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The Truth About Food: Why Pandas Eat Bamboo and People Get Bamboozled

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In The Truth about Food, one of the world’s leading authorities on lifestyle medicine, health promotion, and the prevention of chronic disease lays out not just what he knows about diet and health, but how and why he knows it. This book uniquely empowers readers to benefit from what’s fundamentally and reliably true - while setting us all free from fads, false claims, and In The Truth about Food, one of the world’s leading authorities on lifestyle medicine, health promotion, and the prevention of chronic disease lays out not just what he knows about diet and health, but how and why he knows it. This book uniquely empowers readers to benefit from what’s fundamentally and reliably true - while setting us all free from fads, false claims, and distractions by showing how to differentiate truth from the exploitative “lies” that abound. This book would be much shorter if it only detailed what we know to be true today. It shows how to keep up with new findings, too, and most importantly- how never to be duped again. Based on science, informed by uncommon sense, and aligned with the global consensus of diverse experts, The Truth about Food is an invitation to add years to your life and life to your years; to love the food that loves you back for a lifetime; and to enjoy the comforting confidence that only comes from genuine understanding.


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In The Truth about Food, one of the world’s leading authorities on lifestyle medicine, health promotion, and the prevention of chronic disease lays out not just what he knows about diet and health, but how and why he knows it. This book uniquely empowers readers to benefit from what’s fundamentally and reliably true - while setting us all free from fads, false claims, and In The Truth about Food, one of the world’s leading authorities on lifestyle medicine, health promotion, and the prevention of chronic disease lays out not just what he knows about diet and health, but how and why he knows it. This book uniquely empowers readers to benefit from what’s fundamentally and reliably true - while setting us all free from fads, false claims, and distractions by showing how to differentiate truth from the exploitative “lies” that abound. This book would be much shorter if it only detailed what we know to be true today. It shows how to keep up with new findings, too, and most importantly- how never to be duped again. Based on science, informed by uncommon sense, and aligned with the global consensus of diverse experts, The Truth about Food is an invitation to add years to your life and life to your years; to love the food that loves you back for a lifetime; and to enjoy the comforting confidence that only comes from genuine understanding.

30 review for The Truth About Food: Why Pandas Eat Bamboo and People Get Bamboozled

  1. 5 out of 5

    Simon deVeer

    I suspect many of the one & two star reviews are still in the grips of a fad diet. It's a reference book, not thrilling, but the content is well researched and cited like very few, particularly the fad literature, in the nutrition section. I suspect many of the one & two star reviews are still in the grips of a fad diet. It's a reference book, not thrilling, but the content is well researched and cited like very few, particularly the fad literature, in the nutrition section.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    You could say that I’m a food aficionado, so a book with a title like this one is bound to land on my desk. Although a title like this usually gives me a bad case of hives because as David L. Katz correctly states there’s awfully little truth about what food really is about. The truth concerning food is and probably will always be a moving target because food research is a reductive science. In fact it even is a redundant science for real food is too complex for it. That’s the reason why all man You could say that I’m a food aficionado, so a book with a title like this one is bound to land on my desk. Although a title like this usually gives me a bad case of hives because as David L. Katz correctly states there’s awfully little truth about what food really is about. The truth concerning food is and probably will always be a moving target because food research is a reductive science. In fact it even is a redundant science for real food is too complex for it. That’s the reason why all man made food products like margarine (transfats and all) turned out to be such disasters for our health. About the book:. I read it from beginning to end making the ‘mistake’ to skip the recommendations and even the ‘words of guidance’ of the author himself. Because I always do. But in this case I really shouldn’t have. ‘For any of you _________(crazy? ardent? related to me?) enough to read TTaF cover to cover, I apologize for a certain repetition of core messages, examples, case studies, and expressions you will note throughout. This is intentional and strategic redundancy on my part; this is quite a long book, and I anticipate most readers will read and refer to it in sections. I thus wanted all of the key parts to stand up reasonably well on their own, as well as in the context of the whole. If you read straight through, please think of these recurrences as something like the chorus of a song: a distillation of key messages, rhythmically repeated’ One thing is certainly true: a ‘certain repetition’ (which in this case really is an understatement) makes for quite a long book. Unfortunately it makes for quite a boring book too. Most reference books do not repeat themselves all of the time. But then again they usually have nice indexes to be used for referencing. The book itself has two parts: Lies and Truth with each of them 3 chapters. ‘Lies’, ‘Statistics’ and ‘Damned lies’ for the first one and ‘The Truth’, ‘Nothing but the truth’ and ‘The Whole Truth’ for the latter. It’s obvious that these titles don’t really help with referencing either. Thus although Mr. Katz certainly writes truths about food, and explains the lies the package leaves a lot to be desired for. And then there’s one unfortunate mistake. I can see that while the subtitle ‘why pandas eat bamboo and people get bamboozled’ is a nice gimmic it is in fact the wrong animal to illustrate that ‘EVERY species of wild creature knows enough to feed itself correctly’. Although bamboo is their main food source, giant pandas are horrible at digesting it. Although they developed some adaptations connected to their food of choice (a powerful jaw and teeth to chew the fibrous plant, pseudothumbs to grasp the bamboo stems) their gastrointestinal tract remains that of a carnivore: one simple stomach and a short small intestine which can only digest about 17% of the bamboo it eats. It’s still a mystery why their ancestor started eating bamboo exclusively.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Case

    Katz has a lot of great information in this book. The layout makes it extremely difficult to just read through: it's more of a reference manual for busting the myths on bad eating plans. A lot of the information throughout the book is thus necessarily repeated multiple times, sometimes with the same words. In any case, I read the book cover to cover. I'm convinced that Katz knows the truth about how to eat correctly. I see no reason to doubt the vast majority of his long-accumulated wisdom with r Katz has a lot of great information in this book. The layout makes it extremely difficult to just read through: it's more of a reference manual for busting the myths on bad eating plans. A lot of the information throughout the book is thus necessarily repeated multiple times, sometimes with the same words. In any case, I read the book cover to cover. I'm convinced that Katz knows the truth about how to eat correctly. I see no reason to doubt the vast majority of his long-accumulated wisdom with regards to what a good diet looks like. Where I break with him is this: I don't think he knows how people actually eat badly. Specifically: I don't think he realizes just how many carbs the average fat or diabetic American is consuming, or how much sugar. Honestly, I don't think most diabetics realize how many carbs or added sugars they're getting. Talking to other diabetics I frequently hear the weirdest things about their eating plans, ignoring carbs they just didn't realize was in the food they were eating. For Katz, what it means is this: his advice on preventing and ameliorating obesity and diabetes are useless, because he's not getting to the heart of why people are getting fat and sick. "Eat less and move more" has been tried. It doesn't work. You have to tell people WHAT they need to eat less of: and that would be what they're eating too much of: sugar. And if you're diabetic: carbs. Katz's argument that protein raises insulin more than carbs is irrelevant and not even considered true by most diabetics or endocrinologists from what I can find. We don't eat meat to bring our blood sugar down, and that's what we would do if it actually worked that way. So yes, this is a great book if you aren't fat or sick and just want to improve your probably already healthy-ish diet. If you are already fat or sick, you need to look elsewhere at doctors who understand what makes people fat so you can really understand the mechanisms of why eating bread and sugar will kill you: try Taubes or Fung.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara Campion-Egan

    For me, reading this book was like scratching an itch. For a long time I have cringed when people said they've stopped eating berries because of the high glycemic index. And talk of low car diets make me irrationally angry. Here, Dr. Katz explains it all using science, good sense, humor, literary references, and delightful writing. It is a long read - he even says not meant to be read cover to cover, necessarily. But that's what I did anyway. So some of it is repetitive. It looks like it was rus For me, reading this book was like scratching an itch. For a long time I have cringed when people said they've stopped eating berries because of the high glycemic index. And talk of low car diets make me irrationally angry. Here, Dr. Katz explains it all using science, good sense, humor, literary references, and delightful writing. It is a long read - he even says not meant to be read cover to cover, necessarily. But that's what I did anyway. So some of it is repetitive. It looks like it was rushed through editing. A second edition is merited, for sure. All that said, I can hardly recommend this highly enough. As a nurse practitioner, I feel following Dr. Katz's advice on the care and feeding of homo sapiens will prevent obesity and chronic illness. As a human, I feel his message regarding eating with the preservation of our planet in mind is of the utmost importance. If only everyone would read this and act accordingly!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janet Ramski

    This book is a valuable reference for any nonprofessional seriously interested in human diet. That said, it's about twice as long as it needs to be, (708 pgs) and rather dry reading, in spite of Dr Katz's humor. He also needs to fire his editors and proofreaders - I found the continual typos to be very irritating, as well as the very large proportion of citations of his own works. They unfortunately give it an unprofessional tone.( Yes, I admit, I'm a grammar Nazi) I didn't necessarily agree wit This book is a valuable reference for any nonprofessional seriously interested in human diet. That said, it's about twice as long as it needs to be, (708 pgs) and rather dry reading, in spite of Dr Katz's humor. He also needs to fire his editors and proofreaders - I found the continual typos to be very irritating, as well as the very large proportion of citations of his own works. They unfortunately give it an unprofessional tone.( Yes, I admit, I'm a grammar Nazi) I didn't necessarily agree with all of his conclusions, but do bow to his generally good sense. I give it a four for the good science, but not five, for the extreme length and many many typos.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Molly Moody

    Maybe that's not a fair rating but Katz writes too much. And the editing was horrific! I think I might have enjoyed him more had I just stuck to his Huffington Post articles. All that aside & why he might deserve another star is because he really is trying to expose all the food fads out there exactly for what they are- fads. He also uses good logic to point out the fallacies. If only he didn't have to use so many words. Maybe that's not a fair rating but Katz writes too much. And the editing was horrific! I think I might have enjoyed him more had I just stuck to his Huffington Post articles. All that aside & why he might deserve another star is because he really is trying to expose all the food fads out there exactly for what they are- fads. He also uses good logic to point out the fallacies. If only he didn't have to use so many words.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephani Finley

    Insightful This is a really practical guide to what’s right and wrong about the way we eat without preaching. Katz doesn’t offer fanatical rules or diets, but shows us the way to look at the “newest” fads and nutrition information and how to sort truth from fiction while also keeping an open mind.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Very interesting and brings a light to the influence of big food on government food policy as well as the psychology they use to get us to buy things that really aren't good for us. Very interesting and brings a light to the influence of big food on government food policy as well as the psychology they use to get us to buy things that really aren't good for us.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lance Kugler

    Single best source of truth for all things food.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Moira Dolan, MD

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liam

  13. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nichinungas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Curran

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tammara

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sam Black

  19. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Câmara Ferreira

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elena

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jean Armstrong

  23. 4 out of 5

    barutiel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Wende

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leesa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mr N. Macaninch

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sammysin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sue Grigsby

  30. 5 out of 5

    Don Huberts

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