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From Laurie Frankel, the New York Times bestselling author of This Is How It Always Is, a Reese's Book Club x Hello Sunshine Book Pick, comes One Two Three, a timely, topical novel about love and family that will make you laugh and cry...and laugh again. In a town where nothing ever changes, suddenly everything does... Everyone knows everyone in the tiny town of Bourne, but From Laurie Frankel, the New York Times bestselling author of This Is How It Always Is, a Reese's Book Club x Hello Sunshine Book Pick, comes One Two Three, a timely, topical novel about love and family that will make you laugh and cry...and laugh again. In a town where nothing ever changes, suddenly everything does... Everyone knows everyone in the tiny town of Bourne, but the Mitchell triplets are especially beloved. Mirabel is the smartest person anyone knows, and no one doubts it just because she can’t speak. Monday is the town’s purveyor of books now that the library’s closed―tell her the book you think you want, and she’ll pull the one you actually do from the microwave or her sock drawer. Mab’s job is hardest of all: get good grades, get into college, get out of Bourne. For a few weeks seventeen years ago, Bourne was national news when its water turned green. The girls have come of age watching their mother’s endless fight for justice. But just when it seems life might go on the same forever, the first moving truck anyone’s seen in years pulls up and unloads new residents and old secrets. Soon, the Mitchell sisters are taking on a system stacked against them and uncovering mysteries buried longer than they’ve been alive. Because it's hard to let go of the past when the past won't let go of you. Three unforgettable narrators join together here to tell a spellbinding story with wit, wonder, and deep affection. As she did in This Is How It Always Is, Laurie Frankel has written a laugh-out-loud-on-one-page-grab-a-tissue-the-next novel, as only she can, about how expanding our notions of normal makes the world a better place for everyone and how when days are darkest, it’s our daughters who will save us all.


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From Laurie Frankel, the New York Times bestselling author of This Is How It Always Is, a Reese's Book Club x Hello Sunshine Book Pick, comes One Two Three, a timely, topical novel about love and family that will make you laugh and cry...and laugh again. In a town where nothing ever changes, suddenly everything does... Everyone knows everyone in the tiny town of Bourne, but From Laurie Frankel, the New York Times bestselling author of This Is How It Always Is, a Reese's Book Club x Hello Sunshine Book Pick, comes One Two Three, a timely, topical novel about love and family that will make you laugh and cry...and laugh again. In a town where nothing ever changes, suddenly everything does... Everyone knows everyone in the tiny town of Bourne, but the Mitchell triplets are especially beloved. Mirabel is the smartest person anyone knows, and no one doubts it just because she can’t speak. Monday is the town’s purveyor of books now that the library’s closed―tell her the book you think you want, and she’ll pull the one you actually do from the microwave or her sock drawer. Mab’s job is hardest of all: get good grades, get into college, get out of Bourne. For a few weeks seventeen years ago, Bourne was national news when its water turned green. The girls have come of age watching their mother’s endless fight for justice. But just when it seems life might go on the same forever, the first moving truck anyone’s seen in years pulls up and unloads new residents and old secrets. Soon, the Mitchell sisters are taking on a system stacked against them and uncovering mysteries buried longer than they’ve been alive. Because it's hard to let go of the past when the past won't let go of you. Three unforgettable narrators join together here to tell a spellbinding story with wit, wonder, and deep affection. As she did in This Is How It Always Is, Laurie Frankel has written a laugh-out-loud-on-one-page-grab-a-tissue-the-next novel, as only she can, about how expanding our notions of normal makes the world a better place for everyone and how when days are darkest, it’s our daughters who will save us all.

30 review for One Two Three

  1. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Reasons to read One Two Three, Laurie Frankel’s much-anticipated new novel following the success of her beloved This Is How It Always Is: 1. Mab. The first triplet born to Nora, named with one syllable, who at the age of sixteen loves with all her heart while carrying the burden and guilt of being the “normal” one. 2. Monday. The second triplet, two syllables, lover of books, defender of truth, physically capable but mentally and emotionally unique. 3. Mirabel. Third triplet, three syllables, insig Reasons to read One Two Three, Laurie Frankel’s much-anticipated new novel following the success of her beloved This Is How It Always Is: 1. Mab. The first triplet born to Nora, named with one syllable, who at the age of sixteen loves with all her heart while carrying the burden and guilt of being the “normal” one. 2. Monday. The second triplet, two syllables, lover of books, defender of truth, physically capable but mentally and emotionally unique. 3. Mirabel. Third triplet, three syllables, insightful, empathetic, and eloquent but confined to a body that doesn’t work, only able to communicate through the tap of a finger or a robotic-sounding AAC device, and my favorite literary character of the last several years. These three young women are the bright shining lights of this story about a small town dealing with the aftermath of Big Factory chemical pollution. Frankel has set them up to be the super heroes of her tale, the purveyors of justice. While I frequently winced when the action veered too close to Scooby-Doo “meddling kids” territory, I never stopped rooting for them to topple their Goliath. I received advance copies of the e-book and audiobook from Henry Holt & Company and Macmillan Audio, respectively, via NetGalley. Both formats are recommended, with the audiobook benefiting from three distinct narrators and the inclusion of Mirabel’s AAC device for her dialogue. Blog: www.confettibookshelf.com IG: @confettibookshelf

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susanne Strong

    “One Two Three” by Laurie Frankel is unlike any book I’ve ever read before. It is wholly originally, complex, compelling, profound, quirky and brilliant. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I knew I had to read it, as I loved Laurie Frankel’s prior book, “This is How it Always Is.” This novel is completely different though it is also utterly compelling. Triplets Mab, Monday and Mirabel are teenagers who live in the town of Bourne. Raised by their single mother Nora, the four of them are as close “One Two Three” by Laurie Frankel is unlike any book I’ve ever read before. It is wholly originally, complex, compelling, profound, quirky and brilliant. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I knew I had to read it, as I loved Laurie Frankel’s prior book, “This is How it Always Is.” This novel is completely different though it is also utterly compelling. Triplets Mab, Monday and Mirabel are teenagers who live in the town of Bourne. Raised by their single mother Nora, the four of them are as close as can be, even though all they have ever known is struggle. The same goes for every other resident who lives in Bourne. Bourne isn’t an ordinary town you see. Years ago, Bourne was polluted, the water unsafe to drink, all because a chemical company screwed up and then closed up shop. Nora has been fighting for justice ever since. What is amazing about this novel is that the story could have been depressing but somehow told through the eyes of Mab, Monday and Mirabel, (also referred to as “One Two Three”) who are kind, funny, and utterly captivating, it became something else entirely. Sweet, funny and charming, these three characters stole my heart for reasons you will have to find out for yourself. How this book about environmental contamination, birth defects, cancer, and a legal battle evaded being wholly depressing, I cannot begin to explain except to say that Laurie Frankel’s characters brought this story to an entirely new level. The characters are adorable, quirky and deftly written and they will stay with me for a while. This novel made me laugh a lot (yes, I know that sounds strange considering) and tear up a bit but all in all I enjoyed it immensely. While this novel was a tad bit long and drawn out in a few places, I truly enjoyed it and would recommend it to those who enjoy character driven fiction. Thank you to NetGalley, Henry Holt & Company and Laurie Frankel for the arc. Published on Goodreads on 11.24.20.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Laurie Frankel’s strength is her characters. Here, we have three teenage sisters - triplets. Mabs, One, is the normal one and carries that guilt. Monday, Two, is on the asperger’s spectrum. And Mirabel, Three, is brilliant but confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak except with a robotic speech synthesizer. All three live in Bourne, a town decimated by a man made environmental disaster that led to most folks dying or falling ill (think the Pacific Gas & Electric contamination that Erin Broc Laurie Frankel’s strength is her characters. Here, we have three teenage sisters - triplets. Mabs, One, is the normal one and carries that guilt. Monday, Two, is on the asperger’s spectrum. And Mirabel, Three, is brilliant but confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak except with a robotic speech synthesizer. All three live in Bourne, a town decimated by a man made environmental disaster that led to most folks dying or falling ill (think the Pacific Gas & Electric contamination that Erin Brockovich litigated against). Nora, their mother, has spent the past 16 years trying to sue the company responsible. And then comes word that the plant that caused the contamination is re-opening. At times I would think this was too black and white. But then I’d think of the real life cases where companies did everything in their power to hide the truth. Hell, you don’t have to go further than the cigarette companies. (And then, when I heard the author interview, I was shocked to find she had a specific town in mind that suffered a similar fate.) Frankel manages to take a story that could have been predictable and makes it fresh. I was surprised at the turns the story took. This story is incredibly heartwarming. It’s the story of a lot of people in impossible situations. Even the secondary characters were well developed. I particularly cared for Omar, the mayor, who is constantly between a rock and a hard place trying to do the right thing. Frankel totally gets the mental development of a sixteen year old. Even Mirabel is obviously just as much a sixteen year old as Mabs and Monday. This would make a fabulous book club selection. Kudos to the three amazing narrators. They definitely brought the story to life. My thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan Audio for an advance copy of this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dorie - Cats&Books :)

    I have never read a novel by Ms. Frankel and was blown away by this audiobook!!!!! The narrators are great and with different voices it was easy to keep track of who was talking and the narrative flow was excellent. The blurb for the book sounds a bit like something I might have read about or seen a film about before. But I’m here to tell you that this novel is COMPLETELY UNIQUE!!! It’s almost as if the characters are writing the novel themselves as I was listening. THAT IS GREAT CHARACTER DEVELO I have never read a novel by Ms. Frankel and was blown away by this audiobook!!!!! The narrators are great and with different voices it was easy to keep track of who was talking and the narrative flow was excellent. The blurb for the book sounds a bit like something I might have read about or seen a film about before. But I’m here to tell you that this novel is COMPLETELY UNIQUE!!! It’s almost as if the characters are writing the novel themselves as I was listening. THAT IS GREAT CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT!!! Triplets, Mab, Monday and Mirebel are young teens living in the small town of Bourne. Mab (one) is very ambitious, very intelligent and is always on the highest track at their school, prepping her for college and her SAT’s. Monday (two) is on the spectrum, she sometimes has trouble understanding issues but with the help of her sisters she is able to do well. She loves only one color, yellow, and all of her clothes, the foods that she eats and things in her room that she chooses are yellow. Mirebel (three) was the third born, she has multiple physical handicaps, is not able to walk or speak, but has a voice machine that she can type into with her one good arm. Because she lives in a small town, she is able to get around in her wheelchair and everyone looks out for her. She is brilliant and really well beyond what the classes in her school have to offer, she teaches herself through books Nora, the triplets mother, has been fighting for compensation from The Belsum Chemical Company since before the triplets were born. The company was responsible for the town’s water turning green, making residents and animals sick. Nora’s husband died from cancer at a young age, weeks before the triplets are born. There are many in the town who have been harmed by this company, some are either too poor or too unhealthy to move elsewhere. The Company has continued to deny any wrongdoing or knowledge that they were poisoning the water. Nora’s lawsuit doesn’t have enough physical evidence to prove exactly what the company did to their water supply. She has never stopped fighting for her girls and the town’s future. They say nothing ever happens in Bourne so the day that large land moving equipment starts rolling into town, everyone knows that something is up! Nora learns that the Templeton family, the owners of Belsum, are moving to town; she knows that they are planning on reopening the plant. We watch as this town wrestles with the possibility of jobs with the plant’s reopening and their promises that this time everything has been tested and proven safe. But they certainly have evidence of their past failures, most notably the triplets. This was such a wonderful surprise and I’m going to miss these characters, they will stay with me for a long time. I can highly recommend this audiobook to everyone!!! You may enjoy the interview with the author that I found on Facebook, the link is below! https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    A unique, well researched, thought provoking approach to eco- terrorism/ water pollution with original, creative , well- depicted, remarkable characterization! Yes, we already know Laurie Frankel is one of the skilled storyteller who can create so extra ordinary, detailedly elaborated, memorable characters! And she did it again! The story is centered around triplet teenagers: Mab, Monday, Mirabel : they are so different from each other, they have different dreams, expectations, perspectives. Th A unique, well researched, thought provoking approach to eco- terrorism/ water pollution with original, creative , well- depicted, remarkable characterization! Yes, we already know Laurie Frankel is one of the skilled storyteller who can create so extra ordinary, detailedly elaborated, memorable characters! And she did it again! The story is centered around triplet teenagers: Mab, Monday, Mirabel : they are so different from each other, they have different dreams, expectations, perspectives. The relationship between them set on delicate balances: they can be so hurtful or forgiving. Their arguments can reach to the violent points. But they interestingly formed a tight, intimate bond, more dedicated bond than more siblings can have. And the town they live suffers as like their people. For years lawsuit pending against the chemical plant which has never resolved. The same chemical plant brought financial security, lots of job opportunities, also poisoned and killed town’s folks. The story’s progression is a slow burn. It takes your time and patience to get into and learn the dynamics between sisters and the ecological problems that town’s people have to endure. I have to admit it was a little complex for me at the beginning but as soon as characters start to grow on me, I start to enjoy each chapter. It’s about environmental issues, betrayal, sisterhood, dysfunctional family dynamics! In my opinion those different subjects blended perfect with each other just like the triplets’ polar opposite characterizations. I’m rounding up my 3.5 stars to 4 triple luck, ecological, provocative, original , brave, moving stars! Special thanks to NetGalley and Henry Holt&Company for sending me this digital reviewer copy in exchange my honest thoughts.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    Inspired by a true event of a chemical spill in West Virginia, author Laurie Frankel presents this hard-to-put-down story of teen triplets of fictitious town Bourne. I love the beautiful and well-thought characters. I love the sisters' bond, strength, and resilience. A bittersweet tale. The novel slowly introduced the triplets; Mab, Monday, and Mirabel or One, Two, and Three as they call themselves and the long-term effects of contaminated water that ruin the lives of small-town folk into poverty Inspired by a true event of a chemical spill in West Virginia, author Laurie Frankel presents this hard-to-put-down story of teen triplets of fictitious town Bourne. I love the beautiful and well-thought characters. I love the sisters' bond, strength, and resilience. A bittersweet tale. The novel slowly introduced the triplets; Mab, Monday, and Mirabel or One, Two, and Three as they call themselves and the long-term effects of contaminated water that ruin the lives of small-town folk into poverty, illness, and disabilities. Monday is probably my favorite as her personality and infatuation with yellow made me smile in the midst of all the hardship they endure. This is my first novel by Laurie Frankel and definitely won't be my last. I want to thank Goodreads Giveaway and Henry Holt and Co. for my copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook ….read by Emma Galvin, Jesse Villnsky, Rebecca Soper ….14 hours and 59 minutes What I especially admire about Laurie Frankel, as an author, is her passion to explore the ranges of ‘normal’…..give alternative-type-families an inspiring voice. The three sisters in “One Two Three” are precious …lovable, and awkward in the best of ways…… But….personally, I liked the ‘plot’ in “This Is How It Always Is”, by Laurie a little more— but …..I enjoyed both books…..and both books are inspiring. Both Audiobook ….read by Emma Galvin, Jesse Villnsky, Rebecca Soper ….14 hours and 59 minutes What I especially admire about Laurie Frankel, as an author, is her passion to explore the ranges of ‘normal’…..give alternative-type-families an inspiring voice. The three sisters in “One Two Three” are precious …lovable, and awkward in the best of ways…… But….personally, I liked the ‘plot’ in “This Is How It Always Is”, by Laurie a little more— but …..I enjoyed both books…..and both books are inspiring. Both books, in my opinion ARE MOVING, ENJOYABLE, INSPIRING…. but….both books - had flaws too ….(some parts were like moving through quicksand…a little too wordy)…. Add to that > (in listening) > we are spending hours with ‘young- age- sounding voices ….well, I needed breaks in the same way I would when spending too many hours with children or teens in real life. But there was plenty to enjoy. A damaged town….(contaminated chemicals), is not the place a woman wants to get pregnant. …. ….but meeting the triplets: Mab, Monday, and Mirabel …..with their different physical disabilities ……expanding our thoughts about acceptability-and compassion for their struggles- their personalities- meeting their friends, their academic achievements, their resourcefulness, little OCD-type ‘cute’ obsessions, ( Green Day?/!)….Yellow foods only days….etc.. was still a heartwarming novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I listened to the audio of “One Two Three” by Laurie Frankel and encourage any audio lovers to do the same. The audio production added to the enjoyment of listening to the novel’s three teenage narrators. An added bonus: at the end of the novel there is a discussion with Frankel about how she was inspired to write the story, plus a discussion with the sound editor of Macmillan Audio. I enjoyed listening to what goes into the production of an audio book….from hiring the perfect narrators to meldi I listened to the audio of “One Two Three” by Laurie Frankel and encourage any audio lovers to do the same. The audio production added to the enjoyment of listening to the novel’s three teenage narrators. An added bonus: at the end of the novel there is a discussion with Frankel about how she was inspired to write the story, plus a discussion with the sound editor of Macmillan Audio. I enjoyed listening to what goes into the production of an audio book….from hiring the perfect narrators to melding the three voices into the perfect production. The Mitchell triplets are the sixteen-year-old narrators. As the story opens, Nora, their mother is giving birth to the girls. She wants the girls to have names that begin with “M” with the first daughter a one syllable name, the second will have two syllables, and the third will have three. It does make it easy to follow the girls, as I remembered who was who based upon their names. Sounds silly, but it works. The first daughter is Mab and she is a basic teen. Monday, the second girl is on the spectrum, and she was my favorite. Her insights are hilarious. Finally, Mirabel is the genius who can’t eat, walk, or talk. She is wheelchair bound and uses a voice activating machine for communicating. We get to hear her inner musings. Because she’s in a wheelchair, people treat her like she’s a piece of furniture, so she hears a lot. The girls live in a fictious town named Bourne, where 17 years earlier there was a chemical spill in the water supply forcing the main employer to shut down, rendering the town a ghost town. The people who stayed either had cancer, birth defects or other health issues, which the townsfolk believe the chemical spill caused. Nora is on a mission to make the employer pay for the town’s devastation. The people who still live there are a quirky group and add enjoyment to the story. The girl’s chapters are headed by their birth order. In other words, One’s chapters are Mab’s. Two is Monday, and three is Mirabel. The girls’ lives are upended when the previous owner of the business comes back to Bourne and wants the factory to be reinstated. The owners bring their very handsome sixteen-year-old son, River, with them. Well, there hasn’t been a new person in town EVER, and certainly not a cute boy. The girls are conflicted, as their mother is aghast that the family has returned and she wants nothing more than to expose them and bring them down. Meanwhile, River is a sweet boy who just wants to fit in. This is a very funny, sweet, and touching story of three sisters who are coming-of-age and wanting to help their mother in righting a wrong. The girls are so much fun. Even Mab, who is normal, brings enjoyment to the reader because she is getting ready for her SAT test and she and her BFF, Petra, are working on vocabulary. The words used, LOL, you will chuckle. Monday will only eat yellow things and wear yellow clothing, unless it’s raining, and then it’s green. She’s the town librarian and has books everywhere, including the microwave (because no one uses the microwave). Mirabel uses her furniture status to gain inside information. Nora, who doesn’t narrate but nonetheless is a quirky character adds charm, as do the eccentric townsfolk. I enjoyed this as a fun story that is well written. It’s nice to have a story that brings a smile to your face.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    Happy Publication Day! If you had told me that I would absolutely love a book about environmental contamination and the search for justice I would have rolled my eyes and said "hard pass." Yet I decided to push against my instincts and give it a try and I am so very glad I did. Listened to this one as an audio book and the narrators are superb. Each sister has her own narrator that personifies her personality beautifully. It's the story of triplets in the small town of Borne, a town that has deep Happy Publication Day! If you had told me that I would absolutely love a book about environmental contamination and the search for justice I would have rolled my eyes and said "hard pass." Yet I decided to push against my instincts and give it a try and I am so very glad I did. Listened to this one as an audio book and the narrators are superb. Each sister has her own narrator that personifies her personality beautifully. It's the story of triplets in the small town of Borne, a town that has deeply suffered from the contamination of their water supply. The girls' mother Nora has been on a fourteen year fight for justice and retribution against the chemical company that she feels is responsible for the death of her husband and the effects on her daughters. One is Mab, the "normal" one of the three who shoulders the blessing and curse of this fact. Two is Monday, town librarian, literalist, and on the autism spectrum Three is Mirabel, most brilliant mentally but confined to a wheelchair and cannot speak except through a voice modulator. When a moving truck is spotted in town, little do they know that their lives are about to be turned upside down in many ways. There is so much to adore about this book. The personalities of the sisters are so distinctive and unique that I didn't even have a favorite narrator. I loved going seamlessly from one to the next and learning about the joys, triumphs, and heartaches each of them experienced. I was moved to tears as the narrative moved toward its conclusion, sometimes feeling triumph and defeat myself. The one drawback I have for this novel, and it is slight, is that it's a bit too long and drawn out. There are parts that could have been condensed and tightened to make it flow better. I did appreciate the slowness at times, because it made me think of Nora's fight and how the wheels of justice often turn so slowly that we can't see movement, yet there were other times I just wanted things to start happening. Overall, I highly recommend this unique and well-written story. It will make you laugh, cry, and think. The audio book is stellar. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    DeAnn

    4 sisterly stars This unique book is narrated by a set of triplets – hence the title – one, two, three! Set in the small town of Bourne, which has seen better days. Nearly 17 years ago, tragedy struck Bourne when the nearby chemical plant turned the river (and the town’s drinking water) green. Plagued by cancer, birth defects, and unexplained illnesses, the town is limping along with a higher-than-average number of residents in wheelchairs. The Mitchell triplets – Mab, Monday, and Mirabel– have ve 4 sisterly stars This unique book is narrated by a set of triplets – hence the title – one, two, three! Set in the small town of Bourne, which has seen better days. Nearly 17 years ago, tragedy struck Bourne when the nearby chemical plant turned the river (and the town’s drinking water) green. Plagued by cancer, birth defects, and unexplained illnesses, the town is limping along with a higher-than-average number of residents in wheelchairs. The Mitchell triplets – Mab, Monday, and Mirabel– have very unique voices and I loved how each triplet took turns telling the story with alternating chapters. Their mother Nora has championed the class action lawsuit against the chemical plant for years, searching out evidence for the case. She has an unfortunate connection with the case as her husband died because of the chemicals and her children, especially Mirabel, were affected. Mirabel is in a wheelchair and only has the use of her right hand and can’t speak without an assisted device and she’s very smart! Monday runs the town library out of their house since the original library is shut down. Mab is studying hard to get into college and out of Bourne. Everything is about to change though when the chemical plant’s founding family returns to town. What can happen if they reopen the plant? I adored these characters are rooted for them as they dug deep to figure out a way to fight the plant. Deceptions and secrets can go hand in hand with deep pockets and it’s easy for some to turn the other way. This was a terrific read with great characters and I look forward to reading others by this author! Thank you to Henry Holt & Co. and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this one. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Val

    When I saw that Laurie Frankel had a new book out, I knew that it would be one I would want to read. Then I read the synopsis and was even more convinced that this would be one I would love. And love it I did! I loved the setting, the plot, the characters, the struggles, the regrets and the ending. This story centers around triplets born in a poor town, Bourne, that was devastated by a chemical company and their flippant and careless ways. The story is told through each of the sisters’ voices: On When I saw that Laurie Frankel had a new book out, I knew that it would be one I would want to read. Then I read the synopsis and was even more convinced that this would be one I would love. And love it I did! I loved the setting, the plot, the characters, the struggles, the regrets and the ending. This story centers around triplets born in a poor town, Bourne, that was devastated by a chemical company and their flippant and careless ways. The story is told through each of the sisters’ voices: One - Mab – the sister who feels the weight of the world on her shoulders simply because she is normal, Two - Monday – the sister on the spectrum who takes everything literally, and is emotionally challenged, but fine physically, and Three - Mirabel – the sister in a wheelchair who has extraordinary mental capacity and yet lacks physical capacity save for the use of her fingers and a voice box. As the reader learns, this town is different than any other. Sickness and disease have ravaged and decimated most of its residents. It has had to morph into a town that caters to people with disabilities. Because that is what Belsum Chemical forced upon it. The runoff from the plant poisoning the water system and turning it sulphuric and green. Once it was aware of the catastrophic effects of their greed, the company picked up and left without taking any of the blame. “I think about the ways cause and effect might break you. Bourne is a town of unexpected consequences, a place where what no one sees coming runs you over like a truck.” Although the town tried to force Belsum to assume responsibility, it was a David and Goliath fight with no results. The champion of the cause, Nora, the triplet’s mother, continues throughout the story to search for evidence. The evidence that will finally point the finger at Belsum and prove its culpability. The story was slightly reminiscent of Erin Brokovich. But only in purpose as these characters are all their own. Without saying too much about the story and ruining the suspense for the reader, know that there are developments which bring Nora’s fight back into the forefront. Belsum moves to re-enter Bourne and reopen the plant. In a town with no jobs and no prospects, it proves easy to get people to forget the past and hope for a brighter future. There is suspense, betrayal, shock, unbelief, understanding and finally growth. The character development in this book is sublime. The ways in which all the characters are interwoven serve to strengthen the story and yet also blur the lines between duty and responsibility. An overarching theme emerges – parental expectations and children paying the price for the sins of a parent. Although this may sound like a book that is depressing and heavy, it amazingly is not. It is a story of acceptance, flexibility, fight and personal triumph. I highly recommend! Thank you to Net Galley and Henry Holt for the advance copy of this book to read and review. Pub Date: June 8, 2021.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    The small town of Bourne bears the scars of a chemical company that poisoned their water 17 years ago and left them with no recourse. The Mitchell family was devastated more than most. Nora Mitchell's husband died unexpectedly of cancer just weeks before she gave birth to triplets, two of whom were born severely disabled. Now that the triplets are 16 years old, it could be happening all over again. The chemical company is back promising much-needed jobs and promising they have fixed what was wron The small town of Bourne bears the scars of a chemical company that poisoned their water 17 years ago and left them with no recourse. The Mitchell family was devastated more than most. Nora Mitchell's husband died unexpectedly of cancer just weeks before she gave birth to triplets, two of whom were born severely disabled. Now that the triplets are 16 years old, it could be happening all over again. The chemical company is back promising much-needed jobs and promising they have fixed what was wrong with their process. I liked that the author attempted to show different points of view and how the tragedy affected different townspeople differently. I think she could have dug a little deeper, but it is written for teens so I think it is age-appropriate. However, some subjects did seem overly simplistic. The book does a good job of writing from the points of view of the three 16-year-olds. The adult characters seem just as immature or charicaturized, though. I might recommend this to a young reader, but it isn't all that interesting for an adult, even if they enjoy YA and middle-grade lit.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    In a sleepy little town called Bourne where nothing ever happened and everyone knew everyone else a set of baby girl triplets were born seventeen years ago to Nora Mitchell and her husband. Nora gave birth to her triplets naturally and as she got ready to push her babies out she decided to give them all names with the initial letter M. First came Mab, the oldest, whose name possessed one syllable, and who would later have the ambition to go to college and leave Bourne. Two was named Monday becau In a sleepy little town called Bourne where nothing ever happened and everyone knew everyone else a set of baby girl triplets were born seventeen years ago to Nora Mitchell and her husband. Nora gave birth to her triplets naturally and as she got ready to push her babies out she decided to give them all names with the initial letter M. First came Mab, the oldest, whose name possessed one syllable, and who would later have the ambition to go to college and leave Bourne. Two was named Monday because that was the day she was born on and it had two syllables. Monday was most definitely on the spectrum. She was the honorary librarian of Bourne. After the town library closed, Monday made room for its books in the Mitchell home. Some of the books could even be found in the microwave oven. Monday was obsessed with anything yellow. She only ate yellow food and only wore yellow clothes. Three’s birth was the hardest. Her birth came too slowly so the doctor had to help deliver her. Three’s disabilities were the most pronounced and obvious of the triplets. Three was named Mirabel, mainly because it was a three syllable name and began with a M. Mirabel was the smartest sister even though she could not talk on her own. She spoke through a computerized voice box. Mirabel was confined to a wheelchair. It was Mirabel who initiated the names One, Two and Three for herself and her sisters. She used her fingers to call and indicate which sister she needed. Thus One became Mab, Two became Monday and Three was Mirabel. Before the triplets were born, there had been a chemical plant in Bourne that had contaminated the water and their river and turned it green. As a result, many babies, like One, Two and Three had been born with birth defects, people started being diagnosed with various cancers and Bourne became a town that no one came to visit anymore. The property values in Bourne plummeted. None of the citizens of Bourne ever left because they couldn’t. Nora, with the help of her three daughters, had devoted the last seventeen years of her life trying to find proof of this injustice and bring down Duke Templeton and his chemical plant. Then one day a new family moved into Bourne’s former library. It was Duke Templeton’s son, Nathan Templeton, with his wife, Apple, and their son, River. Everything was about to change in the quiet little town of Bourne. One Two Three by Laurie Frankel was an engrossing and thought provoking book. It was most definitely character driven with well developed characters. The plot was suspenseful and kept my attention on alert throughout. It was about hope, love, doing the right thing, picking profit over the well being of others, and the power and determination of young female daughters. I laughed at parts and cried at others. It was hard to stop listening to this audiobook which was brilliantly narrated by Emma Galvin, Jesse Vilinsky and Rebecca Soler. I particularly enjoyed Mirabel’s character and her voice. The audiobook ran 14 hours, 59 minutes and 11 seconds. At the conclusion of the audiobook there was a bonus conversation with the author, Laurie Frankel, that I found to be very interesting. This was the first book that I had the privilege to read by Laurie Frankel but I hope to read some of her prior books and look forward to seeing what she plans on writing next. Thank you to Macmillan Audio for allowing me to listen to this audiobook through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    One, Two, Three is a fresh, well-plotted novel with three memorable characters - Mab, Monday and Mirabel. Each of the triplets, as well as other town residents, face challenges due to poison from a chemical company. Amazingly, Frankel has created 16-year-olds with rich interior lives who I actually wanted to spend time with. There is a simplicity to the David vs. Goliath plot but Frankel deftly avoids traps that would make the story reductive. I thoroughly enjoyed it! (Thank you to Henry Holt and One, Two, Three is a fresh, well-plotted novel with three memorable characters - Mab, Monday and Mirabel. Each of the triplets, as well as other town residents, face challenges due to poison from a chemical company. Amazingly, Frankel has created 16-year-olds with rich interior lives who I actually wanted to spend time with. There is a simplicity to the David vs. Goliath plot but Frankel deftly avoids traps that would make the story reductive. I thoroughly enjoyed it! (Thank you to Henry Holt and Company for sending me the ARC.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    If one thing is for sure it is the fact that Laurie Frankel can really spin a yarn. And if a second thing is for sure it is that I am, at the pit of my soul, a horrible person. You see, when I first saw people talking about this, my mind went to a severely underrated cartoon . . . . Proving I could never qualify as any sort of emotional support animal. But then I noticed this was by the author of This Is How it Always Is so even though I wasn’t super interested in reading it, I still needed If one thing is for sure it is the fact that Laurie Frankel can really spin a yarn. And if a second thing is for sure it is that I am, at the pit of my soul, a horrible person. You see, when I first saw people talking about this, my mind went to a severely underrated cartoon . . . . Proving I could never qualify as any sort of emotional support animal. But then I noticed this was by the author of This Is How it Always Is so even though I wasn’t super interested in reading it, I still needed to have a copy immediately. Because I am the poster child for first world problems. One, Two, Three is about a town that was decimated by a chemical company who had poisoned the water. If you get these vibes . . . . You are pretty much spot-on, because the plucky mother and her decade plus long battle most certainly will give you Erin Brockovich vibes. The story, however, is told in three-part narration (hence the title) via Nora’s (the mother) triplet daughters. All three have distinctive voices, personalities and issues, but I will admit it took me a minute to settle in to the who was who. Mainly due to them calling each other both “One Two and Three” but also by their given names of Mab, Monday and Mirabel – which, let’s just be honest, don’t really roll off the tongue easily. It can also be blamed on the fact I’m . . . . One of the things I love best about this book is that for so long there appeared to be a potential gray area regarding Big Oil the goings on at the chemical company. No documents had ever been discovered implicating any wrongdoings and, despite one of the triplets being born with disabilities and a father who had died of cancer, other people in town seemed to have been impacted more from fluke accidents such as losing limbs in the machinery or feeling trapped due to their property no longer being worth any money and the other so-called “different” twin was clearly just someone on the spectrum. But of course that all ended up being just some shit my brain was conjuring up. It still ended up being a story that gives the reader something to gnaw on regarding man’s inhumanity to man, the power of money, but also about family and friendship and loyalty (whether right or wrong). I will say this could have been quite a bit shorter as my attention waned in parts and things got a little repetitive, but as a whole this was a quality character driven type of read and I will absolutely be first in line for whatever Ms. Frankel comes up with next. ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    A touching read about family and resilience Nothing new ever happens in the town of Bourne. Everyone knows everyone. So when the moving trucks arrive, it causes a stir. Bourne is a town known for one thing: seventeen years ago, their water turned green. Many of their citizens of died, others have cancer and other illnesses, and others gave birth to children with birth defects. You'll never find a town more accommodating to wheelchairs. But it has one doctor (also the priest) and one therapist (No A touching read about family and resilience Nothing new ever happens in the town of Bourne. Everyone knows everyone. So when the moving trucks arrive, it causes a stir. Bourne is a town known for one thing: seventeen years ago, their water turned green. Many of their citizens of died, others have cancer and other illnesses, and others gave birth to children with birth defects. You'll never find a town more accommodating to wheelchairs. But it has one doctor (also the priest) and one therapist (Nora Mitchell). Bourne houses Nora's triplets, beloved by all: Mab, the "normal" one, who is expected to go to college and escape this place; Monday, who runs the town library from their home and prefers yellow everything (food, clothes, and more); and Mirabel, the smartest of them all, confined to her wheelchair, dependent on her sisters and mom for so much and on a computer to act as her Voice. Nora has been fighting for justice since the water turned green. When the newcomers come to town, the past roars up, involving the Mitchell triplets and bringing to light decades old secrets. How hard will Mab, Monday, and Mirabel fight for their town? This is such an original book from the author of THIS IS HOW IT ALWAYS IS. It sneaks up on you with its quiet and touching story. Frankel weaves an emotional tale that makes you think. It's utterly fascinating, this devastated town and its broken people. So many of its citizens are sick or have lost someone they love. Yet there is a lot of hope in Bourne, especially as the story is told through young Mab, Monday, and Mirabel's eyes. They've only known their mom's sadness and bitterness, never having met their father, yet each has their own (often quirky) way of looking at life. Frankel alternates viewpoints from each triplet, naming her chapters One (Mab), Two (Monday), and Three (Mirabel) and repeating from there. It takes a moment to get into the groove of each triplets' voice, but once you do, it's easy to get attached to them. Mab feels the weight of the world on her shoulders, sweet Monday takes everything literally, and Mirabel must remain cheerful, despite all her medical issues. Their mom holds a variety of jobs, including town therapist and working at the local bar, and maintains a decades long lawsuit and grievance. It's hard to know what the triplets' life might be like without Nora's anger and bitterness. Still, ONE TWO THREE highlights the power of sisterhood and family. You'd think a book about a broken town would be depressing and a slugfest, but it's anything but. In many ways, I found this to be almost a mystery, as the sisters work together to figure out about the newcomers in their town and how they relate to the years of devastation wrecked upon Bourne. The result is utterly compelling, with years of intertwined secrets making for a fascinating read. Still, at the core, this is a story about teenage girls and how they relate to the world. It's sweet, heartbreaking, and extremely well-written. There are a few points where I wish the plot sped up a bit, but overall, this is a touching and lovely story about a family and their small town. I received a copy of this book from Henry Holt & Company and Netgalley in return for an unbiased review. Look for ONE TWO THREE on 6/8/2021! Blog ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Instagram ~ PaperBackSwap ~ Smashbomb

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    I LOVED This Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel so I was excited about this one but it just was a miss for me, I found myself very bored and I couldn't really keep track of the triplets as they seemed to just have the same voice. I can tell she tried to make them distinct but I still had a hard time keeping track so maybe it was just me? Other than that, this was just an okay read that I thought about not finishing quite a few times but had to push through. The narrators did do a great job br I LOVED This Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel so I was excited about this one but it just was a miss for me, I found myself very bored and I couldn't really keep track of the triplets as they seemed to just have the same voice. I can tell she tried to make them distinct but I still had a hard time keeping track so maybe it was just me? Other than that, this was just an okay read that I thought about not finishing quite a few times but had to push through. The narrators did do a great job bringing the story to life. Thank you to Net Galley and Macmillian Audio for the advanced audiobook.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Laurie Frankel is the author of one of my all-time favourite books, This Is How It Always Is. One, Two, Three is her newly released novel told by the 16 year old Mitchell triplets, each with their own distinct voice. Set in the small town of Bourne, Nora (the triplets Mom) and her daughters set out to uncover the truth behind a devastating event that changed their family and town forever. The now closed Belsum chemical plant poisoned the town's water supply when it had promised to do the exact opp Laurie Frankel is the author of one of my all-time favourite books, This Is How It Always Is. One, Two, Three is her newly released novel told by the 16 year old Mitchell triplets, each with their own distinct voice. Set in the small town of Bourne, Nora (the triplets Mom) and her daughters set out to uncover the truth behind a devastating event that changed their family and town forever. The now closed Belsum chemical plant poisoned the town's water supply when it had promised to do the exact opposite. This caused illness, birth defects and death for many of the residents. A well-written story about environmental problems, family dynamics, sisterhood and friendship. Thank you to NetGalley and Henry Holt & Company for an arc of this novel in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Z

    Mab, Monday and Mirabel, also referred to as One, Two, Three, are triplets growing up in the small town of Bourne. Unfortunately, it's not a happy quiet town, it is one riddled with the aftermath of a chemical plant gone bad 17 years ago. The residents are suffering severe consequences, including illness and even death. Nora, the triplet's mom, had been fighting for damages for all 17 years and the girls are her cheerleader and sometimes ringleaders of their own. Told in the alternating voices o Mab, Monday and Mirabel, also referred to as One, Two, Three, are triplets growing up in the small town of Bourne. Unfortunately, it's not a happy quiet town, it is one riddled with the aftermath of a chemical plant gone bad 17 years ago. The residents are suffering severe consequences, including illness and even death. Nora, the triplet's mom, had been fighting for damages for all 17 years and the girls are her cheerleader and sometimes ringleaders of their own. Told in the alternating voices of each of the girls, you get to really know each of them. I love a character driven story so I appreciated getting to know their personalities. This is a story of a fierce, tireless mom. Nora was a woman to admire and cheer for. It is also a story about community and connection. I loved the small town feel. Lastly it is a coming of age story which reminded me of those teen books I read oh so long ago. I alternated between reading and listening and I strongly encourage everyone to get their hands on the audio because it makes a great story even better, with not one, not two but THREE fantastic narrators. 4.5 stars rounded up Thank you Henry Holt, NetGalley and MacMillan Audio for both my physical and audio ARCs.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Val

    When I saw that Laurie Frankel had a new book out, I knew that it would be one I would want to read. Then I read the synopsis and was even more convinced that this would be one I would love. And love it I did! I loved the setting, the plot, the characters, the struggles, the regrets and the ending. I was able to trade off both reading and listening to this book and that method worked really well. This story centers around triplets born in a poor town, Bourne, that was devastated by a chemical com When I saw that Laurie Frankel had a new book out, I knew that it would be one I would want to read. Then I read the synopsis and was even more convinced that this would be one I would love. And love it I did! I loved the setting, the plot, the characters, the struggles, the regrets and the ending. I was able to trade off both reading and listening to this book and that method worked really well. This story centers around triplets born in a poor town, Bourne, that was devastated by a chemical company and their flippant and careless ways. The story is told through each of the sisters’ voices: One - Mab – the sister who feels the weight of the world on her shoulders simply because she is normal, Two - Monday – the sister on the spectrum who takes everything literally, and is emotionally challenged, but fine physically, and Three - Mirabel – the sister in a wheelchair who has extraordinary mental capacity and yet lacks physical capacity save for the use of her fingers and a voice box. The Narrator does a wonderful job with the 3 sister's voices - especially Mirabel's voice box. As the reader learns, this town is different than any other. Sickness and disease have ravaged and decimated most of its residents. It has had to morph into a town that caters to people with disabilities. Because that is what Belsum Chemical forced upon it. The runoff from the plant poisoning the water system and turning it sulphuric and green. Once it was aware of the catastrophic effects of their greed, the company picked up and left without taking any of the blame. “I think about the ways cause and effect might break you. Bourne is a town of unexpected consequences, a place where what no one sees coming runs you over like a truck.” Although the town tried to force Belsum to assume responsibility, it was a David and Goliath fight with no results. The champion of the cause, Nora, the triplet’s mother, continues throughout the story to search for evidence. The evidence that will finally point the finger at Belsum and prove its culpability. The story was slightly reminiscent of Erin Brokovich. But only in purpose as these characters are all their own. Without saying too much about the story and ruining the suspense for the reader, know that there are developments which bring Nora’s fight back into the forefront. Belsum moves to re-enter Bourne and reopen the plant. In a town with no jobs and no prospects, it proves easy to get people to forget the past and hope for a brighter future. There is suspense, betrayal, shock, unbelief, understanding and finally growth. The character development in this book is sublime. The ways in which all the characters are interwoven serve to strengthen the story and yet also blur the lines between duty and responsibility. An overarching theme emerges – parental expectations and children paying the price for the sins of a parent. Although this may sound like a book that is depressing and heavy, it amazingly is not. It is a story of acceptance, flexibility, fight and personal triumph. Thank you to Net Galley and Macmillian Audio for the advance copy of this book to read and review. I highly recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a complimentary print copy of this book from the publisher and Library Thing. I received a complimentary audio version from Macmillan Audio. My review is my voluntary and unbiased opinion. Nora Mitchell was the mother of triplets who were aptly named: Mab, Monday and Mirabel which held significance to the triplets. They used numbers representing their birth order which were 1, 2, 3 so often they would refer to each other by numbers. They are 17 years old and live with their mother, ea I received a complimentary print copy of this book from the publisher and Library Thing. I received a complimentary audio version from Macmillan Audio. My review is my voluntary and unbiased opinion. Nora Mitchell was the mother of triplets who were aptly named: Mab, Monday and Mirabel which held significance to the triplets. They used numbers representing their birth order which were 1, 2, 3 so often they would refer to each other by numbers. They are 17 years old and live with their mother, each with her own challenges. But in Bourne, it seems that many children were born with impairments many years ago when Belsum Chemical held a manufacturing plant there. People became outraged and filed legal actions against Belsum as it hardly seemed coincidental that this small town suddenly had an increased need for special education and rehab services. Nora worked as a therapist in the town which became overwhelming with so many people needing help and not being able to work. The story surrounds the controversial nature of companies situated so close to towns to use the town's resources at the cost to the community. Nora devotes all her free time either baking or working diligently on the lawsuit against Belsum since her husband died. The town was blindsided by the chemical company when the town's water supply became tainted. Some people like Nora could not move past such an aggrievance of justice. Nora organized a class action law suit again Belsum which was a daunting if not futile effort to repair the past. Things in town change when the Templetons move into town as the grandfather had been the one in charge during the chemical disaster. Interestingly, they have a son named River which is rather symbolic of what the family ruined over the years. People would no longer drink tap water and it appeared that even the Templetons were leery themselves although hid that from the town. They were planning to re-open a company there again which would provide employment. Although skeptical, many people listened to the speak regarding all the changes and business practices. Well, this news infuriated Nora who goes to all lengths to prevent this from happening. Can a disaster ever be forgotten and forgiveness offered? When does holding on to anger from the past keep you tied there unable to live in the present? This is a touching story about families and struggles with medical and mental health, consequences of careless greedy people. Although this is a work of fiction, it does address the town of Bourne, Massachusetts which as a long history of water contamination issues.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    I was really looking forward to this after having recently read another of Frankel's books for my book club, This is How It Always Is. We all loved that one, and I recommend it highly. This was a disappointment, however. My main criticism is the massive amount of dialog that goes on and on and on. Particularly over the top was the character Monday, who was incessant in her questions and her Truth or Dare challenges. What I did like about Monday and her friend were all the obscure words they tosse I was really looking forward to this after having recently read another of Frankel's books for my book club, This is How It Always Is. We all loved that one, and I recommend it highly. This was a disappointment, however. My main criticism is the massive amount of dialog that goes on and on and on. Particularly over the top was the character Monday, who was incessant in her questions and her Truth or Dare challenges. What I did like about Monday and her friend were all the obscure words they tossed around in preparation for their SAT test. But I've gotten ahead of myself. Three sisters, triplets, are born to a single mother in a small, dying town. The reason it's dying is a chemical plant that poisoned the river and drinking water, resulting in cancers, birth defects, and deaths. The triplets' mother, Nora, is suing the now closed company, and has been for 16 years -- as long as the triplets have been alive. When the company now comes back to reopen the plant, it's up to the townspeople to decide: Are we going to drop the suit and go work again for a decent wage, or will we try to stop Big Business from ruining us again? Only Nora remains headstrong, while the triplets work behind the scenes to help her in whatever ways they can. One, Two and Three are the triplets. One: Mab, born first, so her name is one syllable and her nickname is One. Two: Monday, born second, on a Monday, which so happens to fit the two-syllable requisite. And oh yeah, her sisters call her Two. She is apparently on the spectrum, eats only yellow foods, and reads only yellow books. Three: Mirable, who is in a wheel chair and speaks only through a machine. All three are extremely intelligent and resourceful. It helps that the town library closed down and Monday took home all the books and files that no one else wanted. While the essence of the plot has been done before, the author seemed to go out of her way to make the triplets and other characters one-of-a-kind. That can be a good thing, or it can feel false. It felt very forced to me, mostly because of the inane dialog. Many others are enjoying this tremendously - your opinion might not match mine. Not helping my experience was the NetGalley audio app, which I swore off last year but thought surely it would be fixed by now. Well, it's not. So there's no way to find the chapter you're on if you get lost; and as before, the audio does a full stop at about 15 random points along the way. Eek! 2.5 stars rounded up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    One Two Three is a story of triplet teenage girls (Mab, Monday and Mirabelle, aka One, Two, and Three) and a town called Bourne. The girls were born about a year after the local chemical plant polluted the air and river with an experimental chemical. It seems fairly obvious that the chemical caused the ensuing illness, death, and congenital anomalies/birth defects that raged through Bourne at a rate “higher than expected”. However, despite Nora’s (the triplets’ mother) unending quest to hold the One Two Three is a story of triplet teenage girls (Mab, Monday and Mirabelle, aka One, Two, and Three) and a town called Bourne. The girls were born about a year after the local chemical plant polluted the air and river with an experimental chemical. It seems fairly obvious that the chemical caused the ensuing illness, death, and congenital anomalies/birth defects that raged through Bourne at a rate “higher than expected”. However, despite Nora’s (the triplets’ mother) unending quest to hold the company accountable, no one has been able to prove the link...yet. I started off really enjoying the story of the girls, all of whom had a distinct voice, and the Erin Brockovich vibe of citizens taking on the Big Bad Chemical plant that had ruined so many lives. I also appreciated the respect the author gave to her characters with disabilities and diverse abilities. The best characters, by far, were the two sisters that didn’t fall into the so-called “normal” category, a label that was touched upon insightfully throughout the book. However, the book started to become very repetitive for me and I grew tired of the over-explanation of every thought that every character had. When you’re listening to a 15-hour audio, you just need it to move along sometimes, right? And while I enjoy good voice acting, I found the audio overly dramatic to the point where I felt like telling the characters to just calm down. Not a good sign. I know many will disagree with me on that point, but it did feel like overacting at times. Lastly, at the risk of sounding less than compassionate, the bitterness that Mab spoke with, while justified, got on my nerves after a while. It just all felt overdone. Three stars for tackling the subjects of inclusivity, accountability, and the importance of environmental protection. Unfortunately, this fell short for me overall, but I know a lot of readers will love it. Thanks to MacMillan Audio for an advance audiobook via NetGalley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dianah

    Coming in on the heels of This Is How It Always Is, Laurie Frankel's One Two Three had a tough row to hoe to come close to that book's genius. Yet, here we are with this absolute gift of a book that is every bit as good as TIHIAI, and more charming, to boot. Three sisters, more connected than any other triplets seemingly could be, live in a town that has been destroyed by the chemical plant that promised jobs, money, and security, yet delivered only poison, illness, and death. There is a lawsuit Coming in on the heels of This Is How It Always Is, Laurie Frankel's One Two Three had a tough row to hoe to come close to that book's genius. Yet, here we are with this absolute gift of a book that is every bit as good as TIHIAI, and more charming, to boot. Three sisters, more connected than any other triplets seemingly could be, live in a town that has been destroyed by the chemical plant that promised jobs, money, and security, yet delivered only poison, illness, and death. There is a lawsuit pending against the plant -- the years grind by but there is never any resolution -- and the town and the townfolk are ruined. Frankel explores themes of eco-terrorism, capitalistic greed, coming-of-age, trust and betrayal, home, family, personal injury, and never-righted wrongs. The story is fantastic and the town's characters are unique and often hilarious, but the heart of this story is about sisters. The bond that solidly ties Mab, Monday, and Mirabel together is also one that binds in ways not always foreseen or appreciated, in ways that can pinch. The chemistry between the sisters is both comforting and volatile, and the risks they take for their home, their family, their lives, and their town is gripping. More than anything else, Frankel will take you on a wild ride in this story of one town's history, disaster, and the ramifications thereof, but moreover, the story of three whimsical sisters, the quirky way they relate to each other, and the underlying bedrock of love they share. Brilliant!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kara Leann

    Laurie Frankel blew me away with This Is How It Always Is so I was extremely excited to read One Two Three. Well, let me say she has produced another fabulous book that will stick with me for a long time. Mab, Monday and Mirabel were some of my favorite characters of all time and I loved that the narrative kept shifting perspectives between the three of them. I also really loved the cast of side characters in Nora, Omar, Frank, Pastor Jeff, Petra and Pooh. Even River, Nathan and Apple Templeton Laurie Frankel blew me away with This Is How It Always Is so I was extremely excited to read One Two Three. Well, let me say she has produced another fabulous book that will stick with me for a long time. Mab, Monday and Mirabel were some of my favorite characters of all time and I loved that the narrative kept shifting perspectives between the three of them. I also really loved the cast of side characters in Nora, Omar, Frank, Pastor Jeff, Petra and Pooh. Even River, Nathan and Apple Templeton were incredibly interesting to me. I loved that Laurie was able to give such amazing character development without sacrificing anything from the plot. I was riveted the whole way through. I highly recommend this incredibly interesting and intricate story! Thank you to Henry Holt and Co for my free review copy via Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A moving story about triplets and a small forgotten town. Everyone here is special. These three were a delight to follow and I loved Monday. Will there be justice? Can this town move on from the horrific things that happened here? You have to read it to find out. This was an audiobook for me. It was narrated by Emma Galvin; Jesse Vilinsky; Rebecca Soler and they did a great job. I highly recommend listening to this. Thanks to Macmillan Audio via Netgalley.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kari Ann Sweeney

    No doubt that Laurie Frankel is a compelling storyteller. 𝐎𝐍𝐄, 𝐓𝗪𝐎, 𝐓𝐇𝐑𝐄𝐄 is a wholly original and complex story told by the Mitchell triplets; three unforgettable and distinct narrators: One (Mab), Two (Monday) and Three (Mirabel). Their lives and their community were dastardly impacted by an event that took place 17 years ago, right before they were born. Their journey unfolds as they discover long held secrets. The writing is purposeful and intentional. The details that may seem small have a No doubt that Laurie Frankel is a compelling storyteller. 𝐎𝐍𝐄, 𝐓𝗪𝐎, 𝐓𝐇𝐑𝐄𝐄 is a wholly original and complex story told by the Mitchell triplets; three unforgettable and distinct narrators: One (Mab), Two (Monday) and Three (Mirabel). Their lives and their community were dastardly impacted by an event that took place 17 years ago, right before they were born. Their journey unfolds as they discover long held secrets. The writing is purposeful and intentional. The details that may seem small have a significant purpose in the bigger picture. The story was complex, lovely, maddening, tender and inspiring. But what will really stick with me is the characters, in particular One, Two & Three. Strong, gutsy, resilient and inexplicably bonded sisters. Girls who are empowered to be the heroes in writing their own story. They were so well formed in my mind. I started this book in print but I wasn't connecting with it like I'd hoped. Once I switched to audio I was invested. 𝐀𝐔𝐃𝐈𝐎: I usually struggle with the narration of juvenile characters. They often come across too cutesy or unrealistic. However, the three narrators in this production were flawless. The talent truly elevated this book and my reading experience. PUB DATE: 6.8.21 Thank you to @libro.fm for the advanced listening copy and to @netgalley for the advanced e-book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    MaryBeth's Bookshelf

    I've said it before and I'll say it again - there is nothing better than picking up a book you know nothing about, having no expectations, and then being told blown away by how good it is. This is my first book by Laurie Frankel and it will definitely not be my last. This story is original, impactful, and compelling. Set in the fictional town of Bourne, we meet the Mitchell triplets: Mab (One), Monday (Two), and Mirabel (Three). 17 years ago their community water supply was poisoned and the peopl I've said it before and I'll say it again - there is nothing better than picking up a book you know nothing about, having no expectations, and then being told blown away by how good it is. This is my first book by Laurie Frankel and it will definitely not be my last. This story is original, impactful, and compelling. Set in the fictional town of Bourne, we meet the Mitchell triplets: Mab (One), Monday (Two), and Mirabel (Three). 17 years ago their community water supply was poisoned and the people of Bourne have been paying the price ever since. Their mother, Nora, has been fighting tirelessly for justice ever since. When a new family rolls in old wounds are exposed and the past comes back to haunt all of the residents. The girls band together to save their town and themselves. I was so heavily invested in this story, I did not want to put it down. All three narrators of the audio were endearing and flawless in their representations of the three Mitchell girls. I absolutely fell in love with these characters; they felt real with all their faults, quirks, and compassion and love for each other. This is definitely a must read/listen to story. I highly recommend listening to the author interview at the end of the audio book; it was very cool to hear about the process of making an audio book!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Blankfein

    Loved this story of a small town and three sisters - full review to come on Book Nation by Jen.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tami

    This is my second book by Laurie Frankel and it’s safe to say she is one author that I will plan to read anything she writes in the future. I love the way she handles difficult topics with such grace and honesty. In this latest book, Frankel takes on a small town that suffered the effects of a toxic chemical plant. The Mitchell family was hit hard, just like many others in town. Nora Mitchell was left widowed at a young age, with triplet girls to raise. Mab, Monday and Mirabel are not like averag This is my second book by Laurie Frankel and it’s safe to say she is one author that I will plan to read anything she writes in the future. I love the way she handles difficult topics with such grace and honesty. In this latest book, Frankel takes on a small town that suffered the effects of a toxic chemical plant. The Mitchell family was hit hard, just like many others in town. Nora Mitchell was left widowed at a young age, with triplet girls to raise. Mab, Monday and Mirabel are not like average girls. They are very close, very intelligent and very different from each other. When the owners of the chemical plant decide to return to the town and reopen the plant, the townsfolk are wary and distrustful of their claims to keep the environment clean. With Nora leading the research for a lawsuit against the plant for the past several years, she is especially upset at the news. Her daughters have followed Nora’s progress since they were infants, so they decide to band together and help Nora with the cause. I can’t say how many times these girls brought a smile to my face as I read this story. The close relationship in the family was really nice to read about. I also loved the other characters in the town. My only complaint is the story did drag a bit at times, but overall I really liked this and definitely think it will make a popular choice for book clubs due to the many topics it touches on. Many thanks to NetGalley and Henry Holt & Company for allowing me to read an advance copy. I am happy to give my honest review.

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