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ONE OF NPR’S BEST BOOKS OF 2019 *Most Anticipated Reads of 2019 by Publishers Weekly, BuzzFeed, The Rumpus, Lit Hub, The Week, and Elle.com* Fifteen brilliant writers explore what we don’t talk to our mothers about, and how it affects us, for better or for worse. As an undergraduate, Michele Filgate started writing an essay about being abused by her stepfather. It took her ONE OF NPR’S BEST BOOKS OF 2019 *Most Anticipated Reads of 2019 by Publishers Weekly, BuzzFeed, The Rumpus, Lit Hub, The Week, and Elle.com* Fifteen brilliant writers explore what we don’t talk to our mothers about, and how it affects us, for better or for worse. As an undergraduate, Michele Filgate started writing an essay about being abused by her stepfather. It took her more than a decade to realize what she was actually trying to write: how this affected her relationship with her mother. When it was finally published, the essay went viral, shared on social media by Anne Lamott, Rebecca Solnit, and many others. The outpouring of responses gave Filgate an idea, and the resulting anthology offers a candid look at our relationships with our mothers. While some of the writers in this book are estranged from their mothers, others are extremely close. Leslie Jamison writes about trying to discover who her seemingly perfect mother was before ever becoming a mom. In Cathi Hanauer’s hilarious piece, she finally gets a chance to have a conversation with her mother that isn’t interrupted by her domineering (but lovable) father. André Aciman writes about what it was like to have a deaf mother. Melissa Febos uses mythology as a lens to look at her close-knit relationship with her psychotherapist mother. And Julianna Baggott talks about having a mom who tells her everything. As Filgate writes, “Our mothers are our first homes, and that’s why we’re always trying to return to them.” There’s relief in breaking the silence. Acknowledging what we couldn’t say for so long is one way to heal our relationships with others and, perhaps most important, with ourselves. Contributors include Cathi Hanauer, Melissa Febos, Alexander Chee, Dylan Landis, Bernice L. McFadden, Julianna Baggott, Lynn Steger Strong, Kiese Laymon, Carmen Maria Machado, André Aciman, Sari Botton, Nayomi Munaweera, Brandon Taylor, and Leslie Jamison.


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ONE OF NPR’S BEST BOOKS OF 2019 *Most Anticipated Reads of 2019 by Publishers Weekly, BuzzFeed, The Rumpus, Lit Hub, The Week, and Elle.com* Fifteen brilliant writers explore what we don’t talk to our mothers about, and how it affects us, for better or for worse. As an undergraduate, Michele Filgate started writing an essay about being abused by her stepfather. It took her ONE OF NPR’S BEST BOOKS OF 2019 *Most Anticipated Reads of 2019 by Publishers Weekly, BuzzFeed, The Rumpus, Lit Hub, The Week, and Elle.com* Fifteen brilliant writers explore what we don’t talk to our mothers about, and how it affects us, for better or for worse. As an undergraduate, Michele Filgate started writing an essay about being abused by her stepfather. It took her more than a decade to realize what she was actually trying to write: how this affected her relationship with her mother. When it was finally published, the essay went viral, shared on social media by Anne Lamott, Rebecca Solnit, and many others. The outpouring of responses gave Filgate an idea, and the resulting anthology offers a candid look at our relationships with our mothers. While some of the writers in this book are estranged from their mothers, others are extremely close. Leslie Jamison writes about trying to discover who her seemingly perfect mother was before ever becoming a mom. In Cathi Hanauer’s hilarious piece, she finally gets a chance to have a conversation with her mother that isn’t interrupted by her domineering (but lovable) father. André Aciman writes about what it was like to have a deaf mother. Melissa Febos uses mythology as a lens to look at her close-knit relationship with her psychotherapist mother. And Julianna Baggott talks about having a mom who tells her everything. As Filgate writes, “Our mothers are our first homes, and that’s why we’re always trying to return to them.” There’s relief in breaking the silence. Acknowledging what we couldn’t say for so long is one way to heal our relationships with others and, perhaps most important, with ourselves. Contributors include Cathi Hanauer, Melissa Febos, Alexander Chee, Dylan Landis, Bernice L. McFadden, Julianna Baggott, Lynn Steger Strong, Kiese Laymon, Carmen Maria Machado, André Aciman, Sari Botton, Nayomi Munaweera, Brandon Taylor, and Leslie Jamison.

30 review for What My Mother and I Don't Talk About: Fifteen Writers Break the Silence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily B

    It didn’t live up to my expectations, despite the essays being written by a variety of very interesting authors. I appreciated the honesty and vulnerability of each writer however I felt like some of the essays didn’t quite hit the brief, although they were interesting despite this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    These essays are varied in style and subject matter, but that is fitting since we all have different relationships with our mothers. I really noticed the recurring theme of setting boundaries as adults, and the damaging power of denial and silence. They made me very reflective - for instance I realized the expectations I had for how my mother would change after my father's death were completely wrong, and I have yet to adjust to the reality. I had previously read the Kiese Laymon essay (I think i These essays are varied in style and subject matter, but that is fitting since we all have different relationships with our mothers. I really noticed the recurring theme of setting boundaries as adults, and the damaging power of denial and silence. They made me very reflective - for instance I realized the expectations I had for how my mother would change after my father's death were completely wrong, and I have yet to adjust to the reality. I had previously read the Kiese Laymon essay (I think it's a chapter in the book Heavy: An American Memoir, but maybe reworked a bit.) There were a few I skimmed because I did not connect with them. My highlights: What My Mother and I Don't Talk About (Michele Filgate) "Silence is what fills the gap between my mother and me. All of the things we haven't said to each other, because it's too painful to articulate." My Mother's (Gate) Keeper (Cathi Hanauer) "But she had admitted it's 'not worth' fighting him to have access to her daughters - or anyone else; that, point blank, she chooses placating him over talking to us." (I must say I resonated deeply with this essay and would give it all the stars.) The Same Story about My Mom (Lynn Steger-Strong) "There is a gaping hole perhaps for all of us, where our mother does not match up with mother as we believe it's meant to mean and all it's meant to give us...." Mother Tongue (Carmen Maria Machado) "This is what my mother and I don't talk about: That it is not my fault she is so profoundly unhappy with her life. That she had a chance to know me - really know me, as an adult and an artist and a human being - and she blew it.... it's the fear that I've learned less from my childhood than I should have, that I am more like her than I want to be." (Also a very stunning gut punch) I received an eARC from the publisher through Edelweiss. The essay collection came out April 30, 2019.

  3. 5 out of 5

    da AL

    Enough with the Hallmark Cards and blah blah Mother's Day platitudes -- this superb collection of honest essays focuses on the real-world complexity of being mothered and mothering, of being human. Top-notch contributors. All the audiobook performers are marvelous. Enough with the Hallmark Cards and blah blah Mother's Day platitudes -- this superb collection of honest essays focuses on the real-world complexity of being mothered and mothering, of being human. Top-notch contributors. All the audiobook performers are marvelous.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    This was a heavy read. Essays from celebrated authors about dysfunctional relationships with their mothers. Keep your Kleenex handy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Varied in scope and focus, this collection of essays is the most real thing I’ve read about the complexity of a relationship with a mother figure. The personal essay is in fine form and I’m here for it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    This collection of essays is human, vulnerable, and at times cathartic. It is uneven at times, but highlights unique literary voices and encourages self reflection and forgiveness. It is not really what I thought it would be - and with so many voices, there were obviously some essays that stand out as higher quality, that resonated more with me and made a more lasting impression. I was pleasantly surprised to see the diversity - in gender, ethnicity, economic background, life trauma experiences, This collection of essays is human, vulnerable, and at times cathartic. It is uneven at times, but highlights unique literary voices and encourages self reflection and forgiveness. It is not really what I thought it would be - and with so many voices, there were obviously some essays that stand out as higher quality, that resonated more with me and made a more lasting impression. I was pleasantly surprised to see the diversity - in gender, ethnicity, economic background, life trauma experiences, etc. - that was included in the collection. There were not many essays that hit on the central theme of the first titular essay, and instead ended up being stories of flawed, often misunderstood women whose lives have confused or alienated their children. I'm grateful for the vulnerability displayed by the authors included in this collection. It made me want to be more vulnerable, too. I'd love to sit in a circle with all of them, each of us holding hands. Our mothers are unknowable, whether they are friends or strangers. We're unknowable to them, as well. There's no fixing it, not really, but we can start talking about it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anita Pomerantz

    This book started off as 5 stars all the way, but unfortunately I feel like the editor organized it from the best essay to the worst. However, despite that, I really liked that this book focused on a much under-scrutinized relationship. There are some renowned authors here, and I think they do a great job of conveying the tension between maternal love and the many mistakes that mothers make. As a mother myself, I often wonder about the mistakes I have made and whether my children will forgive th This book started off as 5 stars all the way, but unfortunately I feel like the editor organized it from the best essay to the worst. However, despite that, I really liked that this book focused on a much under-scrutinized relationship. There are some renowned authors here, and I think they do a great job of conveying the tension between maternal love and the many mistakes that mothers make. As a mother myself, I often wonder about the mistakes I have made and whether my children will forgive them. I wonder that because my own relationship with my mother was not smooth and has lead to a strained relationship even to this day. This book made me feel more forgiving and also made me hope I will be forgiven. I would love to see an equivalent book "What My Child and I Don't Talk About" from the mothers' perspective.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sivananthi T

    14 writers share the complexity of their feelings and relationships with their mothers. It seems mine is simultaneously all of it and none of it. For most of our lives we see and experience our mothers through our lens, our views, of what is said and done to us. And then the point begins with looking at our mothers as individuals in their own right, with stories of their own. Many years are spent in that floundering between desiring approval and receiving/ not receiving that approval; and runnin 14 writers share the complexity of their feelings and relationships with their mothers. It seems mine is simultaneously all of it and none of it. For most of our lives we see and experience our mothers through our lens, our views, of what is said and done to us. And then the point begins with looking at our mothers as individuals in their own right, with stories of their own. Many years are spent in that floundering between desiring approval and receiving/ not receiving that approval; and running away to be free from that burden of desires and expectations. And whether we like it or not, for better, for worse we are almost always coming back to this first relationship to understand the question 'what am I all about'?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    Found this book disappointing. I really had high hopes of liking it, but the overall writing (not the subject matter of most of the stories) of a lot of the stories is not great. I wished the person that had put the book together had thought about that. It is a shame, could have been a marvelous collection.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaya

    “Trying to write about my mother is like staring at the sun. It feels like language could only tarnish this thing she has given me, my whole life—this love.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    Our mothers are our first homes, and that’s why we’re always trying to return to them. To know what it was like to have one place where we belonged. Where we fit. In What My Mother And I Don't Talk About we read essays from fifteen writers about their relationships with their moms and what they don't talk about. This book was such an interesting read for me. It made me feel like I am not the only person who feels like they don't know their mother or don't talk to their mother about certain th Our mothers are our first homes, and that’s why we’re always trying to return to them. To know what it was like to have one place where we belonged. Where we fit. In What My Mother And I Don't Talk About we read essays from fifteen writers about their relationships with their moms and what they don't talk about. This book was such an interesting read for me. It made me feel like I am not the only person who feels like they don't know their mother or don't talk to their mother about certain things. The book also made me feel the urge really look at my relationship with me mother and see how I can make it better. A very interesting collection of stories that I think is required reading.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Essay collections can widely vary in the quality of essays which I expected, but I didn’t expect almost every essay to explore to worst mothers in the world and how writing saved the authors. I was expecting more nuanced view of less fraught relationships.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bridgit

    This collection of essays was unfortunately a bit lackluster for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    An essay collection chock full of talent and heart, from Alexander Chee to Kiese Laymon to Leslie Jamison. Good stuff.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    A very solid collection of essays from a diverse selection of writers about the things they don’t talk to their mothers about: family history, abuse, love, protection, secrets, first husbands, expectations. Particularly poignant essays are from Alexander Chee and Brandon Taylor (the last few pages of Brandon’s gutted me, not because it’s graphic or horrible, but because it’s a wish to have understood his mom and who he knew her to be).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emma Kantor

    Beginning with the title essay, this is a powerful and candid collection on a universal theme, showing the scope of mother-daughter relationships and their impact.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    As with most books of essays by different authors, this was hit or miss. It was definitely an interesting selection representing many different types of relationships (from super tight-knit/loving to abusive/estranged and what most of us experience which is something in between). Didn't pack as much of a punch as I wanted it to, but a few were really interesting-- I did appreciate how some of the writers really captured how complicated and singular our relationships with our mothers are. Thought As with most books of essays by different authors, this was hit or miss. It was definitely an interesting selection representing many different types of relationships (from super tight-knit/loving to abusive/estranged and what most of us experience which is something in between). Didn't pack as much of a punch as I wanted it to, but a few were really interesting-- I did appreciate how some of the writers really captured how complicated and singular our relationships with our mothers are. Thought it was weird to end with the essay by the writer who had the most unequivocally positive relationship with their mom since the focus of the book was on how inevitably fraught 99% of us find our mother/child relationships.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Camelia Rose

    This is a collection of 15 essays about mother-child relationship from different authors, each offering a glimpse into a uniquely complex relationship. More than half of the stories lean towards dysfunctional families or abusive/neglectful/inadequate mothers. I like the emotional depth of each story, and enjoy almost all of them. Mothering is perhaps the most challenging job in the world. Mothers are held to sometimes impossibly high standard. To a child, her/his mother is the world, yet to the m This is a collection of 15 essays about mother-child relationship from different authors, each offering a glimpse into a uniquely complex relationship. More than half of the stories lean towards dysfunctional families or abusive/neglectful/inadequate mothers. I like the emotional depth of each story, and enjoy almost all of them. Mothering is perhaps the most challenging job in the world. Mothers are held to sometimes impossibly high standard. To a child, her/his mother is the world, yet to the mother herself, she is only human. My highlights: What My Mother and I Don't Talk About (Michele Filgate): "Silence is what fills the gap between my mother and me. All of the things we haven't said to each other, because it's too painful to articulate." My Mother's Gate Keeper (Cathi Hanauer): A sort of a happy marriage of an older generation American, yet from a daughter's point of view, the happiness is tainted. What is like having a domineering albeit responsible and not unlovable father and a mother who admits "it's 'not worth' fighting him" and chooses placating him instead of standing up for her children? Not all childhood damage requires acute trauma. Fifteen (Bernice L. McFadden): Each generation makes their own parenting mistakes. Is there a way to break the circle? Her Body, My Body (Nayomi Munaweera) One of my favorites in the collection. What is like living with a mother with borderline personality disorder? I am glad the author has escaped the same fate. The Same Story About My Mom (Lynn Steger Strong): A difficult mother-daughter relationship Mother Tongue (Carmen Maria Machado) Another sad mother-daughter story. "This is what my mother and I don't talk about: That it is not my fault she is so profoundly unhappy with her life. That she had a chance to know me - really know me, as an adult and an artist and a human being - and she blew it.... it's the fear that I've learned less from my childhood than I should have, that I am more like her than I want to be." Brother, Can You Spare Some Change (Sari Botton) A poignant story. How much a mother's choice affects her children? Thesmophoria (Melissa Febos) A mother's boundless love to her daughter. Nothing Left Unsaid (Julianna Baggott) A daughter became her mother's confidant since a very young age. Are You Listening (André Aciman) A son's love letter to her deaf mother And at last, "Great relationships make for bad stories...Who wants to hear about someone else's functional parental relationship anyway?" (From I Met Fear on the Hill by Leslie Jamison). But Leslie Jamison has a very close relationship with her mother. Her story is about a daughter's quest to uncover the woman before she became her mother.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    I thought my mother and I had a basically good relationship, although there were many things about my life that I did not tell her, partly because I knew she would not understand and partly because I did not want to hear her criticism. However, reading the variety of relationships between these women and men and their mothers stirred up memories of corporal punishment when I was young, arguments when I was a teenager, and grudges held by my mother - totally unknown to me - until she finally reve I thought my mother and I had a basically good relationship, although there were many things about my life that I did not tell her, partly because I knew she would not understand and partly because I did not want to hear her criticism. However, reading the variety of relationships between these women and men and their mothers stirred up memories of corporal punishment when I was young, arguments when I was a teenager, and grudges held by my mother - totally unknown to me - until she finally revealed some of them, thirty years after the fact. The truth is, no matter how loving your relationship is with a parent (or pretty much anyone else, for that matter), there are going to be points of disagreement. And, as witnessed by many of these authors, you can't always make things better because both parties have to be willing to change, willing to listen to the other person, willing to find a way to mend the brokenness between them. I highly recommend this book but I will warn you - be aware that it will probably affect you in ways that surprise you greatly. Memories long forgotten may come flooding back, and not just memories of your relationship with your mother; you will be reminded of the entire family dynamic. Under the influence of these stories, I very nearly made the mistake of contacting a family member who is toxic. Fortunately I know myself well enough not to send messages in the wee hours of the morning, when I am at my weakest. Thank goodness I waited until the next day. My relief that I had not sent that message was overwhelming. So if you plan to read this, gird yourself for an emotional rollercoaster ride. And don't send any emails or texts at 3 a.m. Just trust me on that.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    Every essay in here - and so many great writers! - was thought-provoking and brought something new to the table. I loved how different the essays were and the richness of the collection.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Perri

    “There is relief in breaking the silence. This is also how we grow. Acknowledging what we couldn’t say for so long, for whatever reason, is a way to heal our relationships with others and perhaps most important, with ourselves,” says Michele Filgate in the intro of her fantastic new curated essay collection, WHAT MY MOTHER AND I DON’T TALK ABOUT. I couldn’t stop reading—**Everyone** should read this book. As I get closer to entering motherhood by the day, I absolutely lived for these meditations “There is relief in breaking the silence. This is also how we grow. Acknowledging what we couldn’t say for so long, for whatever reason, is a way to heal our relationships with others and perhaps most important, with ourselves,” says Michele Filgate in the intro of her fantastic new curated essay collection, WHAT MY MOTHER AND I DON’T TALK ABOUT. I couldn’t stop reading—**Everyone** should read this book. As I get closer to entering motherhood by the day, I absolutely lived for these meditations on the rich, complex relationships between mothers and their children. If we’re lucky, these relationships will evolve and grow all of our lives.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Oh, wow. This collection of short stories is just one punch to the next and it's amazing. For some reason, I had thought this was a collection about daughters speaking with their mothers but it ISN'T. These are people of a large variety of races, sexual orientations, and genders speaking not only to their mothers, but to their underlying family dynamic as a whole. The stories are so rich and have so many different perspectives and relationships and all are beautifully analyzed. This book gave me Oh, wow. This collection of short stories is just one punch to the next and it's amazing. For some reason, I had thought this was a collection about daughters speaking with their mothers but it ISN'T. These are people of a large variety of races, sexual orientations, and genders speaking not only to their mothers, but to their underlying family dynamic as a whole. The stories are so rich and have so many different perspectives and relationships and all are beautifully analyzed. This book gave me clarity and a sense of solidarity simultaneously. Just extraordinary.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    Excellent essay collection featuring great talent. It really made me consider my relationships with my own parents.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miss Murder

    Moms. 15 writers come together to form this novel and each share a personal essay on the relationship with their mother, more specifically, what they don't talk about with them. They cover a wide range of topics - from passages that explain terrible sexual and emotional abuse to passages about an undying and worshipful love for their mother. From the inseparability of a mother-child relationship to the complete estrangement of one, this book is for everyone that has a mother. It's heartbr Moms. 15 writers come together to form this novel and each share a personal essay on the relationship with their mother, more specifically, what they don't talk about with them. They cover a wide range of topics - from passages that explain terrible sexual and emotional abuse to passages about an undying and worshipful love for their mother. From the inseparability of a mother-child relationship to the complete estrangement of one, this book is for everyone that has a mother. It's heartbreaking and beautiful at the same time. The best word to describe this book is "roller-coaster": the one fault of this book is that one personal essay will be truly outstanding and the next won't live up to that same standard. That's the hard part about collections from different writers - I really resonated with some writers and their style whereas others I couldn't connect to them in the same manner. Overall, I loved the honesty and authenticity of the novel. I'm going to list a couple of my favorite essays within this novel, as a few of them really exemplified what the book was about. What My Mother And I Don't Talk About : This is easily one of my favorite passages in the novel. Michelle Filgate is honest in her writing and kept me intrigued throughout her story. It really started the book off on a good foot. Thesomorphia : Greek mythology allusions?!?!? I didn't know it was in here but I am FOR IT! The imagery in this passage was amazing and covered the topic in a way that was almost fictional. Melissa Febos, honey, I applaud you! I Met Fear on the Hill : This is the final essay of the collection and really ties things up nicely. Leslie Jamison takes you through the free love and hippie era of the 60s and 70s, all while explaining the mystery behind her mother's first marriage. Although some of the essays before were sub-par, her work rekindled the mission of the novel. "Our mothers are our first homes, and that's why we're always trying to return to them. To know what it was like to have one place where we belonged. Where we fit."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong • I finished this collection up last week. I thoroughly enjoyed it! I find reading almost anything about Motherhood and Mother-Child relationships so facinating! I loved how these essays showcased all different relationships with Mothers. The cause and effect of the things we dont speak of. From traumas, addictions, shame, to decisions mother make or don't to fathers to our mothers own lives. It was a very well edited collection. It ma For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong • I finished this collection up last week. I thoroughly enjoyed it! I find reading almost anything about Motherhood and Mother-Child relationships so facinating! I loved how these essays showcased all different relationships with Mothers. The cause and effect of the things we dont speak of. From traumas, addictions, shame, to decisions mother make or don't to fathers to our mothers own lives. It was a very well edited collection. It made me look at my relationship with my own mother. What I would write about and also being a mother how my children see me. Very thought-provoking! Definitely reccomend this one! It also made me discover some new writers who's work I am excited to get and read. Like Leslie Jamison and Melissa Febos.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jane Hamilton

    An uneven collection that dares to ask how to break the silences between mothers and children. I felt some essays in my bones and others were ho-hum for me, but I realize that's not about the essay quality, uniformly good, and instead about my relationship with my mother and how it has moved like the spices she used through everything of life I taste. An uneven collection that dares to ask how to break the silences between mothers and children. I felt some essays in my bones and others were ho-hum for me, but I realize that's not about the essay quality, uniformly good, and instead about my relationship with my mother and how it has moved like the spices she used through everything of life I taste.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    As with many essay collections, there are some hits and some misses, but even the "misses" were relatable in some ways. As with many essay collections, there are some hits and some misses, but even the "misses" were relatable in some ways.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Niko

    Some essays were better than others but overall I did not find any of them to be especially powerful or poignant.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    yes 5 stars! I devoured this essay collection. So often stories of mothers are coated in this deep-rooted, almost mythical closeness that is so unfamiliar to me. This collection was painful in how I related to some essays, but also immensely comforting. Some of the authors were already favorites or familiar, and some were brand-new to me, but I will be reading more of their work now. This collection examines loyalty, abuse, mental heath, brokenness, hurt, healing, and the power mothers have and yes 5 stars! I devoured this essay collection. So often stories of mothers are coated in this deep-rooted, almost mythical closeness that is so unfamiliar to me. This collection was painful in how I related to some essays, but also immensely comforting. Some of the authors were already favorites or familiar, and some were brand-new to me, but I will be reading more of their work now. This collection examines loyalty, abuse, mental heath, brokenness, hurt, healing, and the power mothers have and how our need for their specific love really changes us fundamentally. Gah I could go on. Really captivating and well-paced with different essay lengths. Also worth nothing that it’s mostly from daughters’ perspectives, but there a few male authors.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anangsha Alammyan

    I picked the audiobook only because I was enamoured with the narrator Soneela Nankani. She didn't disappoint, leading me to this gem of a book. A collection of bold, brave, unabashed stories from sons and daughters recounting their relationships with their mothers. This book is filled with anecdotes that will touch, leave you in awe, and make you wonder how people from two separate corners of the world can lead such different lives, and yet, share these similar emotions. If you ever feel conflicte I picked the audiobook only because I was enamoured with the narrator Soneela Nankani. She didn't disappoint, leading me to this gem of a book. A collection of bold, brave, unabashed stories from sons and daughters recounting their relationships with their mothers. This book is filled with anecdotes that will touch, leave you in awe, and make you wonder how people from two separate corners of the world can lead such different lives, and yet, share these similar emotions. If you ever feel conflicted about not loving your parents enough, this is the book you should read. Listen to the audiobook. The performances make it worth the time invested. 100% would recommend. :)

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