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The Means of Uniting them

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Original Title: Strange Bedfellows This is a very A/U story. Darcy's and Elizabeth's marriage is arranged when they are very young. Growing up, they must struggle with the consequences of their fathers' decision to marry them. Original Title: Strange Bedfellows This is a very A/U story. Darcy's and Elizabeth's marriage is arranged when they are very young. Growing up, they must struggle with the consequences of their fathers' decision to marry them.


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Original Title: Strange Bedfellows This is a very A/U story. Darcy's and Elizabeth's marriage is arranged when they are very young. Growing up, they must struggle with the consequences of their fathers' decision to marry them. Original Title: Strange Bedfellows This is a very A/U story. Darcy's and Elizabeth's marriage is arranged when they are very young. Growing up, they must struggle with the consequences of their fathers' decision to marry them.

33 review for The Means of Uniting them

  1. 5 out of 5

    J. W. Garrett

    http://meryton.com/aha/index.php?show... Rating: angst, angst, angst, MA: mature audience: sexually graphic and descriptive. This unpublished work is what we call an AU [Alternate Universe] of Austen’s P&P. Basically, the names, locations and time period are the same but everything else is different. We open in a flashback that describes a crucial encounter between the elder Darcy and the elder Bennet that drives the rest of the story. This pivotal moment sets the tone of the story and then takes http://meryton.com/aha/index.php?show... Rating: angst, angst, angst, MA: mature audience: sexually graphic and descriptive. This unpublished work is what we call an AU [Alternate Universe] of Austen’s P&P. Basically, the names, locations and time period are the same but everything else is different. We open in a flashback that describes a crucial encounter between the elder Darcy and the elder Bennet that drives the rest of the story. This pivotal moment sets the tone of the story and then takes it in a completely different direction from canon. It resulted in the betrothal of their children. I had a hard time reading this story. I found myself trying to wrap my brain around a different atmosphere populated with most but not all of our P&P characters. Although I didn’t miss many of them, I could see the lack of their influence on our main characters. For Lizzy: Without Jane, we were missing the calming benefits of the affectionate elder sister. Missing also were Uncle and Aunt Gardiner. They lived in the West Indies and didn’t retire to England until we were well into the story. That meant that Lizzy grew up without their refined impact on her development. Also absent was Mrs. Bennet’s caustic, mean-understanding and her unnatural dislike of her girl child. For Darcy: His mother was different and distant. His friendships were different. He spent a lot of time in London and not at Pemberley. This was a watered-down version of Austen’s Darcy. “In youth we learn; in age we understand.” –Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach I quickly began to dislike this Lizzy character and had to rack my brain trying to figure out where she was coming from. What motivated her? What made her act, respond and think as she did? We knew that Mr. Bennet taught at a University where he lived with his son James and young daughter Elizabeth. I surmised that Lizzy grew up in an academic rich atmosphere surrounded by her father and his colleagues. She probably read or played under the table while they debated and argued philosophy, history, literature, poetry, authors and politics. This male-centric influence would have a profound impact on Lizzy. I imagine in this male dominate atmosphere she was taught or learned to think, analyze, and approach problems like a man would. Add to that mix, her reading Wollstonecraft’s ‘A Vindication…’ and you have a little harridan on your hands that wanted to think and act in the same manner as her elder brother. This early environment did not provide her with the womanly accomplishments, comportment, and deportment deemed necessary for a young lady. She would rather play chess than do needlework. She would prefer reading or arguing a proper debate before practicing on the piano-forte. “Youth is easily deceived because it is quick to hope.” –Aristotle I needed to somehow understand where she was coming from. She chose a path in her young life that nearly destroyed her, Darcy and his family. It nearly brought me to violence. I wanted to shake her senseless and nearly abandoned the story. The angst dragged on and on and… well, you get the idea. It was horrid. She was stubborn to the point of being ridiculous. She was a dog with a bone and nothing was going to sway her opinion. She was right and she demanded her way. As I write this, I suddenly had a vivid picture in my head… she was like a young Lady Catherine. Oh-My-Gosh! It is true. The very same adjectives that I would use to describe the Lady Witch are the same ones I used to describe this Lizzy. As in canon, Lizzy foolishly chose Wickham’s lies over Darcy’s honor and would not see reason. Only, in this case, it was worse. It was the perfect trap of twisted half-truths and a story so worded that Wickham knew it would force a confrontation between her and Darcy. All his actions were an attempt to destroy their marriage and cause Darcy problems. And she walked right into it with her eyes wide opened. Poor Darcy. I felt for him. I ached for him. Wickham put him in an untenable situation and Lizzy would not… would not let it go. She stood right in the middle of their long-held feud upholding and maintaining Wickham’s lies until Darcy refuted them and proved himself. Outrageous! He should have kicked her to the curb. Or better yet, sent her to his farthest estate in England, Scotland or Ireland and never allowed her back into his life. She crossed a line no woman should cross with a husband. I was so upset and angry with her. This is an excellent story for the drinking game. You know the game where something is said or mentioned repeatedly and you have to take a drink every time it is mentioned. The word ‘young or very young’ was mentioned so many times, I wanted to scream. If I had been playing the game, I would have been smashed within a few chapters. This was a long story and so many story/plot lines. Each character had a story and we followed each of them over the months and years. Be prepared for OOC [out-of-character] behavior and modern sensibilities. The sex scenes were meh-worthy. I mean… once you leave romantic behind, it just becomes porn. I was still so angry at Lizzy… I didn’t enjoy their escapades at all. When I reached the end of Chapter 40, I discovered that this was unfinished and was still a WIP. Grrrr!!! I’m posting this anyway and can update it if I need to later. Dang! I reserve the right to change my stars as needed. “We are all rebellious teenagers. Sometimes we grow out of it, and sometimes we don’t.” –Kelly Asbury

  2. 4 out of 5

    wosedwew

    http://meryton.com/aha/index.php?show... http://meryton.com/aha/index.php?show...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Excellent. For me, one of the best variations I have read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    It's a very good story, however, it's only really a Pride and Prejudice variation in that it uses Elizabeth, Darcy and Pemberly as specific points. The Bennett family is not the same, there's a lot of focus on original characters, and quite honestly, the characters of Darcy and Elizabeth are more specific to the space and time than the characters of Ms. Austen. The author could easily change the names of a few main characters and simply publish as a regency era romance novel it's that AU. I do ha It's a very good story, however, it's only really a Pride and Prejudice variation in that it uses Elizabeth, Darcy and Pemberly as specific points. The Bennett family is not the same, there's a lot of focus on original characters, and quite honestly, the characters of Darcy and Elizabeth are more specific to the space and time than the characters of Ms. Austen. The author could easily change the names of a few main characters and simply publish as a regency era romance novel it's that AU. I do have to say, the thing that bothered me most about this was a refusal to find middle ground repeatedly by most of the characters. Darcy's refusal to say ANYTHING about his dislike of Wickham, which he easily could have done by saying "Wickham was a thief, Wickham meddled with servant girls, Wickham..." did any of the million other things he did besides the one specific thing he did to Darcy that Darcy wasn't ready to talk about. He left his young inexperienced wife exposed by not telling her any of the million true things about Wickham he could have told her. And then did the same thing all over again when he was trying to help her brother towards the end of the book. All Elizabeth needed for the whole book was a kernel of information, something small to understand that Wickham was a bad man. His dogged refusal to say anything at all was a disservice to both of them. If he couldn't trust her with information that wasn't specifically related to him except that it was done by Wickham, why should she trust him about a vague random thing when they were so new to knowing each other very well. Trust is earned, respect is earned, they didn't have enough for him to demand them of her blindly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alberico Nucci

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meg

  8. 4 out of 5

    Drishti

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martina

  10. 5 out of 5

    Val F

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lit Reader

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janalyn

  14. 4 out of 5

    T

  15. 4 out of 5

    Citywide Plumbing

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dung

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julianne Bellardo

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  19. 4 out of 5

    ana darcy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lenora Robinson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aly Schne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Madenna U

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Majczan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  26. 4 out of 5

    OG

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bk

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

  29. 5 out of 5

    Li Martins

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eva Belavsky

  31. 5 out of 5

    Bsao

  32. 4 out of 5

    Maiko-chan [|]

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ragini

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