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Introduction Some things in life take time. For decades I have been questioning myself if I should start this journey. This journey that will try to tell my life from a different perspective, as well as on the war and all the things that happened in one of the most painful wars in the world’s history, and especially in the history of the United States of America. Simply – Introduction Some things in life take time. For decades I have been questioning myself if I should start this journey. This journey that will try to tell my life from a different perspective, as well as on the war and all the things that happened in one of the most painful wars in the world’s history, and especially in the history of the United States of America. Simply – my life in Vietnam. My name is Susan Wheeler. If someone had told me that from a small city in Alabama I would one day write a book about my life, I would just smile at him for saying nonsense. The truth is I come from a small, normal family, with a younger sister and parents working as teachers in primary school. That was a most important thing for my family – to study hard and be kind to people. With our mom a music teacher and our dad teaching physics, me and my sister had numerous possibilities to choose from, where to go next in life. My first and only choice was medicine. From my early days, I used to heal wounded birds, dogs and later that transferred to me wishing to become a doctor and help people so they don’t feel pain. And in the light of war in Vietnam, my patriotic feelings took me to apply for something that would definitely change my entire life. As the story goes, you will see that my tasks included much more in time. The fighting progressed and soon the victims became even women and children. Yes, Vietnamese women and children. As a nurse, my duty is to help people ease their pain or make it completely go away. War was not important at all. At the moment it started, we were healing our soldiers. That was the main reason we went to Vietnam in the first place. Later on, we were going to orphanages and helping the Vietnamese kids, as well. That was not our duty, it was our wish. That was also when my Vietnam war non-fiction started. Our colleagues had taken good care of us. As women in the Army, we were there to help them, but they had always tried to make us feel as safe as possible. There were no safe zones or clear lines of battle front. We were in a constant danger that we could be attacked, especially with the nature of the guerilla warfare. Their specialty was the incursions during the night or during heavy rain, for example. You were never completely safe, and the jungle was all around you. The enemy could hit you anytime. But that was only one in many other memoirs of Vietnam war that we had experienced. Malaria crisis, which is mentioned in nearly all Vietnam war books, was another important enemy we had to fight every day. Like any other epidemic disease, it disintegrated troop strength more than anything. Every year, after the wet season started, the number of soldiers admitted to the hospital with malaria was jumping to proportions of a crisis. Sometimes the disease was even drug-resistant. Soldiers did neglect their anti-malaria precautions; it was more difficult to think about that when the actual war is going on. But that was a huge mistake. Unfortunately, at the time, because of the war that was going on, we could never really know if patients are getting the exact dosage they need, we had to improvise and hope for the best. During the times of crisis, we had spent entire days and nights there, with no sense of time. In Vietnam War - Vietnam War Stories, World War 2, Historical Romance Stories, Vietnam War Memories


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Introduction Some things in life take time. For decades I have been questioning myself if I should start this journey. This journey that will try to tell my life from a different perspective, as well as on the war and all the things that happened in one of the most painful wars in the world’s history, and especially in the history of the United States of America. Simply – Introduction Some things in life take time. For decades I have been questioning myself if I should start this journey. This journey that will try to tell my life from a different perspective, as well as on the war and all the things that happened in one of the most painful wars in the world’s history, and especially in the history of the United States of America. Simply – my life in Vietnam. My name is Susan Wheeler. If someone had told me that from a small city in Alabama I would one day write a book about my life, I would just smile at him for saying nonsense. The truth is I come from a small, normal family, with a younger sister and parents working as teachers in primary school. That was a most important thing for my family – to study hard and be kind to people. With our mom a music teacher and our dad teaching physics, me and my sister had numerous possibilities to choose from, where to go next in life. My first and only choice was medicine. From my early days, I used to heal wounded birds, dogs and later that transferred to me wishing to become a doctor and help people so they don’t feel pain. And in the light of war in Vietnam, my patriotic feelings took me to apply for something that would definitely change my entire life. As the story goes, you will see that my tasks included much more in time. The fighting progressed and soon the victims became even women and children. Yes, Vietnamese women and children. As a nurse, my duty is to help people ease their pain or make it completely go away. War was not important at all. At the moment it started, we were healing our soldiers. That was the main reason we went to Vietnam in the first place. Later on, we were going to orphanages and helping the Vietnamese kids, as well. That was not our duty, it was our wish. That was also when my Vietnam war non-fiction started. Our colleagues had taken good care of us. As women in the Army, we were there to help them, but they had always tried to make us feel as safe as possible. There were no safe zones or clear lines of battle front. We were in a constant danger that we could be attacked, especially with the nature of the guerilla warfare. Their specialty was the incursions during the night or during heavy rain, for example. You were never completely safe, and the jungle was all around you. The enemy could hit you anytime. But that was only one in many other memoirs of Vietnam war that we had experienced. Malaria crisis, which is mentioned in nearly all Vietnam war books, was another important enemy we had to fight every day. Like any other epidemic disease, it disintegrated troop strength more than anything. Every year, after the wet season started, the number of soldiers admitted to the hospital with malaria was jumping to proportions of a crisis. Sometimes the disease was even drug-resistant. Soldiers did neglect their anti-malaria precautions; it was more difficult to think about that when the actual war is going on. But that was a huge mistake. Unfortunately, at the time, because of the war that was going on, we could never really know if patients are getting the exact dosage they need, we had to improvise and hope for the best. During the times of crisis, we had spent entire days and nights there, with no sense of time. In Vietnam War - Vietnam War Stories, World War 2, Historical Romance Stories, Vietnam War Memories

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