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Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom

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For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens, who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them. Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens, who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them. Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth. They somehow manage to make pregnancy look effortless, bring out the beauty in a screaming child, and keep the back seat of their cars as spotless as their kitchens. And then there’s women like Liz Astrof. In this blunt and side-splittingly funny book of essays, Liz Astrof embraces the realities of motherhood (and womanhood) that no one ever talks about—from needing to hide from your kids on a regular basis to the eternal quest for time alone, from the terror of failing to sometimes seriously wondering whether this whole parenting thing was a big mistake. In vivid and relatable prose, she discusses her love for her career, how she’s managed to overcome some of her own childhood trauma, and the ups and downs of raising the little demons she calls her own. Soul-baring, entertaining, and insightful, Stay at Work Mom is an abashedly honest look at parenting and relationships for moms who realize that motherhood doesn’t have to be your entire life—just an amazing part of it.


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For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens, who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them. Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens, who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them. Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth. They somehow manage to make pregnancy look effortless, bring out the beauty in a screaming child, and keep the back seat of their cars as spotless as their kitchens. And then there’s women like Liz Astrof. In this blunt and side-splittingly funny book of essays, Liz Astrof embraces the realities of motherhood (and womanhood) that no one ever talks about—from needing to hide from your kids on a regular basis to the eternal quest for time alone, from the terror of failing to sometimes seriously wondering whether this whole parenting thing was a big mistake. In vivid and relatable prose, she discusses her love for her career, how she’s managed to overcome some of her own childhood trauma, and the ups and downs of raising the little demons she calls her own. Soul-baring, entertaining, and insightful, Stay at Work Mom is an abashedly honest look at parenting and relationships for moms who realize that motherhood doesn’t have to be your entire life—just an amazing part of it.

30 review for Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cari

    This book really surprised me. While there are hilarious moments - the trip to Great Wolf Lodge and the turtle story - there are also many stories of pain and the journey to work through it. I really empathized with Liz Astrof, especially when she wrote about her mother and the difficulties she faced growing up. This isn't so much a parenting book as it is a memoir, but I wholeheartedly recommend it. I got the advanced reader copy from Edelweiss, but I'll definitely check out the audio when it b This book really surprised me. While there are hilarious moments - the trip to Great Wolf Lodge and the turtle story - there are also many stories of pain and the journey to work through it. I really empathized with Liz Astrof, especially when she wrote about her mother and the difficulties she faced growing up. This isn't so much a parenting book as it is a memoir, but I wholeheartedly recommend it. I got the advanced reader copy from Edelweiss, but I'll definitely check out the audio when it becomes available - I think it would be fabulous that way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Theis

    What a witty, cringey and hilarious read! I found myself laughing out loud and devouring every word. From their trip to Great Wolf Lodge, to Tim Allen trying to kill her 😉🤣 Liz Astrof's stories were interesting and I'm so glad I won this in a goodreads giveaway (thanks guys!) 🧡 Even through the accounts of abuse from her crazy mother and her struggle with weight as a kid, I was enjoying my reading (it was humorous as well as upsetting) Every chapter was a new story from her life, which speaking What a witty, cringey and hilarious read! I found myself laughing out loud and devouring every word. From their trip to Great Wolf Lodge, to Tim Allen trying to kill her 😉🤣 Liz Astrof's stories were interesting and I'm so glad I won this in a goodreads giveaway (thanks guys!) 🧡 Even through the accounts of abuse from her crazy mother and her struggle with weight as a kid, I was enjoying my reading (it was humorous as well as upsetting) Every chapter was a new story from her life, which speaking of, I just want to say I love 2 broke girls and Last Man Standing 🤓🥰 Overall it was a great read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I won this book on Goodreads. It was supposed to be funny but I didn't find it funny at all. The author had a terrible childhood and it doesn't sound like any of her life has been anything but a mess. Her chapters on different things in her life didn't really sound like she thought they were funny either. Some of the stories could've been funny if they didn't have such terrible things behind them. I won this book on Goodreads. It was supposed to be funny but I didn't find it funny at all. The author had a terrible childhood and it doesn't sound like any of her life has been anything but a mess. Her chapters on different things in her life didn't really sound like she thought they were funny either. Some of the stories could've been funny if they didn't have such terrible things behind them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heather Mashnouk brandon

    Don't get this book if you are afraid to giggle uncontrollably or let loose with a few swears once you look up the price of a Cartier Love Bracelet. Don't Wait Up by Liz Astrof is a fun, crazy, surprising, and quite real look into the life of a successful writer of comedy TV shows. Liz was the Executive Producer of Two Broke Girls and is a self proclaimed "Stay at Work Mom." This book showcases her life not only as a professional woman but that of a mom who is worried about screwing up her kids, Don't get this book if you are afraid to giggle uncontrollably or let loose with a few swears once you look up the price of a Cartier Love Bracelet. Don't Wait Up by Liz Astrof is a fun, crazy, surprising, and quite real look into the life of a successful writer of comedy TV shows. Liz was the Executive Producer of Two Broke Girls and is a self proclaimed "Stay at Work Mom." This book showcases her life not only as a professional woman but that of a mom who is worried about screwing up her kids, her life, and everything else. Astrof is incredibly easy to relate to and makes even the most difficult truths about her childhood and struggles with grace and humor. Each chapter is its own story although they all manage to weave together to paint the picture she finishes in the final pages. She is self deprecating but honest about her scars and insecurities, which would help any mom see a little bit of herself written here. There were some shocking and sad moments as well as some laugh out loud ones. Who will enjoy this: Moms with a snarky sense of humor, moms who worry about everything and need to see that there are others like them, people that like a good laugh, people that want a quick but engaging read. Who will not: There are some triggers here related to Astrof's childhood with an absent and abusive mother and some readers might have difficulty with it. Sanctimoms and perfect moms. People that don't care for profanity (it isn't a large portion of the text, but it is there). People that don't like reading someone's thoughts that might ramble and go on some tangents- If you like a sentence to go from A to B immediately, this might be a tough read for you. The Author's brain doesn't work that way and neither does her story- But the story about Tim Allen trying to kill her would not be the same without it. My only real complaint seems to be an editing one that I imagine will be fixed from the advanced copy I read. When discussing an on and off relationship with an ex, the name of said ex changed from "Andy" to "Rick" and back again which was obviously confusing. If you need a laugh pick this one up. Thank you NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Nelson

    *I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* I can’t say enough good things about this book–it is incredible. I laughed and cried and thoroughly enjoyed reading Astrof’s memoir. She details her journey through working in comedy and becoming a TV producer, focusing on her childhood and how that has affected her view of having and raising kids. I don’t have kids myself, but I found so much in Astrof’s story to relate to–the Great Wolf L *I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* I can’t say enough good things about this book–it is incredible. I laughed and cried and thoroughly enjoyed reading Astrof’s memoir. She details her journey through working in comedy and becoming a TV producer, focusing on her childhood and how that has affected her view of having and raising kids. I don’t have kids myself, but I found so much in Astrof’s story to relate to–the Great Wolf Lodge story was hilarious (it is a horrendous place) and I am so glad to not be the only one to be horrified by it. Mixed in with her humor, however, are heart-breaking stories about her rough childhood and the trauma she experienced, and how afraid she is of passing that down to her own children. This book is filled with heartfelt, genuine stories that so many readers can connect to. Like all well-crafted memoirs, each chapter is its own story, but they work together to show a bigger picture of Astrof’s life and her thoughts about life. I enjoyed this book so much and definitely recommend it if you’re a fan of memoirs. I’m excited to see how the audio version will turn out, because I think it’ll be stellar. Also posted on Purple People Readers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    As a single mom of three teens with a son med disabled from birth seeing this book sitting on the library shelf waiting for me to take it home felt like the omen from the man above. Yet, it wasn't quite the salvation I had hoped for as it was quite disarrayed and felt disjointed to me and hurried. While motherhood doesn't come with that magical book of how to's it's meant to be trial and error. Within those errors are our strengths as parents try to adjust in raising kids to adulthood so they can As a single mom of three teens with a son med disabled from birth seeing this book sitting on the library shelf waiting for me to take it home felt like the omen from the man above. Yet, it wasn't quite the salvation I had hoped for as it was quite disarrayed and felt disjointed to me and hurried. While motherhood doesn't come with that magical book of how to's it's meant to be trial and error. Within those errors are our strengths as parents try to adjust in raising kids to adulthood so they can fly off using their own wings. For me their wasn't much hilarious action as the preview noted and yes I'm from the Pocono Mts. so I can easily relate to the Great Wolf Lodge opening credits or shall I say digs. Sure the chlorine is a bit much but it's better than the alternative. Yes, floating poop happens especially with young children all around 24-7 and surely the water rides are breathtaking if not scary especially for us ladies with skimpy bathing attire that can easily flip or flop (if ya get my drift). I also related to the author's past hardships and not so easy childhood so I can understand how some feel it was passive aggressive in her writing style. I must note this for me just seemed a wee bit off and I don't know why as it had all the earmarkings for greatness. It was a quick read in fact I read it prior to getting my daughter from school and never checked it out of the library as I finished reading while there. So perhaps you'll feel more connected but for me I just didn't feel the empathy, compassion, concern of love of raising a family.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Smith

    Thank you to Goodreads for the giveaway copy of this book. I was not familiar at all with this writer or any of her shows; thus, I was not prepared for the vulgarity or attempts at humor. She came across as spoiled, a woman willing to do anything to avoid interacting with her children. She clearly didn't need to work for the money and enjoyed the accolades her work brings. That's fine to use your talents in other ways besides your family, but this went beyond that. Although it's to be expected t Thank you to Goodreads for the giveaway copy of this book. I was not familiar at all with this writer or any of her shows; thus, I was not prepared for the vulgarity or attempts at humor. She came across as spoiled, a woman willing to do anything to avoid interacting with her children. She clearly didn't need to work for the money and enjoyed the accolades her work brings. That's fine to use your talents in other ways besides your family, but this went beyond that. Although it's to be expected that there are sacrificial aspects to mothering, this book focused more on her needs and her complaining. I couldn't finish the book and cannot recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Funny! Painfully funny at times, always honest and also painfully so at times!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    Couldn’t bring myself to finish this audiobook. I am genuinely alarmed at the quantum of stories of women from abused backgrounds who are pushed to accept substandard working conditions to make it in life. Acknowledgment for the fact that this is a real issue that needs serious attention, but the matter of fact way in which this one was narrated wasn’t emotive enough to make me want to push through another one of these.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Kayden

    3.5 stars - Funny, relatable and clever. Some touching moments and some laugh out loud moments.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kris Ogara

    4+ stars. This was laugh out loud- Liz- I want to be your friend. You make me feel normal😀

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I was entertained but not much more to it than that.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kym

    Not what I was expecting. I didn't realize the author was a writer for TV shows, so her relatability took a dive for me. I don't judge her parenting or her crappy childhood. Maybe it was therapeutic for her to confess, maybe she thought some things funny. However, her anectdotes just led me to conclude some of the other people in her life sure put up with a lot. Not what I was expecting. I didn't realize the author was a writer for TV shows, so her relatability took a dive for me. I don't judge her parenting or her crappy childhood. Maybe it was therapeutic for her to confess, maybe she thought some things funny. However, her anectdotes just led me to conclude some of the other people in her life sure put up with a lot.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    When editors acquire fiction, they usually require the author to have completed the entire manuscript. When they acquire non-fiction, they buy based on a chapter or three and the author's reputation and marketability. Don't Wait Up is non-fiction. It's a memoir by Liz Astrof, a fabulously successful television writer and producer who has worked on Two Broke Girls, the King of Queens, and a Tim Allen show I can't remember the name of and wasn't sure which it was when I Googled. I suspect her book When editors acquire fiction, they usually require the author to have completed the entire manuscript. When they acquire non-fiction, they buy based on a chapter or three and the author's reputation and marketability. Don't Wait Up is non-fiction. It's a memoir by Liz Astrof, a fabulously successful television writer and producer who has worked on Two Broke Girls, the King of Queens, and a Tim Allen show I can't remember the name of and wasn't sure which it was when I Googled. I suspect her book was bought on the basis of the first full chapter, which is so funny I almost had to pull off the road because I was laughing so hard while listening to the audiobook. After that, things went straight downhill. She endured a truly crappy childhood, with nothing funny about it. She and her brother protected each other from their abusive mother until she left when Liz was about six. Liz was happy to see her go. After that, she got "good, kind, clean, beautiful Kathy" as a stepmother. Kathy and her dad weren't abusive, but they weren't exactly loving either. Astrof grew up, endured her 20s, and finally, with the support of her brother who had already become a wildly successful TV writer, moved to Los Angeles to become one too. Things improved in Astrof's life, and the book becomes funny again, but it never becomes as hilarious as it is in the first chapter. She has a tendency to overuse certain lines in an effort at humor: regarding the Cartier Love Bracelet she desperately wants for her 40th birthday: "In yellow gold. Not rose gold. Not platinum." It's a tribute to how good that first chapter was that I made it through the middle chapters to see if there would be something great at the end. It's good, it's memorable, it's fun, it's a quality audiobook, but she's no Tina Fey or Trevor Noah (who also endured a miserable childhood, but his was funnier).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Don't Wait Up is a collection of humorous essays about the author's parenting skills when she's not even sure she can parent. In the beginning, the author discusses the whole stigma of being a "stay-at-work" mom. There is one scene where she's at a sporting event with her kids, wearing a "2 Broke Girls" hat. Another mom came over and asked the author if her husband worked on the show, assuming it could never be her, the mom. She says, “You don't even recognize yourself under those maternity sweat Don't Wait Up is a collection of humorous essays about the author's parenting skills when she's not even sure she can parent. In the beginning, the author discusses the whole stigma of being a "stay-at-work" mom. There is one scene where she's at a sporting event with her kids, wearing a "2 Broke Girls" hat. Another mom came over and asked the author if her husband worked on the show, assuming it could never be her, the mom. She says, “You don't even recognize yourself under those maternity sweatpants. You fantasize about getting in your minivan, running away from it all, getting involved in a Bridges of Madison County type romance, and never coming home again. There is no way any adult enjoys spending time with a toddler, even if it’s brilliant and hilarious. And frankly, if you really do enjoy them that much, there is something wrong with you.” Later, we realize all the author's fear and questioning about her own parenting comes from her relationship with her mother, which she described in great detail. That part was actually sad and gave a great perspective into her life. So even though this book is funny, it's not just a comedy. The author shows us where all the humor and pain comes from, which I think is the best part. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/liz...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Victoria B.

    Marketed as a "side-splittingly funny book of essays" but basically a memoir, Liz Astorf's book is a mixture of sarcasm, trauma, dysfunction, awkwardness, and sadness. While some of it was relatable (like her description of a 5 year old after 9:15pm), there were parts that made me question why she wanted children (she said certain things like she was trying to be funny but it came across a little detached). I think it's a defense mechanism to hide how scared she is of repeating the abusive patte Marketed as a "side-splittingly funny book of essays" but basically a memoir, Liz Astorf's book is a mixture of sarcasm, trauma, dysfunction, awkwardness, and sadness. While some of it was relatable (like her description of a 5 year old after 9:15pm), there were parts that made me question why she wanted children (she said certain things like she was trying to be funny but it came across a little detached). I think it's a defense mechanism to hide how scared she is of repeating the abusive patterns from her own childhood. Each chapter was basically about herself, her traumas, and her internalized pain that occasionally exerts itself in her self-destructive attitude and behavior. Sometimes a chapter ended with how she could apply lessons she learned toward her child ("No More Monsters" for example) or how she was better than her parents (Happy New Year). The chapters bounced all over the place; don't expect any kind of chronological thread. I'll be honest - at first, she came across as selfish, petty, and kind of mean, but the deeper you tread into the book, the more you can see what cruelty fueled it. But I definitely wouldn't classify this as humor...I spent most of the book cringing at the way she is/was treated or how she treated others. I'm sure the material would be much funnier in audio or as a stand up routine though, since her delivery might make a difference. P129-234 no mention of kids. P. 223, Out-of-left-field: "Julie and I are no longer friends, for reasons that are clear to her." What?? She wasn't even talking about Julie. Like, for the whole chapter! So I don't know what that's about or where it came from. Favorite quote: Describing her 5 year old "...around nine-fifteen, Phoebe starts to turn sort of...mean. Like a bad drunk after two drinks, she becomes abusive, starts making false accusations, and it gets ugly." I received a complimentary copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for my honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Poignant and achingly funny, these essays are a tonic for overwhelmed mothers looking for an authentic voice in the mothering madness. Yes, the mommy wars that we all watched playing out in the media have never really gone away, and there is still some distrust, skepticism and hand-wringing on both sides of the first-world debate about whether it's a good idea for a woman to hold a job while raising young children. In Astrof's case, her abusive mother only provided an example of what not to do. Poignant and achingly funny, these essays are a tonic for overwhelmed mothers looking for an authentic voice in the mothering madness. Yes, the mommy wars that we all watched playing out in the media have never really gone away, and there is still some distrust, skepticism and hand-wringing on both sides of the first-world debate about whether it's a good idea for a woman to hold a job while raising young children. In Astrof's case, her abusive mother only provided an example of what not to do. Mothering without any blueprint for raising confident, well-adjusted kids in a stable, loving household was never going to be easy, and she wisely chose a partner who approaches parenting from a place of balance and equanimity. Childhood trauma left her with a coping mechanism of finding humor in chaos, leading to a career as a writer and producer of television sitcoms. Her tales of the tv writer's room/sausage factory are by turns horrifying and hilarious. Most of us can't imagine being invited to the private home of a famous actor, but she describes the stress of that experience in a way that makes you glad you'll never need to do that. She's honest about their household circumstances, acknowledging the privilege and perks of a comfortable income (a nanny, family vacations, retail therapy) while remembering her more humble origins and trying to repel a sense of entitlement from her kids' worldview. Her writing voice is delightful, I absolutely enjoyed this unique collection of essays, and look forward to reading more from the author. Thank you to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for allowing me to read this book at no charge in exchange for my honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Lunz Trujillo

    This was an entertaining read, as I'd expect from a comedy tv writer. I see quite a bit of her backstory in Max of 2 Broke Girls. But this couldn't overcome how irritated I was with the author. She has a lot of psychological issues that she takes out on others and that make her incredibly fragile. She's passive aggressive, expects family and friends to read her mind, lies, and seems to take her husband for granted. She'll throw people under the bus and lash out at them. She's the type who claims This was an entertaining read, as I'd expect from a comedy tv writer. I see quite a bit of her backstory in Max of 2 Broke Girls. But this couldn't overcome how irritated I was with the author. She has a lot of psychological issues that she takes out on others and that make her incredibly fragile. She's passive aggressive, expects family and friends to read her mind, lies, and seems to take her husband for granted. She'll throw people under the bus and lash out at them. She's the type who claims to not want anything for her birthday, then gets angry not only if nobody gets her anything, but also if it's not the right thing. She's shitty to friends who do nothing but be kind to her, and then has no trouble lying to their face about being two-faced. She has serious jealousy issues. She also starts the book off by describing how much of a "struggle" it is to be with her kids for a whole weekend, which I find entitled, pathetic, and an actual sign of a bad parent. Like yeah, I get that she had a rough childhood, but c'mon, that can't be a justification for acting shitty. And being funny about it doesn't make it ok. Finally, this book is marketed as being about motherhood. But relatively few stories were about motherhood, and most were about the author herself. Thank you to Goodreads giveaways and the publishers for a free ARC of the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rieta

    It took me two days to review this book and it disappeared??? I loved loved loved it. I feel like Liz and I are emotionally related. Speaking of which I saw a review that said Liz is a terrible mother making excuses. Liz, ignore that! Only truly immature people who haven't walked in your shoes feel they can judge you! Bull! I've been married for 38 years this month and my husband says to me "You had 17 years of hell and 38 great years, how can those 17 still impact you?" BECAUSE they're the form It took me two days to review this book and it disappeared??? I loved loved loved it. I feel like Liz and I are emotionally related. Speaking of which I saw a review that said Liz is a terrible mother making excuses. Liz, ignore that! Only truly immature people who haven't walked in your shoes feel they can judge you! Bull! I've been married for 38 years this month and my husband says to me "You had 17 years of hell and 38 great years, how can those 17 still impact you?" BECAUSE they're the formative years. People with toxic mothers are a sisterhood the healthier set just can't get. Steve Wynn, a Las Vegas casino owner had a 6 million dollar picture hanging over his desk. One day he inadvertently elbowed and ripped it. It was repaired. Everyone seeing the picture speaks of it's beauty except him. He sees the repair. His eye goes there repeatedly. I think he might have even sold it because for him it was ruined. Wounded people do that. Others see their (your) beauty but we see our scars. Brene Brown did a talk on vulnerability and bravery. You're rediculously brave. First chapter I almost wet my pants ;o) Fan for life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    mlhruby

    Preface: Do not be deceived! This is not a book about being a working mom. It’s about being a mom. And how we try to do better for our kids by fixing our parents mistakes and by doing that making our own mistakes! Read this book!! I loved this book so much! And I would love for everyone to read this book and love it as much as I did. It made me feel like talking with a fellow mom, a new best friend. I really do feel like I have a new friend and I only wish there were more chapters left. She was c Preface: Do not be deceived! This is not a book about being a working mom. It’s about being a mom. And how we try to do better for our kids by fixing our parents mistakes and by doing that making our own mistakes! Read this book!! I loved this book so much! And I would love for everyone to read this book and love it as much as I did. It made me feel like talking with a fellow mom, a new best friend. I really do feel like I have a new friend and I only wish there were more chapters left. She was captivating and funny and feel good. This book was fantastic! Liz is fantastic! Wow...just wow! She’s definitely my new best friend! This was a great read for December because she took me away from the crazy stress and made me laugh and I just enjoyed it so much. Liz, I’m following you! Whatever you are writing for, I’m there! Whatever show or book or comedian, I’m there. But also please write more books!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mayar El Mahdy

    This was amazing. I'm not brave enough to venture into a book with 15 ratings from an author I never heard of. We don't do that here. But I did. I read a book with 15 ratings from an author I don't know just like a brave reader would. And boy was it worth it. Liz Astrof turned out to be a TV writer for some cool shows including 2 Broke Girls and Raising Hope. I always thought TV writers don't get enough credit and this proves it. Anyway, I got to read a messed up autobiography by a really funny wo This was amazing. I'm not brave enough to venture into a book with 15 ratings from an author I never heard of. We don't do that here. But I did. I read a book with 15 ratings from an author I don't know just like a brave reader would. And boy was it worth it. Liz Astrof turned out to be a TV writer for some cool shows including 2 Broke Girls and Raising Hope. I always thought TV writers don't get enough credit and this proves it. Anyway, I got to read a messed up autobiography by a really funny woman. I felt awful reading the parts about her mom and the fat camp. I wanted to give her a big hug and tell her she's doing great, sweetie like I imagine my virtual support system doing when I'm down. (It doesn't) This was great to read, I'm happy Liz got to do so much in her life and -sort of- got through all her past.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Francis M. Torres

    This book brought me so many laughs in these two days it took for me to read it. Now that it was a short read but more that it’s hard to put down once you started because you just want to keep laughing. I feel like it’s more of a memoir if anything, each and every single story had me bawling straight laughter, and I feel so sad too because this is her life, but it’s so funny and this is why she’s this award winning comedy writer. The story that’s my favorite will be the Guilt Trip, and since it’ This book brought me so many laughs in these two days it took for me to read it. Now that it was a short read but more that it’s hard to put down once you started because you just want to keep laughing. I feel like it’s more of a memoir if anything, each and every single story had me bawling straight laughter, and I feel so sad too because this is her life, but it’s so funny and this is why she’s this award winning comedy writer. The story that’s my favorite will be the Guilt Trip, and since it’s the first story I know you guys will really enjoy, and also No more Monsters those two are my top. She talks about her mother and her family outside of her kids and it’s great that she opens up about all that, makes me feel like I know her, like I can call her and have her come over and chill, haha.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    From the cover and sub-title and introduction, I was expecting a slightly funny discussion of being a working parent. In fact, this was actually a heart-rending look at the author's childhood, with enough humor sprinkled in to make it bearable. Only a few of the stories (including the first and last) feature Astrof as a parent; most recount much earlier events. Astrof is an excellent writer and each chapter can stand alone as an interesting story of her life. At times it was rather terrifying th From the cover and sub-title and introduction, I was expecting a slightly funny discussion of being a working parent. In fact, this was actually a heart-rending look at the author's childhood, with enough humor sprinkled in to make it bearable. Only a few of the stories (including the first and last) feature Astrof as a parent; most recount much earlier events. Astrof is an excellent writer and each chapter can stand alone as an interesting story of her life. At times it was rather terrifying thinking about how much we as parents affect our children. But then it was also oddly reassuring that even with the terrible things she carries from her childhood, Astrof managed to grow up, become a functional adult, and be a reasonably good parent.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Cobb Sabatini

    I won an Advance Reader's Edition of Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom by Liz Astrof from Goodreads. Liz Astrof pokes fun at life and, especially, herself in her book, Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom. This collection of essays takes a closer look at some very awkward situations and some truly embarrassing moments with humor and insight. Readers are moved, sometimes to tears, even as they laugh out loud at Liz's foibles, missteps, blunders, and triumphs, all in the I won an Advance Reader's Edition of Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom by Liz Astrof from Goodreads. Liz Astrof pokes fun at life and, especially, herself in her book, Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom. This collection of essays takes a closer look at some very awkward situations and some truly embarrassing moments with humor and insight. Readers are moved, sometimes to tears, even as they laugh out loud at Liz's foibles, missteps, blunders, and triumphs, all in the search for a loving family of her own. It's not all fun and games, but when it is, Don't Wait Up: Confessions of a Stay-at-Work Mom by Liz Astrof is hilarious.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kayla MacVicar

    This is my introduction to Liz Astrof - I knew nothing of her before, but I am so glad I came across this book. I listened to this collection of essays, read by Liz herself, and both laughed and cried several times. This book made me wildly uncomfortable and made me feel incredibly seen. Liz made me feel like I might just be doing an okay job as a mom after all. Not by comparing myself to her, but by understanding my own motivations by her sharing some of hers. Liz, I didn’t know you before, but This is my introduction to Liz Astrof - I knew nothing of her before, but I am so glad I came across this book. I listened to this collection of essays, read by Liz herself, and both laughed and cried several times. This book made me wildly uncomfortable and made me feel incredibly seen. Liz made me feel like I might just be doing an okay job as a mom after all. Not by comparing myself to her, but by understanding my own motivations by her sharing some of hers. Liz, I didn’t know you before, but I feel like I know myself more now because of you, and you will forever be a part of me because of that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kavi Krish

    I love 2 broke girls. So the moment I saw that "Don't Wait Up!" was written by Liz Astrof, I had to read it. It was amazing. This is a witty, funny and crazy memoir. I was gripped on to it from the very beginning. From the trip to the Great Wolf Lodge to her struggles faced during her childhood, I could connect with this hilarious and upsetting (at some moments) autobiography of hers. I'm glad that I picked this one up. I would like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for this advanced eARC in I love 2 broke girls. So the moment I saw that "Don't Wait Up!" was written by Liz Astrof, I had to read it. It was amazing. This is a witty, funny and crazy memoir. I was gripped on to it from the very beginning. From the trip to the Great Wolf Lodge to her struggles faced during her childhood, I could connect with this hilarious and upsetting (at some moments) autobiography of hers. I'm glad that I picked this one up. I would like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for this advanced eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Howell

    I didn't hate this book, but I also didn't love it. That being said, I read the book in basically one weekend. The book is essentially comprised of short stories, all of which would well written and great to read. However, I felt the title of the book didn't quite capture what the book was actually about. As a working mom, I was expecting the book the be largely about balancing work and family, but many of the chapters/stories seemed to tell more about the authors background rather than mom conf I didn't hate this book, but I also didn't love it. That being said, I read the book in basically one weekend. The book is essentially comprised of short stories, all of which would well written and great to read. However, I felt the title of the book didn't quite capture what the book was actually about. As a working mom, I was expecting the book the be largely about balancing work and family, but many of the chapters/stories seemed to tell more about the authors background rather than mom confessions. It was still an excellent read, but not what I was expecting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    This book was like reading a headache, but I couldn’t put it down. The author is so crazy and exhausting in just the way I’m afraid I am. You can see why she’s like that, and you can also see it bleeding into her kids, too. All around, this is a funny book, and even more so, it’s a sad book. I can only hope she was exaggerating everything for the sake of humor (which I also do). One thing I’m confused about is the Cartier Love Bracelet. If they screw it onto your wrist, why would they have to saw This book was like reading a headache, but I couldn’t put it down. The author is so crazy and exhausting in just the way I’m afraid I am. You can see why she’s like that, and you can also see it bleeding into her kids, too. All around, this is a funny book, and even more so, it’s a sad book. I can only hope she was exaggerating everything for the sake of humor (which I also do). One thing I’m confused about is the Cartier Love Bracelet. If they screw it onto your wrist, why would they have to saw it off when you die? Couldn’t they just unscrew it? Am I missing a joke here? What’s the deal?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gail Heaney

    I love love love this book (I own the audible and the print version). Comedy and memoirs/essays are my "go to" genres, and this book is funny and authentic. There are so many wonderful hysterical essays that deal with her own demons and her relationships with her children, husband, friends and family. I burned through it but will pick it up again and again when I need a laugh. I highly recommend the Audible version read by the author. The comic timing is impeccable. I love love love this book (I own the audible and the print version). Comedy and memoirs/essays are my "go to" genres, and this book is funny and authentic. There are so many wonderful hysterical essays that deal with her own demons and her relationships with her children, husband, friends and family. I burned through it but will pick it up again and again when I need a laugh. I highly recommend the Audible version read by the author. The comic timing is impeccable.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

    This book didn't end up being a laugh a minute. Don't get me wrong it is very funny, but the author shares a lot of her dysfunctional childhood and how it impacts every single parenting decision. It just might be the main reason she is a “Stay-At-Work Mom.” I laughed, but I also cried because I could relate to many of the author’s fears. It is definitely worth the read, but it isn’t like some of the other funny parenting books out there, like say the Shitty Mom books. This book didn't end up being a laugh a minute. Don't get me wrong it is very funny, but the author shares a lot of her dysfunctional childhood and how it impacts every single parenting decision. It just might be the main reason she is a “Stay-At-Work Mom.” I laughed, but I also cried because I could relate to many of the author’s fears. It is definitely worth the read, but it isn’t like some of the other funny parenting books out there, like say the Shitty Mom books.

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