web site hit counter The Woods Murder - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Woods Murder

Availability: Ready to download

Looking for a classic murder mystery from an acclaimed crime writer? Discover Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Enjoy a beautifully told story from a time before smart phones and DNA testing. Full of twists and turns, this will have you gripped from start to finish. THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” Nine-year-old Jenny Carson is brutally murdered Looking for a classic murder mystery from an acclaimed crime writer? Discover Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Enjoy a beautifully told story from a time before smart phones and DNA testing. Full of twists and turns, this will have you gripped from start to finish. THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” Nine-year-old Jenny Carson is brutally murdered in Kenton Wood on her way from school. Then Charles Lendon is found stabbed to death with a skewer through his heart. He was a ruthless lawyer and something of a womaniser. Jenny’s father blamed him for her murder. As the local police struggle, Inspector Crow is called in. Can he connect the two killings? He discovers that several of those closest to Charles Lendon had good reason to hate him: his housekeeper lover, her unstable brother, even the boyfriend of his attractive young colleague Cathy Tennant. “A literate, thoughtful examination of human nature combined with a grimly suspenseful police procedural.” Booklist “Tightly written, well-paced and relentlessly accurate.” Oxford Times. This fast-paced mystery will have you enthralled from the start. Set in England in the late 1960s, this is the third book to feature Inspector John Crow. More coming soon. DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE MYSTERY WRITER Perfect for fans of Peter James, Ruth Rendell, P.D. James and Peter Robinson. Roy Lewis is one of the most critically acclaimed crime writers of his generation. PRAISE FOR ROY LEWIS MYSTERIES “Each Lewis seems to better the last. Here is an intriguing puzzle and likely police work and a fine picture of Northumbrian society and countryside” The Times “Roy Lewis has demonstrated an enviable range both in geography and style…a nice neat story” The Financial Times “Lots of cunning complications embracing conservation and financial fiddles” The Guardian “A thorough, unpretentious and immensely solid piece of work with an interesting and likeable hero” Times Literary Supplement “Chilly drama with some stirring cliff hanger” Sunday Telegraph THE DETECTIVE Skeletally-built, mild-mannered Inspector John Crow is established in the Murder Squad in London and constantly meets hostility when he is called upon to work on murder cases in regional crime squads in Wales and the Midlands. He displays strong moral feelings, and a sensitivity which brings him into conflict with regional staff as he doggedly and successfully pursues the truth in cases where he is called in. INSPECTOR CROW BOOKS Book 1: A LOVER TOO MANY Book 2: ERROR OF JUDGMENT Book 3: THE WOODS MURDER MORE COMING SOON!


Compare

Looking for a classic murder mystery from an acclaimed crime writer? Discover Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Enjoy a beautifully told story from a time before smart phones and DNA testing. Full of twists and turns, this will have you gripped from start to finish. THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” Nine-year-old Jenny Carson is brutally murdered Looking for a classic murder mystery from an acclaimed crime writer? Discover Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Enjoy a beautifully told story from a time before smart phones and DNA testing. Full of twists and turns, this will have you gripped from start to finish. THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” Nine-year-old Jenny Carson is brutally murdered in Kenton Wood on her way from school. Then Charles Lendon is found stabbed to death with a skewer through his heart. He was a ruthless lawyer and something of a womaniser. Jenny’s father blamed him for her murder. As the local police struggle, Inspector Crow is called in. Can he connect the two killings? He discovers that several of those closest to Charles Lendon had good reason to hate him: his housekeeper lover, her unstable brother, even the boyfriend of his attractive young colleague Cathy Tennant. “A literate, thoughtful examination of human nature combined with a grimly suspenseful police procedural.” Booklist “Tightly written, well-paced and relentlessly accurate.” Oxford Times. This fast-paced mystery will have you enthralled from the start. Set in England in the late 1960s, this is the third book to feature Inspector John Crow. More coming soon. DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE MYSTERY WRITER Perfect for fans of Peter James, Ruth Rendell, P.D. James and Peter Robinson. Roy Lewis is one of the most critically acclaimed crime writers of his generation. PRAISE FOR ROY LEWIS MYSTERIES “Each Lewis seems to better the last. Here is an intriguing puzzle and likely police work and a fine picture of Northumbrian society and countryside” The Times “Roy Lewis has demonstrated an enviable range both in geography and style…a nice neat story” The Financial Times “Lots of cunning complications embracing conservation and financial fiddles” The Guardian “A thorough, unpretentious and immensely solid piece of work with an interesting and likeable hero” Times Literary Supplement “Chilly drama with some stirring cliff hanger” Sunday Telegraph THE DETECTIVE Skeletally-built, mild-mannered Inspector John Crow is established in the Murder Squad in London and constantly meets hostility when he is called upon to work on murder cases in regional crime squads in Wales and the Midlands. He displays strong moral feelings, and a sensitivity which brings him into conflict with regional staff as he doggedly and successfully pursues the truth in cases where he is called in. INSPECTOR CROW BOOKS Book 1: A LOVER TOO MANY Book 2: ERROR OF JUDGMENT Book 3: THE WOODS MURDER MORE COMING SOON!

30 review for The Woods Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Inspector John Crow #3 Jenny Carson was brutally murdered on her way home from school. She was just nine years old. Charles Lendon was a lawyer and a bit of a womaniser. He was stabbed to death with a skewer. Jenny's father blamed him for her murder. I like this series. As I've said before, I like police procedurals where all they have to rely on is their policeman's nose. They do not have the technology the police have today. There are plenty of twists and suspects who all have motives. The local Inspector John Crow #3 Jenny Carson was brutally murdered on her way home from school. She was just nine years old. Charles Lendon was a lawyer and a bit of a womaniser. He was stabbed to death with a skewer. Jenny's father blamed him for her murder. I like this series. As I've said before, I like police procedurals where all they have to rely on is their policeman's nose. They do not have the technology the police have today. There are plenty of twists and suspects who all have motives. The local police are struggling, so they ask Scotland Yard for some assistance. Inspector John Crow is called in to help. Will he be able to to find a connection between the two killings? This is a well written series that's set in the 1960's. I really enjoyed this who-did-it style murder mystery. I would like to thank Joffe Books and the author Roy Lewis for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” This is the 3rd appearance of Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Told in the time frame of the 1960s, Crow has to solve crimes the old fashioned way. There were no cell phones, no pagers, no DNA testing. There have been two crimes committed in a small English village. A nine-year-old girl goes missing, only to be found day a day later. The girl's father blames Charles Lendon for her death. And when Lendon is found murdered a week later, he be THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” This is the 3rd appearance of Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard. Told in the time frame of the 1960s, Crow has to solve crimes the old fashioned way. There were no cell phones, no pagers, no DNA testing. There have been two crimes committed in a small English village. A nine-year-old girl goes missing, only to be found day a day later. The girl's father blames Charles Lendon for her death. And when Lendon is found murdered a week later, he becomes the prime suspect. Local law enforcement is not too happy to have Crow in their jurisdiction, so they have split the crimes. The locals will follow the young girl while Crow concentrates on the lawyer, Lendon. There are many suspects, as Lendon was not a well liked man. A lot of people had reason to want him dead .... his housekeeper lover, the various other lovers and their husbands, his business partner, even the young lady who is his colleague and her boyfriend. This is a fast-paced mystery, a page turner from start to finish, with a surprising ending. The characters are credible and the premise is exact. I look forward to Crow's next adventure. Many thanks to the author / Joffe Books / Netgalley for the digital copy of this crime fiction. Opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dana-Adriana B.

    A nine year old girl is murdered on her way home from school, in a small English village. And then the suspect is murdered too. It is a great police novel. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Joffe Books for an advance copy of The Woods Murder, the third novel to feature DCI John Crow of Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad, originally published in 1972. When solicitor Charles Lendon is murdered Canthorpe’s Chief Constable calls in outside help from Scotland Yard, reasoning that his local team has enough on its hands with the unsolved murder of nine year old Jenny Carson, not that the team agree. John Crow is the man sent to solve Lendon and only Lendon’s m I would like to thank Netgalley and Joffe Books for an advance copy of The Woods Murder, the third novel to feature DCI John Crow of Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad, originally published in 1972. When solicitor Charles Lendon is murdered Canthorpe’s Chief Constable calls in outside help from Scotland Yard, reasoning that his local team has enough on its hands with the unsolved murder of nine year old Jenny Carson, not that the team agree. John Crow is the man sent to solve Lendon and only Lendon’s murder. I thoroughly enjoyed The Woods Murder which is a good, old fashioned whodunnit with plenty of twists and turns. I used to read Mr Lewis’s books in the 80s and 90s but this is my first encounter with DCI Crow so I wasn’t sure what to expect. Firstly I was surprised that there is no sense of location as his other series are so firmly rooted in the North East. Canthorpe could be anywhere in England. Apart from this it is a fairly “straightforward” police procedural with an unlikeable victim and a plethora of suspects, all with plausible motives. Obviously with the novel being written in the 70s there is no forensic science to speak of so the investigation boils down to deductive reasoning and, here, Mr Lewis plays his cards close to his chest with the reader being made aware of certain evidence but not being given the content immediately, rather, being left to wonder. I think some readers will find it intriguing, others annoying. I enjoyed the whodunnit aspect of the novel, finding it logical and believable although some of the motives and attitudes do date the novel. The Woods Murder is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    This is Roy Lewis’ third Inspector Crow novel, and it is the best one yet. Roy Lewis was actively writing from the late sixties into this century, and this particular book was published in 1971. Allowing for the fact that there were no desk computers, cellphones, or DNA, this book is not dated, and is an excellent mystery. Roy Lewis is unjustly underrated, and should be considered one of Britain’s top crime authors. These Inspector Crow books are good, old-fashioned mysteries and police procedur This is Roy Lewis’ third Inspector Crow novel, and it is the best one yet. Roy Lewis was actively writing from the late sixties into this century, and this particular book was published in 1971. Allowing for the fact that there were no desk computers, cellphones, or DNA, this book is not dated, and is an excellent mystery. Roy Lewis is unjustly underrated, and should be considered one of Britain’s top crime authors. These Inspector Crow books are good, old-fashioned mysteries and police procedurals. A murder, or murders, is committed, and the police work to solve it. According to what I read in the British papers of today, modern British police forces are more focused on thought crimes and are not trying to solve actual crimes such as burglary and assault, but the police officers in Roy Lewis’ books are what we think of when we imagine the police, thank goodness. I don’t like spoilers, so I am not going to give any. We follow along with the police, and some of the characters, with the author playing very fair with the reader. I confess I did not know “whodunnit,” but looking back the clues were there. I am so happy that these Roy Lewis books are being reissued for Kindle. Lewis has long been one of my favorite authors, but the Inspector Crow series is new to me. I am enjoying it very much, and I heartily recommend these books to anyone who likes mysteries. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Larum

    This is the third in the Inspector Crow series and I enjoyed this one much more than the first two. I think Crow has grown on me and I'm learning to not react when the writing style gets a bit pedantic. The book has a great plot with main characters who are utterly believable, including the victim. I could see him in my mind's eye very clearly - the lawyer with a huge ego and as hard as nails. Inspector Crow is called in because the local force already have a murder to deal with - a little girl w This is the third in the Inspector Crow series and I enjoyed this one much more than the first two. I think Crow has grown on me and I'm learning to not react when the writing style gets a bit pedantic. The book has a great plot with main characters who are utterly believable, including the victim. I could see him in my mind's eye very clearly - the lawyer with a huge ego and as hard as nails. Inspector Crow is called in because the local force already have a murder to deal with - a little girl who was killed as she was walking home from school. Her father is sure that she would still be alive if she hadn't had to take the path through the woods but the quicker route home had been closed by the landowner, none other than the lawyer who was the next victim. Crow has opposition to his presence from the local Superintendent, even though the Chief Constable wanted Crow there. It was impossible to guess who the killer was and the ending was a revelation to me, which is the way I like my crime books. If you enjoy the old-fashioned method of policing using brains rather than technology, this is the book for you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Another great story Roy Lewis has done it again!!! I really liked this story and I read it in one sitting. I loved the characters Crow knows what's really going on. Another great story Roy Lewis has done it again!!! I really liked this story and I read it in one sitting. I loved the characters Crow knows what's really going on.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Bridgeman

    Charles Lendon, a solicitor, has been murdered. The day before his death, his clark, Cathy, had overheard a quarrel with unseen person, as well as hearing him argue with the father of a murdered child. His daughter had been killed in public woods where the children of the local housing estate would play. They used this as a short cut to school as Lendon had been successful in stopping them using Woodrow Lane. As a result of using this shortcut, Jenny had been attacked and killed. The murder had Charles Lendon, a solicitor, has been murdered. The day before his death, his clark, Cathy, had overheard a quarrel with unseen person, as well as hearing him argue with the father of a murdered child. His daughter had been killed in public woods where the children of the local housing estate would play. They used this as a short cut to school as Lendon had been successful in stopping them using Woodrow Lane. As a result of using this shortcut, Jenny had been attacked and killed. The murder had never been solved . As Cathy leaves Lendon’s offices, her boyfriend, Mike, is waiting and watching Lendon, he places the blame on Cathy rejecting his marriage proposal squarely at Lendon’s feet. He feels it has given Cathy ambitions to become a lawyer and he just wants her as a wife and mother-this is set in the 1960’s where this attitude was not unusual although it is uncomfortable to read. Furthermore, the rumours about Lendon’s reputation as a ladies man is giving Mike cause for concern. When he is found, skewered to death, the local police force are enraged to find that their services are to be subverted by John Crow ‘from the Yard’. This creates tension and also an air of expectation that he will not only uncover the murderer of Lendon, but also that of Jenny. So far so ‘Life ‘On Mars’. ‘Your emotions, ‘Crow said coldly, ‘are as irrelevant to me as is your sense of humour. I have a job to do, and like you I’m doing it to the best of my ability. But I repeat, I wasn’t interfering in your case!’ John is very much a fish out of water but in quick time he has uncovered Lendon’s mistress, who is kept in a cottage by the promise of ‘expectations’. The list of suspects mounts as one of the police constables is attacked and knocked out at the police station and vital evidence goes missing, one of Lendon’s enquiry agents has been killed in an alleged ‘hit and run’ and there are blank pages in Lendon’s diary where he could anywhere, and with anyone.Things get more intriguing when Lendon’s will is found and he has left most of his estate to Cathy... The clues and twists mount up as this police procedural races towards it’s conclusion with you running alongside John Crow as he interviews witnesses, charges around the town looking for answers and organises the local police force against their will. He has arrived, like a hurricane and will not stop until he gets his man-or woman, A quick, satisfying read at 174 pages, this will be perfect for anyone looking for a ‘book between books’, a palate cleanser or aperitif for something more substantial. I enjoyed it despite finding the casual sexism of the era hard to stomach. Many thanks to Jill Burlinshaw of Booksnall promotions for letting me take part in the blog tour for ‘The Woods Murders’.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian Williams

    Scotland Yard Chief Inspector John Crow is dispatched to the countryside town of Canthorpe to investigate the vicious murder of a local lawyer, Charles Lendon. Lendon was stabbed in the chest with a skewer at a deserted mill in the woods. It's a killing with plenty of emotion behind it. Crow butts heads with the local Police Superintendent Hugh Simpson who is annoyed that his Chief Constable has not let him handle the case. However, Simpson has already got a murder investigation to deal with, one Scotland Yard Chief Inspector John Crow is dispatched to the countryside town of Canthorpe to investigate the vicious murder of a local lawyer, Charles Lendon. Lendon was stabbed in the chest with a skewer at a deserted mill in the woods. It's a killing with plenty of emotion behind it. Crow butts heads with the local Police Superintendent Hugh Simpson who is annoyed that his Chief Constable has not let him handle the case. However, Simpson has already got a murder investigation to deal with, one that is proving difficult to crack after several weeks of work. Simpson resents Crow's presence in Canthorpe and makes his feelings known. Friction between the two detectives increases as their two investigations begin to overlap. Lendon, he victim in Crow's case, is a prosperous lawyer, but with low personal morals. He chases and beds most women he comes into contact with. As the opening sentence in the story says: "Most women were fascinated by Charles Lendon" Lendon plays on this fascination although things don't always work out well for the women. He is astute in his work, maybe even ruthless, but is successful. Crow sets about investigating the many people who may want Lendon dead and quickly finds several potential suspects. There is a bit of soap opera in Canthorpe which produces some activity for Crow to pursue. The story is told at a brisk pace without any dull moments, and several chase scenes keep suspense at a high level. There's an exciting conclusion and all the loose ends are tied up. This book is one of a series but is easily read as a standalone. It is a recently revised edition of a book published in 1971 (with a different title) and it reflects the then current technology. There is for example no DNA testing and more prosaically, no email, mobile telephones or similar devices. It is not so dated as to be quaint and the storyline still works. It is easy to read: English slang may be interpreted by non-British readers using the glossary of terms appended to the book. There's a curious fascination with Crow's physical appearance. As one witness remarks after her interview by the inspector: "'He's an ugly man, isn't he,' she said. "I mean, he's so tall, and his head is such a funny shape. He's like a skeleton". Comments similar to this one are numerous in the book. "The Woods Murder" is a cleverly plotted police procedural murder mystery set in the English countryside and has a satisfying conclusion. It is recommended for fans of English police detective fiction. Thanks to Joffe Books and Netgalley for my copy of the eBook. The views expressed are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kerry https://likeherdingcatsblog.wordpress.com Robinson

    Synopsis It’s difficult to write a detailed synopsis without giving things away. Set in the late sixties (prior to DNA testing, mobile phones etc), The Woods Murder is the fast paced story of Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard and his quest to find a murderer. Shortly after the horrific murder of 9-year-old Jenny Carson shocks an entire town, the body of local solicitor Charles Lendon (A womaniser and outsider disliked by many local people) is found with a skewer stabbed through his heart. Already wit Synopsis It’s difficult to write a detailed synopsis without giving things away. Set in the late sixties (prior to DNA testing, mobile phones etc), The Woods Murder is the fast paced story of Inspector Crow of Scotland Yard and his quest to find a murderer. Shortly after the horrific murder of 9-year-old Jenny Carson shocks an entire town, the body of local solicitor Charles Lendon (A womaniser and outsider disliked by many local people) is found with a skewer stabbed through his heart. Already with their hands full, the local police reluctantly call in Inspector Crow and his team to assist in Lendon’s case. The more Crow looks into the murder, the longer and more complicated the list of suspects become until reaching an intense climax close to the end. Review After the first few chapters I really wasn’t sure if I was going to like this book or not. I struggled to find anything about the characters that I liked ( character rapport is really important for me) and I also found it difficult to shift my thinking into the era this book is set in. But, I’m not one to give up on a book so quickly and I continued. And boy was I rewarded! It didn’t take long (about chapter 6 or 7) until I became hooked. Rather than rely on the fear factor, (although there is a particularly intense scene through the woods) Lewis goes for the suspense angle. The Woods Murder reads like a good old-fashioned police drama, like the ones I remember watching with my grandparents on a Sunday afternoon. You spend the whole book playing ‘who dun it?’ Through a variety of points of view, the story is told, weaving a web of potential suspects, each one as likely as the next. It keeps you guessing right until the very end and each time you are sure you know who the murderer is, bam! – something changes your mind. I also love the fact that it sticks to the story line. There are no real sub stories of romance going on etc. It means you can fully focus on the simple but thrilling crime drama. It’s compulsive reading! This is a recommended read for anyone who likes crime/police dramas. It’s the third in the Inspector Crow series and I’m definitely adding the first two to my TBR pile.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Misfits farm

    THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” A young girl, Jenny, was murdered a while ago and there are few leads in the case. This is the 1960’s and the police and forensics are very different to how we perceive them today. Cathy is an articled clerk in a solicitors office. Her mentor Charles is not liked by many and he is known to be a womaniser however he is good to her and she supports him. One day , by chance she overhears an argument he has with an unknown man. When Charles is THIS BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS “A SECRET SINGING.” A young girl, Jenny, was murdered a while ago and there are few leads in the case. This is the 1960’s and the police and forensics are very different to how we perceive them today. Cathy is an articled clerk in a solicitors office. Her mentor Charles is not liked by many and he is known to be a womaniser however he is good to her and she supports him. One day , by chance she overhears an argument he has with an unknown man. When Charles is found dead the following week, she wonders if this could be connected. Jenny’s father) blames Charles as he wouldn’t allow right of way over his land and Jenny wouldn’t have been where she was had the right of way been available. Inspector Crow now has his work but out and isn’t best pleased when Scotland yard are brought in to assist. Assistance he could very well do without. Roy is a wordsmith and at times this is like reading one of the classics, the writing being of such quality and words that we tend not to use everyday. “for her mind was patterned with doubt and incomprehension, a cicatriced amorphous mass criss crossed with questions and uncertainty” - I had to look up cicatriced - the scar of a healed wound) . That is not a criticism, more of a nod to the era in which this is set- a time of tradition and not so flexible points of view as we have now. If you enjoy Morse, Endeavour and Life on Mars or remember the 1960’s this could be right up your street. A good old fashioned detective story with no fuss. For more reviews please see my blog http://nickibookblog.blogspot.co.uk/ or follow me on Twitter @nickijmurphy1 Amazon Top 1000 reviewer.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Misfits farm

    A young girl, Jenny, was murdered a while ago and there are few leads in the case. This is the 1960’s and the police and forensics are very different to how we perceive them today. Cathy is an articled clerk in a solicitors office. Her mentor Charles is not liked by many and he is known to be a womaniser however he is good to her and she supports him. One day , by chance she overhears an argument he has with an unknown man. When Charles is found dead the following week, she wonders if this could A young girl, Jenny, was murdered a while ago and there are few leads in the case. This is the 1960’s and the police and forensics are very different to how we perceive them today. Cathy is an articled clerk in a solicitors office. Her mentor Charles is not liked by many and he is known to be a womaniser however he is good to her and she supports him. One day , by chance she overhears an argument he has with an unknown man. When Charles is found dead the following week, she wonders if this could be connected. Jenny’s father) blames Charles as he wouldn’t allow right of way over his land and Jenny wouldn’t have been where she was had the right of way been available. Inspector Crow now has his work but out and isn’t best pleased when Scotland yard are brought in to assist. Assistance he could very well do without. Roy is a wordsmith and at times this is like reading one of the classics, the writing being of such quality and words that we tend not to use everyday. “for her mind was patterned with doubt and incomprehension, a cicatriced amorphous mass criss crossed with questions and uncertainty” - I had to look up cicatriced - the scar of a healed wound) . That is not a criticism, more of a nod to the era in which this is set- a time of tradition and not so flexible points of view as we have now. If you enjoy Morse, Endeavour and Life on Mars or remember the 1960’s this could be right up your street. A good old fashioned detective story with no fuss. For more reviews please see my blog http://nickibookblog.blogspot.co.uk/ or follow me on Twitter @nickijmurphy1

  13. 4 out of 5

    Simon Leonard

    This is the third book in the DI Crow series, and as such you should really read the first two to get to know the man behind the face as it were.   As with the previous books this one is set back in the dark ages of forensics and police investigations where the police had to do a lot more door knocking instead of relying on science.  There are also a lack of any modern technology in this book, which isn't necessarily a bad thing as it does rely on the police force doing a lot more digging around a This is the third book in the DI Crow series, and as such you should really read the first two to get to know the man behind the face as it were.   As with the previous books this one is set back in the dark ages of forensics and police investigations where the police had to do a lot more door knocking instead of relying on science.  There are also a lack of any modern technology in this book, which isn't necessarily a bad thing as it does rely on the police force doing a lot more digging around and actually talking to suspects and witnesses. As with the previous two books this one is a very nice straight forward who-dunnit mystery with the reader learning everything at the same time as the Inspector himself, although there are some little nuggets of information we know that the DI doesn't, but not enough for me to work out who did it. Overall I thought the book was a very good read for it's time, although in places it did come across a bit dated.  If you are looking for a nostalgic crime/mystery book then I would recommend this book as it was quite an enjoyable read

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marion

    In this the third Inspector Crow mystery, Crow is called in by the local force to ivestigate the murder of a nine year old, Jenny Carson who was killed on her way home from school. Charles Lendon, a lawyer, had closed a right of way across his land that the children used as a short cut home from school thereby causing them to go via the woods. When Lendon is found stabbed through the heart the first suspect to present himself is Jenny`s father, however as Crow digs into the private and professiona In this the third Inspector Crow mystery, Crow is called in by the local force to ivestigate the murder of a nine year old, Jenny Carson who was killed on her way home from school. Charles Lendon, a lawyer, had closed a right of way across his land that the children used as a short cut home from school thereby causing them to go via the woods. When Lendon is found stabbed through the heart the first suspect to present himself is Jenny`s father, however as Crow digs into the private and professional life of Lendon he finds a host of possible suspects. It seems Lendon was a womaniser a man with a cruel streak that showed itself in his business and personal dealings. Crows thought processes and tenacity eventually pay off and as with all good detective stories I didn`t foresee who was responsible until the final reveal. Crow is a character who along with Wilson has grown on me and I look forward in anticipation to their next case. Thanks to Joffe books for the chance to read this as an ARC.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Normally I won’t request something that isn’t set in the current time period (or future) for various reasons but I didn’t see that aspect before clicking request so I figured I’d give it a go. I’m glad I did! It was actually refreshing to read a story without all the modern technology that makes crime solving “so easy” these days. One really had to work for it back then! I liked the writing and it was an interesting cast of characters. There were a few different subplots happening but all was res Normally I won’t request something that isn’t set in the current time period (or future) for various reasons but I didn’t see that aspect before clicking request so I figured I’d give it a go. I’m glad I did! It was actually refreshing to read a story without all the modern technology that makes crime solving “so easy” these days. One really had to work for it back then! I liked the writing and it was an interesting cast of characters. There were a few different subplots happening but all was resolved at the end. There were some surprises and red herrings and the ending was a surprise for me. I had not read any previous work by the author and this is a series but it reads quite well by itself. Overall a nice and unexpected change from my usual stories. Thanks to NetGalley, the author and Joffe Books for a copy in exchange for a review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    This is my second Inspector Crow. Neither book has been consecutive, nor do you need to read this series in order, each book stands alone. I am thrilled with this series, the writing is concise, the plots are cleverly constructed and I never have figured out who the bad guy is. The timeframe is the 60’s, it is the characters, rather than the setting, so the time period is irrelevant in my opinion. The author is very good at building suspence, so once in, it is hard to put down. Language and sex This is my second Inspector Crow. Neither book has been consecutive, nor do you need to read this series in order, each book stands alone. I am thrilled with this series, the writing is concise, the plots are cleverly constructed and I never have figured out who the bad guy is. The timeframe is the 60’s, it is the characters, rather than the setting, so the time period is irrelevant in my opinion. The author is very good at building suspence, so once in, it is hard to put down. Language and sex are not an issue, nor is it violent. If you like the television show “Endeavor” or “George Gently” you will like this. I highly recommend this author and this series. Thank you to netgalley for a free advance copy in exchange for an honest review, all opinions are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diane E

    Gripping for sure A child's murder, a lawyer's murder but who. Mr Lewis again weaves multiple story lines through this book making it difficult to figure out who the villain actually was. Touching at times. Very touching at times . Fun to read, kept me going for sure . Don't like the dictionary of "British slang " because most word differences are easy to figure out and true slang words are not included. Same dictionary I have seen in other books by this publisher . Simple rubbish . Gripping for sure A child's murder, a lawyer's murder but who. Mr Lewis again weaves multiple story lines through this book making it difficult to figure out who the villain actually was. Touching at times. Very touching at times . Fun to read, kept me going for sure . Don't like the dictionary of "British slang " because most word differences are easy to figure out and true slang words are not included. Same dictionary I have seen in other books by this publisher . Simple rubbish .

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aileen (Ailz) Grist

    It is nice to have a modern murder mystery set in a time before mobile phones, dna, etc. Policing was more difficult, but Detective Chief Inspector Crow manages well with his intuition. I love the description of Crow - and wonder who would play him in a film or on tv - he's tall, thin, bald, with a skull like head. He can generally tell who is lying to him - but two people get away with it here - and affect the whole outcome. A good, readable book. It is nice to have a modern murder mystery set in a time before mobile phones, dna, etc. Policing was more difficult, but Detective Chief Inspector Crow manages well with his intuition. I love the description of Crow - and wonder who would play him in a film or on tv - he's tall, thin, bald, with a skull like head. He can generally tell who is lying to him - but two people get away with it here - and affect the whole outcome. A good, readable book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    Jenny Carson is murdered in the woods. Her father blames Charles Lendon, a ruthless lawyer and womanizer. The local police are having a hard time with this case so they call in Inspector Crow. Can the Inspector find the connection between the two murders? This story is set in the 1960's in England. A pretty good police procedural. Thanks to Joffee Books for the copy so I could give an honest review. Jenny Carson is murdered in the woods. Her father blames Charles Lendon, a ruthless lawyer and womanizer. The local police are having a hard time with this case so they call in Inspector Crow. Can the Inspector find the connection between the two murders? This story is set in the 1960's in England. A pretty good police procedural. Thanks to Joffee Books for the copy so I could give an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    When a second murder occurs in the area Chief Constable Rogers asks Scotland Yard for help, much against the views of his Chief Superintendent, Simpson. So Detective Chief Inspector with his Sergeant arrive to begin their investigation. An enjoyable, well-written and easily read police procedural mystery set in the 1960's. When a second murder occurs in the area Chief Constable Rogers asks Scotland Yard for help, much against the views of his Chief Superintendent, Simpson. So Detective Chief Inspector with his Sergeant arrive to begin their investigation. An enjoyable, well-written and easily read police procedural mystery set in the 1960's.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    A good, old style whodunit. The book aged well and it's pleasure to read about discoveries based on deduction more than scientific tests. I love this book and look forward to reading other in this series. Recommended! Many thanks to Joffe Books and Netgalley for this ARC A good, old style whodunit. The book aged well and it's pleasure to read about discoveries based on deduction more than scientific tests. I love this book and look forward to reading other in this series. Recommended! Many thanks to Joffe Books and Netgalley for this ARC

  22. 4 out of 5

    Greta Halliday

    Another good police procedural solved in the days before modern technology came into being. The best in the series so far. Thanks to Joffe Books for giving me the opportunity to read this extremely interesting novel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen Beavin

    Entertaining This story was entertaining but certainly didn't have me on the edge of my seat. There were several other storylines going on that got wrapped up at the end, but I hadn't figured out who the killer was. Entertaining This story was entertaining but certainly didn't have me on the edge of my seat. There were several other storylines going on that got wrapped up at the end, but I hadn't figured out who the killer was.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    The Woods Murder This book had an interesting but complicated plot. The characters were believable and interesting. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and look forward to reading the next book in the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mr Kenneth L Mullen

    Another great story Another great story featuring Inspector Crowe. Lots of action with plenty of twists and turns and an exciting ending. Looking forward to the next one in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Gave it 4 star! I would have given more , but it was too slow! I get that it was written in the time period where everything was much slower , and things take longer. Didn't suspect a thing! Gave it 4 star! I would have given more , but it was too slow! I get that it was written in the time period where everything was much slower , and things take longer. Didn't suspect a thing!

  27. 5 out of 5

    P.

    Decent read, even if the climax is an easy out. Interestingly, Crow has developed an eye for the ladies, and subjects the reader to more than one bout of [somewhat tedious] meditations on women, among other things.... 1972

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie Radley

    Kept me in its grip This mystery kept me guessing big time. Enjoyed the characters. No I have to read the rest in the series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mrs E Bowden

    Really good read I really enjoyed this book and the description of the characters are really well written I would recommend these books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pam Madson

    Excellent I really enjoyed this book. There was a lot of action and so much suspense as well as some pretty good twists and turns.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.