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Year's Best Weird Fiction, Vol. 5

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Showcasing the finest weird fiction published in 2017, volume 5 of the Year's Best Weird Fiction is the final, triumphant volume in the acclaimed series. Editors Robert Shearman and Michael Kelly bring their knowledge and skill to this fifth and final volume of the Year's Best Weird Fiction. Michael Kelly - Foreword Robert Shearman - Introduction Kurt Fawver - The Conve Showcasing the finest weird fiction published in 2017, volume 5 of the Year's Best Weird Fiction is the final, triumphant volume in the acclaimed series. Editors Robert Shearman and Michael Kelly bring their knowledge and skill to this fifth and final volume of the Year's Best Weird Fiction. Michael Kelly - Foreword Robert Shearman - Introduction Kurt Fawver - The Convexity of Our Youth Ben Loory - The Rock Eater Brenna Gomez - Corzo Kathleen Kayembe - You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych Daniel Carpenter - Flotsam Michael Mirolla - The Possession Ian Muneshwar - Skins Smooth as Plantain, Hearts Soft as Mango Claire Dean - The Unwish Kristi DeMeester - Worship Only What She Bleeds David Peak - House of Abjection Helen Marshall - The Way She is With Strangers Joshua King - The Anteater Jenni Fagan - When Words Change the Molecular Composition of Water Alison Littlewood - The Entertainment Arrives Chavisa Woods - Take the Way Home That Leads Back to Sullivan Street Carmen Maria Machado - Eight Bites Eric Schaller - Red Hood Rebecca Kuder - Curb Day Adam-Troy Castro - The Narrow Escape of Zipper-Girl K.L. Pereira - Disappearer Camilla Grudova - The Mouse Queen Brian Evenson - The Second Door Nadia Bulkin - Live Through This Paul Tremblay - Something About Birds


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Showcasing the finest weird fiction published in 2017, volume 5 of the Year's Best Weird Fiction is the final, triumphant volume in the acclaimed series. Editors Robert Shearman and Michael Kelly bring their knowledge and skill to this fifth and final volume of the Year's Best Weird Fiction. Michael Kelly - Foreword Robert Shearman - Introduction Kurt Fawver - The Conve Showcasing the finest weird fiction published in 2017, volume 5 of the Year's Best Weird Fiction is the final, triumphant volume in the acclaimed series. Editors Robert Shearman and Michael Kelly bring their knowledge and skill to this fifth and final volume of the Year's Best Weird Fiction. Michael Kelly - Foreword Robert Shearman - Introduction Kurt Fawver - The Convexity of Our Youth Ben Loory - The Rock Eater Brenna Gomez - Corzo Kathleen Kayembe - You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych Daniel Carpenter - Flotsam Michael Mirolla - The Possession Ian Muneshwar - Skins Smooth as Plantain, Hearts Soft as Mango Claire Dean - The Unwish Kristi DeMeester - Worship Only What She Bleeds David Peak - House of Abjection Helen Marshall - The Way She is With Strangers Joshua King - The Anteater Jenni Fagan - When Words Change the Molecular Composition of Water Alison Littlewood - The Entertainment Arrives Chavisa Woods - Take the Way Home That Leads Back to Sullivan Street Carmen Maria Machado - Eight Bites Eric Schaller - Red Hood Rebecca Kuder - Curb Day Adam-Troy Castro - The Narrow Escape of Zipper-Girl K.L. Pereira - Disappearer Camilla Grudova - The Mouse Queen Brian Evenson - The Second Door Nadia Bulkin - Live Through This Paul Tremblay - Something About Birds

30 review for Year's Best Weird Fiction, Vol. 5

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Contents: vii - Forward - Michael Kelley xi - Introduction - Robert Shearman 003 - “The Convexity of Our Youth” by Kurt Fawver 027 - “The Rock Eater” by Ben Loory 035 - “Corzo” by Brenna Gomez 047 - “You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych” by Kathleen Kayembe 081 - “Flotsam” by Daniel Carpenter 095 - “The Possession” by Michael Mirolla 105 - “Skins Smooth as Plantain, Hearts Soft as Mango” by Ian Muneshwar 127 - “The Unwish” by Claire Dean 141 - “Worship Only What She Bleeds” by Kristi DeMeester 149 - “Hou Contents: vii - Forward - Michael Kelley xi - Introduction - Robert Shearman 003 - “The Convexity of Our Youth” by Kurt Fawver 027 - “The Rock Eater” by Ben Loory 035 - “Corzo” by Brenna Gomez 047 - “You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych” by Kathleen Kayembe 081 - “Flotsam” by Daniel Carpenter 095 - “The Possession” by Michael Mirolla 105 - “Skins Smooth as Plantain, Hearts Soft as Mango” by Ian Muneshwar 127 - “The Unwish” by Claire Dean 141 - “Worship Only What She Bleeds” by Kristi DeMeester 149 - “House of Abjection” by David Peak 165 - “The Way She is With Strangers” by Helen Marshall 181 - “The Anteater” by Joshua King 197 - “When Words Change the Molecular Composition of Water” by Jenni Fagan 209 - “The Entertainment Arrives” by Alison Littlewood 223 - “Take the Way Home That Leads Back To Sullivan Street” by Chavisa Woods 249 - “Eight Bites” by Carmen Maria Carmen Machado 267 - “Red Hood” by Eric Schaller 281 - “Curb Day” by Rebecca Kuder 293 - “The Narrow Escape of Zipper-Girl” by Adam-Troy Castro 305 - “Disappearer” by KL Pereira 323 - “The Mouse Queen” by Camilla Grudova 329 - “The Second Door” by Brian Evenson 351- “Live Through This” by Nadia Bulkin 371 - “Something About Birds” by Paul Tremblay 395 - Contributors Notes 403 - Copyright Acknowledgements

  2. 5 out of 5

    Suki St Charles

    I was sorry to see that this is the last of the series-- I enjoyed these books a lot. I liked the idea of each volume having a "guest" editor, which gave the series a wider range than if a single person had chosen all the stories for every book. I was sorry to see that this is the last of the series-- I enjoyed these books a lot. I liked the idea of each volume having a "guest" editor, which gave the series a wider range than if a single person had chosen all the stories for every book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Merl Fluin

    You can't expect to enjoy everything in an anthology. But I had hoped to enjoy more of this than I did. I generally dislike familial sentimentality (Helen Marshall, Ian Muneshwar, Kathleen Kayemebe), ostentatious exercises in literary theory (David Peak), and stories where the "weird" element amounts to little more than an extended metaphor (too numerous in this volume to list – it seems to be the default notion of weird here). That said, I finished the book a couple of days ago, and I'm surprise You can't expect to enjoy everything in an anthology. But I had hoped to enjoy more of this than I did. I generally dislike familial sentimentality (Helen Marshall, Ian Muneshwar, Kathleen Kayemebe), ostentatious exercises in literary theory (David Peak), and stories where the "weird" element amounts to little more than an extended metaphor (too numerous in this volume to list – it seems to be the default notion of weird here). That said, I finished the book a couple of days ago, and I'm surprised about which stories have stayed with me. They didn't all seem like standouts while I was reading them, but they kind of snuck up on me afterwards. The "rewritten fairy-tale" format has become overused since Angela Carter, but Eric Schaller's "Red Hood" pulls it off to unsettling effect. Camilla Grudova's "The Mouse Queen" sags in the middle (and is even, yes, a tad metaphorical) but still conjures a dark swirl of mystery and chaos. Brian Evenson's "The Second Door" is hard to summarise, so let's just say the impression it made on me was probably enhanced by my reading it on a plane. And Kristi DeMeester's "Worship Only What She Bleeds" is a total knockout, almost enough on its own to redeem the mediocrity of the rest. Almost.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Therese

    A strong finish to this distinguished series. While I still feel that Volume 2, edited by Kathe Koja, is the finest of the five, Shearman has assembled an excellent group of stories by a bevy of stylish, challenging writers and arranged them with care. Reliable favourites and recent phenoms like Brian Evenson, Carmen Maria Machado, Chavisa Woods, Nadia Bulkin, Helen Marshall, and Paul Tremblay are here but there are also lesser-known but equally intriguing authors like Eric Schaller, Kristi DeMe A strong finish to this distinguished series. While I still feel that Volume 2, edited by Kathe Koja, is the finest of the five, Shearman has assembled an excellent group of stories by a bevy of stylish, challenging writers and arranged them with care. Reliable favourites and recent phenoms like Brian Evenson, Carmen Maria Machado, Chavisa Woods, Nadia Bulkin, Helen Marshall, and Paul Tremblay are here but there are also lesser-known but equally intriguing authors like Eric Schaller, Kristi DeMeester, Camilla Grudova, Claire Dean, Kathleen Kayembe, and Ian Muneshwar. Shearman casts his net wide and his definition of "weird" might well be a bit too broad and diffuse for some readers of the genre, but I like this openess to strangeness in all forms and feel this has allowed him to put together a genuinely diverse and entertaining collection that rarely bogs down or takes itself too seriously. This was a pleasure to read and I'm genuinely sad there won't be any more in this series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bill Hsu

    More detailed notes and conversations at: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... Favorites so far: “You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych” by Kathleen Kayembe “The Unwish” by Claire Dean “Worship Only What She Bleeds” by Kristi Demeester [Chavisa Woods and Carmen Machado re-visits] "Red Hood" by Eric Schaller “Disappearer” by KL Pereira [Brian Evenson re-visit] More detailed notes and conversations at: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... Favorites so far: “You Will Always Have Family: A Triptych” by Kathleen Kayembe “The Unwish” by Claire Dean “Worship Only What She Bleeds” by Kristi Demeester [Chavisa Woods and Carmen Machado re-visits] "Red Hood" by Eric Schaller “Disappearer” by KL Pereira [Brian Evenson re-visit]

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    There is a part of me that loves to read weird fiction. Not horror, exactly, but kind of creepy, off stuff, and the stories in this collection fit the bill. They don't scare the bejeezus out of you, just leave you feeling a cold fingers up and down your spine feeling that's rather fun. As long as the lights are all on, the dog is curled up next to you and the usual number of people can be heard in the next room. Count them just to be sure. There is a part of me that loves to read weird fiction. Not horror, exactly, but kind of creepy, off stuff, and the stories in this collection fit the bill. They don't scare the bejeezus out of you, just leave you feeling a cold fingers up and down your spine feeling that's rather fun. As long as the lights are all on, the dog is curled up next to you and the usual number of people can be heard in the next room. Count them just to be sure.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I always score short fiction out of 10 based on imagination, layers and enjoyment. Also just because a story didn’t work for me DOES NOT reflect its quality at all. Jenni Fagin, Daniel Carpenter and Helen Marshall contributed my favourite stories. I have read Helen Marshall before and she never disappoints but the other two are new to me. The Convexity of Our Youth - by Kurt Fawver (8/10) The Rock Eater - by Ben Loory (4/10) Corzo - by Brenna Gomez (6/10) You Will Always Have Family - by Kathleen K I always score short fiction out of 10 based on imagination, layers and enjoyment. Also just because a story didn’t work for me DOES NOT reflect its quality at all. Jenni Fagin, Daniel Carpenter and Helen Marshall contributed my favourite stories. I have read Helen Marshall before and she never disappoints but the other two are new to me. The Convexity of Our Youth - by Kurt Fawver (8/10) The Rock Eater - by Ben Loory (4/10) Corzo - by Brenna Gomez (6/10) You Will Always Have Family - by Kathleen Kayambe (7/10) Flotsam - by Daniel Carpenter (9/10) The Possession - by Michael Minolta (5/10) Hearts Soft as Mango - by Ian Muneshwar (5/10) The Un Wish - by Claire Dean (7/10) Worship Only What She Bleeds - by Kristi Demeester (5/10) House of Abjection - by David Peak (7/10) The Way She Is With Strangers - by Helen Marshall (8/10) The Anteater - by Joshua King (7/10) Composition of Water - by Jenni Fagin (9/10) The Entertainment Arrives - by Alison Littlewood (8/10) Back to Sullivan Street - by Chavissa Wood (7/10) Eight Bites - by Carmen Machado (6/10) Red Hood - by Eric Schaller (6/10) Curb Day - by Rebecca Kuder (5/10) The Narrow Escape of Zipper Girl - by Adam Troy Castro (4/10) Disappeared - by KL Pereiar (5/10) The Mouse Queen - by Camilla Grudova (8/10) The Second Door - by Brian Evenson (8/10) Live Through This - by Nadia Bulkin (7/10) Something About Birds - by Paul Trembley (5/10)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt Turner

    Some crackerjack stories within. There were a few stories that really stood out, left their mark after the reading. There were some alright stories and some quite good stories. About half, while well written, didn’t engage much interest in me, and a few I wondered aloud their point. — This is about par for the anthology course. That said, four of these stories are superb. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Des Lewis

    To quote again from the Tremblay above: “That’s the true power of story. That it can find the secrets both the writer and reader didn’t know they had within themselves.” This book is a cornucopia of powers. An engulfing experience. Sheer, man! The detailed review of this book posted elsewhere under my name is too long to post here. Above is its conclusion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Randolph

    Just not into Weird anymore. More interested in horror. The group I started is called Literary Horror, not Literary Weird. Different strokes for different folks. This particular volume, what I finished, left me uninterested but given my current leanings that doesn’t necessarily mean it was bad. However, I did find every volume except the first somewhat uninspiring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Book lover

    It was weird A collection of short, weird science fiction stories. There were four or five interesting stories but the rest were not for me. I would urge sci-fi fans to give it a try.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Iggi

    DNF- read the forward, the intro, and the first story, but it left a bad taste in my mouth. Dunno if it was the intro's defensiveness or that the first story failed to wow me, but I began dragging my feet on picking it up again, so I took it back to the library. Maybe I'll try again another day. DNF- read the forward, the intro, and the first story, but it left a bad taste in my mouth. Dunno if it was the intro's defensiveness or that the first story failed to wow me, but I began dragging my feet on picking it up again, so I took it back to the library. Maybe I'll try again another day.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Demartelaere

    I enjoyed most of these, disappointed this is the final volume.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Corey Farrenkopf

  15. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  16. 5 out of 5

    George Hopper

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reilly

  18. 5 out of 5

    Misty Rice

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lavers

  20. 5 out of 5

    Literary Lion

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nikolaos

  22. 4 out of 5

    Metta

  23. 4 out of 5

    Agnieszka Kotwasińska

  24. 5 out of 5

    Igorina

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dom Voyce

  26. 4 out of 5

    Donyae Coles

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Darshan R. Phatak

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heather Neidlinger

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fred

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