web site hit counter The Hundred Years' War on Palestine: A History of Settler-Colonial Conquest and Resistance, 1917-2017 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Hundred Years' War on Palestine: A History of Settler-Colonial Conquest and Resistance, 1917-2017

Availability: Ready to download

A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history. In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous pe A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history. In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous people who would not easily accept their own displacement. He warned of the perils ahead, ending his note, "in the name of God, let Palestine be left alone." Thus Rashid Khalidi, al-Khalidi's great-great-nephew, begins this sweeping history, the first general account of the conflict told from an explicitly Palestinian perspective. Drawing on a wealth of untapped archival materials and the reports of generations of family members - mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats, and journalists - The Hundred Years' War on Palestine upends accepted interpretations of the conflict, which tend, at best, to describe a tragic clash between two peoples with claims to the same territory. Instead, Khalidi traces a hundred years of colonial war on the Palestinians, waged first by the Zionist movement and then Israel, but backed by Britain and the United States, the great powers of the age. He highlights the key episodes in this colonial campaign, from the 1917 Balfour Declaration to the destruction of Palestine in 1948, from Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon to the endless and futile peace process. Original, authoritative, and important, The Hundred Years' War on Palestine is not a chronicle of victimization, nor does it whitewash the mistakes of Palestinian leaders or deny the emergence of national movements on both sides. In reevaluating the forces arrayed against the Palestinians, it offers an illuminating new view of a conflict that continues to this day. Cover photograph Amnon Bar Or—Tal Gazit Architects LTD


Compare

A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history. In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous pe A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history. In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous people who would not easily accept their own displacement. He warned of the perils ahead, ending his note, "in the name of God, let Palestine be left alone." Thus Rashid Khalidi, al-Khalidi's great-great-nephew, begins this sweeping history, the first general account of the conflict told from an explicitly Palestinian perspective. Drawing on a wealth of untapped archival materials and the reports of generations of family members - mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats, and journalists - The Hundred Years' War on Palestine upends accepted interpretations of the conflict, which tend, at best, to describe a tragic clash between two peoples with claims to the same territory. Instead, Khalidi traces a hundred years of colonial war on the Palestinians, waged first by the Zionist movement and then Israel, but backed by Britain and the United States, the great powers of the age. He highlights the key episodes in this colonial campaign, from the 1917 Balfour Declaration to the destruction of Palestine in 1948, from Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon to the endless and futile peace process. Original, authoritative, and important, The Hundred Years' War on Palestine is not a chronicle of victimization, nor does it whitewash the mistakes of Palestinian leaders or deny the emergence of national movements on both sides. In reevaluating the forces arrayed against the Palestinians, it offers an illuminating new view of a conflict that continues to this day. Cover photograph Amnon Bar Or—Tal Gazit Architects LTD

30 review for The Hundred Years' War on Palestine: A History of Settler-Colonial Conquest and Resistance, 1917-2017

  1. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    5 stars for a book that is both depressing and illuminating. This book tells the story of an indigenous people colonized and deprived of their own land over a 100 year period. The first colonization was by the British who conquered Palestine during World War I from the Ottoman Empire. They had issued the Balfour declaration in 1917, stating their intention to provide a national home for Jewish people in Palestine. Although 94% of the population in Palestine in 1917 was Palestinian, the declarati 5 stars for a book that is both depressing and illuminating. This book tells the story of an indigenous people colonized and deprived of their own land over a 100 year period. The first colonization was by the British who conquered Palestine during World War I from the Ottoman Empire. They had issued the Balfour declaration in 1917, stating their intention to provide a national home for Jewish people in Palestine. Although 94% of the population in Palestine in 1917 was Palestinian, the declaration did not promise them the same political or national right guaranteed the Jews. Britain then embarked on a program granting Jewish immigrants preferred status in their new colony. Britain even armed Jewish immigrants to help suppress the great revolt against the British from 1936-1939. Britain was following an old colonial strategy of divide and rule, setting two groups against each other. It had used this strategy before, in India, Muslim against Hindu and Ireland, Protestant against Catholic. Britain savagely suppressed the revolt, killing , wounding or exiling 10% of the adult male population. This provided the Zionist movement 2 advantages: they had a nascent military force and it greatly weakened the native population. The subsequent 1947-48 war between the Palestinians and Jewish settlers saw the Zionists win and steal land and homes from thousands of Palestinians. This theft is continuing today. Israel calls it "settlements." The Palestinian point of view is rarely presented in the US today. The author frequently compares the Irish rebellion of 1919-21 to the Palestinian rebellion of 1936-39. He comments that the British even used veteran "Black and Tan" soldiers of the Irish rebellion. The "Black and Tans" were renowned for their cruelty. Many of them were criminals that Britain released in return for being part of the force suppressing the Irish rebellion. The US is actually complicit in the theft of Palestinian land, in that gives billions of dollars yearly to Israel. There are extensive footnotes, some of which have links to documents in the public domain. Thanks to the author and Henry Holt & Co for sending me this eARC through NetGalley. #TheHundredYearsWarOnPalestine #NetGalley

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    A sweeping overview of the reality America (and the evangelical community in particular) has willfully ignored for the last century. Rather than packing this with pathos, Khalidi patiently and carefully walks his reader through decades of policy, war, Western support and withdrawal, intifadas, settlements, and lines drawn and redrawn. I lament the US's blind and misguided partnership with a colonizing, ethnically cleansing, nationalistic state so anathema to democracy. I've thought a lot about t A sweeping overview of the reality America (and the evangelical community in particular) has willfully ignored for the last century. Rather than packing this with pathos, Khalidi patiently and carefully walks his reader through decades of policy, war, Western support and withdrawal, intifadas, settlements, and lines drawn and redrawn. I lament the US's blind and misguided partnership with a colonizing, ethnically cleansing, nationalistic state so anathema to democracy. I've thought a lot about the similarities between Israel and the United States the last several weeks—their zionism, nationalism, and brutal systems of oppression swept aside by powerful, foundational myths—and Khalidi speaks to this in a way I'd been probing for: "Establishing the colonial nature of the conflict has proven exceedingly hard given the biblical dimension of Zionism, which casts the new arrivals as indigenous and as the historical proprietors of the land they colonized. In this light, the original population of Palestine appears extraneous to the post-Holocaust resurgence of a Jewish nation-state with its roots in the kingdom of David and Solomon: they are no more than undesirable interlopers in this uplifting scenario. Challenging this epic myth is especially difficult in the United States, which is steeped in an evangelical Protestantism that makes it particularly susceptible to such an evocative Bible-based appeal and which also prides itself on its colonial past. The world ‘colonial’ has a valence in the United States that is deeply different from its associations in the former European imperial metropoles and the countries that were once part of their empires. “Similarly the terms ‘settler’ and ‘pioneer’ have positive connotations in American history, arising from the heroic tale of the conquest of the West at the expense of its indigenous population as projected in movies, literature, and television. Instead, there are striking parallels between these portrayals of the resistance of Native Americans to their dispossession and that of the Palestinians. Both groups are cast as backward and uncivilized, a violent murderous, and irrational obstacle to progress and modernity. While many Americans have begun to contest this strand of their national narrative, Israeli society and its supporters still celebrate—indeed, depend on—its foundational version. Moreover, comparisons between Palestine and the Native American or African American experiences are fraught because the United States has yet to fully acknowledge these dark chapters of its past or to address their toxic effects in the present. There is still a long way to go to changes Americans’ consciousness of their nation’s history, let alone that of Palestine and Israel, in which the United States has played such a supportive role."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lubinka Dimitrova

    Once a person starts reading about the Palestine conflict, they can never un-see Israel and USA's stance on this issue. It is mind-boggling how this matter has been mishandled, misrepresented and ignored for more than a century now. And one can never go back to seeing Jews as only victims of another mind-boggling genocide. Truly a heart-wrenching and deeply insightful book. Once a person starts reading about the Palestine conflict, they can never un-see Israel and USA's stance on this issue. It is mind-boggling how this matter has been mishandled, misrepresented and ignored for more than a century now. And one can never go back to seeing Jews as only victims of another mind-boggling genocide. Truly a heart-wrenching and deeply insightful book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Excellent book. It's comprehensive, readable, well-researched, and current. Each chapter focuses on a major event or time period in the history of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict to argue that Palestinians have--and continue to be--the victims of a hundred years of settler colonial warfare against them. Two things that set this book apart from other histories I've read are (1) the personal dimension Khalidi is able to offer not only as a Palestinian but as someone with first-hand experience in Excellent book. It's comprehensive, readable, well-researched, and current. Each chapter focuses on a major event or time period in the history of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict to argue that Palestinians have--and continue to be--the victims of a hundred years of settler colonial warfare against them. Two things that set this book apart from other histories I've read are (1) the personal dimension Khalidi is able to offer not only as a Palestinian but as someone with first-hand experience in Palestinian politics and (2) a "rigorous, introspective self-criticism of Arab weaknesses and failures" which he takes from historian and intellectual Constantine Zureiq as indispensable for charting the best path forward for Palestinian action. INTRO provides the academic and personal background for the books main thesis: that the modern Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be understood as a colonial war against an indigenous Palestinian population. While Khalidi employs plenty of scholarly sources to make his argument, what sets this book apart is the personal element which is expressed in the introduction through the account of his great-great-great uncle Yusuf Diya, an Islamic scholar. Through Diya's correspondences with Herzl and Khalidi's academic sources, a picture is presented of the early zionist project as a clearly settler colonial one. Whether that colonial aspiration was expressed discreetly (as in Herzl's memoir entries regarding "spiriting the penniless population across the border) or explicitly (as in Jabotinsky's declaration of zionist colonialism). CH1 This chapter covers the "first declaration of war" on Palestine embodied by Britain's sponsoring of the Zionist project beginning with the 1917 Balfour Declaration. Khalidi looks at a changing Palestine at the turn of the 20th century. Its modernizing national infrastructure (education, transportation, and the press) as it integrates into the world market bringing with it an ascendant bourgeois class against the backdrop of a declining Ottoman Empire. Concurrent with these developments was the growing threat to self-determination posed by the settler colonial Zionist movement and its European backers. Khalidi draws on memoirs, press reports, and oral history to show that the Palestinian national identity was formed alongside of and in response to the burgeoning Zionist movement. Some of the key historical moments covered in this chapter include: demographic shifts due to Jewish immigration and land purchases, the 1922 Mandate which established Britain as the colonial power in the region, Britains support for a parallel Jewish administration with representative authority and control over public works (things the Arab population was denied), growing tensions resulting in a 1936 general strike, The Peel Commission's partition plan ceding 17% of the land to the Jewish population (and the expulsion of Arabs therein) while handing the rest over to Transjordanian control, the Great Revolt of 1937-1939, and, finally, Britains brutal repression of Palestinian fighters and activists. The chapter ends with Chamberlain's 1939 conciliatory white paper to appease Arabs as it prepared for WWII (the commitments never being carried out on Britain's part, of course). Ch.2 This chapter, focusing on the 1947-49 Nakba, begins with an anecdote recounting the author's father (Ismail al-Khalidi) delivering an official message from the Arab Higher Committee to King Abdullah of Transjordan to the effect that "were the Palestinians to succeed in escaping the British yoke, they did not want to come under that of Jordan. They aspired to control their own fate." Therefore, the AHC would not accept the King's offer of "guardianship" or "protection." The delivery of this message coincided with the UN vote on Resolution 181 in favor of partitioning Mandatory Palestine. This anecdote speaks to three themes important to this chapter. 1. Palestinians' uncompromising desire for full self-determination 2. King Abdullah's desire for westward territorial expansion and 3. Palestinians' lack of state apparatuses in the run up to war (Ismail's role as messenger here was ad hoc as his real reason for meeting with the King concerned unrelated academic matters connected to the Arab-American Institute, not as an official diplomatic liaison which the AHC simply didnt have). This 3rd point is one of many factors that explains the Arab defeat by the organized, militant, higly prepared Israeli forces. It's this combination of the personal and historical that sets this book apart from other histories of the conflict I've read. This chapter also details the shifting global power structure in which the old colonial powers were replaced by the US and USSR as the major imperialist forces in the Middle East after WWII. A situation shrewdly foreseen by Israeli leadership. Khalidi emphasizes the internal division, ineffective leadership, and disorganized institutions (the AHC, ANF, Arab Office, etc.) on the Palestinian side as contrasted to the organized, sophisticated, well-funded and well connected Jewish para-state throughout the 30s and 40s. The outbreak of violence as Britain ceded control of Mandatory Palestine to the UN in '47 resulted in decisive military victories for the Israelis and, ultimately, the ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians. Continued colonial control over the Arab League, particularly in foreign affairs, further hamstrung efforts to resist Israeli conquest. When the dust settled in the summer of 1949, Israel declared statehood and sovereignty of 80% of historical Palestine, over 700,000 Palestinians were displaced, Egypt controlled the Gaza Strip while King Abdullah fulfilled his territorial ambitioins by claiming the West Bank as part of Jordan. The chapter concludes by discussing Palestinian Fedayeen activity in the early 50s, Israel's disproportionate reprisals, the resulting outbreak of the 1956 Suez War, and the tripartite alliance of Israel, Britain, France yielding to USSR/US demands to end the conflict further cementing the latter as the dominant regional actors. Ch 3 The Third Declaration of War is the 1967 Six Day War and its aftermath. Khalidi begins by dismissing the myth of a vulnerable Israel beset on all sides by its hostile Arab neighbors seeking its destruction. A popular propaganda line that was used to justify Israel's first strike against Egypt, Syria, and Jordan. First off, it was apparent to US intelligence that an "attack was not immanent" and, secondly, if war did break out Israel would "whip the hell out of them" (in President Johnson 's words). The factors leading up to the war included Arab popular distress at Israel's diversion of Jordan River waters to its territory, Fatah harassment (mostly symbolic actions of sabotage), Israeli threats and attacks on Syrian targets, and the needlessly provocative saber rattling of Egypt moving troops into the Sinai ultimately giving Israel the causus belli to initiate its pre-emptive attack. The main ideas of this chapter revolve around the changing power alignments and evolving terms of the Palestinian debate following the war. To the first point: while the Truman, Eisenhower, and even Kennedy administrations occasionally pushed back against Israeli overreach (see Eisenhower and the Suez Crisis), the Johnson administration and his pro-zionist circle of friends and advisors like Fortas, Goldberg, and Clifford proved utterly supportive of Israel in essentially all respects. Furthermore, new militant activism sprung up in the 60s like the Movement of Arab Nationalists, the Marxist PFLP, Fatah, and the PLO which had been originally intended by the Arab League to coopt rejuvenated Palestinian nationalist fervor but soon lost control of the organization after '67. The political alignments of the Arab League itself was also changing as with the Carter Admin's success in prying Egypt away from Palestine and into the Israel/US fold culminating in the bilateral Camp David treaty of '79. On the point regarding the discurssive side of the issue, the main takeaway is that Palestinians managed to re-insert themselves into the discussion as political agents and a cultural force. Khalidi documents the cultural renaissance that flowered throughout the 60s and 70s with the writings of Kanafi, Darwish, Zayyad, and others. The assertion of a strong Palestinian identity and its expression on the world stage (Edward Said being an immensly important figure in that) countered the Zionist falsegoods that the Palestinians simply didnt exist. This isn't an exaggeration...in 1969 Prime Minister Golda Meir once claimed "there were no such thing as Palestinians...they did not exist". Finally, this Palestinian movement gave itself a voice through the PLO which managed to set up channels of communication (much to Israel's frustration) with world powers including the US. This laid the groundwork for their participation in international politics when before they were sidelined as an incidental piece of state-to-state conflicts over territorial boundaries. The chapter ends on the Lebanese civil war, the PLO's role, and the various motives/interests/players involved. All of which is too complicated for me to cover in this review...or even understand tbh. Ch 4 Thr 4th Declaration of War is the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon--a country already years into its civil war--aimed at dislodging the PLO from the country. The plan was to knock out PLO operations in Israel's northern neighbor, destroy the Palestinian national movement, and use the opportunity to consolidate control over and eventually annex occupied territory. Because Khalidi and his family lived in Beirut at the time, he is able to add a personal perspective and human dimension that gets lost in other histories of the conflict I've read. Especially moving were his reflections on the Sabra and Shatila massacres carried out by the Philangist militias avenging assassinated president-elect Bashir Gamayel with full complicity of the IDF. The ominous scenes of military flares silently floating "over the southern reaches of Beruit" reminded me of the animated documentary Waltz With Bashir which Khalidi references. The IDF used the flairs to illuminate the refugee camps so the Philangist militiamen could effectively carry out its two day slaughter of over 1300 Palestinians. Khalidi details the duplicity employed by Begin, Sharon and others--detailed in the Israeli Kahan Commission reports--to nullify meaningful safeguards for civilians during the PLO's evacuation demanded by Palestinian negotiators, French diplomatic interlocutors, and promised by American officials. The picture Khalidi presents is one of concentric "circles of responsibility" from the innermost architects of the war (Begin and Sharon) to the American officials tacitly supplying diplomatic and propaganda support. The upshot of the war, however, was not the annihilation of the Palistinian national movement Israel hoped for but rather an intensification of the civil war, the rise of Hezbollah, and the relocation of the movement back into Palestine itself where it soon developed into the First Intifada. Ch. 5 The Fifth Declaration of War spans the period between the First Intafada in 1987 to the Oslo II accords in ’95. During this period, the Israeli army carried out brutal repressions against the Palestinian uprisings and secured a legal codification of the status quo through the Oslo framework which Khalidi argues was a major defeat for the Palestinian national cause. The authors details how simmering tensions erupted in the largely non-violent wave of uprisings beginning in Dec. 1987, the excessive Israeli response, the global public’s response, and the response of the PLO to the Intifada—which was to renounce terrorism, recognize Israel’s “right to exist” and support of a two-state settlement based on Resolutions 242 and 338 thus marking a major strategic shift toward diplomatic resolution. Khalidi is particularly critical of the PLO in this chapter, not for adopting non-violent tactics which he sees as a more effective path forward, but for a number of blunders that caused long-term harm to the movement for Palestine. The first was Arafat’s support of Iraq in the first gulf war and the second was accepting the Oslo framework which essentially outsourced the responsibility for enforcing the Palestinian’s colonial status to the Palestinians themselves. Khalidi, having been part of the advisory team to the Palestinian delegation at Madrid and both Oslo conferences, provides important insider perspectives on the diplomatic front. This is especially useful in his evaluation of the possible alternatives, the different actors (Dennis Ross and Martin Indyk in particular come under well-deserved heavy fire), and outcomes of the peace process. Ch. 6 The final (sixth) declaration of war consists in the continued colonial occupation of the West Bank and Gaza well after “final status” settlements were supposed to be adopted according to the Oslo accords, including the 3 massive attacks on the Gaza Strip during operations Cast Lead, Pillar of Defense, and Protective Edge. Topics also include the Camp David conference, the rise of Hamas, the politics of the Palestinian Authority, and the failures of the Obama administration to produce any substantive change.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Ataua

    A real jaw-dropper of a history that had me wanting to cancel my subscription to the human race. The only weakness of the book was the inclusion of so many personal and family stories that made it less rather than more powerful for me. It remains a very important but depressing read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Clarke

    A good overview and introduction to the history of the Israeli/Palestinian question, from a Palestinian point of view. He regards the entire Zionist project as a colonial enterprise, fostered first by the British and then, post WWII, by the USA. The author is very critical of the various Palestinian organisations’ failures over the years. His conclusions are pretty depressing, although he feels that the USA’s hegemony over the region is slipping and this may create conditions for change and a pe A good overview and introduction to the history of the Israeli/Palestinian question, from a Palestinian point of view. He regards the entire Zionist project as a colonial enterprise, fostered first by the British and then, post WWII, by the USA. The author is very critical of the various Palestinian organisations’ failures over the years. His conclusions are pretty depressing, although he feels that the USA’s hegemony over the region is slipping and this may create conditions for change and a peaceful solution in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nour

    If you’ve never read anything on Palestine, the history of the colonial conquest, and current developments, this is the book for you. Truly excellent, but surprises there considering it’s Rashid Khalidi.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rick Homuth

    My favorite part of this book wasn't the book itself (which was good, it is a good book, I liked the book) but rather the dumbass NYT reviewer who wrote about this book and critiqued it b/c it doesn't "move us any closer to some kind of resolution." AKA, don't write a book about how fucked up the situation in Palestine is if you're not also gonna solve it for us in a way that doesn't involve ceding any annexed land My favorite part of this book wasn't the book itself (which was good, it is a good book, I liked the book) but rather the dumbass NYT reviewer who wrote about this book and critiqued it b/c it doesn't "move us any closer to some kind of resolution." AKA, don't write a book about how fucked up the situation in Palestine is if you're not also gonna solve it for us in a way that doesn't involve ceding any annexed land

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Rashid Khalidi starts his book by vaguely attacking other books on Israel and Palestine for their one sided narrative that favors Israel, without providing much detail on their historiographic failings. He points out that there is a need to provide a Palestinian narrative using extensive primary sources, which is true. He does not do that however, and instead resorts to primarily relying upon personal and family stories. When he uses historic sources, he proceeds to leave out rebellions, massac Rashid Khalidi starts his book by vaguely attacking other books on Israel and Palestine for their one sided narrative that favors Israel, without providing much detail on their historiographic failings. He points out that there is a need to provide a Palestinian narrative using extensive primary sources, which is true. He does not do that however, and instead resorts to primarily relying upon personal and family stories. When he uses historic sources, he proceeds to leave out rebellions, massacres, entire wars and whole sections of essential biographies, that would be easily criticized as callous mistakes, if it was not clear that he carefully left them out to fit his narrative. He left out the Arab revolt of 1929, when Jews were raped and massacred, and the second holiest city in Judaism, Hebron, was ethnically cleansed of Jews. He left out the entire Nazi past of Grand Mufti Amin Al-Husseini. He only mentioned the Yom Kippur War once. Why? Because each of those facts disprove key points in his narrative. On the the note of the Grand Mufti, the only time Khaldi mentioned Nazi Germany, was to note the damage his “presence” there did to the Palestinian cause. Thus he seemed to care more about image of the cause than the deaths of Jews. He repeats this disregard when talking about how suicide bombers killed innocent Israelis and he talks about how it was foolish, because it looked bad in the media. This highlights another problem with this book. For a book that is oozing with emotion, personal stories and cries for sympathy, he shows almost no empathy to Jews killed in the long conflict or at any other time or place. He made strong points about Israel’s botched invasion of Lebanon and the failures of the Oslo Accords. Yet by the time I came to that part of the book, I was suspicious of everything he said. I can’t imagine the effect that the trauma of the siege of Beirut of 1982 and the Nakba had on him and his family. However, does not give him the right to produce a false historical narrative void of any empathy towards Jews. Regardless to your feeling on this deeply emotional conflict, this book offers an extremely narrow and one sided narrative, that takes shocking liberties with historic data.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This reminded me of Jakarta Method. A deeply human yet academic and critical look at Palestine and their oppression and resistance. While very critical of Palestinian leadership, Khalidi is still offering a distinctly Palestinian perspective on this story, which is not something I'd gotten before. In the book and elsewhere, it is mentioned that Khalidi was used as a smear against Obama in 08, as they were colleagues and friends. Obama didn't even bother defending his friend, which is exactly wha This reminded me of Jakarta Method. A deeply human yet academic and critical look at Palestine and their oppression and resistance. While very critical of Palestinian leadership, Khalidi is still offering a distinctly Palestinian perspective on this story, which is not something I'd gotten before. In the book and elsewhere, it is mentioned that Khalidi was used as a smear against Obama in 08, as they were colleagues and friends. Obama didn't even bother defending his friend, which is exactly what he did to Palestine when he got into office and ignored Israel's most violent siege against Palestine in the 100 year history of this conflict. I find it interesting that McCain called Khalidi a terrorist, and that Obama didn't defend him, because Khalidi represents a pretty moderate perspective on Palestine. He's critical of violence against civilians, denounces antisemitism, and writes beautifully about Israelis' connection to Palestine, as most were now born there. If there's ever going to be peace, his view should be the starting point for discussion. This does not seem likely while the far right have captured israeli politics and have helped create a deeply racist society. I highly recommend reading this for a critical and accurate, while also beautifully written story of Palestine.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Comprehensive, accessible, and clear. Even if you're already down with the cause, this provides a lot of context, and I appreciated the author's personal insights wherever they appeared. I wish I could've read this years ago. Comprehensive, accessible, and clear. Even if you're already down with the cause, this provides a lot of context, and I appreciated the author's personal insights wherever they appeared. I wish I could've read this years ago.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Martijn

    Though one-sided by design, I thought this was a really fair and balanced story, written by an insider and critical of all parties involved, that helped me look at the conflict in the Middle East with fresh eyes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eli Kaufman

    This an extremely thorough and concise history of the ongoing colonisation of Palestine. I would highly recommend it to all readers, as it is simultaneously accessible to newcomers and enlightening for those more familiar with the subject. At first I was a bit skeptical of Khalidi's focus on his own family (one of the most important families of mandate era Palestine), thinking that this was going to be a navel-gazing and horn trumpeting history through the lens of his family ego. I was happily pr This an extremely thorough and concise history of the ongoing colonisation of Palestine. I would highly recommend it to all readers, as it is simultaneously accessible to newcomers and enlightening for those more familiar with the subject. At first I was a bit skeptical of Khalidi's focus on his own family (one of the most important families of mandate era Palestine), thinking that this was going to be a navel-gazing and horn trumpeting history through the lens of his family ego. I was happily proven wrong and fairly quickly. His use of his own family history only adds a dimension that is often missing from history books on this subject, especially when written by non-Palestinians and overly reliant on Israeli source material. His personal connection to the history is littered throughout the book, as he was a negotiator during the 1991 so-called Peace Process and was living in Beirut during the 1982 Israeli invasion . Regardless, he is never overly reliant on the personal to tell this story, as the book is replete with sources, both primary and secondary, and across the temporal spectrum. This leads me to another praise of this book: its bibliography. Not only does this book concisely unravel the complicated knot of history that is the last 100 years of Palestine, but it also leaves us with a library of books, articles and films to go to when the book is done and we are left wanting more depth, more nuance, and more understanding. We do not desire this because the book is lacking, but rather because this book sets the stage so well for the reader to go deeper. That is what is invaluable about this book. Overall, I was deeply impressed by Khalidi's ability to somehow tell the story of the ongoing colonisation of Palestine with nuance and depth in only 250 pages (though let's not forget the 50 pages of footnotes, this being my one criticism of the book - why not just make the main text a little longer?), in an accessible way that doesn't dumb down or oversimplify the complexity of the history, leaving both the new and seasoned with something to write home about.

  14. 4 out of 5

    jess

    a really thorough history of the israeli occupation of palestine over the last hundred years, told from a palestinian perspective. what this book does brilliantly is to establish the historical legacies and structural aspects that characterize israel as a colonial occupation, rather than an equivalent conflict between two peoples and states or one of "right vs. right." khalidi elaborates on the concept of inequality, which allows us to understand the disproportionality of the power dynamic betwe a really thorough history of the israeli occupation of palestine over the last hundred years, told from a palestinian perspective. what this book does brilliantly is to establish the historical legacies and structural aspects that characterize israel as a colonial occupation, rather than an equivalent conflict between two peoples and states or one of "right vs. right." khalidi elaborates on the concept of inequality, which allows us to understand the disproportionality of the power dynamic between israelis and palestinians that has been repeatedly obfuscated by discursive moves to innocence/disproportionate coverage of say, hamas suicide bombings vs. the massive firepower advantage that the israeli government possesses in armed conflict. i thought this history was really helpful in outlining how israel inherited its legitimacy from british colonial mandate, and how the territory has always been shaped by imperial/hegemonic regimes (e.g. through the shift from british and french influence to to U.S./USSR spheres during the cold war era, and continuing into the monumental american support for israel). i also appreciated how khalidi demonstrates that the politics of zionists vs. the politics of the PLO, fatah, and hamas played out according to leaders' experiences navigating the different political landscapes of wartime europe vs. the arab world. the careful attention to transnationalism emphasizes that settler colonialism always happens in an international context, and that indigenous peoples are sovereign nations first and recognized as/negotiating as such internationally even when such sovereignty is completely erased later. some things i want to read more about: the connections between central european nationalism and zionism, how nationalist dogma has become the state response to past trauma/insecurity for israel, the contested concept of jewish indigeneity, and how khalidi ultimately concedes that there are two peoples in palestine with real claims to nationhood and that a reconciliation most likely involves a binational state

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kade Johnston

    The writing itself I didn’t find compelling more of an information dump that’s highly important for context on Palestinian issues.

  16. 5 out of 5

    نادية كامل

    ground breaking view daring and corageous rich and resourceful lacks in social dimension more of political scientist kaleidoscope

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marc Cullison

    I was excited to read this book since I knew little of the Middle East. The only information I'd had is from the American mainstream media. As I delved into the book, I was astounded at the accusations and condemnation of the Israelis and Arab states. Of course, this confounded my notions of the Israelis and the Zionist movement. I plodded through the repetitive narrative, absorbing new information about the Palestinians all the while cognizant of the overt bias of the author. It was as if I was I was excited to read this book since I knew little of the Middle East. The only information I'd had is from the American mainstream media. As I delved into the book, I was astounded at the accusations and condemnation of the Israelis and Arab states. Of course, this confounded my notions of the Israelis and the Zionist movement. I plodded through the repetitive narrative, absorbing new information about the Palestinians all the while cognizant of the overt bias of the author. It was as if I was reading the same chapter three or four times. Nevertheless, it served to cement the details in my mind. It is unfortunate that the Israelis chose to do to the Palestinians what the Europeans had done to them. The Israeli government was quite adept at propaganda and clever enough to establish such a robust government and military machine. Even through the author’s resentful bias against the Israelis and the surrounding Arab states, his points are well taken as a historical gauge of the inhuman treatment of the Palestinian people. It is a book well worth reading to gain an understanding of the current situation in the Middle East.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samar Dahmash Jarrah

    I highly recommend this book. I had the honor of interviewing professor Khalidi on our live radio show to talk about this book. The wars launched on Palestine in the past 100 years never broke their hope or the will to resist a brutal inhuman colonizing project that is doomed to fail. Here is my interview with the Author https://sound.wmnf.org/sound/wmnf_200... I highly recommend this book. I had the honor of interviewing professor Khalidi on our live radio show to talk about this book. The wars launched on Palestine in the past 100 years never broke their hope or the will to resist a brutal inhuman colonizing project that is doomed to fail. Here is my interview with the Author https://sound.wmnf.org/sound/wmnf_200...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amit

    The Zionist movement wanted a country for the adherents of Judaism. It could not have been anywhere else but in Palestine. Why? Because the leaders of Zionism realized that the it was only the promise of the returning to holy land that could persuade millions of people to uproot themselves and move to a new place. There was a small complication - this land had been settled by another people for almost 1,500 years, so the Zionists had to embark on a campaign to conquer and resettle it. From the s The Zionist movement wanted a country for the adherents of Judaism. It could not have been anywhere else but in Palestine. Why? Because the leaders of Zionism realized that the it was only the promise of the returning to holy land that could persuade millions of people to uproot themselves and move to a new place. There was a small complication - this land had been settled by another people for almost 1,500 years, so the Zionists had to embark on a campaign to conquer and resettle it. From the start they knew that overwhelming force was essential, as were alliances with dominant powers, something that has been true for all colonial projects. Rashid Khalidi tells the story of the Zionist conquest from the perspective of the Palestinians, the people that were conquered. As you read, you can feel the pain in his words and sense his disappointment with Palestinian political leadership and other Arab governments. This book is a stark reminder of the fact that we are not in a post-colonial world yet. If you like this book, I would recommend two others: 1. "Enemies and Neighbors: Arabs and Jews in Palestine and Israel, 1917-2017|34218167", by Ian Black. A history of the same era, written by a veteran British journalist. Though based on a broader set of sources, it reaches the same conclusions. 2. "In Distant Lands: A Short History of the Crusades|34935991]", by Lars Brownsworth, a book about the Christian settler project in Palestine. Though separated by almost 900 years, it is reminder of how a settler state in Palestine cannot exist without the support of strong western powers. For the crusaders, it was France. For the state of Israel, it is the United States.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    As a citizen of the US, almost everything I've ever seen on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict has been from a definitively pro-Israeli perspective with extreme bias against the Palestinian point-of-view. Despite this, I've always found the information unsettling, sensing on some level that the terrible acts committed upon Palestinians by Israel were being dismissed far too lightly and that the wrongs of Palestinians were being brought to the forefront in a vacuum as if unprovoked. While I doubt th As a citizen of the US, almost everything I've ever seen on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict has been from a definitively pro-Israeli perspective with extreme bias against the Palestinian point-of-view. Despite this, I've always found the information unsettling, sensing on some level that the terrible acts committed upon Palestinians by Israel were being dismissed far too lightly and that the wrongs of Palestinians were being brought to the forefront in a vacuum as if unprovoked. While I doubt that anything which could be truly classified as unbiased will ever exist on this topic within my lifetime, I think that Rashid Khalidi has done a remarkable job of presenting a well-sourced history of the Palestinian experience of this conflict while not disregarding or diminishing the actions of suicide bombers and groups such as Hamas. To be honest, this is dry AF at some points. It could fairly be accused of being academic to a fault in certain sections. With that said, it's also an extremely important read and deserving of your time and attention.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shira Reiss

    This NY Times article review of the book says it all. You can read it and get the gist of the entire book: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/28/bo... This NY Times article review of the book says it all. You can read it and get the gist of the entire book: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/28/bo...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gaby Chapman

    An in-depth, clear-eyed history of the largely successful attempt by Zionist Jews to push out the indigenous settlers of the land they believed the bible meant to be theirs and theirs alone, finished off with a path forward for justice to prevail.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan Mccarthy

    Rashid Khalidi brings a personal up lose reflection to the struggle for Palestinian national survival and recognition in his book “The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017.” From an educated Palestinian family who played roles in the governing of the province under Ottoman Rule up through World War One, struggled against the British Mandate in the interwar periods, survived the siege of Beirut in 1980, and personally was a part of numerous d Rashid Khalidi brings a personal up lose reflection to the struggle for Palestinian national survival and recognition in his book “The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017.” From an educated Palestinian family who played roles in the governing of the province under Ottoman Rule up through World War One, struggled against the British Mandate in the interwar periods, survived the siege of Beirut in 1980, and personally was a part of numerous delegations and negations on behalf of the Palestinian people, Khalidi brings a close-up focus to the story of the struggles of the Palestinian people as only one who has survived it can. Khalidi breaks up the history of the relationship between the Palestinian Arabs and the Zionist settlers and later Israelis based on six “Declarations of War”, each covering a crucial moment in the geopolitical foundations of the modern-day Palestinian-Israeli conflict. He first reflects on the major issues faced by the fledgling post World War One Palestinian community, at a time when nations across the world were first beginning to recognize their will and ability to self-rule, and their inability to grasp their situation as the Balfour Declaration places their new British Imperial rulers behind the European Zionist movement. As I have often seen, Khalidi compares the struggles of the early-years of Palestinian conflict with the British to the same occurrences in Ireland and India at the same time, correctly placing the narrative in a wider colonial context. From the early years, Khalidi traces the armed conflicts of 1948, 1967, and 1982. In a chapter on each period of conflict, he reflects on the attitudes of the Palestinian leaders, often based on personal recollections, and discussed the challenges they faced; Lack of geopolitical knowledge often allowing Israel to bend the narrative to their benefit, a failure to recognize the need for the aid and approval of the wider world, a reliance on other Arab nations with their own motives as refugee home-bases, and all exacerbated by a never-ending list of assassinated leaders (often replaced by more inexperienced persons). The final two chapters bring the narrative up to the present day, through the First and Second Intifada and the recent Israeli attacks on Gaza. Throughout the book, we can see the distinct fingerprints of settler colonialism and indigenous struggle, and the impact of the ‘Western literacy’ that the Israeli settlers possessed, and the Palestinian leadership lacked. Eqbal Ahmad, quoted in the book, summed it up: “August 1947 marked the beginning of decolonization, when British rule in India ended. It was in those days of hope and fulfillment that the colonization of Palestine occurred. Thus at the dawn of decolonization, we were returned to the earliest, most intense form of colonial menace…exclusivist settler colonialism.” Israel’s policy of refusal to negotiate with Palestinian leadership on equal footing, or even recognizing that they should, is reminiscent to the treatment of indigenous peoples in the Americas and Australia. The methods of Palestinian resistance are taken directly from the playbook of other oppressed people facing a militarily superior foe. All of which is portrayed competently by Khalidi, the author of seven books on the subject and a professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University. But you would not know any of this if you read the New York Times’s book review. While the reviewer seems to not dispute the historicity of Khalidi’s book, or that his insights are “thought-provoking”, the review takes a ‘so what stance’ on the narrative: “But the bigger weakness of this book, to my mind, can be distilled to a simple question: Where does it get you? Even if one fully accepts Khalidi’s colonialist thesis, does that move us any closer to some kind of resolution? This may seem an unfair criticism. After all, it is not incumbent on a historian to offer up possible remedies — except this is the closing task Khalidi sets for himself. It is also where his insights become noticeably threadbare.” Yes, that is an unfair criticism, and no, Khalidi does not set out to offer remedies for one of the most difficult geopolitical issues of the modern day. Even so, these remarks make me wonder if the reviewer just did not read the conclusion of the book, which I nearly feel the necessity to quote verbatim as evidence of just how not ‘threadbare’ Khalidi’s thesis is. Instead I will attempt to boil it down: Israel and Palestine cannot reach a peaceful solution without negotiations, Israel cannot negotiate unless you recognize those you wish to negotiate with, and Israel cannot recognize Palestine without also recognizing the one-hundred years of settler colonialism imposed on the Palestinian people.   https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/28/bo...  

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    Depressing but eye opening. A very important book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gadi

    There is a lot of truth here, but also a lot of strategic omission, to an extent that even I — not a professional historian — felt was deliberate and wrong. I was hoping Khalidi would bring out a new perspective, a way to understand the conflict and the Palestinian view that would be more productive, but instead this felt — in tone, and in the selection of events — like propaganda. I listened to the book, and noted all of my skepticism about his reporting of history: Why did Palestinian Arabs no There is a lot of truth here, but also a lot of strategic omission, to an extent that even I — not a professional historian — felt was deliberate and wrong. I was hoping Khalidi would bring out a new perspective, a way to understand the conflict and the Palestinian view that would be more productive, but instead this felt — in tone, and in the selection of events — like propaganda. I listened to the book, and noted all of my skepticism about his reporting of history: Why did Palestinian Arabs not support the Peel commission at all, or offer a cogent counteroffer, either then or in 1947? Khalidi doesn't engage with those proposals in detail; he doesn't confront the Arab belief at the time that Jews had no place in Palestine — a refusal to engage with the Zionist idea that Jews had nowhere to go and that, in hindsight, Palestine was the only solution for them. What would he have done, if he were a Jew in the 1930s? Is asking him to consider this question too much? Khalidi has nothing but criticism for Abdullah in Jordan, for stifling Palestinian nationalism — though he was one of the only Arab leaders to give them full citizenship after 1948. Why was there no discussion of how they are fully naturalized citizens of Jordan? Does Khalidi wish for refugees to be denied absorption into their new countries? He mentions Abu Iyad — as an important Palestinian leader, later assassinated — and discusses him admiringly, without mentioning at all that he masterminded the Munich Massacre. Did he ever express regret for helping plan the murder of Israeli athletes? And why would Khalidi completely fail to mention that about Abu Iyad? Why would Khalidi fail to mention the Munich Massacre in the book at all? That seems to have been a central moment in the Palestinian story, an instance in which the Palestinian cause commanded global attention, and perhaps a major backwards step in their struggle — completely ignored by Khalidi. Is this because he intended for this book to target Western audiences that would not sympathize with the strategies of the Palestinian movement? The failure of the Oslo accords, the Camp David negotiations in 2000 — no mention of the sticking point of refugee return, or of the Clinton Parameters for peace that Barak accepted but Arafat did not? No mention of the 2008 negotiations, in which Olmert drew up an offer on a napkin that Abbas left on the table? Sure, all these negotiations were flawed, the offer may not have been attractive to Palestinians, or the Palestinian leaders may not have felt that they had the popular mandate to accept them (a different problem altogether) — but there was scant or no mention of these discussions in this book. How can Khalidi claim to disagree with the Zionist thesis of Palestinian rejectionism without addressing the most recent and salient points of data that support it? Khalidi very heavily criticizes the Oslo process and its facade of peace, which he claims concealed the continued entrenchment of Israeli occupation — but he doesn't cite the horrible suicide bombings during this period that cooled the Israeli public's desire for peace. He only brings up the terrorist attacks during the Second Intifada section, and even then more as a strategic failure for the Palestinian movement. When discussing the start of the Second Intifada, he mentions the tunnel built under the Temple Mount but doesn’t explain its archeological purpose or the defamatory propaganda that inflamed Palestinians' hysteria about it, and about Sharon's ascent to the Temple Mount. He mentions the Israeli bulldozing of the neighborhood adjacent to the Western Wall — which, yes, was awful — but he never mention Jordanian and Palestinian destruction and desecration of the Jewish quarter after 1947. And the most aggravating thing for me, personally, was his language around terrorist attacks: Suicide bombings “followed” other events, "were carried out" by Hamas, etc. — were they not heavily supported by the Palestinian public at the time? Who carried them out? And does he not see that Israelis' response to these attacks would be utter unwillingness of any rapprochement with Palestinians? Anyway. Those were my thoughts as I was reading, and on the whole I agree with the prism that Khalidi uses to view this conflict: It is at heart a settler conflict vs. native encounter, and Israel is mostly in the wrong, seeing as it has the upper hand in nearly every way. But the book proved to be a wholly minor addition to my understanding of the conflict — saying nothing new, sticking by the Palestinian narrative, while also calculatingly omitting events that could lead a Western audience to lose sympathy for the Palestinian cause.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    In 1984, Rashid Khalidi was part of a group of respected Palestinian academics that tried to persuade Yasser Arafat that the Palestinian movement “needed to take American public opinion into account, and devote to it sufficient resources and energy, but to no avail.” (110-21) If this book is any measure of Khalidi’s ability to address an American audience and get them to understand the history of Palestine and its people, Arafat and the Palestine Liberation Organization made a grave mistake. The In 1984, Rashid Khalidi was part of a group of respected Palestinian academics that tried to persuade Yasser Arafat that the Palestinian movement “needed to take American public opinion into account, and devote to it sufficient resources and energy, but to no avail.” (110-21) If this book is any measure of Khalidi’s ability to address an American audience and get them to understand the history of Palestine and its people, Arafat and the Palestine Liberation Organization made a grave mistake. The Hundred Years' War on Palestine: A History of Settler-Colonial Conquest and Resistance, 1917-2017 is a powerful retelling of the last century in the Middle East. One of the central themes of Zionist justification of their right to set up a Jewish state in the Holy Land is that there is no such thing as “the Palestinian people.” They described the land they wished to claim in the late 19th century as “a land without a people for a people without land.” In practical terms, this was never true. Khalidi notes that while Palestinians are frequently abandoned and marginalized, they usually made themselves heard. You owe it to yourself to read this book if your understanding of the conflict in the Middle East is limited to the conventional narrative of this conflict: Where brave little Israel builds a democratic beachhead in the desert, but is only beset by constant attack by Arabs and Iranians. Where the only people calling themselves “Palestinians” are terrorists planting bombs or firing rockets against peaceful civilians. Where so-called Palestinians cannot be “partners for peace,” but autocratic monarchs can.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

    Rashid Khalidi's "The Hundred Years' War on Palestine" offers a great overview to the last hundred years of Levantine history. This is quite an accomplishment, especially at the shorter page length, as there is a lot to cover. While This book does not cover everything it does a good job addressing many of the major events from the fall of the Ottoman Empire to our current Trump Administration climate. As someone who has read other books on this subject some of the subject matter was a review for Rashid Khalidi's "The Hundred Years' War on Palestine" offers a great overview to the last hundred years of Levantine history. This is quite an accomplishment, especially at the shorter page length, as there is a lot to cover. While This book does not cover everything it does a good job addressing many of the major events from the fall of the Ottoman Empire to our current Trump Administration climate. As someone who has read other books on this subject some of the subject matter was a review for me but I haven't read a book as contemporary as this. This lead to my engagement in the later chapters to be stronger than those earlier on. Some of the greatest takeaways for me were the consistent disadvantage Palestinians have been at throughout the last 100 years and just how rapidly the situation has intensified just in my lifetime. Khalidi does a good job of explaining the major conflicts that have happened since 1917 and the climate that they arose from. What is unique about this book is the fact that Khalidi offers his personal perspective and the perspective of his ancestors during each of these events. The Khalidi family served in many leadership and public service roles in the history of Jerusalem and Palestine and this offers insight into situations that very few other authors could offer. If you are someone who is new to learning about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict I would recommend this book as it is the most concise and comprehensive I have read so far. That being said, someone who has already been introduced to the subject matter would still find some new and informative revelations from this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    This was an unusually good book on a number of levels. First, it was amazingly thorough given how short it is. It could very easily have been a multi-volume effort, but the author gave a narrative structure to those who already knew the basics, and provided enough detail for those previously poorly informed to find their way to more depth elsewhere. Secondly, the author inserts several personal anecdotes directly tied into the information discussed, but without turning the points made into a per This was an unusually good book on a number of levels. First, it was amazingly thorough given how short it is. It could very easily have been a multi-volume effort, but the author gave a narrative structure to those who already knew the basics, and provided enough detail for those previously poorly informed to find their way to more depth elsewhere. Secondly, the author inserts several personal anecdotes directly tied into the information discussed, but without turning the points made into a personal response, while still giving credence to the Palestinian perspective. This brings me to a related point: The author is never shy to point out how the Palestinians have contributed to their own obstacles in achieving what any peoples would want for themselves. Certainly, the author points out "bad deeds" by what most Americans would assume would be "good people" concerning the "Palestinian problem," but the author struck me as very much a realist searching for honest analysis. Sadly, he seems to see little light at the end of the tunnel. I might add that the book breaks down the Palestinian struggle into several periods of what I will just call very hard times. Previous, to this book, I had already read what would be just one section of what is covered in this one. That, along with multiple other sources, provided me with enough data and analysis to take what this author says very seriously. I find it sad that most Americans will not have a clue of most of what is mentioned in this book, because, well, the PR by the opposition has been so good as to not make it worth most people's effort to try to know. Recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lorenzo Coopman

    If you are like me, chances are that the Palestine conflict has been a background noise ... like forever. You may even feel sympathetic toward the plight of the Palestine people but not towards its leaders who seem the worst people imaginable to solve this lasting conflict. You think you saw the Jewish people drifting toward ever radical positions and as a proud European you think you are in a good position to judge the conflict without bias ... turns out your wrong. The biggest merit of this bo If you are like me, chances are that the Palestine conflict has been a background noise ... like forever. You may even feel sympathetic toward the plight of the Palestine people but not towards its leaders who seem the worst people imaginable to solve this lasting conflict. You think you saw the Jewish people drifting toward ever radical positions and as a proud European you think you are in a good position to judge the conflict without bias ... turns out your wrong. The biggest merit of this book lies in its reconstruction of how Israel came to be it does this in great detail. The author has a viewpoint -close to those who hold power in Palestine before its occupation-that gives a unique insight you never hear in the mainstream or much of the alternative press. Another question this book answer is why negotiations never seem to resolve the matter or bring a compromise that is acceptable to both parties no matter how prestigious the meditator is. I leave it to those that read this book to judge if there is a peaceful way out with current talking points. If I have to point something out is while you get the impression that Palestinians suffer from bad leadership through the obvious personal flaws of its leading personnel, there seems to be more going on that hinders the leadership of the Palestinians in an endemic way, it's nepotism that makes you wonder how much talent is wasted. It's a great read for those who are worried about this seemingly unending conflict but it doesn't give you much hope that it is going to get resolved in the near future.

  30. 4 out of 5

    I. David

    Creation of the State of Israel – The Palestinian Point of View Please visit I. David’s blog at: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show... I have read several books that describe the Israeli viewpoint of the creation of the State of Israel. However, this issue cannot be fully understood without also reading the Palestinian viewpoint. The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017, by Rashid Khalidi, is a compelling description of that viewpoint. Khal Creation of the State of Israel – The Palestinian Point of View Please visit I. David’s blog at: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show... I have read several books that describe the Israeli viewpoint of the creation of the State of Israel. However, this issue cannot be fully understood without also reading the Palestinian viewpoint. The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017, by Rashid Khalidi, is a compelling description of that viewpoint. Khalidi currently serves as the Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University. He has a very personal connection with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as he and his family members – mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats and journalists - have been living though the West’s encroachment into Palestine since the late 19th century. In The Hundred Years’ War Khalidi provides a deeply researched and well-written description of the military actions by Britain, and then Israel, that have resulted in the current status of the Palestinians. He describes the Palestinian efforts to try to change their current status through their own military efforts. But, he asserts that they are not likely to achieve any of their goals through such efforts. Instead, he contends that the Palestinians need to do a better job explaining their history, their rights and their goals to the rest of the world. Only by winning this public relations campaign will the Palestinians be able to convince other world powers to apply pressure on Israel to agree to any concessions. I give this book 5 stars and recommend it for anyone who wants to understand the Palestinians’ viewpoint of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.