of the Mole People. Doug finds himself balancing between his underground cavern and his life in the "Up-World". As he's a bit unwilling to be the King of the Mole People, this new adjustment takes some time, but offers him a chance to be himself. He must learn to love himself for who he is to help solve the Giant Worm Problem for his kingdom of Mole People. A huge thank you to Paul Gilligan and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for our honest review. All of my reviews can be found at https://shejustlovesbooks.com/

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    Strange and Fun This book touches all of the weird kid humor/adventure school daze bases, which is fun, but it also has an particularly well developed oddball and deadpan sense of humor, which I especially appreciated. Doug thinks he's a weird loser, (which he's not), and is happy to tell us all about the weird loser things that happen to him. Being crowned King of the Mole people, of course, puts the tin cap on the whole thing. Becoming an object of attraction for Magda the pre-Goth weird girl, ( Strange and Fun This book touches all of the weird kid humor/adventure school daze bases, which is fun, but it also has an particularly well developed oddball and deadpan sense of humor, which I especially appreciated. Doug thinks he's a weird loser, (which he's not), and is happy to tell us all about the weird loser things that happen to him. Being crowned King of the Mole people, of course, puts the tin cap on the whole thing. Becoming an object of attraction for Magda the pre-Goth weird girl, (she's actually a real trooper), living in a creepy house in a graveyard, and having a clueless weird Dad just rounds out the picture. Underground Mole world adventures keep things moving. You really do get it all here. But the funnest part is that Doug is smart, observant, and the possessor of a dry and understated wit. So we don't get a lot of silly wacka-wacka humor from Doug. We get deadpan throwaway lines and sly comments that go way beyond just the usual fart based jokes. The author doesn't mock the genre, (he plays that straight), but he has fun with it and lots of bits are gentle jabs at kid book conventions. All the characters are likable, nothing is very edgy, and the whole tale feels more like affectionate poking fun. It's silly fun with an upbeat tone, and lots of clever running gags, which is how I like my Mole people. A nice and undemanding find that I'd be happy to follow as a series. (Please note that I received a free ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Moryah

    *I won this book in a goodreads giveaway.* This book had a couple of solid ideas, but overall I was a little disappointed. The whole concept of the layers with different races of creatures was interesting and fun. I felt like if the author would have spent more time developing that aspect and adventuring there I would have enjoyed this book more. The vast majority of the book was dedicated to the up world, or what we are familiar with already. The main character is a "weird" seventh grade boy who *I won this book in a goodreads giveaway.* This book had a couple of solid ideas, but overall I was a little disappointed. The whole concept of the layers with different races of creatures was interesting and fun. I felt like if the author would have spent more time developing that aspect and adventuring there I would have enjoyed this book more. The vast majority of the book was dedicated to the up world, or what we are familiar with already. The main character is a "weird" seventh grade boy who just wants to fit in at school. The antagonists of the novel are his teachers, classmates, and father. This part of the story all seemed rather typical and I felt was kind of boring. The lay out of the book was nice for kids. The font was large and quick and easy to read. I liked all the different picture that were sprinkled in throughout the book. Most of the chapters were short and would make for easy before bed story time for kids and adults. Overall, I'd say that it is similar to other middle grade books that are already available.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin Buhr

    KING OF THE MOLE PEOPLE has been described as the next Wimpy kid. I can certainly see some of the parallels. The main character is that scrawny kid who isn't athletic and isn't the smart and doesn't have a great way to fit in. He tries and fails to be "normal" and there is a underlying reminder throughout the book that perhaps this isn't the best goal. Where this book takes a turn is when it introduces the Mole People. Doug Underbelly (yes, that's his name) lives in a house surrounded by a cemet KING OF THE MOLE PEOPLE has been described as the next Wimpy kid. I can certainly see some of the parallels. The main character is that scrawny kid who isn't athletic and isn't the smart and doesn't have a great way to fit in. He tries and fails to be "normal" and there is a underlying reminder throughout the book that perhaps this isn't the best goal. Where this book takes a turn is when it introduces the Mole People. Doug Underbelly (yes, that's his name) lives in a house surrounded by a cemetery with his truly unusual father. Underground are the mole people who have decided he is their king. The parallel universe that he escapes to every now and then tipped this over the top for me, but then I'm not the intended audience. My favorite part was Magda, an equally strange girl who follows him around, seemingly as a constant reminder that being unusual and abnormal is far more interesting. This book is packed with oddball fun and illustrations that are even sillier. A middle grade book that seems to understand it's audience's sense of humor.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alba Arango

    A cross between Wimpy Kid and Timmy Failure. I would recommend this book for younger middle-grade readers, 8-10 years old. Doug just wants to be normal and fit in, but that proves to be a bit of a challenge for him. He lives in a creepy mansion with a graveyard for a backyard. He’s bad at jokes, sports, school, and pretty much everything else. His dad makes him eel sandwiches for lunch. Oh, and he’s also been crowned king of the mole people. Trying to fit in above ground is hard when you’re trying A cross between Wimpy Kid and Timmy Failure. I would recommend this book for younger middle-grade readers, 8-10 years old. Doug just wants to be normal and fit in, but that proves to be a bit of a challenge for him. He lives in a creepy mansion with a graveyard for a backyard. He’s bad at jokes, sports, school, and pretty much everything else. His dad makes him eel sandwiches for lunch. Oh, and he’s also been crowned king of the mole people. Trying to fit in above ground is hard when you’re trying to solve the Giant Worm Problem for your underground mole people. What I liked: pretty much everything. Great illustrations and fun, unique characters. Lots of quirky adventure and funny situations. Great underlying moral of accepting who you are, even if you’re different than everyone else. What I didn’t like: not much. The beginning was a tad slow, but it picked up quickly. Overall, a really fun, weird read. 5 out of 5 stars

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    Things are not going well for Doug Underbelly. His family moved into a freaky old house with a cemetery in the back yard. His father makes meals exclusively out of eels. His efforts to fit in at school all fail miserably. He has a back-up bully for when his primary bully is otherwise busy. And he's been made the King of the Mole People. Can it get any worse? This book is pretty friggin hilarious. I'd have loved a silly book like this when I was a kid. It's all about fitting in, accepting yourself Things are not going well for Doug Underbelly. His family moved into a freaky old house with a cemetery in the back yard. His father makes meals exclusively out of eels. His efforts to fit in at school all fail miserably. He has a back-up bully for when his primary bully is otherwise busy. And he's been made the King of the Mole People. Can it get any worse? This book is pretty friggin hilarious. I'd have loved a silly book like this when I was a kid. It's all about fitting in, accepting yourself for who you are, helping out your true friends, and maybe caring a little less about what the other kids at school think about you in the meantime. And apparently you can make quite tasty mac & cheese from eels, who knew? Poor Doug will work things out, both above and below ground, although not the way he's expecting, and not in the way he'd like, but things do work out. And I'm pretty psyched to see what the King of the Mole People gets up to next!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    King of the Mole People is a super fun story of friendship, loyalty, and lots of weird underground adventures. Doug just wants friends. He's awkward, lives next to a graveyard, and his dad fixes eel for nearly every meal. What he doesn't want is to be King of the Mole People. But unfortunately for Doug, he is the king. Sneaking off through secret passageways to make his way the underground world of the Mole people, Doug has to balance his above ground life with his underground life. This leads, King of the Mole People is a super fun story of friendship, loyalty, and lots of weird underground adventures. Doug just wants friends. He's awkward, lives next to a graveyard, and his dad fixes eel for nearly every meal. What he doesn't want is to be King of the Mole People. But unfortunately for Doug, he is the king. Sneaking off through secret passageways to make his way the underground world of the Mole people, Doug has to balance his above ground life with his underground life. This leads, of course, to plenty of wacky adventures. It's funny, sweet, completely absurd, and tells a wonderful tale of true friendship. It would be great for kids ages 8-12. Thank you to Netgalley and the Publisher for the opportunity to read and review this title. All opinions are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I don't even really know what to say about this book. It's great. There is so much that goes on, and finding a way to talk about it without spoilers is difficult. The characters are developed and different from what you will find in other books. Doug's interactions with the Mole People make for some humorous situations that kind of make me feel bad for him. It has to be difficult dealing with creatures that try so hard to please you, but at the same time don't quite understand the right way to g I don't even really know what to say about this book. It's great. There is so much that goes on, and finding a way to talk about it without spoilers is difficult. The characters are developed and different from what you will find in other books. Doug's interactions with the Mole People make for some humorous situations that kind of make me feel bad for him. It has to be difficult dealing with creatures that try so hard to please you, but at the same time don't quite understand the right way to go about things. It is easy to spot the villain, but I was surprised by his motives. There is a lot going on behind the scenes that leads Doug on the adventure of a lifetime. I'm ready for the next book. Author: Paul Gilligan Publisher: Macmillan/Christy Ottaviano Publication Date: 2019

  14. 4 out of 5

    Traci

    What a great book for your middle school age student. This book is full of interesting characters and adventures. Doug Underbelly is having a hard time fitting in at his new school and in his new role as the King of the Moles. This book does a wonderful job of showing that it is better to be yourself when interacting with others. It is not ok to pretend to have an accent to be an actor in the school play. Also, the mole people are full off antics that gets them into all kinds of trouble and situ What a great book for your middle school age student. This book is full of interesting characters and adventures. Doug Underbelly is having a hard time fitting in at his new school and in his new role as the King of the Moles. This book does a wonderful job of showing that it is better to be yourself when interacting with others. It is not ok to pretend to have an accent to be an actor in the school play. Also, the mole people are full off antics that gets them into all kinds of trouble and situations.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda Donohue

    What is “normal”? Growing up we judge it by the people around us. I know with me every one could read better than me, could memorize poetry better than me, jump rope better than me. I in time learned what I was good at. I liked the story because the King of the Mole People learned what he was good at (or better than normal). I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway and I thank the author and publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    My honest review: I thought the title was brilliant and intriguing, so everything after was a disappointment since it didn't live up to my expectations. Both the wackiness and cleverness could have been much better. However, I don't think the target audience will come into it with the anticipation I did so won't feel the same letdown. They'll relate to Doug's issues and feelings of awkwardness and will find the humor amusing. Two stars for me, three stars for them. My honest review: I thought the title was brilliant and intriguing, so everything after was a disappointment since it didn't live up to my expectations. Both the wackiness and cleverness could have been much better. However, I don't think the target audience will come into it with the anticipation I did so won't feel the same letdown. They'll relate to Doug's issues and feelings of awkwardness and will find the humor amusing. Two stars for me, three stars for them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz Friend

    The story: Doug Underbelly just wants to be normal...but this is not an easy task, when he lives in a graveyard, has a dad who cooks nothing but eels, and spends his time avoiding the weird Goth girl living next door who happens to be the only one who wants anything to do with him. Well, aside from the Mole People, that is: an underground group of tunnel dwellers not to be confused with furry little mammals. When Doug is unwillingly crowned as king of the Mole People, his life gets even more con The story: Doug Underbelly just wants to be normal...but this is not an easy task, when he lives in a graveyard, has a dad who cooks nothing but eels, and spends his time avoiding the weird Goth girl living next door who happens to be the only one who wants anything to do with him. Well, aside from the Mole People, that is: an underground group of tunnel dwellers not to be confused with furry little mammals. When Doug is unwillingly crowned as king of the Mole People, his life gets even more confusing and grubby (literally) as his subjects try to come to his aid and fix his unpopular life---and of course, cause even more trouble for him in the process. It’s only when Doug embraces his weirdness and comes up with a solution for the Giant Worm Problem that he finally realizes it’s okay not to be like everyone else. June Cleaver's ratings: Language G; Violence PG; Sexual content G; Nudity G; Substance abuse G; Magic & the occult PG; GLBT content G; adult themes G; overall rating PG. Liz's comments: This is an extremely strange story, filled with sly humor and featuring a narrator with whom any kid who’s ever felt like a total loser will identify. Cartoon drawings by the author add to its quirky appeal. There’s even a little character growth here...for anyone who happens to be looking.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cindie

    The crazy possibility of being King of the Mole people is the reality in this book. It is adventurous and fun without being scary. Good family read, we shared the book and laughed out loud. Best statement by my son, "All that for a life lesson about accepting yourself for who you are?" The crazy possibility of being King of the Mole people is the reality in this book. It is adventurous and fun without being scary. Good family read, we shared the book and laughed out loud. Best statement by my son, "All that for a life lesson about accepting yourself for who you are?"

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    This was a fun quirky read! Ordering it for our library! :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Fun, fast-paced early middle grade. Great for boys, especially those who always come home with dirt, rocks and frogs in their pockets.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    A Goodreads Giveaway A fine story with the lesson for children, or anyone, that it is okay to be different. Passed the book on to my grandson.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Desireecjschneidergmail.Com

    My son and I started this as a bedtime read aloud but he liked it so much he finished it on his own! Goofy and funny!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    This was lots of fun. The art and humor make this a great read for kids ready to level up from Diary of a Wimpy Kid.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Doug Underbelly is just trying (really hard) to be a normal 7th grader. He doesn't want to be popular; he just wants to NOT be at the bottom of the social hierarchy at school. Easier said than done because he is also the king of the Mole People. Doug regularly goes underground to talk with the mole people whom he was recently, unwillingly made king of. The Mole People are fascinated with life in the Up-World (where we live). Doug just wants his life to be normal, to live in a normal house, to ha Doug Underbelly is just trying (really hard) to be a normal 7th grader. He doesn't want to be popular; he just wants to NOT be at the bottom of the social hierarchy at school. Easier said than done because he is also the king of the Mole People. Doug regularly goes underground to talk with the mole people whom he was recently, unwillingly made king of. The Mole People are fascinated with life in the Up-World (where we live). Doug just wants his life to be normal, to live in a normal house, to have a normal dad, and to NOT be the King of the Mole People. This was a humorous read that is appropriate for middle grade kids. There are lots of ridiculous hijinks as Doug tries to navigate life in middle school and as a reluctant king of the Mole People. This book is full of illustrations to accompany the fantasy adventure story. The story has positive messages about just being yourself, even if yourself is a little on the weird side. I recommend this book for kids aged 8 and up. I received a digital review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, MacMillan for the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from MacMillan Children's Publishing Group through NetGalley. Doug is a lonely boy who wants to be normal and fit in. Hard to do as he lives beside a graveyard in a less than normal looking home with a dad working on a "How to Cook Eel" cookbook. Already, elementary level readers will be grossed out and pulled in to this story. Add the fact that Doug is king of the mole people and the plot grabs further attention. Doug feels like everything is conspiring against his h I received an electronic ARC from MacMillan Children's Publishing Group through NetGalley. Doug is a lonely boy who wants to be normal and fit in. Hard to do as he lives beside a graveyard in a less than normal looking home with a dad working on a "How to Cook Eel" cookbook. Already, elementary level readers will be grossed out and pulled in to this story. Add the fact that Doug is king of the mole people and the plot grabs further attention. Doug feels like everything is conspiring against his hope of a normal life but accepts the challenges and figures out how to stop the coming Mole invasion of the up-world. With help from Magda and his Mole Royal Guards, Doug solves the main problem (a giant clog) and convinces the various underground kingdoms - Mole, Slug, Rock, Mushroom, Worm - to interact to save their homes. Mid to upper elementary readers will welcome the absurdity and relate to the various characters. The beginning bogged down but the pace picked up and the connections amongst the characters became clearer and more believable about one third of the way through the story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie Wright

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Banks

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Anderson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sugarrr

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.