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Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, our childhoods have been captured and preserved online, never to go away. But what happens when we can't leave our most embarrassing moments behind? Until recently, the awkward moments of growing up could be forgotten. But today we may be on the verge of losing the ability to leave our pasts behind. In The End of Forgetting, Kate Eichhorn e Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, our childhoods have been captured and preserved online, never to go away. But what happens when we can't leave our most embarrassing moments behind? Until recently, the awkward moments of growing up could be forgotten. But today we may be on the verge of losing the ability to leave our pasts behind. In The End of Forgetting, Kate Eichhorn explores what happens when images of our younger selves persist, often remaining just a click away. For today's teenagers, many of whom spend hours each day posting on social media platforms, efforts to move beyond moments they regret face new and seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Unlike a high school yearbook or a shoebox full of old photos, the information that accumulates on social media is here to stay. What was once fleeting is now documented and tagged, always ready to surface and interrupt our future lives. Moreover, new innovations such as automated facial recognition also mean that the reappearance of our past is increasingly out of our control. Historically, growing up has been about moving on--achieving a safe distance from painful events that typically mark childhood and adolescence. But what happens when one remains tethered to the past? From the earliest days of the internet, critics have been concerned that it would endanger the innocence of childhood. The greater danger, Eichhorn warns, may ultimately be what happens when young adults find they are unable to distance themselves from their pasts. Rather than a childhood cut short by a premature loss of innocence, the real crisis of the digital age may be the specter of a childhood that can never be forgotten.


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Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, our childhoods have been captured and preserved online, never to go away. But what happens when we can't leave our most embarrassing moments behind? Until recently, the awkward moments of growing up could be forgotten. But today we may be on the verge of losing the ability to leave our pasts behind. In The End of Forgetting, Kate Eichhorn e Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, our childhoods have been captured and preserved online, never to go away. But what happens when we can't leave our most embarrassing moments behind? Until recently, the awkward moments of growing up could be forgotten. But today we may be on the verge of losing the ability to leave our pasts behind. In The End of Forgetting, Kate Eichhorn explores what happens when images of our younger selves persist, often remaining just a click away. For today's teenagers, many of whom spend hours each day posting on social media platforms, efforts to move beyond moments they regret face new and seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Unlike a high school yearbook or a shoebox full of old photos, the information that accumulates on social media is here to stay. What was once fleeting is now documented and tagged, always ready to surface and interrupt our future lives. Moreover, new innovations such as automated facial recognition also mean that the reappearance of our past is increasingly out of our control. Historically, growing up has been about moving on--achieving a safe distance from painful events that typically mark childhood and adolescence. But what happens when one remains tethered to the past? From the earliest days of the internet, critics have been concerned that it would endanger the innocence of childhood. The greater danger, Eichhorn warns, may ultimately be what happens when young adults find they are unable to distance themselves from their pasts. Rather than a childhood cut short by a premature loss of innocence, the real crisis of the digital age may be the specter of a childhood that can never be forgotten.

30 review for The End of Forgetting: Growing Up with Social Media

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is a cogently and succinctly synthesized book that is accessible to general audiences but clearly grounded in ample literature and research. Eichhorn makes some important observations about our current media landscape and the way that is changing childhood and adolescence in ways that warrant the attention of all of us. She's particularly good making the comparisons between old and new media without ever going overboard in suggesting there aren't continuities or that any media's role in soc This is a cogently and succinctly synthesized book that is accessible to general audiences but clearly grounded in ample literature and research. Eichhorn makes some important observations about our current media landscape and the way that is changing childhood and adolescence in ways that warrant the attention of all of us. She's particularly good making the comparisons between old and new media without ever going overboard in suggesting there aren't continuities or that any media's role in society is technologically determined or over-determined. I know I just used far more academic jargon than was necessary in this description. But I really would recommend this book to anyone who cares about the future generations and the way that they will contend with media throughout their lives.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Graham G

    Read this for class. I found it surprisingly compelling and easy to read for Academia, and it investigates a very important issue. If you pick this up and knock out a few pages a day, it's a not a bad way to spend time. Read this for class. I found it surprisingly compelling and easy to read for Academia, and it investigates a very important issue. If you pick this up and knock out a few pages a day, it's a not a bad way to spend time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda Anticoli

    The book is full of nice hints and useful take-home points. Unfortunately the author does a bit of cherry-picking in her arguments. All the cases are not analysed in depth, while concepts that can be more or less trivial, are redundantly repeated. I strongly, strongly disagree that one of the cases analysed should be regarded as a 'teens are not free to make mistakes and sexually experiment' case. It is sexists, it subtly condones rape (at first at a first glance, not that this is intended) as p The book is full of nice hints and useful take-home points. Unfortunately the author does a bit of cherry-picking in her arguments. All the cases are not analysed in depth, while concepts that can be more or less trivial, are redundantly repeated. I strongly, strongly disagree that one of the cases analysed should be regarded as a 'teens are not free to make mistakes and sexually experiment' case. It is sexists, it subtly condones rape (at first at a first glance, not that this is intended) as part of growing up experience. Moreover, in my opinion, the author points out that social media is such a bad beast, judging teens and kids actions to the point that they are no more allowed to make mistakes, since these mistakes can potentially resonate. This is wrong, I agree, but people who wants to live in large groups have to conform to societal norms. This happens in small town and rural areas more, though. As the choice is not always to move, not for everyone, then we had to deal with societal norms, conform, and censor our behaviour way before social media.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lukáš Zorád

    Interesting essay about a topic that should concern every responsible parent. There are things that we as parents can influence and take control over thus reduce the potential harm to our kids, but there are many things we won´t have direct influence over. What I apppreciate about this book is the "diagnostic part", meaning that the book describes what is happening and how does it affect (or potentially affect) people who are growing up with social media and loosing the possibilities of being fo Interesting essay about a topic that should concern every responsible parent. There are things that we as parents can influence and take control over thus reduce the potential harm to our kids, but there are many things we won´t have direct influence over. What I apppreciate about this book is the "diagnostic part", meaning that the book describes what is happening and how does it affect (or potentially affect) people who are growing up with social media and loosing the possibilities of being forgotten. What I miss in this book are deeper tips on what to do and how to overcome these challenges, but that may be another story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Not convincing. No matter how many times Eichhorn insists that not being able to forget/be forgotten is a problem for children and adolescents, she does not prove that point. Sure, the effects of social media on children absolutely merit consideration, but there’s no data here - just quotes from psychoanalysts, extreme anecdotes, and Eichhorn repeating that social media is a problem... all of which fail to convince me there’s actually an issue here for -most- people. How many more children and t Not convincing. No matter how many times Eichhorn insists that not being able to forget/be forgotten is a problem for children and adolescents, she does not prove that point. Sure, the effects of social media on children absolutely merit consideration, but there’s no data here - just quotes from psychoanalysts, extreme anecdotes, and Eichhorn repeating that social media is a problem... all of which fail to convince me there’s actually an issue here for -most- people. How many more children and teens are being bullied because of their social media activities? How many more are killing themselves, or becoming depressed? What are the actual, material consequences for adults? From this book, I don’t know that answer, nor is there any sense of the negative scale and scope Eichhorn insists upon. While I can sympathize with refugees and assault victims having to relive trauma (is that really the same issue though as one’s own, deliberate social media postings?) and can agree that you shouldn’t hold children’s bad judgement against them, I’m less concerned about the “horrifying” prospect of my current circle seeing an embarrassing old picture (said as someone who entered college along with facebook). The chapter on changing technologies was interesting...as history. That was about it for me. Overall, the style is bland and academic, though mercifully the book is short.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Drawing on thousands of hours of interviews in retirement homes all over the country, Eichhorn can talk confidently about how was it for the first generation to grow up with social media. And, we all remember the novels of four-five centuries ago when people were oblivious of the social aspects of life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kari Sweeten

    I read this book for an assignment in my mass communications class and I found the modern day views of technology fascinating but I feel like the book was more of a history lesson in photography, computers, phones, etc, There was a lot of detailed research and I found the concept of having a digital identity to be very eye opening!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thingdong

    A well-written, important book about social media. Also slightly depressing to read when you have grown up with social media yourself :/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Greenbrook

    https://twitter.com/JGreenbrookHeld/s... https://twitter.com/JGreenbrookHeld/s...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    302.231 E343 2019

  11. 5 out of 5

    M

    For an academic, this book was written in an extremely accessible way for the layperson, and I'm grateful. The End of Forgetting delves into the mire of an issue we all worry about — stupid shit we do finding their way onto the internet and interrupting our daily lives. I've had this happen with a citation I received in my wayward youth coming back to bite me on a background track despite having paid for the court to settle the issue. In reading this, I hoped that Dr.Einhorn would go into someth For an academic, this book was written in an extremely accessible way for the layperson, and I'm grateful. The End of Forgetting delves into the mire of an issue we all worry about — stupid shit we do finding their way onto the internet and interrupting our daily lives. I've had this happen with a citation I received in my wayward youth coming back to bite me on a background track despite having paid for the court to settle the issue. In reading this, I hoped that Dr.Einhorn would go into something like this, which is an issue that affects minorities in the United States after they've gone to prison, served their time, and want to start anew. Instead of focusing on the many, it seems like Dr.Einhorn's book focuses on the few. For example, she details the painful experience of a video taken without consent of an awkward teenager playing with a light sabre that then went viral — and ruined his life in the process. For me, there are bigger issues. Specifically, the one related to countless individuals who can't get redemption for something they did years ago. I guess I would've written about this topic from a different angle.

  12. 4 out of 5

    J.W.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Ploetz

  15. 4 out of 5

    Felipe Calvo

  16. 4 out of 5

    KP

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria Hughes

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Tang

  22. 5 out of 5

    Guan You

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jackson Forner

  24. 5 out of 5

    Declan Henesy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Cliff

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Nikolla

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jon Tickle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Minahil

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Manavis

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