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Teaching Frankenstein: A Cautionary Tale

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Every student has a story... But you won’t find it here. Dark, profane, and absurd, this comedy follows the journey of a young teacher on a misguided adventure to resurrect dead dreams. After being let go from his first school, the nameless narrator finds himself at a tough urban high school ready to quit. He decides that the only way to rekindle his passion for teaching Every student has a story... But you won’t find it here. Dark, profane, and absurd, this comedy follows the journey of a young teacher on a misguided adventure to resurrect dead dreams. After being let go from his first school, the nameless narrator finds himself at a tough urban high school ready to quit. He decides that the only way to rekindle his passion for teaching is through his favorite novel. It’s a decision that leads him on an unsuspecting journey where he discovers that teaching a book about monsters means dealing with his own first. The story exposes the importance of friendship and the truth behind what it means to be a teacher. Based on real events, the novel parallels Mary Shelley’s 1818 classic, Frankenstein, and shows that 200 years later, humanity still struggles to identify the real monsters. It’s a must-read for aspiring educators, teachers, and those struggling with adulting. Newly Edited Second Edition


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Every student has a story... But you won’t find it here. Dark, profane, and absurd, this comedy follows the journey of a young teacher on a misguided adventure to resurrect dead dreams. After being let go from his first school, the nameless narrator finds himself at a tough urban high school ready to quit. He decides that the only way to rekindle his passion for teaching Every student has a story... But you won’t find it here. Dark, profane, and absurd, this comedy follows the journey of a young teacher on a misguided adventure to resurrect dead dreams. After being let go from his first school, the nameless narrator finds himself at a tough urban high school ready to quit. He decides that the only way to rekindle his passion for teaching is through his favorite novel. It’s a decision that leads him on an unsuspecting journey where he discovers that teaching a book about monsters means dealing with his own first. The story exposes the importance of friendship and the truth behind what it means to be a teacher. Based on real events, the novel parallels Mary Shelley’s 1818 classic, Frankenstein, and shows that 200 years later, humanity still struggles to identify the real monsters. It’s a must-read for aspiring educators, teachers, and those struggling with adulting. Newly Edited Second Edition

30 review for Teaching Frankenstein: A Cautionary Tale

  1. 4 out of 5

    Faith Asdell

    Enjoyed the story. Main gripe, it's in serious need of proofreading. Enjoyed the story. Main gripe, it's in serious need of proofreading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Parts of this book are really really funny and capture the insanity of being a teacher. There’s also a lot of good commentary on the difficulties we face, such as the lack of respect for the profession and constant need to be held “accountable.” Too many good passionate teachers leave the profession for reasons totally unrelated to kids and actual teaching, which is sad and ridiculous because those are the only things we should really have to worry about. The book helps show how that happens. So Parts of this book are really really funny and capture the insanity of being a teacher. There’s also a lot of good commentary on the difficulties we face, such as the lack of respect for the profession and constant need to be held “accountable.” Too many good passionate teachers leave the profession for reasons totally unrelated to kids and actual teaching, which is sad and ridiculous because those are the only things we should really have to worry about. The book helps show how that happens. Some of it felt like preaching to the choir though (who other than a teacher will read this book?) Also, sometimes I couldn’t stand the the narrator’s mean-spirited attitude towards the kids (not just the teasing or regular complaining, but the harsher stuff) and the sometimes hypocritical way he would talk to coworkers about the students. The character of Wilson was really lovable and reminded me of how important it is to have a teaching BFF. The students felt pretty real as well. I have taught those kids before (though I certainly didn’t let them swear as much) and they are exhausting but the struggle made the good moments that much sweeter. Overall I enjoyed it, and appreciated a realistic teaching book instead of the “inspirational teacher movie.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This story follows a 2nd year English teacher at an extremely challenging school. He decided to teach Frankenstein to his 9th graders. It is wildly funny in some moments, sad in others, and captures the teaching experience beautifully. There is also a critique of the politics of teaching, which runs many great teachers out of schools in need, myself included. WARNING: There is a lot of profanity, by the kids and the teacher.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susie Honsinger

    Excellent, compelling and funny. This story just puts out into the page and the characters and emotions are vivid. I was reminded in good ways of Bel Kaufman's classic, Up the Down Staircase. Marred by poor proofreading, particularly in the last third of the book. Excellent, compelling and funny. This story just puts out into the page and the characters and emotions are vivid. I was reminded in good ways of Bel Kaufman's classic, Up the Down Staircase. Marred by poor proofreading, particularly in the last third of the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Trawick

    Teaching is not for the feint of heart Great story of a young man, relatively new to the teaching game, who choses "Frankenstein" as the book he will bee his lessons on. Fun, challenging students, some duds, some downright scary. Highly recommend for a fledgling teacher. I have 2 beefs (though) about the writing. There were missing words, words incorrectly used, and in one case the gender if a student was changed by a mere pronoun. This is just editing. I hated the chapter where he switched back an Teaching is not for the feint of heart Great story of a young man, relatively new to the teaching game, who choses "Frankenstein" as the book he will bee his lessons on. Fun, challenging students, some duds, some downright scary. Highly recommend for a fledgling teacher. I have 2 beefs (though) about the writing. There were missing words, words incorrectly used, and in one case the gender if a student was changed by a mere pronoun. This is just editing. I hated the chapter where he switched back and forth from his story and that of the principal during an assembly at the end of the year. It was disconcerting as heck. Loved the intruding story in itself, but not the way it was presented. Still loved the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maison Ray

    An honest and sometimes harsh account of the american education system. The narrator presents relatable content throughout the entire novel--especially if you have ever worked in any kind of service career. There are tender moments, grimacing narratives, and the ever-present, laughably inappropriate comedy. You not only fall in love with the teacher(s), but also the obnoxious students. This is a story of determination, growth, and engaging agony (for all of the characters). Mister becomes a man An honest and sometimes harsh account of the american education system. The narrator presents relatable content throughout the entire novel--especially if you have ever worked in any kind of service career. There are tender moments, grimacing narratives, and the ever-present, laughably inappropriate comedy. You not only fall in love with the teacher(s), but also the obnoxious students. This is a story of determination, growth, and engaging agony (for all of the characters). Mister becomes a man that you've likely talked to in passing at a bar: a delicate soul with a wicked sense of humor as his main coping technique. I laughed, I felt uncomfortable, and I felt human. This story was a reminder that struggle is behind all of us and you have the option to rise to the occasion or fall short and wallow in self-pity. Would recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Vanderwoude

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As a teacher in an underfunded, low income school district. This is the most realistic thing I’ve ever read. In fact the only 2 things I couldn’t relate to, were having a supportive admin, and being able to hold kids back. But everything was so accurate. I actually laughed out loud when the girl came back from the bathroom to “we’ve been waiting for you” because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve done weird things just to make it through the day! Same thing goes with marker sniffing. It also h As a teacher in an underfunded, low income school district. This is the most realistic thing I’ve ever read. In fact the only 2 things I couldn’t relate to, were having a supportive admin, and being able to hold kids back. But everything was so accurate. I actually laughed out loud when the girl came back from the bathroom to “we’ve been waiting for you” because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve done weird things just to make it through the day! Same thing goes with marker sniffing. It also had me on the first page with the penises drawn everywhere because I can’t count the amount I’ve had to clean off, draw over, rip out... over the years. I wish more people would read this and understand what we go through! Thank you for such an accurate description

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Hamilton

    I was an English teacher for nearly 40 years in both rural and urban districts. Nothing prepared me for my first year in a tiny school in Kansas. I had seven different preps, sponsored yearbook and newspaper, put on two district-wide plays, and had no planning period. It was the hardest job I have ever done, but my last years of teaching were my best. I loved the students usually, but the administration in all the schools were always the biggest obstacle. Viktor James’ book is brutally honest. M I was an English teacher for nearly 40 years in both rural and urban districts. Nothing prepared me for my first year in a tiny school in Kansas. I had seven different preps, sponsored yearbook and newspaper, put on two district-wide plays, and had no planning period. It was the hardest job I have ever done, but my last years of teaching were my best. I loved the students usually, but the administration in all the schools were always the biggest obstacle. Viktor James’ book is brutally honest. My favorite part, in addition to his writing voice, was at the end when he talked about trench warfare. This was a delight to read and I am so happy my daughter who is also a teacher sent it to me. I recommend this book for any teacher of any age.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amber Helms

    I am a fifth grade teacher in a low income community that deals with a lot of the same challenges that Viktor writes of. The book was a very honest and real depiction of a teacher’s thoughts while working in the trenches! I love that he is brutally honest but also had a few magical moments of hope that keep him going. I’m sad to hear that he no longer teaches, but the politics and broken system really will wear you down! I couldn’t put this book down, it was the perfect mix of witty, cynical, an I am a fifth grade teacher in a low income community that deals with a lot of the same challenges that Viktor writes of. The book was a very honest and real depiction of a teacher’s thoughts while working in the trenches! I love that he is brutally honest but also had a few magical moments of hope that keep him going. I’m sad to hear that he no longer teaches, but the politics and broken system really will wear you down! I couldn’t put this book down, it was the perfect mix of witty, cynical, and exciting! I also hope that non teachers read this with no judgement, teaching is hard!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Smith

    Insightful and real. This does not glamorize teaching, but it provides hope. It also allows you to empathically connect with the author. I have been teaching for 12 years, and everything in this book is true. Kids will disappoint you, break your heart, and make you cry; however, they will also make you laugh, make you proud, and surprise you every day. I also really love the extended metaphor of Frankenstein as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carol Goldie

    True to life I've been teaching for thirty years, as of January. I've taught PE, health, French, Spanish and Russian and coached track, gymnastics, swimming, cheerleading and field hockey. This book made me laugh so many times, as he described the life inside my classroom at times. The ending crushed me. I'm sorry he left. I've wanted to quit so many times, but I can't. Something pulls me back. True to life I've been teaching for thirty years, as of January. I've taught PE, health, French, Spanish and Russian and coached track, gymnastics, swimming, cheerleading and field hockey. This book made me laugh so many times, as he described the life inside my classroom at times. The ending crushed me. I'm sorry he left. I've wanted to quit so many times, but I can't. Something pulls me back.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

    Teachers will nod along while reading Nicely written Viktor James. I have been in the trenches for 10 years now, though at the elementary level. Everything that you wrote resonated with me, from the stories of every student, the bullshit from administration, and the politics. You hit the nail on the head.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jacey Morrill

    Truth in Teaching This novel sits with me. I am a teacher in a pretty well-to-do school. We have supplies and kids and parents that care and yet many of the truths in this novel hold for my experience in education. Raw, true, and real. It’s not the most well written novel. But it tells a story that needs to be told. Teaching sucks. It’s hard work and it’s thankless work. You are not treated nor paid like a professional. Mostly for educators - but a good read for anyone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bree

    I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. It's a deviation of my normal genres of non-fiction. The characters were honest and real, and a true depiction of ways I see the current school system is broken. From lack of books and curriculum, to reviews, and challenging student personalities this book was full of entertainment. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. It's a deviation of my normal genres of non-fiction. The characters were honest and real, and a true depiction of ways I see the current school system is broken. From lack of books and curriculum, to reviews, and challenging student personalities this book was full of entertainment.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    Read it I've never related to a book so much. If you're a teacher you should read this. If you're a parent you should read this. If you've ever been a student you should read this. Read it I've never related to a book so much. If you're a teacher you should read this. If you're a parent you should read this. If you've ever been a student you should read this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Harrison

    Great Read! As an educator, I thoroughly enjoyed the author's unbridled truth as he navigated the trials and tribulations of teaching. I'm glad he stuck with it as long as he did and he found purpose. Great Read! As an educator, I thoroughly enjoyed the author's unbridled truth as he navigated the trials and tribulations of teaching. I'm glad he stuck with it as long as he did and he found purpose.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    I highly recommend this book! I was intrigued by the title and description. I was a little skeptical when I began reading. However, I was hooked by the end of chapter 1! I could not put it down! It was one of those stories that I kept wishing went on just a little longer. I highly recommend reading this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    An honest and relatable account of what it means to be a teacher. I empathized with the narrator on many occasions, even though our teaching situations are vastly different.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Camgemi

    This was a raw, painful, absurd, hilarious, sarcastic and, yes, poignant look into the world of teaching and the immense obstacles that block the heartfelt desire and talents of teachers. I stumbled upon this book as a sponsored ad on FB, and I'm glad I did; it opened my eyes even more to the travesty that is the United States' education system. I highly recommend this book; you won't be disappointed. This was a raw, painful, absurd, hilarious, sarcastic and, yes, poignant look into the world of teaching and the immense obstacles that block the heartfelt desire and talents of teachers. I stumbled upon this book as a sponsored ad on FB, and I'm glad I did; it opened my eyes even more to the travesty that is the United States' education system. I highly recommend this book; you won't be disappointed.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Reina Lopez

    Honest Overall, I liked this book because it is raw and real and it's something that teachers deals with almost every day. This book is not for those that are easily offended due to the language of the book. Honest Overall, I liked this book because it is raw and real and it's something that teachers deals with almost every day. This book is not for those that are easily offended due to the language of the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erin Merrill

    Grab your highlighter; teaching self-help at its best I’ve been teaching for 14 years, and this book eloquently sums up the (few) joys and the (many) pains of fighting apathy, politics, and broken copiers to share our passion with students and affect their lives.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Art

    I taught for 31 years. There's a lot in this book that rings true, the frustrations and satisfactions of working with kids. I found the sheer amount of cursing, especially from the students, to be off-putting. Maybe it's just where I taught, but that would not be tolerated. In that respect I found it unrealistic. The most realistic part is that it wasn't a super-teacher/savior book. Most teachers do just what the main character here does: come in day after day, doing their best, sometimes winnin I taught for 31 years. There's a lot in this book that rings true, the frustrations and satisfactions of working with kids. I found the sheer amount of cursing, especially from the students, to be off-putting. Maybe it's just where I taught, but that would not be tolerated. In that respect I found it unrealistic. The most realistic part is that it wasn't a super-teacher/savior book. Most teachers do just what the main character here does: come in day after day, doing their best, sometimes winning and sometimes losing. We need to take the joys from the little things and satisfactions from completing goals we set for ourselves. I was going to give the book four stars, but the sheer number of spelling mistakes an other typos worked on my English teacher side and cost this one star.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Murphy

    Ok so I’m used to teacher books telling you how they transformed into this awesome teaching machine. They saved all the kids and learning the secret of teaching and everyone is wonderful and perfect. This is not that book. This is real, lots of swearing, and dick pictures, teachers and kids just barely succeeding. I so wanted the author to have finished with some conference ready presentation on reaching at-risk students. Instead it was the same as I feel at the end of the year (yesterday). I ma Ok so I’m used to teacher books telling you how they transformed into this awesome teaching machine. They saved all the kids and learning the secret of teaching and everyone is wonderful and perfect. This is not that book. This is real, lots of swearing, and dick pictures, teachers and kids just barely succeeding. I so wanted the author to have finished with some conference ready presentation on reaching at-risk students. Instead it was the same as I feel at the end of the year (yesterday). I made a ton of mistakes, I reached a few kids, and failed a few more. I’ll take some time over the summer to rest, regroup, and redo some lessons. Hopefully next year will be better. I’m just not sure how long I can do this because the politics get in the way of the teaching.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vonnysue

    This is one of the most honest books I’ve ever read about the trials of teaching. The author doesn’t sugar coat a thing-not his faults, his errors of judgement, his passion, nor his language. And, he very cleverly lays it all out while showing us how he kept upping his teacher gamesmanship by teaching the novel Frankenstein by Shelley. It so reminded me of me, early in my career, when I taught historical novels along each time period we studied to keep them grounded in the timeline, and improve This is one of the most honest books I’ve ever read about the trials of teaching. The author doesn’t sugar coat a thing-not his faults, his errors of judgement, his passion, nor his language. And, he very cleverly lays it all out while showing us how he kept upping his teacher gamesmanship by teaching the novel Frankenstein by Shelley. It so reminded me of me, early in my career, when I taught historical novels along each time period we studied to keep them grounded in the timeline, and improve their reading and deductive reasoning skills. Plus, like, you know, “oh...my gawd...history’s sooo, like...boring!!!” I am a retired eighth grade middle school history teacher. Teaching was my third career, so I got a late start, but I still left early after thirteen years. And, if you read the book, you’ll understand why. And, it was never the students, although many were horrible. (I endured more than one Nemesus.) Because, so many more of them were whip-smart, wonderful, funny, kind...and did I say funny? More than four years later I miss them, and my fellow teachers in the trenches who were also whip-smart, wonderful, funny... The author mentions mind numbing repetitive teacher meetings (with talkers that waste time), new state and district programs adopted (seemingly) yearly before fully utilizing the one previously bought, lack of basic supplies (I never had a new textbook-it was ten years old when I started), constant over-supervision, and politics. Politics at national, state, local, school, and right there in-the-grade level. And, it’s all mixed in a soup with his personal life and a second job, because having a great education and working at your dream job shaping young minds doesn’t pay worth sh*t!!! If you’re already a teacher, read it. If you want to be a teacher, read it. If you’re a parent, read it. If you’re a student, read it. It’s a cautionary tale. But it’s also motivational. Who knows where it will lead you? I highly recommend!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I received a free copy of this book as part of a Goodreads giveaway. Teaching Frankenstein: A Cautionary Tale is the story of a young teacher trying to get through the year at a new school while not sure if teaching is what he should really be doing. This book received three stars from me for various reasons. First of all, the narrator is only ever referred to as "Mister" no first name, no last which grows to be confusing and annoying. I feel like this was probably done to emphasize that his coul I received a free copy of this book as part of a Goodreads giveaway. Teaching Frankenstein: A Cautionary Tale is the story of a young teacher trying to get through the year at a new school while not sure if teaching is what he should really be doing. This book received three stars from me for various reasons. First of all, the narrator is only ever referred to as "Mister" no first name, no last which grows to be confusing and annoying. I feel like this was probably done to emphasize that his could be a universal experience within teaching but as the story goes on and the reader gets more and more details about his physical appearance this strategy is rendered moot. Another thing I found distracting is the multiple proofreading errors which stop the flow of the story and divert attention. Overall, this book is explained as the reason why the narrator is no longer a teacher but really I felt that he focused much more on the reasons why he stayed a teacher. In the end he reveals that politics is what made him finally turn away from teaching but within the story school politics are really only talked about once or twice and mentioned a few other times in passing. They did not receive the amount of attention I think they should have been allotted for being what disillusioned not only the narrator but also his coworker. Although the narrator's voice is at times eye-roll-inducing, at other times it was perfect in how it conveyed the frustration, confusion, and sometimes fear so many teachers experience. The actual highlight of the whole book though, for me, was when a student volunteers to read her essay to the class and the reader gets to read a beautiful, confessional account of one student who has a crush on another. So I did find it disappointing that this student was only mentioned once more in passing in the entirety of the book. "But all I wanted to do was hold her hand, feel her soft palm in mine. I wanted to walk with her through the rain and lean in for a long-awaited kiss."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Canepa

    Teaching Frankenstein was an enjoyable, sometimes humorous, realistic read about the life of a new teacher. It is not idealistic at all, but it is a truthful tale that could possibly help prepare a new teacher or even train the spouse, partner, or family of a teacher on the emotional turmoil we go through. I have taught for about nineteen years now, and many of the experiences and feelings the author went through, I have gone through myself, so it is definitely realistic. When you read this book Teaching Frankenstein was an enjoyable, sometimes humorous, realistic read about the life of a new teacher. It is not idealistic at all, but it is a truthful tale that could possibly help prepare a new teacher or even train the spouse, partner, or family of a teacher on the emotional turmoil we go through. I have taught for about nineteen years now, and many of the experiences and feelings the author went through, I have gone through myself, so it is definitely realistic. When you read this book, you will be met with endearing moments, some laughter, horrifying moments, and a lot of profanity. The students in this book curse a lot, and the teacher, just as much. Is that realistic? Yes. I have heard more profanity in my job as a public school teacher than I have heard anywhere else in my life. It seems to get worse every year, so I imagine Mr. James likely cursed even more after having been a teacher for a few years. What do you do? You love and accept the children anyway and hope the parents deal with it when you share that information. Some chapters seemed to be added in just as filler, although, maybe it seemed that way due to there order. The last half of the book really drew me in; I sincerely wanted to see Mr. James succeed, whether in reaching these kids or just getting them to the end of the novel, Frankenstein. His frustration was very believable. Every horror story he shares is true to life, I am sorry to say. Some of his mishaps happened to me in my first few years as a teacher myself. I'd gladly read another book by this author when he produces one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Gouin

    This should be required reading for all future teachers. Viktor James has crafted what is probably the most accurate depiction of working in a low-income public school I've ever read. It felt so authentic I could envision previous classrooms and students I've had in my own professional path. Oftentimes cynical, often times using more colorful language than was probably necessary, Viktor James doesn't rose-tint anything. From the moment he stepped foot in his dilapidated English classroom and not This should be required reading for all future teachers. Viktor James has crafted what is probably the most accurate depiction of working in a low-income public school I've ever read. It felt so authentic I could envision previous classrooms and students I've had in my own professional path. Oftentimes cynical, often times using more colorful language than was probably necessary, Viktor James doesn't rose-tint anything. From the moment he stepped foot in his dilapidated English classroom and noticed the lack of resources, he knew he wouldn't be a teacher forever. Despite the burn out rate, he took the uphill journey of trying to teach Frankenstein to his 9th grade English class. Disappointed in their lack of effort, Viktor relies on Wilson who teaches across the hall. Though Wilson has a positive attitude and clearly loves the job and reminds "Mister" of what a great job he's doing, Mister continues to be discouraged. The ending isn't happy and Mister warns that this isn't like the movies where he miraculously saves everyone. It has a very morose conclusion but the message behind every word rings 100% true.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Raasch

    Excellent read! I've read other teacher books. And I filter my teenager's school stories through the teacher's perspective and remember they are human and have a story. BUT this book has a narrator and story that is just so raw and real that it stands out from other books of the genre. How many teenagers saying " this teacher sucks" about an assignment would believe this giant authority figure had just gone through a break up, lost his previous job, lived in an empty apartment furnished with a s Excellent read! I've read other teacher books. And I filter my teenager's school stories through the teacher's perspective and remember they are human and have a story. BUT this book has a narrator and story that is just so raw and real that it stands out from other books of the genre. How many teenagers saying " this teacher sucks" about an assignment would believe this giant authority figure had just gone through a break up, lost his previous job, lived in an empty apartment furnished with a sleeping bag and spent his nights waiting tables? But what is heart breaking about this story of fierce struggle is the grinding down of the souls of children, teachers, and administrators by the inexorable "system". I've railed against the system for years about what it does to a child's mind and curiosity about the world. This story tells us that the system also stifles all that is best and passionate about the teacher.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Williams

    Honesty with some humor The title grabbed me. It was post by the author on Facebook. Dark comedy about teaching....sounds intriguing. I teach, I wanted to see how close the book was to real life. I can say, pretty darn close. The story flowed well, had some very “colorful” language, and a cast of students I could relate to. He captured the inner turmoil so many of us face each year. Do we make a difference? Is what we do worth it? Do we come back the following year? All questions I’ve asked myse Honesty with some humor The title grabbed me. It was post by the author on Facebook. Dark comedy about teaching....sounds intriguing. I teach, I wanted to see how close the book was to real life. I can say, pretty darn close. The story flowed well, had some very “colorful” language, and a cast of students I could relate to. He captured the inner turmoil so many of us face each year. Do we make a difference? Is what we do worth it? Do we come back the following year? All questions I’ve asked myself at one time or another during my career. I honestly enjoyed the story. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants to get a little insight into the actual year of a teacher. It isn’t Dangerous Minds or Dead Poet’s Society. This story is a fictional factual representation. Thank you for writing it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amitra Schwols

    Why teaching.... This book answers why someone might become a teacher, why that same someone might wind up in a love/hate relationship with teaching, why someone with multiple degrees is still a blue collar worker in our country, and why so many of us leave our profession. To be honest, I would have been shocked by the protagonists behavior as a fellow teacher. Showing up to class still smelling of alcohol? Cursing in front of students? Dodging the special ed teacher and evaluations? But to be ho Why teaching.... This book answers why someone might become a teacher, why that same someone might wind up in a love/hate relationship with teaching, why someone with multiple degrees is still a blue collar worker in our country, and why so many of us leave our profession. To be honest, I would have been shocked by the protagonists behavior as a fellow teacher. Showing up to class still smelling of alcohol? Cursing in front of students? Dodging the special ed teacher and evaluations? But to be honest again....it worked for him and his students. It made for a compelling read, and he's right about what is really wrong in schools in the US today. I recommend to read this before investing in becoming a teacher. I really recommend it to politicians creating policy for schools. Though I fear in both cases the message will be lost.

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