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Still, silence. Still silence. Until the smell of the release caught up to the metaphysics. Now, she needed to face him, to grant him the remnant dignity, to overlook the biology of passing, to touch him, to place pads of fingertips along his neck and on his wrist. She turned to him and knelt to one knee. Bill’s eyes had dulled to milk left sitting on the counter too long, Still, silence. Still silence. Until the smell of the release caught up to the metaphysics. Now, she needed to face him, to grant him the remnant dignity, to overlook the biology of passing, to touch him, to place pads of fingertips along his neck and on his wrist. She turned to him and knelt to one knee. Bill’s eyes had dulled to milk left sitting on the counter too long, the water separating from the lactose. His jaw had slackened, his mouth slightly agape. “You needed someone to be here with you. Sorry it had to be me, Bill,” she said softly. “I don’t mind doing it. I’m just sorry for you that it happened to be me.” Grabbing his neck, she propped up his chin with her thumb as she felt for his jugular. Whether intentionally or not, she held his face up, his eyes now aligned with hers. No pulse yet, no pulse yet, no pulse yet, no pulse yet. After a minute, she quit thinking the yet. Hope hadn’t left though. It simply transferred its wishes. From life to whatever Bill had believed would happen next. For people of past generations, it's rare to find atheists, Mona reminded herself. These men had survived foxholes and seen the conquering of diseases that had carried away their younger siblings. They’d raised livestock, had dealt with death regularly. Accepted its bitterness, finality, and lack of influence or control over it.


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Still, silence. Still silence. Until the smell of the release caught up to the metaphysics. Now, she needed to face him, to grant him the remnant dignity, to overlook the biology of passing, to touch him, to place pads of fingertips along his neck and on his wrist. She turned to him and knelt to one knee. Bill’s eyes had dulled to milk left sitting on the counter too long, Still, silence. Still silence. Until the smell of the release caught up to the metaphysics. Now, she needed to face him, to grant him the remnant dignity, to overlook the biology of passing, to touch him, to place pads of fingertips along his neck and on his wrist. She turned to him and knelt to one knee. Bill’s eyes had dulled to milk left sitting on the counter too long, the water separating from the lactose. His jaw had slackened, his mouth slightly agape. “You needed someone to be here with you. Sorry it had to be me, Bill,” she said softly. “I don’t mind doing it. I’m just sorry for you that it happened to be me.” Grabbing his neck, she propped up his chin with her thumb as she felt for his jugular. Whether intentionally or not, she held his face up, his eyes now aligned with hers. No pulse yet, no pulse yet, no pulse yet, no pulse yet. After a minute, she quit thinking the yet. Hope hadn’t left though. It simply transferred its wishes. From life to whatever Bill had believed would happen next. For people of past generations, it's rare to find atheists, Mona reminded herself. These men had survived foxholes and seen the conquering of diseases that had carried away their younger siblings. They’d raised livestock, had dealt with death regularly. Accepted its bitterness, finality, and lack of influence or control over it.

35 review for Hatchet Women: Medicare Mayhem

  1. 5 out of 5

    J Earl

    Hatchet Women: Medicare Mayhem from Nick Sconce is a hard book for me to formulate a good opinion on. There were things I liked and things that just irritated me. This is the first work by Sconce I have read and I can't say for sure whether I would or would not read another. I usually know that I would or wouldn't with writers who are new to me. I guess ambivalence might sum it up best. I liked the main characters, the action in the first chapter alone made me think I might really love this novel Hatchet Women: Medicare Mayhem from Nick Sconce is a hard book for me to formulate a good opinion on. There were things I liked and things that just irritated me. This is the first work by Sconce I have read and I can't say for sure whether I would or would not read another. I usually know that I would or wouldn't with writers who are new to me. I guess ambivalence might sum it up best. I liked the main characters, the action in the first chapter alone made me think I might really love this novel. Yet even there there were the things that would grate on my nerves. The writing style didn't seem to me to flow. Parts would move nicely then the flow would be broken by some questionably structured sentences. Ones that made you reread to make sure you got what he was saying. That is frustrating in a book that you expect to move briskly. Then some words just were wrong. No doubt the spellchecker worked, they weren't technically misspelled, they were just the wrong word. Like Gomer Pile for Gomer Pyle. I think some people will enjoy this more than I did, the idea is interesting and, like I said, I really liked the main group of characters. I just felt the writing was too stilted and uneven, which made it way too easy to put the book down and pick up something else until my curiosity about what would happen overcame my desire to read good prose. Reviewed from a copy made available through Goodreads' First Reads.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judy Collins

  4. 5 out of 5

    loveallbooks88

  5. 5 out of 5

    Book Smeller Jessica Prien

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  7. 5 out of 5

    ☯~☽~•Patricia Mainard•~☾~☯

  8. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pat

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Davis

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  13. 5 out of 5

    J

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Walker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Isley Forrester

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Rate

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lourdes Rivera

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Baker

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jerrilynn Atherton

  28. 5 out of 5

    F

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  32. 4 out of 5

    Barbie Campbell

  33. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  34. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

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