web site hit counter The Boys, Volume 3: Good For The Soul - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Boys, Volume 3: Good For The Soul

Availability: Ready to download

In The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul, everyone has something to get off their chest: Frenchie and the Female are up to something nasty with the Mafia, Mother's Milk goes to see his mom, Annie January wants a word with God himself, and Butcher enjoys yet another ghastly tryst with CIA Director Rayner. The Legend, meanwhile, offers to tell Hughie everything he wants to kno In The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul, everyone has something to get off their chest: Frenchie and the Female are up to something nasty with the Mafia, Mother's Milk goes to see his mom, Annie January wants a word with God himself, and Butcher enjoys yet another ghastly tryst with CIA Director Rayner. The Legend, meanwhile, offers to tell Hughie everything he wants to know about The Boys - all Hughie has to do is take a walk with the dead. And in "I Tell You No Lie, G.I.", the beans are spilled: sixty years of Vought American's superhero agenda for America, with every dirty trick, shady deal and black operation since World War II revealed at last. The Boys, meanwhile, confront the Seven on the site of the superheroes' greatest failure. The worst secret of all is what really happened early one September morning, not so long ago in New York City. The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul collects issues 15-22 of The Boys by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson!


Compare

In The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul, everyone has something to get off their chest: Frenchie and the Female are up to something nasty with the Mafia, Mother's Milk goes to see his mom, Annie January wants a word with God himself, and Butcher enjoys yet another ghastly tryst with CIA Director Rayner. The Legend, meanwhile, offers to tell Hughie everything he wants to kno In The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul, everyone has something to get off their chest: Frenchie and the Female are up to something nasty with the Mafia, Mother's Milk goes to see his mom, Annie January wants a word with God himself, and Butcher enjoys yet another ghastly tryst with CIA Director Rayner. The Legend, meanwhile, offers to tell Hughie everything he wants to know about The Boys - all Hughie has to do is take a walk with the dead. And in "I Tell You No Lie, G.I.", the beans are spilled: sixty years of Vought American's superhero agenda for America, with every dirty trick, shady deal and black operation since World War II revealed at last. The Boys, meanwhile, confront the Seven on the site of the superheroes' greatest failure. The worst secret of all is what really happened early one September morning, not so long ago in New York City. The Boys, Vol. 3: Good for the Soul collects issues 15-22 of The Boys by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson!

30 review for The Boys, Volume 3: Good For The Soul

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This is continuing to be a great story and I'm definitely excited for more. Hugie finds about a bit more about the beginnings of The Seven and Vought American, and Annie starts to doubt her faith in God. As a couple, they have one of the better, funnier, maybe more realistic, sex moments I've read in a comic. Worth reading for that alone. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] I like the comic book angle of this world, too. Using the issues as pro-superhero propaganda that spin a darker truth? Br This is continuing to be a great story and I'm definitely excited for more. Hugie finds about a bit more about the beginnings of The Seven and Vought American, and Annie starts to doubt her faith in God. As a couple, they have one of the better, funnier, maybe more realistic, sex moments I've read in a comic. Worth reading for that alone. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] I like the comic book angle of this world, too. Using the issues as pro-superhero propaganda that spin a darker truth? Brilliant! The entire concept of The Boys is just cool and fun. Can't wait to read more! Definitely recommended! <--for mature readers

  2. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    Ennis continues his obsession with shit in this 3rd installment of his vindictive parody. the underground team known as "The Boys" continues to keep a watch on various super-powered groups like "Teenage Kix" and "The Seven". mysteries are deepened, some questions are answered but more are not, a slain character comes back as a revolting zombie, the most enjoyable character - the naïve heroine Starlight - continues to evolve, there's a slice of graphic hate sex for a couple of characters, and the Ennis continues his obsession with shit in this 3rd installment of his vindictive parody. the underground team known as "The Boys" continues to keep a watch on various super-powered groups like "Teenage Kix" and "The Seven". mysteries are deepened, some questions are answered but more are not, a slain character comes back as a revolting zombie, the most enjoyable character - the naïve heroine Starlight - continues to evolve, there's a slice of graphic hate sex for a couple of characters, and there's also a surprisingly touching love story at the center of it all (explicit joke about cunnilingus during menstruation notwithstanding). my two favorite things: a fascinating standoff between the leader of The Boys and the leader of The Seven ("Homelander", ha!) and most of all, a brilliant depiction of The Seven failing to rescue an airplane hijacked by terrorists. and then there's the shit. Ennis and illustrator Darick Robertson surely do love the inclusion of feces whenever possible. it is all over the page due to the excessively detailed and revoltingly gross renderings of two slavering, excreting superheroes-turned-zombies. but it's more than just a reader gross-out, shit is there as a regularly recurring metaphor and analogy. it is frequently used as such by the characters and it is also clearly the author's touchstone when viewing the world and its history and the rationale behind why things happen in the way that they do, in the way that the most banal of motivations always win out, crushing the spirits of the unlucky and the disposable. per Ennis, The World Is Shit. well, okay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Ennis continues his send up of superhero comics in this the third volume of The Boys (A CIA-backed group monitoring the supes), with two basic storylines: Some back story by Billy Butcher told to Wee Hughie about the Vought Corporaation’s support for the Superhero group The Seven who botched a rescue attempt of a plane during 9-11. Yes, it’s that nasty. Billy is a kind of a twisted Stan Lee parody, who has his own personal reasons for resentment against the supes especially after supporting them Ennis continues his send up of superhero comics in this the third volume of The Boys (A CIA-backed group monitoring the supes), with two basic storylines: Some back story by Billy Butcher told to Wee Hughie about the Vought Corporaation’s support for the Superhero group The Seven who botched a rescue attempt of a plane during 9-11. Yes, it’s that nasty. Billy is a kind of a twisted Stan Lee parody, who has his own personal reasons for resentment against the supes especially after supporting them and producing them for all these years. As happens with superhero comics, superheroes that are dead come back to life again, kill them again and again, superhero zombies, yes literally is the case in one issue here. That’s a good point, and fun. Wee Hughie is the central character in this one, talking with Butcher about Vought’s ugly history of supremely vain and brainless and destructive superheroes beloved by a comics public brainwashed by the comics and mainstream media. At the same time, Wee Hughie is developing a sweet relationship with Annie as this darker political story works its way out. Ennis balances the sweet with the vulgar and dark, definitely, but he can be very funny, with a heart beating in there somewhere and some good satirical work. Ennis has a juvenile (shall we say Boyish?) obsession with bodily fluids as a basis for his humor (and especially in his commentary on the supes!). I still have not warmed up to this one as much as The Preacher, but it is good comics work from Ennis.

  4. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    I wasn’t sure if I was gonna continue this series after q very disappointing second volume. However I decided if I really like the first book in a series but really dislike the second, I should try the third, give it another shot. Also the TV show looks pretty bad-ass! I’m really glad I gave it another try! What’s it about? Hughie finds out more things about how the world works and deals with the results of the events of volume 2. Starlight struggles with her faith and life as a superhero in genera I wasn’t sure if I was gonna continue this series after q very disappointing second volume. However I decided if I really like the first book in a series but really dislike the second, I should try the third, give it another shot. Also the TV show looks pretty bad-ass! I’m really glad I gave it another try! What’s it about? Hughie finds out more things about how the world works and deals with the results of the events of volume 2. Starlight struggles with her faith and life as a superhero in general. Butcher fixes to piss The Homelander off. Pros: The story is interesting and surprisingly complex. It’s surprising to say that about an egdy satire of superheroes but yeah. The art is very well done. It suits the book very well. The characters are interesting. The most interesting in this volume is probably Starlight (which is sorta humorous as she’s not one of The Boys) but the other characters are pretty interesting too. The action scenes are fantastic. Definitely for fans of bloody, intense stuff. There’s some great humor throughout! This comic is fairly suspenseful. There is some fun stuff for comic nerds that sorta pokes fun at a lot of things in superhero comics. I know some people point at this and say that Ennis must hate superheroes but I’d say they’re wrong. As a fan of superheroes this is extremely clever and fun for fans of superhero comics. I like the dog! The romance is very well done and interesting. Cons: This comic tries too hard to be edgy. I don’t mind the graphic content in this, I read (hell sometimes even write) stuff more explicit than this but some of it tries too hard (example: undead guy covered in shit). Some parts are a tad confusing. Keep in mind that this volume has a lot to take in all at once and that is probably the reason but nonetheless, this gets confusing. I can’t understand what the french guy’s saying. You’d think they could maybe translate it. Overall: This comic may not be for everyone and it’s not quite a masterpiece, but it’s damn fun. It’s a good story with interesting characters, gory action, lots of humor and clever satire. Recommended for superhero fans who have a high tolerance for graphic content. 4/5

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    Loving the tv show and loads of Easter eggs from this comic on it. Love what they’ve done so far.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ill D

    When did Garth Ennis become a Soap Opera author?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Third volume into this great series, and nothing yet makes me want to stop reading. This one has a lot more about the characters, history, and background info that led us to where things sit here: a sort of Cold War stalemate between the Seven (Think JLA) and the Boys. Hughie gets more ink than anyone else, and I think that's a great idea because he's easily the one that most can relate with. We get a glimpse into the history of Vought-American, the uber-corporation that supports (and more) the S Third volume into this great series, and nothing yet makes me want to stop reading. This one has a lot more about the characters, history, and background info that led us to where things sit here: a sort of Cold War stalemate between the Seven (Think JLA) and the Boys. Hughie gets more ink than anyone else, and I think that's a great idea because he's easily the one that most can relate with. We get a glimpse into the history of Vought-American, the uber-corporation that supports (and more) the Seven, and Supes in general, as well as a look into the alternate 9-11 tragedy in this world. There's definitely some funny bits here too, especially as things pick up with Hughie and Annie, and neither one knows the other all that well...definitely setting up for some interesting stories to follow. I also loved how Butcher stayed so quiet and stoic during his meeting with his counterpart. Makes me really excited for the eventual throw-down that is no doubt going to be bloody. We even get the return of a character thought dead, and I can't say it's joyful... Well done, looking forward to the next installment!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Still a fun series. 3.5 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    I consider this the best installment so far. The formula is: put Watchmen and Planetary in a blender, add several pounds of f---s and c---s, and several cups of degradation (sex and violence, and not always separately), garnish with "underground" flair. I'm starting to like it, and that bothers me. I consider this the best installment so far. The formula is: put Watchmen and Planetary in a blender, add several pounds of f---s and c---s, and several cups of degradation (sex and violence, and not always separately), garnish with "underground" flair. I'm starting to like it, and that bothers me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    I swear, sometimes it seems as though this book would more accurately be titled Wee Hughie, Co-Starring the Boys. I'm not really complaining, mind you. He's the New Guy, and gives us an outsider's perspective on the team. It gives Butcher and/or Mother's Milk someone to explain things to without sounding too exposition-y. In any case, this volume is decidedly Hughie-centric as he deals with his guilt over Blarney Cock's death, makes progress in his relationship with Annie, and gets filled in on I swear, sometimes it seems as though this book would more accurately be titled Wee Hughie, Co-Starring the Boys. I'm not really complaining, mind you. He's the New Guy, and gives us an outsider's perspective on the team. It gives Butcher and/or Mother's Milk someone to explain things to without sounding too exposition-y. In any case, this volume is decidedly Hughie-centric as he deals with his guilt over Blarney Cock's death, makes progress in his relationship with Annie, and gets filled in on some of the secrets behind Vought American. Still loving this series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Why might I warn people away from the series? For the same reason they might find any of Ennis's work off-putting: Graphic ultraviolence. Graphic sex. Perversity. The usual. That said, in some of Ennis's books, (Preacher, for example) the depictions of sex and violence sometimes (bordering on regularly) feel gratuitous. I never felt that way with The Boys. Yes, it was over-the-top a lot of times, but it always felt fitting to the story being told. (Continued in book four.) Why might I warn people away from the series? For the same reason they might find any of Ennis's work off-putting: Graphic ultraviolence. Graphic sex. Perversity. The usual. That said, in some of Ennis's books, (Preacher, for example) the depictions of sex and violence sometimes (bordering on regularly) feel gratuitous. I never felt that way with The Boys. Yes, it was over-the-top a lot of times, but it always felt fitting to the story being told. (Continued in book four.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 stars. This is the third volume of this ground-breaking series by Garth Ennis. For the most part, I thought the story-line was just okay and the sex and violence seemed to be a bit more pointless than in the previous two volumes. That said, the infamous 9/11 tie in plot-line in the last story arc was gutsy and very well done. Apart from that, this would have gotten two stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This time around we're getting to know everyone - the characters, the supes, the world and even the Stan Lee-on-testosterone parody. I really like this kind of writing by Ennis - gives the story and characters a chance to breathe, lets us take a closer look and understand why these crazies did or will do what they do. I'm thrilled we're getting some details (finally!) about the Vought-American Corp and the supes they funded, and Ennis has a hilarious take on how they intervene in the 9-11 fiasco. This time around we're getting to know everyone - the characters, the supes, the world and even the Stan Lee-on-testosterone parody. I really like this kind of writing by Ennis - gives the story and characters a chance to breathe, lets us take a closer look and understand why these crazies did or will do what they do. I'm thrilled we're getting some details (finally!) about the Vought-American Corp and the supes they funded, and Ennis has a hilarious take on how they intervene in the 9-11 fiasco. It's moving slower than the previous two books, granted - and I can see why some folks would feel disappointed when they just came off two fast-moving, shocking and balls-out funny books. I've been with Ennis long enough to know this is part of his style, and it means that once he's done setting the pieces in place and get them shined up, we're going to see some crazy funny shit come fast and furious.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This volume has some real nasty scenes, all I can say is poor poor Hughie, that's not what you want to wake up to. Haha Some interesting concepts in this issue, which is mainly focused on giving you some background on the boys and the seven. Alternate reality stuff on 9/11 was really messed up. Why are super heroes so dumb? On to volume 4! This volume has some real nasty scenes, all I can say is poor poor Hughie, that's not what you want to wake up to. Haha Some interesting concepts in this issue, which is mainly focused on giving you some background on the boys and the seven. Alternate reality stuff on 9/11 was really messed up. Why are super heroes so dumb? On to volume 4!

  15. 4 out of 5

    TJ Shelby

    Guilty pleasure...or maybe sick obsession is a better explanation. As with all Garth Ennis books, I cannot with good conscience recommend them to anyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Ahmed

    i can say that this series starts to grow on me, and i start to enjoy reading it away from the TV. the story is much different with many Easter eggs. in this vol there is 2 story arcs 1st is good for the soul. it spots on Hughie and Annie's 2nd meeting and the start of their relationship, and hughie with an old problem comes to hunt him. 2nd is I tell you no lie GI. the origin of Vought-american. both arcs was really good, and the art remains not to my liking but i start to get used to it. i can say that this series starts to grow on me, and i start to enjoy reading it away from the TV. the story is much different with many Easter eggs. in this vol there is 2 story arcs 1st is good for the soul. it spots on Hughie and Annie's 2nd meeting and the start of their relationship, and hughie with an old problem comes to hunt him. 2nd is I tell you no lie GI. the origin of Vought-american. both arcs was really good, and the art remains not to my liking but i start to get used to it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jim Gorman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A short review of The Boys Vol. 3: Good for the Soul. This one lets us into a lot of the history of Vought-American. This is the corrupt company that created the V Compound that makes the supes. We also see more of Wee Hugie’s developing relationship with Annie/Starlight. At this point neither of them realize their “secret” identities of each other. And the last thing it really touches on is how supes don’t really die.So, let’s discuss the main themes. The first and largest part of this book is A short review of The Boys Vol. 3: Good for the Soul. This one lets us into a lot of the history of Vought-American. This is the corrupt company that created the V Compound that makes the supes. We also see more of Wee Hugie’s developing relationship with Annie/Starlight. At this point neither of them realize their “secret” identities of each other. And the last thing it really touches on is how supes don’t really die.So, let’s discuss the main themes. The first and largest part of this book is about Hughie sitting with the Legend and getting the real story on how supes were made by Vought. He gets a whole history lesson about how Vought changed over the years from making shitty guns that caused a lot of deaths in war by not working. They later move onto making the V compound that causes some people to become supes. We learn that one of the Legend’s son’s was killed in Vietnam due to his group using those shitty guns. We also learn about how the money for Vought comes from the comic PR teams and merchandising that goes with it. One of the big reveals is how the supes were the ones that caused the destruction of the Brooklyn Bridge on 9/11. In this history two of the jets were shot down by the Air Force. But when the last jet was heading to the Twin Towers the Air Force were called off for the supes to deal with it. Naturally they fuck it up and everyone in the jet and on the bridge die. We also learn that Blarney Cock was his other son. Which leads to the second theme.Hughie also learns that supes don’t really die. The V compound in their system can cause them to come back to life. But, that “life” is pretty brain dead and they have to be hidden behind the scenes until they can destroy the body. Hughie had killed Blarney Cock in the first volume, and he comes back to his apartment one night and finds BC there wanting his gerbil back. He then attacks Hughie who has to kill him a second time. Billy finds out, as he finds out everything. He watches as Hughie burns the body to destroy it. The discuss after how Hughie has to clean up his own messes and has to get his hands dirty to truly be one of The Boys.The last theme is the growing romance between Hughie and Annie. Both are lying to each other about their “jobs”. Annie is going through a lot I regards to her role in the Seven, and how she no longer believes in God. This is a huge break for her, and she really no longer like the Seven. But both she and Hughie are hurt by life and finding each other has helped them both heal. But will they eventually what each other does? I really hope they don’t hate each other when they do.I am still really enjoying this series. It is such a “dark” comic series. So many anti-heroes on all sides. I just hope that things work out for Hughie. He is such a good guy and I am sorry to see him go down this dark path. I just hope he and Annie are able to make it work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Dalton

    There is no way in the world I am going to miss Amazon TVs version of The Boys. Sometime the end of this month I am sure. Each issue is getting weirder and graphic. How much of this will transtition to the Amazon Prime series? I know it is cable, but that is asking a lot. I think I have access to 3 more Volumes thanks to my Comixology Unlimited subscription.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Britton

    Ennis got his start in the mid to late 90s, establishing a reputation as an extremist in the comics community alongside Warren Ellis, though Ennis would become the Grant Morrison to Ellis' Alan Moore, with Ennis sometimes going to extremes without letting his story threads come together in a natural way. Does that mean Ennis is a bad writer? Of course not. He wouldn't be a favorite of mine if that were the case. While The Boys doesn't entirely reach the heights of some of Ennis' finer outings li Ennis got his start in the mid to late 90s, establishing a reputation as an extremist in the comics community alongside Warren Ellis, though Ennis would become the Grant Morrison to Ellis' Alan Moore, with Ennis sometimes going to extremes without letting his story threads come together in a natural way. Does that mean Ennis is a bad writer? Of course not. He wouldn't be a favorite of mine if that were the case. While The Boys doesn't entirely reach the heights of some of Ennis' finer outings like Preacher or Punisher MAX, The Boys proved itself to be another interesting series in Ennis' catalogue. Garth Ennis is never one for the easily offended, the copious amounts of sex, violence and mayhem that inhabits this series can test even the most mentally and physically strong of people, as I said earlier Ennis is rather extreme with his content. Though luckily, Ennis does know how to pace himself and provide a good plot to keep you invested unlike some of the other artists and writers from the uber grimdark period of comics (cough cough, Rob Liefeld, cough cough, Frank Miller). Ennis, much like Alan Moore, makes a point to show that if superhumans were to exist in our world, they would bring about an apocalyptic sense of change to the world. Though unfortunately, I'm not quite as sure that Ennis is as thorough in his exploration as Moore was. He never fully goes deeper in his critique of superheroes, which is rather unfortunate. Though unlike Moore, Ennis pulls no punches when taking shots as superheroes, this is unsurprising given his well known disdain for the superhero genre, yet again, I don't find that his satire nearly goes far enough to make a grand point of it all. While The Boys' satire is admittedly simplistic unlike something that is more nuanced like Watchmen, we see Ennis' reputation for characterization shine through, with Billy Butcher being a standout and even Ennis himself lamenting that he was his favorite character to write. Most of the characters in The Boys are strongly developed and their depth and likability is reminiscent of Preacher, but we also see how they change over time. Wee Hughie in particular changes from a mild mannered normal person into a hardened, but still well intentioned person. The satire of The Boys, while sometimes going overboard and becoming crude, usually does its job, with targets being of corporatism, crony capitalism, and the incompetence of government, in particular the Bush era. I have often complained about how many modern comics have problems with pacing. But luckily Ennis doesn't have this issue, and I would lobby him alongside Ed Brubaker as having a mastery of pacing, as Ennis knows when he should slow things down and when to let things speed up. It is nice to find someone else to use as an example of how to pace your stories in a way to where you won't lose your audience, and Ennis definitely knows how to keep his audiences attention, for better or worse. Few problems come through in the series, Ennis's writing teeters in quality near the end, with some unexpected twists coming in that shakes up the story at hold and not in a way that feels natural. Though luckily Ennis manages to make it work as best as he can and manages to wrap his story up in a satisfying way. While Ennis is ruthless in his mockery of the superhero genre and its conventions, some of his edgy, extreme humor doesn't really seem to go anywhere, which is a problem that pervades through much of his work. Though unlike Preacher or Punisher MAX where he manages to tamper it with volumes of excellent story, The Boys sometimes does get brought down by its over the top extremes. The art from Derrick Robertson, while very good and well drawn, I often compare to his extraordinary work on Transmetropolitan, and I found that he hasn't ever surpassed the strange and surreal visuals from that series. Cruel and crass as The Boys may be, Ennis rarely forgets character motivation or good plotting to keep readers invested, while he may lose some of his steam by the end of the series, The Boys remains a strong and enjoyable outing from Ennis' catalogue.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    So after the head-explodingly engaging ending the Volume 2: Get Some, how does Garth Ennis continue the story of the Boys and their neverending quest to keep dipshit superheroes in line? By diverting to a more low-key level of course. Okay so Good for the Soul is divided into two separate story arcs, each one operating as something of a down-time for the characters of the previous arcs. It allows some moments for the Boys to explore elements of their characters and also gives some time for the sup So after the head-explodingly engaging ending the Volume 2: Get Some, how does Garth Ennis continue the story of the Boys and their neverending quest to keep dipshit superheroes in line? By diverting to a more low-key level of course. Okay so Good for the Soul is divided into two separate story arcs, each one operating as something of a down-time for the characters of the previous arcs. It allows some moments for the Boys to explore elements of their characters and also gives some time for the supes to collect their bearings and for Ennis to explore as to what makes them tick. This is also the moment for Ennis to explore the world a bit more and give the reader insight in why the world is so severely fucked up. Not that in 2019 it isn't already more than a little fucked up - TOPICAL HUMOUR! Also quick reminder: Like before, the artwork by Darick Robertson is consistently good with good characters designs, decent use of lighting, shadow and colour, albeit sometimes a wee bit too graphic even for my tastes and some of the wider shots are a little scruffy. Anyway, story arc one: Good for the Soul is divided into two interconnecting plots. On the one hand we have Hughie grappling with the aftereffects and the guilt of killing the Teen Kix supe Blarney Cock in the arc The Name of the Game. One thing to remember is that Hughie isn't some hardened soldier or sociopathic killer like Billy or The Female. He's just an average bloke who's been thrown in the deep end of a world he didn't understand and has had to acclimatize to that. One thing I'll generally say about Ennis's writing is that while he revels in depicting violence, sociopathic characters and pitch-dark humour, he's also perfectly capable of writing very flawed human beings. Hughie has some very real human moments here of self-doubt, guilt, despair and even justifiable rage. He makes a good counterbalance to all the fucked up shit that Ennis puts on all the other pages. That and watching him wake up the morning after cunnilingus looking like this makes for a good moment where I fell off my chair. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] The other story deals with Anne January AKA Starlight AKA the newest member to the Seven, and her steady progression from sheltered naive innocent to someone with a more realistic albeit more cynical view of the world. Here is probably where I reckon some people will get their knickers in a knot. Anne's development from Christian Evangelist darling to angry jaded atheist is going to rub some people the wrong way. It shouldn't be a surprise that Ennis is himself a staunch atheist who thinks religion is a bunch of bullshit meant to oppress and dominate so that element of the story is handled a little hamfistedly. But I would also say that's its a development that a lot of us go through. And Anne's progression to what she becomes isn't some cynical whiny emo shit either. In the wake of walking away from her former life, Ennis shows her letting loose, making mistakes, sticking up for herself, but at the same time trying to not let go of herself in the process. Here's a woman who's standing up for herself. The story overall is pretty decent with some good character moments and some genuinely human moments from the likes of Hughie and Anne. In the end, Blarney Cock comes back due to the Compound V in his system - Ennis's little jab I reckon at how superheroes never fucking stay dead - but he's killed again his corpse is burned so Teen Kix can't use him for comeback publicity - something comic companies also have a tendency of doing and never fucking stop doing. Seriously who in their right mind ever though Wolverine was going to stay dead? Arc 2: I Tell You No Lie G.I. is one of Ennis's patented love letters to World War 2 history, the incompetence of corporations and his contempt for superheroes being used as commodities. So a typical Garth Ennis love story. That's not to say it's bad, but its better to get an idea of what you're getting into going in. Like before, the story is split into three plots, albeit interconnected in some ways. The first minor plot deals with Butcher having a little chinwag with the Homelander after the boys disrupted a Pro-Supe speech the Vice President was going to give. The second minor plot deals with Starlight and A-Train having to clean out the basement of the Seven's Headquarters, in particular the room of a single occupant. The main plot is essentially one big backstory told by the Legend about the history of Vought American, their history, scummy dealings, poor products and eventual break in the superhero market. I'll say this about Ennis; when he wants to make history come alive, he certainly can find ways to make it engaging. I say this because sometimes his attempts do fall flat (like in Volume 10 of Punisher MAX) but here, the Legend is enough of a character that his storytime moments feel alive. Strap yourself in kiddies, Uncle Legend's about to tell you some shit.... It also helps that Ennis remembers to make the story engaging and interesting every step of the way and Robertson's artwork helps that along. One of the big problems I had with Volume 10 of the Punisher was that Ennis tried to do a similar thing as he did here. But in that comic, the history lesson was told through memoirs and essays. So none of the emotional impact of what was said carried through much in comic format. Here though, Ennis learned his lesson. Throughout the story, we see the effects of Vought American's incompetence/indifference to their faulty products through horrifying images of death, destruction and failure. It also helps that Ennis is himself something of a war buff and knows his shit, so when he models the Vought American M-20 Rifle after the British SA80 rifle - which had its own share of problems - it makes it sounds more authentic. Ennis also takes the time to weave the history of Vought American into actual American history to give it a more authentic feel. Ennis also uses this arc to explore how Superheroes are used basically as commercial products for profit, something you can tell he has a degree of contempt for. Makes me wonder how the Boys would function if it was rewritten now. Well there is the TV show on Amazon Prime.... Quiet you! Anyway where was I? Other than that, the side stories are a little blah, even if they do tie into the main plot. Butcher's showdown with the Homelander is definitely a tense one, with both of them sizing each other up like two dogs in a fighting pit. It's a slow burn and expands a little on the lore of the world. Meanwhile Anne and A-Train's cleaning duties feels more like seasoning on top of a sumptuous meal. It's definitely appreciated what with taking time to give Anne more character and development and it definitely ties in with the main plot. It's just that given the events of the main story, they all seem a little meh. And then Issue 21 comes along. Holy fuck..... Ever wonder how superheroes can handle any crisis with complete confidence and competence? What would happen in real life? What would REALLY happen? The Boys Volume 3 is a solid outing despite being a more low-key series of stories. It does a good job of exploring the lore of the world without feeling it comes out of left field, the humour is pitch black and well executed, the characters of note are given decent time to shine and the art like always with amazing and beautiful to look at. When it isn't covered in blood or body parts or spunk.... Remind me to never look in the mirror while eating spaghetti sauce ever again.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson amp up human and superhuman elements in this series and Wee Huey, one protagonist. You have to like and acknowledge Ennis extreme humor to appreciate this stuff. TV deal, hey? I'm curious about the rest. Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson amp up human and superhuman elements in this series and Wee Huey, one protagonist. You have to like and acknowledge Ennis extreme humor to appreciate this stuff. TV deal, hey? I'm curious about the rest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Another volume of two halves. The first half sees Hughie tasked with his first ever solo mission - will he make the grade? He also sees more of Annie who is looking at her life before and after joining The Seven, and asking herself who she is. The second half is a comic writing masterpiece as Ennis juxtaposes The Boys/Vought Americans history over are reality to create a thoroughly convincing alternate timeline that unquestionably calls out the American Military-Industrial complex. Alongside t th Another volume of two halves. The first half sees Hughie tasked with his first ever solo mission - will he make the grade? He also sees more of Annie who is looking at her life before and after joining The Seven, and asking herself who she is. The second half is a comic writing masterpiece as Ennis juxtaposes The Boys/Vought Americans history over are reality to create a thoroughly convincing alternate timeline that unquestionably calls out the American Military-Industrial complex. Alongside t this we get the first meeting between The Seven and the rest of the Boys! You ain't seen nothing like - wonderful scripting and art creates such an intense, yet also darkly comedic scene. The greatest comics ever written always tell the backstory/story as organically as possible. Ennis throws that away, goes old school an does 4 issues of exposition, and it works! Five Star Read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzy | Gone Readin’

    Actual rating: 4.5 stars Well, that was a turnout for the [comic] books. After an underwhelming experience with Vol. 2 of this series, I ploughed on with Vol. 3 and was pleasantly surprised. I didn't get the backstories I was hoping for in this volume of 'The Boys', but we did get the skinny on how the so-called 'supes' came to be, and a whole load of info about the role of Vought-American (the fat cats that are mentioned throughout Vols. 1 & 2 - The Boys, Volume 1: The Name of the Game & The Boys, Actual rating: 4.5 stars Well, that was a turnout for the [comic] books. After an underwhelming experience with Vol. 2 of this series, I ploughed on with Vol. 3 and was pleasantly surprised. I didn't get the backstories I was hoping for in this volume of 'The Boys', but we did get the skinny on how the so-called 'supes' came to be, and a whole load of info about the role of Vought-American (the fat cats that are mentioned throughout Vols. 1 & 2 - The Boys, Volume 1: The Name of the Game & The Boys, Volume 2: Get Some). The plot thickened, and although I still feel like I'm missing out on the origin stories I wanted, this was definitely the one that I needed at this point. I was pleased to hear more from The Legend. He's a great character that deserved a bit more page space and his revelations were perfectly timed for the development of the storyline. There were a couple of interesting twists in this one, which has kept my interest piqued. So far this is the issue featuring the least action, but it needed to be in order to make room for all that backstory. What I love most about this series is the plot line, and how this turns all we know (and love) about comics & superheroes on its head. What we glean in this volume only adds to that, so I'm a happy camper. I'm finding the series is well balanced in terms of action vs. intrigue and I'm just enjoying the ride. I only had one real gripe with this volume: Ennis has a tendency to include certain elements that I don't think add anything to the story. These are clearly intended to be humorous, but they're not hitting the right note for me. (In case anyone's wondering, it's the scene when Butcher picks Wee Hughie up from his motel. Yeeeeah, that one.). Overall, a strong addition to the series and I'm looking forward to picking up the next one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Raimo

    'No one wants their heroes sleazy an' fucked-up--so you feed 'em a dream. An' they'll buy the t-shirts an' watch the T.V. shows, which is where the real money is, by the way, an' the last thing they'll do is try lookin' any further...' We seem to have a child-like fondness when it comes to superheroes, as we look up to them during these trying times as someone we could idolize, have faith in, to believe in. In a sense, they are like gods among men, who defend the weak and fight the wicked, wh 'No one wants their heroes sleazy an' fucked-up--so you feed 'em a dream. An' they'll buy the t-shirts an' watch the T.V. shows, which is where the real money is, by the way, an' the last thing they'll do is try lookin' any further...' We seem to have a child-like fondness when it comes to superheroes, as we look up to them during these trying times as someone we could idolize, have faith in, to believe in. In a sense, they are like gods among men, who defend the weak and fight the wicked, who really could do no wrong. In a sense, Starlight is that young, naive person, who believes in the wholesomeness that surrounds the myth of superheroism akin to how one might believe in one's faith. The Boys continues to preach that one should never meet their heroes in real life. All of the shallowness, swearing, nihilism aside, The Boys is rather poignant. It isn't so much concerned with the question of whether superheroes are incorruptible - although that does come up quite often -, but rather it is interested in how people would behave if given godlike power. Not to mention, at the heart of it, this is a story of how power and money corrupts, but more importantly how dangerous the world would be if characters like Homelander would walk from the pages of fiction into reality. While this is a tongue-in-cheek satire of our cultural obsession with superheroes, it also functions as an interesting look at the military-industrial complex, where powerful companies work tirelessly to profiteer off any and all possible military conflicts. Iraq? You betcha. Pakistan? Yup. Really any country in the Middle East? Yeah! Ennis does not hide his distaste for superheroes in this graphic novel, and while it does get repetitive at one point, he does offer us some hope. Starlight seems to be the one superhero who truly is incorruptible, who tries to do what is best for her and everyone else. She keeps the reader invested in the very human conflict she faces, and helps make this a very interesting read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gav451

    Now this is why you read Garth Ennis books. A sublime read and it makes me wonder why volume 2 was such a misstep. There is a lot of history and exposition in this book but so deftly handled that it is honestly fascinating. Tonally it is perfect and all of the reservations I have with volume 2 were not here. There was still edgy language and moments that were adult in nature but they were relevant and consistent with the story. Nothing felt unnecessary. The back story is a cracker and I do not pro Now this is why you read Garth Ennis books. A sublime read and it makes me wonder why volume 2 was such a misstep. There is a lot of history and exposition in this book but so deftly handled that it is honestly fascinating. Tonally it is perfect and all of the reservations I have with volume 2 were not here. There was still edgy language and moments that were adult in nature but they were relevant and consistent with the story. Nothing felt unnecessary. The back story is a cracker and I do not propose to discuss it any more than that because I would not wish to ruin it for anyone else. While that is going on the main story is moving too but at a slightly slower pace. This felt like the build up to bigger and more interesting things. There are revelations here and twists and unexpected moments. You can see where there is going to be conflict in the future so I left this book really wanting more. I think you could skip volume 2 and move straight to this with almost no ill effects. It would have been a shame if volume 2 had put me off moving onto this volume because its great.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alain Gutierrez

    Entertaining comic as always but Garth Ennis gets a little too wordy and way into politics, which can be interesting at times, but overall much too confusing. At points I was lost and had to re read certain sections just because I forgot what the plot of said issue was. Still a fine read nonetheless

  27. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte (Buried in Books)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This one explained quite a lot of the Vought American backstory. How they couldn't make decent guns or planes. It also told a different story about 9/11. Hughie and Annie got a lot closer and the Blarney Dock made a brief return. Good stuff! This one explained quite a lot of the Vought American backstory. How they couldn't make decent guns or planes. It also told a different story about 9/11. Hughie and Annie got a lot closer and the Blarney Dock made a brief return. Good stuff!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nidah (SleepDreamWrite)

    I wasn't sure what I was expecting from this series. But wow is this a weird series. From the characters, their arcs and that art style. And yet I want to know what happens next. I wasn't sure what I was expecting from this series. But wow is this a weird series. From the characters, their arcs and that art style. And yet I want to know what happens next.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donald Armfield

    A little bit of the origins of The Seven. Including the Airplane Scene. Totally different compared to the TV Series. Blood, Guts and Gore.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Sweet but also dark, disgusting and very funny.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.