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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - From the New York Times food editor and former restaurant critic comes a cookbook to help us rediscover the art of Sunday supper and the joy of gathering with friends and family "A book to make home cooks, and those they feed, very happy indeed."--Nigella Lawson "People are lonely," Sam Sifton writes. "They want to be part of something, even when NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - From the New York Times food editor and former restaurant critic comes a cookbook to help us rediscover the art of Sunday supper and the joy of gathering with friends and family "A book to make home cooks, and those they feed, very happy indeed."--Nigella Lawson "People are lonely," Sam Sifton writes. "They want to be part of something, even when they can't identify that longing as a need. They show up. Feed them. It isn't much more complicated than that." Regular dinners with family and friends, he argues, are a metaphor for connection, a space where memories can be shared as easily as salt or hot sauce, where deliciousness reigns. The point of Sunday supper is to gather around a table with good company and eat. From years spent talking to restaurant chefs, cookbook authors, and home cooks in connection with his daily work at The New York Times, Sam Sifton's See You on Sunday is a book to make those dinners possible. It is a guide to preparing meals for groups larger than the average American family (though everything here can be scaled down, or up). The 200 recipes are mostly simple and inexpensive ("You are not a feudal landowner entertaining the serfs"), and they derive from decades spent cooking for family and groups ranging from six to sixty. From big meats to big pots, with a few words on salad, and a diatribe on the needless complexity of desserts, See You on Sunday is an indispensable addition to any home cook's library. From how to shuck an oyster to the perfection of Mallomars with flutes of milk, from the joys of grilled eggplant to those of gumbo and bog, this book is devoted to the preparation of delicious proteins and grains, vegetables and desserts, taco nights and pizza parties.


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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - From the New York Times food editor and former restaurant critic comes a cookbook to help us rediscover the art of Sunday supper and the joy of gathering with friends and family "A book to make home cooks, and those they feed, very happy indeed."--Nigella Lawson "People are lonely," Sam Sifton writes. "They want to be part of something, even when NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - From the New York Times food editor and former restaurant critic comes a cookbook to help us rediscover the art of Sunday supper and the joy of gathering with friends and family "A book to make home cooks, and those they feed, very happy indeed."--Nigella Lawson "People are lonely," Sam Sifton writes. "They want to be part of something, even when they can't identify that longing as a need. They show up. Feed them. It isn't much more complicated than that." Regular dinners with family and friends, he argues, are a metaphor for connection, a space where memories can be shared as easily as salt or hot sauce, where deliciousness reigns. The point of Sunday supper is to gather around a table with good company and eat. From years spent talking to restaurant chefs, cookbook authors, and home cooks in connection with his daily work at The New York Times, Sam Sifton's See You on Sunday is a book to make those dinners possible. It is a guide to preparing meals for groups larger than the average American family (though everything here can be scaled down, or up). The 200 recipes are mostly simple and inexpensive ("You are not a feudal landowner entertaining the serfs"), and they derive from decades spent cooking for family and groups ranging from six to sixty. From big meats to big pots, with a few words on salad, and a diatribe on the needless complexity of desserts, See You on Sunday is an indispensable addition to any home cook's library. From how to shuck an oyster to the perfection of Mallomars with flutes of milk, from the joys of grilled eggplant to those of gumbo and bog, this book is devoted to the preparation of delicious proteins and grains, vegetables and desserts, taco nights and pizza parties.

30 review for See You on Sunday: A Cookbook for Family and Friends

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I got this book from work solely because I had been thinking about making corn pudding and when skimming thru this book, unintentionally flipped right to the corn pudding recipe. It's not like I can ignore fate when it's this obvious I got this book from work solely because I had been thinking about making corn pudding and when skimming thru this book, unintentionally flipped right to the corn pudding recipe. It's not like I can ignore fate when it's this obvious

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kellaura

    The most Episcopalian book ever written. “Church ought just to be dinner.” Amen. All we crave right now is between these covers: the sacraments, family, friends, togetherness.

  3. 4 out of 5

    RH Walters

    America's desperate need for unity vs the pandemic. I so love the message, but right now I need a cookbook for two mildly depressed adults who don't want to shop but yet must feed themselves and a restless kindergartener who wonders if she's going to get to go to first grade. My garden is such a shambles you would laugh if you saw it. Food? America's desperate need for unity vs the pandemic. I so love the message, but right now I need a cookbook for two mildly depressed adults who don't want to shop but yet must feed themselves and a restless kindergartener who wonders if she's going to get to go to first grade. My garden is such a shambles you would laugh if you saw it. Food?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    The crazier the world gets, the more we depend on our phones, the more we crave basic human connection. And what better way to connect with family and friends than over a delicious dinner? Sam Sifton gets that. As the Food Editor for The New York Times, he understands both the hectic schedule of daily life and that inner drive for fellowship with others. And he’s come up with some ideas that can help us all, starting with chicken. Really, he starts his new cookbook, See You on Sunday, with a bun The crazier the world gets, the more we depend on our phones, the more we crave basic human connection. And what better way to connect with family and friends than over a delicious dinner? Sam Sifton gets that. As the Food Editor for The New York Times, he understands both the hectic schedule of daily life and that inner drive for fellowship with others. And he’s come up with some ideas that can help us all, starting with chicken. Really, he starts his new cookbook, See You on Sunday, with a bunch of good information about how to plan and create a weekly supper that will feed and sustain the soul as well as the body. He talks the practical advice of picking wine, setting the table, even warming the plates—all the details that help provide the hospitality without formality. But then he moves on to the best part—the food. There is a big chapter on chicken. Why is that? Because it’s one of our favorite foods here in America, and it’s relatively inexpensive. A couple of roast chickens can go in the oven with just some simple seasoning, and an hour or so later, you have a hearty dinner. Or maybe you don’t want to do just another roast chicken. Then try the recipe for Chicken Adobo, Chicken Milanese, Chicken Paprika, Chicken Provencal, Chicken Shawarma, or Oven-Roasted Buffalo Chicken Wings. From there the ideas go to Big Meats. Pulled pork, ribs, pork chops, ham, roast beef, brisket, steaks, lamb. Then he talks Big Pots, like Chili, Gumbo, Beef Stew, Beef Stroganoff, and Mapo Ragu.. There are recipes for pastas, beans, rice, seafood, vegetables. There are a few words about salads, tips about serving breads, ideas for desserts. And because Sifton understands us, there is an entire chapter on Taco Night, and another just on pizza. The most important thing about these recipes is that they meet us where we are. He’s not trying to get us to create a whole different lifestyle. He doesn’t want us to throw formal dinner parties (or if we do, to make those separate from these Sunday suppers). He wants us to create meals that nourish our relationships and our spirits as well as our bodies. He gives us thoughtful options for keeping our grocery bill low or for stepping out of our comfort zone and trying something new. He doesn’t care about the Instagram-worthiness of the food. He just wants it to taste good, and for those gathered to enjoy themselves. See You on Sunday is a big cookbook with lots of gorgeous photos. But they’re not the glossy, magazine styled (overly styled) pages that you might expect from an Important Cookbook. The photos make the food craveable but realistic, honest, pure. This book is written from the perspective of a friend who you asked for advice on what to serve for dinner. He just has a bigger idea of what your dinner should be, and he wants you to jump on board and get excited about the idea too. And you know what? For me, I think it worked. I love this idea, and while I’m not sure we can pull off this kind of meal every week, we can certainly try to do it more often. Especially with all these lovely recipes to try out! I’ve received a free copy of See You on Sunday from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linda Quinn

    This is a standout in the cookbook world and I’ll be buying my own copy ASAP. My first impression was oh, not enough pictures which I always find disappointing in a cookbook. See You on Sunday is an exception to that. The pictures that are here are beautifully set but more importantly the recipes are clear, simple and warming. So many recipes brought childhood family dinners rushing back. There is also a very fine assortment of ethnic dishes that should make every home chef happy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mskychick

    Haha, there’s just 2 of us in our house and we are intermittent fasters who eat Whole 30/keto and vegan half the time to boot 😋 We would have to really scale down these recipes most of the time! But I got a few nice ideas for church supper club.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Sifton has a lovely writing voice but the recipes are heavy and meat centric. Not for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    A

    Your New Basic Cookbook Can there be a fresh, new take on the basics ? Sam Sifton’s new book says, “YES !” Fish tacos, Pernil, Bo Ssam, grilled lettuce are all dishes that are so readily found in restaurants that they have become our new basics. Crown Roast of Pork, Glazed Ham, Boston Baked Beans are old beloved standbys. See You on Sunday offers both old and new basics in easy to follow recipes for both weeknight dinners and entertaining. The recipes feature ingredients that you have in your ho Your New Basic Cookbook Can there be a fresh, new take on the basics ? Sam Sifton’s new book says, “YES !” Fish tacos, Pernil, Bo Ssam, grilled lettuce are all dishes that are so readily found in restaurants that they have become our new basics. Crown Roast of Pork, Glazed Ham, Boston Baked Beans are old beloved standbys. See You on Sunday offers both old and new basics in easy to follow recipes for both weeknight dinners and entertaining. The recipes feature ingredients that you have in your home or are easily available. Except for Dessert, the chapters are based on what you would like to cook rather than courses - “Birds, Big Pots, Pasta, Taco Night…” A surprising Chapter 11, A Nice Party features just four recipes that I won’t give away here ! I received a copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review. And I’m glad I did…. See You on Sunday is my new “go to” gift for new graduates, new couples, new home, new apartment - you name it. And it is just what my old basic recipes needed - some freshening up !

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

    I love Sam Sifton's column so much but I was disappointed in the cookbook. Just not very inspiring either in recipes or photos. I wouldn't buy it again if I had it to do over. Anyway, I'll continue to read him in the NYT and call it good. I love Sam Sifton's column so much but I was disappointed in the cookbook. Just not very inspiring either in recipes or photos. I wouldn't buy it again if I had it to do over. Anyway, I'll continue to read him in the NYT and call it good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    See You on Sunday is the latest cookbook by Sam Sifton, the food editor of the New York Times. Subtitled A Cookbook for Family and Friends, the book evolved from the author’s many years of cooking Sunday dinners for his family and friends. As a result, Mr. Sifton has created a collection of casual, simple meals taking care not to include too many expensive ingredients. Since the focus is on feeding a group, all recipes yield about six average servings and can easily be made to serve more. Recipe See You on Sunday is the latest cookbook by Sam Sifton, the food editor of the New York Times. Subtitled A Cookbook for Family and Friends, the book evolved from the author’s many years of cooking Sunday dinners for his family and friends. As a result, Mr. Sifton has created a collection of casual, simple meals taking care not to include too many expensive ingredients. Since the focus is on feeding a group, all recipes yield about six average servings and can easily be made to serve more. Recipes are delicious and hearty and I think this would be a good cookbook for those starting out and for those with no dietary restrictions. The majority of the recipes are meat or carb heavy. Pork, sausage, and bacon are plentiful and are even included in bean, pasta, and vegetable dishes. Dairy, flour, and alcohol tend to also be common ingredients. I feel that some of the recipes such as for white rice, brown rice, corn on the cob, and garlic bread are not actually recipes but more like instructions on how to prepare these items. This coupled with the fact that recipes tend to be for tried-and-true items such as potatoes, chili, tacos, stew, BBQ items, sauces, and pizza is why I feel that this would be a wonderful cookbook for new cooks. More seasoned chefs most likely already have favorite recipes for the majority of these. I really appreciate the message of focusing on the experience of gathering together that this book imparts. However, in this day and age where most everyone I know is vegan, gluten or dairy free, or simply trying to cut back on meat (especially processed meat) consumption, I simply feel that this is not the cookbook for me. Disclosure: I received a free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jayne Gerdeman Homsher

    Wonderful cookbook for busy cooks who make time to create excellent meals on the weekends. These are recipes that are tasty and not too difficult really for the majority of home cooks. The author Sam Sifton is the food editor for the New York Times. He created this cookbook for people who appreciate a great home cooked meal. From roasted fish to pasta and chicken dishes so good I swear will make your mouth water. The dishes are classic yet modern. Homemade cuban black beans is perfection. Sam's Wonderful cookbook for busy cooks who make time to create excellent meals on the weekends. These are recipes that are tasty and not too difficult really for the majority of home cooks. The author Sam Sifton is the food editor for the New York Times. He created this cookbook for people who appreciate a great home cooked meal. From roasted fish to pasta and chicken dishes so good I swear will make your mouth water. The dishes are classic yet modern. Homemade cuban black beans is perfection. Sam's recipe for a roasted cauliflower with parmesan bread crumb topping is a dish I will make all the time now. My next recipe I will try is his banana pudding. You will find this cookbook will be a cookbook you will use quite a lot. I put this cookbook as necessary as the Joy of Cooking classic cookbooks. This is high praise from me. Cookbooks that I can use to create an entire large dinner from become magical to me. Thank you, @randomhouse. I've received a free copy of this cookbook from Random House in exchange for my free and unbiased review. Shout out to Sam Sifton.🌹🌹

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    What a bummer to pick this book up to read and cook through right before a pandemic!!! I typically read through cookbooks, but as I was starting to read I was bummed out about not being able to entertain and be with friends and family for the foreseeable future. Even two months after I started to read this book I still cannot foresee a time when we will have our dining tables full. I was able to cook a couple of recipes from the book before our grocery shopping availability got all wonky. Roast What a bummer to pick this book up to read and cook through right before a pandemic!!! I typically read through cookbooks, but as I was starting to read I was bummed out about not being able to entertain and be with friends and family for the foreseeable future. Even two months after I started to read this book I still cannot foresee a time when we will have our dining tables full. I was able to cook a couple of recipes from the book before our grocery shopping availability got all wonky. Roast Chicken, page 22 - It was the perfect roasted chicken. Flawless! Cheater's Brisket, page 94 - Delicious! I'm from Memphis and we consider our bar-b-que pork, but this grilled/roasted brisket was so tender and delicious. I would make this again. While I didn't have the experience I was hoping for when I picked up the book, it's not the book's fault. I will definitely pick it back up once the pandemic is over.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reading Fool

    This is ONE OF THE BEST cookbooks I've seen in recent times. So approachable, easy to read and follow, written for us common home cooks who are not trying to prepare something outrageous. This book had me at Chapter One, which is introduced by the scriptural verse: "They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts." I have tried three recipes: Pan-Roasted Steaks with Garlic and Thyme Butter, Chicken Adobo, and Spaghetti Bolognese. All were delicious and were big hits This is ONE OF THE BEST cookbooks I've seen in recent times. So approachable, easy to read and follow, written for us common home cooks who are not trying to prepare something outrageous. This book had me at Chapter One, which is introduced by the scriptural verse: "They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts." I have tried three recipes: Pan-Roasted Steaks with Garlic and Thyme Butter, Chicken Adobo, and Spaghetti Bolognese. All were delicious and were big hits with my family. Company-worthy, too. I only wish that there were more photographs. But this is a small ask, considering the high quality of this book. This is one to give to friends and family as a valuable gift. I've received a free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Ok, so I grabbed this book from the library intending to read it and take pictures of interesting recipes and then of course return it. But I have loved this cookbook so much that I have decided to put it on my birthday list! Yes I have access to pictures of all the recipes I want (which is pretty much every one) but it's the voice and input from the author that really make it special. I love the concept, which focuses on having a regular meal hosted for friends and family to come together, but Ok, so I grabbed this book from the library intending to read it and take pictures of interesting recipes and then of course return it. But I have loved this cookbook so much that I have decided to put it on my birthday list! Yes I have access to pictures of all the recipes I want (which is pretty much every one) but it's the voice and input from the author that really make it special. I love the concept, which focuses on having a regular meal hosted for friends and family to come together, but in a casual manner. But all of the little written passages before each chapter are so inspiring. After each one I felt myself inspired to cook, remember and yearning for memories of meals with everyone gathered. Yearning to make the food and enjoy the experiences that it brings. :) This is what a cookbook should do. Love it and can't wait to own it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I was so excited to receive this cookbook in the mail. I've read many food articles by Sam Sifton in The New York Times and have clipped recipes. What's great about this cookbook is that it has many wonderful recipes for the cook to use for family and friends meals. I have scoured the internet for recipes to find something that looks delicious and satisfying to share with those that I cook for, and it had been time consuming. I think this cookbook will be my go to book for recipes when I'm hosti I was so excited to receive this cookbook in the mail. I've read many food articles by Sam Sifton in The New York Times and have clipped recipes. What's great about this cookbook is that it has many wonderful recipes for the cook to use for family and friends meals. I have scoured the internet for recipes to find something that looks delicious and satisfying to share with those that I cook for, and it had been time consuming. I think this cookbook will be my go to book for recipes when I'm hosting family or friends gatherings at my home. I think this book is a wonderful addition to the cook's collection of cookbooks and will most likely be used often. I've received a free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    New York Times Cooking Editor Sam Sifton sets the table, pun intended, for readers to start a Sunday dinner tradition! What a great concept! I'm devoted to reading through the weekly offerings from NYT Cooking via my paid online subscription. I find WAY too many recipes that I want to make this way but that's not really a bad thing. Back to this book, it's got a great selection of recipes including the Delaware Fried Chicken that Sam recently demonstrated on the Today Show leading me to send my New York Times Cooking Editor Sam Sifton sets the table, pun intended, for readers to start a Sunday dinner tradition! What a great concept! I'm devoted to reading through the weekly offerings from NYT Cooking via my paid online subscription. I find WAY too many recipes that I want to make this way but that's not really a bad thing. Back to this book, it's got a great selection of recipes including the Delaware Fried Chicken that Sam recently demonstrated on the Today Show leading me to send my husband to the store for the ingredients and later forcing him to cook the best friend chicken I've had in a long time! If you like reading through cookbooks and learning about cooking techniques while getting some great recipes,, this is the book for you!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laureen Nowakowski

    This is such a fabulous cook book. I have been following Sam Sifton in the NYT for years and he currently oversees the NYT cooking. I don’t buy many cookbooks anymore since most recipes are available on line, but I bought this one. Just holding it cheers me up and I have read it cover to cover. I have made quite a few of the recipes and they have all been great. Sam is also famous for the no recipe recipe and he has a few of those in here. His no recipe for cooking whole carrots on the stovetop This is such a fabulous cook book. I have been following Sam Sifton in the NYT for years and he currently oversees the NYT cooking. I don’t buy many cookbooks anymore since most recipes are available on line, but I bought this one. Just holding it cheers me up and I have read it cover to cover. I have made quite a few of the recipes and they have all been great. Sam is also famous for the no recipe recipe and he has a few of those in here. His no recipe for cooking whole carrots on the stovetop is a show stopper, or his little essay on Mallomars and milk. I also like to cook big Sunday dinners and I only hope I don’t spill gravy or something on this book. This is my favorite cookbook.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The is a festive, fun cookbook for entertaining at home with family and friends. The recipes are clearly written. The book is beautifully photographed. There are so many delicious recipes in this book, I know I'll be using it a lot. I read Sam Sifton's recipes in the NY Times and I often keep them for future meals. This book would also be an amazing gift to any of your friends/family who like to cook and/or eat. I've received a free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased revi The is a festive, fun cookbook for entertaining at home with family and friends. The recipes are clearly written. The book is beautifully photographed. There are so many delicious recipes in this book, I know I'll be using it a lot. I read Sam Sifton's recipes in the NY Times and I often keep them for future meals. This book would also be an amazing gift to any of your friends/family who like to cook and/or eat. I've received a free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    I loved the recipes in this book. I have tried quite a few and all of the ones I tried have been winners. Some of the recipes even improved on my tried and true ones. The only thing that I didn't like was that there was not a picture for every recipe. I like cookbooks with pictures to get me inspired to try the recipes. Just reading about them sometimes just doesn't do it for me. I received a free copy free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review. I loved the recipes in this book. I have tried quite a few and all of the ones I tried have been winners. Some of the recipes even improved on my tried and true ones. The only thing that I didn't like was that there was not a picture for every recipe. I like cookbooks with pictures to get me inspired to try the recipes. Just reading about them sometimes just doesn't do it for me. I received a free copy free copy from Random House in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anne Glosky

    This cookbook has brought joy into our family’s home bound life the past two months. High-quality recipes, often simple, packed with flavor and broad appeal. I’m grateful to have heard an interview with Sifton with Terry Gross on Fresh Air around the time we moved into “Healthy at Home” restrictions and to local bookseller Carmichael’s Books for having a copy on the shelves. This book has made a big difference in my life the past two months.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This book makes me so excited that my family and friends will be fully vaccinated in the next couple of months. The main conceit of this book is that gathering over inexpensive and well cooked meals deepen relationships. Most of the recipes are fairly simple and seem doable on a week night. So far I’ve made the chicken shawarma, chicken adobo and bo ssam. All three have been very popular with all members of the family. I’m excited to continue cooking through the book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Luv

    I couldn't really give it a rating because it just didn't have recipes I like. We're trying to eat more plant based foods. None of the few plant based recipes in the book, like roasted vegetables, were much different than standard recipes. His Chicken Adobo recipe has coconut milk. I've never had it made that way. I'm going to try it using a meat substitute. I couldn't really give it a rating because it just didn't have recipes I like. We're trying to eat more plant based foods. None of the few plant based recipes in the book, like roasted vegetables, were much different than standard recipes. His Chicken Adobo recipe has coconut milk. I've never had it made that way. I'm going to try it using a meat substitute.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I'm a regular reader of Sifton's NYTimes work and recipes. I appreciate his writing about food and family and the difference between Dinner Parties and dinner for friends, with the importance of ritual in both. His recipes are inspiring and remind me how much I look forward to being able to cook for crowd again soon. I'm a regular reader of Sifton's NYTimes work and recipes. I appreciate his writing about food and family and the difference between Dinner Parties and dinner for friends, with the importance of ritual in both. His recipes are inspiring and remind me how much I look forward to being able to cook for crowd again soon.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angela Counter

    I only add a few cookbooks a year to goodreads out of the dozens that I skim. I add the ones where I read every bit of copy and the stories and sidebars. The ones I can't put down. The ones that make me stop everything to go try a recipe. Personality is what I'm looking for, opinions, maybe even attitude. This book made me long for the day I can throw dinner parties again. I only add a few cookbooks a year to goodreads out of the dozens that I skim. I add the ones where I read every bit of copy and the stories and sidebars. The ones I can't put down. The ones that make me stop everything to go try a recipe. Personality is what I'm looking for, opinions, maybe even attitude. This book made me long for the day I can throw dinner parties again.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Made the Ma Po Ragu and am making the chicken shawarma. This is an okay basic cookbook with a lot of variety, prob good for a recent grad or something, but the majority of the recipes are kind of old standards so it wasn’t super interesting to me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Louise Sanchez

    I grew up in a home where Sunday dinner was an event and I still try to make that meal memorable. But with the pandemic and no guests, the meals were not what I'd call Sunday dinners. Perhaps this custom will return in our near future and people will bring out the tablecloths and good china again. I grew up in a home where Sunday dinner was an event and I still try to make that meal memorable. But with the pandemic and no guests, the meals were not what I'd call Sunday dinners. Perhaps this custom will return in our near future and people will bring out the tablecloths and good china again.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Get this book if you cook for people. If you like to read cookbooks, this is as good as it gets. Sam writes like the NY Times Food Editor he is.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dona

    Great cookbook. I really liked its laid back approach.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Could use lots more pictures.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I liked it so much I bought the book.

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