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Nikki Heat. Fala Upalu. Audiobook

30 review for Nikki Heat. Fala Upalu. Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 76% | Good Notes: Fun but disposable. It's got all the bones of a good detective story, but with characters in need of further fleshing out. (B+) 76% | Good Notes: Fun but disposable. It's got all the bones of a good detective story, but with characters in need of further fleshing out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    For those of you who watched last night's Castle: yes, the thing on page 105 is really there. FYI. I don't really know how to actually review this, so I'll repeat what I said to a friend of mine this morning: Her: Oh my God. IS IT TERRIBLE? I MUST KNOW. Me: It's not! It's not high literature either, but--it's basically the same in terms of quality as the show. Fluffy, funny, throwing in another dead body whenever they think of plot, and just adorable. (and slashy.) I like. For those of you who watched last night's Castle: yes, the thing on page 105 is really there. FYI. I don't really know how to actually review this, so I'll repeat what I said to a friend of mine this morning: Her: Oh my God. IS IT TERRIBLE? I MUST KNOW. Me: It's not! It's not high literature either, but--it's basically the same in terms of quality as the show. Fluffy, funny, throwing in another dead body whenever they think of plot, and just adorable. (and slashy.) I like.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mojca

    This is a prime example of TV-show-success exploitation. It reads like a fanfiction written by someone NOT Richard Castle. At least not Richard Castle from the TV show. Because from what I saw in the series, the “original” Richard Castle at least appears to be a (much) better writer. So, why the fanfiction-y feel? 1. It read like one of the episodes of the TV show, though to be turned into one if would need a lot of work. 2. All of the “main” characters were there (with slightly different names), a This is a prime example of TV-show-success exploitation. It reads like a fanfiction written by someone NOT Richard Castle. At least not Richard Castle from the TV show. Because from what I saw in the series, the “original” Richard Castle at least appears to be a (much) better writer. So, why the fanfiction-y feel? 1. It read like one of the episodes of the TV show, though to be turned into one if would need a lot of work. 2. All of the “main” characters were there (with slightly different names), and Mr. Castle didn’t bother much with characterization. They were all pretty much one-dimensional and would’ve been bland without my imagination providing for their voices, images, and filling up all the other holes. 3. It had a little more nudity (scene with Pochenko). 4. It had the mandatory sex scene between the two leads (What’s the acronym for them in the fanfic world? Caskett?), though it still read like an episode part (...they tumble onto the bed. [Fade to black] The next morning...). I missed the “steaminess” so-much-advertised in one of the starter episodes of Season 2. Especially given the last one, which could be Richard Castle living out writing up his fantasy scenario with “real life” Nikki Heat (Det. Kate Beckett), why did I say it was written by someone so obviously not Richard Castle from the show? Well, sure, Jameson Rook (Richard Castle’s “fictional” counterpart, and the one Nikki Heat had a naked one-on-one on “page 105” sans all the steam if we don’t count the fictional heat wave) was a bit more “heroic” and more obviously protective than his “real life” counterpart, but why on earth would Rick Castle write himself to be such an idiot? Because while the “real” Richard Castle would sometimes act like a child (well, most of the time) he’s a pretty good detective, often providing insightful and helpful information for solving the case. James Rook on the other hand appeared to have no clue, jumping from conclusion to conclusion, suspect to suspect, offering himself up for embarrassment and pick-on fodder for Heat and Roach. Maybe I dissected this a bit too much (when it comes to characters), instead of just enjoying it for an entertaining romp that it hoped to be was. But as a new, yes, but enthusiastic fan of Castle I couldn’t help but feel cheated with this book. This is one of those times when you wish you could get a refund. One-dimensional characters, some of them acting not at all like them (Jameson Rook is one example, Nikki Heat the other, because she was being a bitch through most of the book), a pretty standard crime with the perp visible from a mile away, not particularly well-written. The flow was broken, the pacing slow, the jumping from scene to scene a bit too jarring... I do have the next book on my eReader, but I think I’ll wait and enjoy the TV show instead.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    Sorry, Castle, I love your television show, but Heat Wave is lukewarm at best :( It's been said that the bigger they are, the harder they fall...so maybe that's why king of New York real estate Matthew Starr just took a plunge from a six-story balcony. And while plenty of people may have wanted Starr dead, since he himself wasn't one of them, the authorities know they have a homicide on their hands. So the NYPD does what they always do when they need to catch a murderer...they turn up the Heat! Sorry, Castle, I love your television show, but Heat Wave is lukewarm at best :( It's been said that the bigger they are, the harder they fall...so maybe that's why king of New York real estate Matthew Starr just took a plunge from a six-story balcony. And while plenty of people may have wanted Starr dead, since he himself wasn't one of them, the authorities know they have a homicide on their hands. So the NYPD does what they always do when they need to catch a murderer...they turn up the Heat! As detective Nikki Heat investigates Starr's murder, she finds herself being trailed by dangerous opponents, professional killers, and worst of all, annoying tag-along reporter Jameson Rook! Nikki Heat always gets her man...and no one is more happy to hear that than Jameson Rook! Okay, let me just get something out of the way...this book, which is a media tie-in for the "Castle" television series, is advertised as being written by a fictional character...so it's not like I went into this expecting high art or anything! But I am a big fan of Castle, and while a lot of the success of that series is owed to its brilliant stars, Stana Katic and Nathan Fillion (who play, respectively, NYPD homicide detective Kate Beckett and best-selling author Richard Castle), I've always enjoyed the writing on the show as well. The dialogue is often clever, the characters are all likeable in their own quirky ways, and the mysteries are fun to solve. So while I understood that I wasn't about to read the next War and Peace here, I was hoping to read something that was about as enjoyable as an average episode of the Castle television show. So imagine my disappointment when this book didn't even manage to live up to those expectations... After reading "Heat Wave", I'm not surprised bookstores don't seem to be in any danger of selling out all their copies... At first glance, I thought I was in for a fun ride. The cover features a blurb from James Patterson (a frequent guest-star on the series) praising "Castle's" latest effort. The book is dedicated to "the extraordinary KB" and all of Castle's friends "at the 12th". The acknowledgements tear down the fourth wall when Castle includes some very familiar names (including Stana's & Nathan's), and the "About The Author" blurb features a rather amusing clue as to who the book's authors really were. Unfortunately, it didn't take long before I stopped grinning and started groaning instead. For one thing, the prose is beyond clumsy. The writers were clearly trying to mimic the hard-boiled writing style of Raymond Chandler and Michael Connelly, but the prose is often just dull in the best moments, and downright awful in the worst. Another glaring problem is the mystery itself. Anyone who has read more than ZERO mysteries will have no problem figuring out the solution long before Nikki Heat does. In fact, the only reason I ever wondered if I may have been mistaken is that the solution seemed so painfully obvious, I questioned if maybe the book would throw an unexpected twist at me towards the end. Sadly the ending held no surprises (and didn't come soon enough, for that matter). Now, since it's alluded to that this book was really written by two of the TV show's head writers, I can give them some leeway in regards to the above complaints. After all, television writers aren't accustomed to telling a story through third-person narration, they mostly use dialogue and action to move things along. So while I expected that the prose might be lacking, I at least thought that I would have some fun with the characters themselves. Unfortunately, the writers came up short here too. I'll admit that I got a kick out of watching the main characters of the show pop up throughout the book. In addition to Beckett and Castle being channeled through Nikki Heat and Jameson Rook, Beckett's team of nerdy detective Ryan and cocky detective Esposito show up as Detectives Raley and Ochoa, while sassy medical examiner Lanie Parish is transformed into Lauren Parry. Unfortunately, none of the book characters have even a fraction of the charisma of their television counterparts. Raley and Ochoa display almost no personality, with most of their attempted jokes falling flat. And Jameson Rook is just downright annoying! While Castle is a bit too full of himself, his charm and sense of humor still make him the kind of guy you'd like to have a drink with. Rook, on the other hand, is the kind of guy you'd like to slip a mickey in his drink just to get him to shut up! He comes across as a self-absorbed egomaniac, and the only thing the writers get right with him is that his behavior makes it completely understandable why Nikki wouldn't want to have him around! The ladies fare a little better, with Parry offering some tender moments. And while Nikki isn't nearly as endearing as Kate Beckett, she at least manages to outshine the other characters (which is kind of like crediting the vampire episode of Gilligan's Island as being the most believable)! There may be a little Nikki Heat in Kate Beckett, but there isn't nearly enough Kate Beckett in Nikki Heat :( That's not to say that the entire book is a failure. The action sequences are actually very well done, especially an exciting fight between Nikki and a brutal hit-man. And while the dialogue often lacks the zing of the TV show's, sometimes the characters do fire off a good one (like when Heat refers to an interrogation being conducted by her and Rook as them playing "Good Cop - No Cop"). And fans of the show will enjoy some of the winks to the audience. Castle's mother Martha has a hysterical cameo as Margaret Rook...it's too bad her appearance was so short, as she was the only one who really lived up to her television counterpart. And then there's Chapter Ten...hardcore fans of "Castle" already know what I'm talking about! On the television series, after "Heat Wave" is released, Beckett is soon shocked (but also somewhat intrigued) when she learns that there is a hot sex scene between Nikki and Jameson on Chapter 10. People who have heard Chapter Ten referenced on the show will have fun getting to see what all the fuss was about, and yes, we now can understand why Beckett was horrified, yet also flattered, when she read the scene for herself... DAVE'S FINAL JUDGMENT - THE DEFENSE - Occasionally the dialogue is clever - Fans of the show will get a big kick out of Chapter 10 - At under 200 pages, it's a quick read THE PROSECUTION - Uninspired prose - Main story is dull - The solution to the mystery is way too obvious - At under 200 pages, the book still manages to be too long THE VERDICT Little more than a lazy cash grab from the makers of "Castle". Die-hard fans of the show may find some enjoyment from this book, but even they would be better served by just watching the TV show instead.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I never got into Richard Castle's Derek Storm novels, because I try to avoid things that hit bestseller status--in no small part because I've had one too many instances of "bestseller" being code for "hamfisted writing". Plus, there's been all the media hype about how Castle's such a ruggedly handsome jetsetter of an author, and the whole thing about him tagging along with the NYPD by way of the world's longest publicity stunt to promote a new series, yeah yeah yeah blah blah blah but can the ma I never got into Richard Castle's Derek Storm novels, because I try to avoid things that hit bestseller status--in no small part because I've had one too many instances of "bestseller" being code for "hamfisted writing". Plus, there's been all the media hype about how Castle's such a ruggedly handsome jetsetter of an author, and the whole thing about him tagging along with the NYPD by way of the world's longest publicity stunt to promote a new series, yeah yeah yeah blah blah blah but can the man actually write? I had my doubts, I have to say, when I learned that the lead character of his shiny new series is named Nikki Heat. Let me emphasize that: Nikki Heat. Say what? C'mon, I thought that the romance genre was supposed to be the one with all the stupidly named characters. "Heat" isn't even a name you'd see in romance novels. It's more like something you'd see in badly executed porn. If you can get past the godawful name for the character, you'll get to a rather eye-rolling central personality concept for her: Nikki is the prototypical tough cop chick who really just wants to have a relationship and a life. Granted, she's also got her share of being a competent detective going on, and she has plenty of reason to be devoted to her career. But did we really have to go down the route of "but what she really wants is a relationship?" And did this have to get more emphasis in her character development than the fact that she's also got a lot invested in her career as a cop? While the book didn't go overboard with this to the point that I wanted to smack it against a wall, it was still frustrating to see that kind of stereotypical portrayal for a lead female character. Nikki Heat is, I fear, no real match for Eve Dallas. And, of course, Jameson Rook, our male lead, has "Marty Stu" written all over him. Having the love interest be a journalist tagging along with the NYPD was just not the right move, Mr. Castle, sorry; it's like putting yourself into the story wearing glasses and a different jacket, and hoping nobody would notice. Now, all this said? Aside from these big glaring flaws, the story's actually not half bad. Despite her annoying name and central motivation, Nikki is a competent detective when the story lets her be, and she's believable doing her job. Rook's a Marty Stu, but at least he's a likeable one, and I do have to admit that having a civilian involved with the police investigation does lend a feel to the reader of "really being there". The murder mystery to be solved is decently suspenseful, and Castle's prose, while never truly noteworthy, is nonetheless engaging and readable. Three stars. Addendum: In case it's not obvious, this review is written entirely in-character. If ABC can give us a novel from the Castle universe, I can review it as such! But I'll also, out of character, give it an extra star just because the sheer fact that this novel exists makes me giggle and giggle. So the real ranking? Four stars!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Going into this, I had an inkling it wouldn’t be a literary masterpiece, but I still couldn’t help but be surprised by how weak this novel was in every aspect. This book series is based on the now finished procedural crime drama, Castle. When I started watching that show, I was very young. It was one of the first dramatic television shows I watched, and I instantly fell in love with that way of storytelling. There are so many aspects of Castle that impacted me and my tastes, as well as my abilitie Going into this, I had an inkling it wouldn’t be a literary masterpiece, but I still couldn’t help but be surprised by how weak this novel was in every aspect. This book series is based on the now finished procedural crime drama, Castle. When I started watching that show, I was very young. It was one of the first dramatic television shows I watched, and I instantly fell in love with that way of storytelling. There are so many aspects of Castle that impacted me and my tastes, as well as my abilities as a writer. It allowed me to take an interest in crime and murder mysteries, as well as introducing me to my favorite banter-filled will-they-won’t-they relationship. So, it is no surprise that the show has a special place in my heart. The book on the other hand...well, it honestly has no reason to exist. Why the publishers decided to publish nine of them, I have no idea. Every book store I walk into seems to have these novels in the bargain section, unable to get rid of them even at the lowest prices. I’m often spoiled by young adult fiction, which has grown to be really progressive, so I often find myself surprised at the rampant sexism and unacceptable remarks I see in adult fiction. Detective Heat smiled back and parted her linen blazer to give him something else to fantasize about. ... She broke the surface and palmed the suds off her face and hair, and floated, weightless in the cooling water, and let herself wonder what it would be like with Jameson Rook. What would he be like? How would he feel and taste and move? And then the flutter hit her again. What would she be like with him? It made her nervous. She didn’t know. It was a mystery. So, can we tell a man wrote this? I also found the romance to be written in a really uncomfortable way, rather than the charming banter in the show. This book’s only saving grace is the fact that I was pictured the characters as Nathan Fillion and Stana Katic. The author does a somewhat okay job of capturing the vibe of the show, with it’s not-at-all-serious take on homicide, filled to the brim with (kind of terrible) jokes and banter. If reading a really shitty episode of Castle sounds appealing to you, this may be entertaining. But for me, the story fell completely flat and the murder is entirely unremarkable. There is no tension in the narrative whatsoever, though that is somewhat consistent with the show. Also, these two gems: A carrot cupcake was screaming at her from that plate and it had to be silenced. … OK..." said Paxton, accepting Rook's presence as if recognizing there was a walrus on the front lawn but not understanding why. Anyway, not good. I knew it wouldn’t be, but I can now officially say that these novel tie-ins are not worth a read. I’ll stick to the show.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Everyone knows this is a TV tie in novel based on the hit show 'Castle'. I had no idea what to expect when I started reading "Heat Wave". I was pleasantly surprised. The book mirrors the show a great deal, but isn't exactly the same. Nikki Heat has to allow "Rook", a journalist doing research for a magazine article, to follow her around while she works a case. In this instance, a very wealthy man is tossed from his apartment window and killed. Then, the man's wife is attacked. Heat and the gang h Everyone knows this is a TV tie in novel based on the hit show 'Castle'. I had no idea what to expect when I started reading "Heat Wave". I was pleasantly surprised. The book mirrors the show a great deal, but isn't exactly the same. Nikki Heat has to allow "Rook", a journalist doing research for a magazine article, to follow her around while she works a case. In this instance, a very wealthy man is tossed from his apartment window and killed. Then, the man's wife is attacked. Heat and the gang have to determine who killed Matt and why. The atmosphere in this book is just like the show. Lots of sharp and sassy dialogue and humor. No overly graphic language or violence. The story is fast paced and the mystery was interesting. I'm impressed with this one- even though I have no idea who the real "Richard Castle" is. Overall this one gets an A

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    I tried again, harder this time. Still didn't get that far, only 28%. It's not a bad book, really. Just not something I normally read or enjoy. But objectively speaking, it has its charms. It's kind of funny and kind of cute if you like the bumbling amateur PI vs. tough real cop dynamic. I'm not a big fan of detective fiction (unless it's SFF), so this is not doing much for me, but I can see mystery fans enjoying this book as a fun popcorn read. * * * * * DNF @ 20%. I tried, though not very hard, s I tried again, harder this time. Still didn't get that far, only 28%. It's not a bad book, really. Just not something I normally read or enjoy. But objectively speaking, it has its charms. It's kind of funny and kind of cute if you like the bumbling amateur PI vs. tough real cop dynamic. I'm not a big fan of detective fiction (unless it's SFF), so this is not doing much for me, but I can see mystery fans enjoying this book as a fun popcorn read. * * * * * DNF @ 20%. I tried, though not very hard, so maybe I'll return to it later (if there's time or if it's chosen as a BotM). This book came to me highly recommended by bookclub friends who are also big fans of the TV show. I watched the first few episodes, but didn't find them that interesting. Kind of generic, really. It's an okay show overall, with nondescript (forgettable) characters and trope-ish murder mysteries. So basically another serial procedural drama. Nothing to write home about. And the book is just like that. The show doesn't stray too far from the source material.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    I enjoy the TV show Castle, which is why I bought this book. However, for me, this book falls short of the show. (Rare, since I prefer reading to TV.) The dialogue is much like the TV show. The characters banter and there is a lot of lighthearted fun in the way they speak to one another. However, the story lacked detail. The plot was a spin on various episodes of the show. At times it was more like reading a summary of events. The characters also lacked detail. If I had never watched the show, I I enjoy the TV show Castle, which is why I bought this book. However, for me, this book falls short of the show. (Rare, since I prefer reading to TV.) The dialogue is much like the TV show. The characters banter and there is a lot of lighthearted fun in the way they speak to one another. However, the story lacked detail. The plot was a spin on various episodes of the show. At times it was more like reading a summary of events. The characters also lacked detail. If I had never watched the show, I doubt I would have had a clear grasp of the characters. Heat came off a little too needy (in a drippy, drooly, school girl crush kind of way) and Rook (Castle in the show) came off a little too childish. The book is short (196 pages) and doesn't require a big committment. It's easy to read, light, and a good distraction from life. Overall, good but far from great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I'm a big fan of the TV show Castle and had been dying to read the Nikki Heat books supposedly written by Nathan Fillion's character. In Heat Wave, I found great writing, wonderful character chemistry and an unbeatable mystery. I also found my mind making constant connections to the show, which was both distracting and confusing at times. It's hard not to compare Nikki Heat and Jameson Rook to Kate Beckett and Richard Castle from the show. The book is written under the premise that Castle is the I'm a big fan of the TV show Castle and had been dying to read the Nikki Heat books supposedly written by Nathan Fillion's character. In Heat Wave, I found great writing, wonderful character chemistry and an unbeatable mystery. I also found my mind making constant connections to the show, which was both distracting and confusing at times. It's hard not to compare Nikki Heat and Jameson Rook to Kate Beckett and Richard Castle from the show. The book is written under the premise that Castle is the author and Beckett is his muse. All signs point to Castle writing a very biographic character in Jameson Rook - from the last name to hs quippy humor to the fact he's a writer (articles instead of novels) working with the police. Nikki is written like Castle's fantasy Beckett, she's just like Kate but willing to give into her attraction to the writer in her life. Having watched the TV show for years, the line often becomes blurred between the two. With a little reader effort, one can actively disassociate the show and the book allowing for a great reading experience. This would be a wonderful mystery even if it had no pop culture connection. It's reasonably fast paced and definitely keeps you guessing. Readers who don't watch the show may enjoy Heat Wave even more than fans, as they'll be able to fully immerse themselves into the plot and characters without preconceived ideas of how things are supposed to go.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a fun, quick read. Mystery novels are not my thing, but I adore the TV show "CASTLE" and this book reads exactly like a show episode. In fact, bits and pieces of scenes from the first season where playboy novelist Richard Castle is riding-along with Det. Kate Beckett make their way into the story. Castle's counterpart is Jameson Rook, a magazine journalist shadowing Det. Nikki Heat (based on Beckett) to get an on the job perspective for an article about NYPD homicide detectives. Captain This was a fun, quick read. Mystery novels are not my thing, but I adore the TV show "CASTLE" and this book reads exactly like a show episode. In fact, bits and pieces of scenes from the first season where playboy novelist Richard Castle is riding-along with Det. Kate Beckett make their way into the story. Castle's counterpart is Jameson Rook, a magazine journalist shadowing Det. Nikki Heat (based on Beckett) to get an on the job perspective for an article about NYPD homicide detectives. Captain Montgomery, Medical Examiner Lanie Parish, and Detectives Esposito and Ryan also have doppelgangers in the novel: Captain Montrose, M.E. Lauren Perry, Det. Ochoa, and Det. Raley, respectively. If you've seen this Monday's episode (Season 2, Ep 2) of "CASTLE", then you also know that there is a sex scene in the novel between Rook and Nikki Heat, which does not occur between the TV series' characters. I love how they handled that aspect on the show -- very funny. Congrats to "Richard Castle" for Heat Wave's #26 entry on the NY Times Best Sellers (Hardcover Fiction) List!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    It'll be a while, I'm way down the list for this at the library. Wonder who wrote it? It came it. Basically, stick with the TV series. Sad to say but it really didn't make the transition all that well. This thin volume has a few good word gags and a passable story, but not great. It lost my interest early on. Could just be me I suppose. I picked it up because I find the series humerus though (of course) totally implausible. Yes, a chief of detectives is going to force one of his officers to trave It'll be a while, I'm way down the list for this at the library. Wonder who wrote it? It came it. Basically, stick with the TV series. Sad to say but it really didn't make the transition all that well. This thin volume has a few good word gags and a passable story, but not great. It lost my interest early on. Could just be me I suppose. I picked it up because I find the series humerus though (of course) totally implausible. Yes, a chief of detectives is going to force one of his officers to travel around with a writer (reporter in this book) sssuuurrreee. Television realism. The legal liabilities alone would be a nightmare. Mostly I think it's Nathan Fillion's comic timing and ability to actually act that sells the TV program...you don't get that here. So, decide for yourself, not a real winner from my point of view, but not the worst thing I ever read either. (I don't think it is anyway.....)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: a deeply surprised 3* of five As a rule, I watch very little TV that isn't about science, on PBS, or revoltingly prurient. Outside of that, why bother? So the other year, there came on this little show called "Castle" that had a promising premise: Bestselling author strongarms NYC mayor into giving him access to a working homicide team to research a character for some novels. (Yeah, right.) Sorta like being an embedded journalist in Afghanistan. I heard about it, I watched a few, I liked i Rating: a deeply surprised 3* of five As a rule, I watch very little TV that isn't about science, on PBS, or revoltingly prurient. Outside of that, why bother? So the other year, there came on this little show called "Castle" that had a promising premise: Bestselling author strongarms NYC mayor into giving him access to a working homicide team to research a character for some novels. (Yeah, right.) Sorta like being an embedded journalist in Afghanistan. I heard about it, I watched a few, I liked it fine. I forgot all about it after a few episodes, which is pretty much Standard Operating Procedure for me, unless the show is revoltingly prurient in which case its entire schedule is permanently etched in my brain (need to know when another episode of "Spartacus: Blood and Sand" is coming on? Me or the website, either one can tell you). Then this slender volume assaults my eyes in the Buns and Nubile I patronize in Carle Place. I mean, what? A book by a fictional author in a real bookstore? And it's not soap opera related?! (Charm! by "Kendall Hart" - go look it up, and yes I watch "All My Children" I already said I like revoltingly prurient TV so leave it.) So I got...oh the shame...curious. I couldn't bring myself to plunk down twenty United States dollars for the little marvy, but the liberry saved me. Sort of saved me, anyway. I read the book, a competently written tale of love gone bad, greed, revenge, and a dash of silly sex tossed (!) in for good measure. I wouldn't recommend it on its literary merits. But I was struck by something interesting...the TV network that runs the show is owned by the same corporation that owns the publishing house, and that corporation owns several companies whose products figure into the story. The story itself isn't the usual "this is a script we couldn't find a way to budget so now it's a hit-series-companion-volume" type of thing...this is the book the fictional author in the series is said to be researching and writing, featuring the thinly disguised fictionalization of the sexy homicide detective he's following around. So for fans of the show, there are in-jokes and throwaways that add a level of insiderness to the read. And it makes me feel a little queasy, frankly. It's all so...arch, manipulative, packaged that it just comes across as...cynical. It reeks of editorial committee meetings wherein the Corporate Parent's Wishes are acceded to. Possibly even applauded. Whatever, it just isn't natcherl, like a blue rose isn't. Recommended? Oh...on balance, not; if you're interested in plumbing the depths of commercialization, this is a good case study, though.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I found this as a downloadable audio book at the library. I like the show "Castle" mostly because of Nathan Fillion. He was great as Cap'n Mal in Firefly & I even liked him in "Slither". In "Castle" Fillion plays Richard Castle, a best selling author who has made millions with his Derrick Storm novels. He wants to write a new series & asks his buddy, the Mayor, if he couldn't work with one of the best female detectives, Kate Beckett. He does & bases his new series & character on Kate, thus is bo I found this as a downloadable audio book at the library. I like the show "Castle" mostly because of Nathan Fillion. He was great as Cap'n Mal in Firefly & I even liked him in "Slither". In "Castle" Fillion plays Richard Castle, a best selling author who has made millions with his Derrick Storm novels. He wants to write a new series & asks his buddy, the Mayor, if he couldn't work with one of the best female detectives, Kate Beckett. He does & bases his new series & character on Kate, thus is born Nikki Heat. I don't know what I expected when I found this. I did a brief Google search to find out who the ghost writer was & ran across a couple of items that said it was a big secret. I don't know why. After listening to a bit, I realized that it must be the script writers. This is an episode of Castle, just the names have been changed. Castle = Rook a magazine writer instead of novelist, but he got his gig with the police the same way. Same personality. Kate = Nikki, no change & so on. So far, no daughter, but there is Rook's mother. She's a successful actress with multiple Tony awards. Even the case they're working on has a lot of similarities to one of Castle's. A man beaten with a fist that has a ring on it. I recognized other situations from the show. I'm not sure if they're all the same episode - probably not - but they run together in my memory, anyway. There is a sex scene, but nothing terrible, just a bit long. IOW, if you like watching "Castle" & think you might like reading one or listening to it, this is for you. It's not bad, although the reader didn't do a lot for me. I won't be getting another any time soon. One was fun, two would be pushing it, though. I will look for a Derrick Storm novel, though. That will be fun.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Berry

    This was really not that good of a book. And for that, I'm very disappointed given how much I love the TV show and how apt I am to squee with delight at everything that has Nathan Fillion's picture on it. The premise, for those living under a rock, is that these are the books written by Richard Castle as he follows Kate Beckett around at her detective job on Castle. The TV show plays prominently here, so if for some reason you've picked this up without ever watching the show, you're not going to This was really not that good of a book. And for that, I'm very disappointed given how much I love the TV show and how apt I am to squee with delight at everything that has Nathan Fillion's picture on it. The premise, for those living under a rock, is that these are the books written by Richard Castle as he follows Kate Beckett around at her detective job on Castle. The TV show plays prominently here, so if for some reason you've picked this up without ever watching the show, you're not going to 'get' some of the references they make. Here's a good one that I actually enjoyed: Judge Simpson. Nikki Heat thinks the judge reminds her of Homer Simpson and wants him to say "D'Oh!" On the TV show, the actor playing Judge Markway (the basis for Judge Simpson) is played by Dan Castellaneta, the same guy who does the voice for Homer Simpson. And sadly, this was my favorite part of the whole book. I did like the mystery story, even though I had solved it down to almost the last detail by 1/2 way through. What killed it for me, though, was the actual quality of the writing. It could have benefited from a few more edits. Things that grate on my nerves like repeating the same phrase over and over again within the same paragraph, not for emphasis, but for lack of imagination, and clunky phrasing/dialogue happen quite often in the book. And the beautiful chemistry between Beckett and Castle did not translate well to Heat and Rook. I wanted more of the banter, the flirting that isn't but that is, the interplay of emotions they have towards each other and towards the feelings they have about those emotions. The whole thing felt flat. I had no emotional attachment to any of the characters in the book whatsoever. Will I read the rest? Yes. And hope the writing gets better and the characters start to matter to me. Why two stars? Well, like I said, Nathan Fillion's picture is on the back cover.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erma Talamante

    Oh, my... Hack! Absolute hack! But of the wonderful variety... I never thought that I would love hack, but this, I really like! (Okay... too many exclamation points already. But, you get the point...) But as much as I declare this hack, it's GOOD hack, as shown in the actual action scenes. This was definitely written by an awesome author, who knows how to write a gripping scene, and not just glorified fan-fiction, which is the tone this book starts out on. So if this doesn't appeal to you from the Oh, my... Hack! Absolute hack! But of the wonderful variety... I never thought that I would love hack, but this, I really like! (Okay... too many exclamation points already. But, you get the point...) But as much as I declare this hack, it's GOOD hack, as shown in the actual action scenes. This was definitely written by an awesome author, who knows how to write a gripping scene, and not just glorified fan-fiction, which is the tone this book starts out on. So if this doesn't appeal to you from the start, keep reading - it truly does get better. Read the full review here: https://ermareads.wordpress.com/novel...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt Schiariti

    I'm a big fan of the TV show from day one. I hadn't even known at the time that they were planning on putting out books by 'Richard Castle' based on his time spent and research with the 12th Precinct. I'm glad I decided to check it out. From the peer blurbs on the front cover and inside jacket, to the press photo of 'Richard Castle' on the back, to the dedication in the very beginning, the novel feels very authentic. As if Richard Castle on TV were a real author and used his adventures in his fic I'm a big fan of the TV show from day one. I hadn't even known at the time that they were planning on putting out books by 'Richard Castle' based on his time spent and research with the 12th Precinct. I'm glad I decided to check it out. From the peer blurbs on the front cover and inside jacket, to the press photo of 'Richard Castle' on the back, to the dedication in the very beginning, the novel feels very authentic. As if Richard Castle on TV were a real author and used his adventures in his fictional TV life to put pen to paper and write a book based on those experiences. If you're a fan of the TV show, you'll feel right at home reading this. It has all the elements that make the show fun. 'Castle' wrote himself into the book, under the guise of Jameson Rook, a pulitzer prize winning journalist who's doing research for a series of articles he wants to write. Nikki heat is detective Beckett, and even her two detectives are in the book. In a way, it reads very much like the television show which is fine by me. All the elements are there. The police work, the begrudged Heat/Beckett crush on Rook/Castle, the interplay at the precinct, the ride along, crimes, suspects, interrogations in the observation room. I have no idea who actually wrote this, but even if it weren't based on the 'research' of Rick Castle, it would still be a fun mystery/whodunnit. My guess is that it's one of the TV show's writers, but I could be wrong. In any event, there's a solid little mystery here as well as some genuine laugh out loud moments between Rook and the Detectives he's become latched on to. Lots of fun!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mikella Etchegoyen

    Let me preface this with a declaration of my love for the show Castle. Nathan Fillion as a best selling author of detective novels? That’s a win in my book. There’s also the intense sexual tension between Castle and Beckett,and the antics of lovable partners Ryan and Esposito. Anyway, reading Heat Wave was like watching a marathon of Castle episode. Raley and Ochoa (a.k.a. Roach) are fictional duplicates of Ryan and Esposito. Nikki Heat, while obviously altered to fit Castle’s imagination of the Let me preface this with a declaration of my love for the show Castle. Nathan Fillion as a best selling author of detective novels? That’s a win in my book. There’s also the intense sexual tension between Castle and Beckett,and the antics of lovable partners Ryan and Esposito. Anyway, reading Heat Wave was like watching a marathon of Castle episode. Raley and Ochoa (a.k.a. Roach) are fictional duplicates of Ryan and Esposito. Nikki Heat, while obviously altered to fit Castle’s imagination of the character, is definitely a perfect rendition of Beckett. And then there’s Rook, the embodiment of Castle, who’s only difference is that he’s a journalist not a novelist (haha, Rook, Castle, get it?). The only difference between the book and the show, is the will-they-won’t-they dynamic Castle and Beckett have going on is non existent in the book…there’s just a very descriptive they did toward the middle of the book. My love for the show amplified my love for this little tie-in, promotional book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    This is a pretty awesome idea, all things considered. Put out the book that the character writes, and do it all in character. Even the marketing, from what I've seen. Right down to the acknowledgements in the back. It's a moneyspinner: even people who don't know the show, Castle, might pick it up, and certainly loads of people that watch the show will pounce on it. And people who read it unknowing might end up sucked into the show. Also, tons of opportunities to reference it in the show, and to f This is a pretty awesome idea, all things considered. Put out the book that the character writes, and do it all in character. Even the marketing, from what I've seen. Right down to the acknowledgements in the back. It's a moneyspinner: even people who don't know the show, Castle, might pick it up, and certainly loads of people that watch the show will pounce on it. And people who read it unknowing might end up sucked into the show. Also, tons of opportunities to reference it in the show, and to further characterise Richard Castle himself. The mystery itself is way secondary to all other concerns, reading it as a fan of Castle. It's pretty trashy, an easy read, quick: good to just kick back with, and not think too much about. The story on its own is so-so, I guess: I was there for the Castle references, not for anything unique and scintillating on its own. Pretty much standard fare. Not sure how I felt about the idea of Castle writing a sex scene about the characters so clearly based on himself and Beckett. I guess I'll have to see how it's played in the show, but I didn't think he'd go that far. Still, pretty fun, and an awesome idea.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adi (Reading in the Windowseat)

    Four stars for one reason alone - I love the plot of the TV series more than that of the book. But I'll definetely be onto the next book like... today, actually XD The first installment of the Nikki Heat series is dynamic and catching, realistic to the point of seeming based on real events and convoluted enough to keep the reader wondering who's the real bad guy to the very last chapter. I found the characters unique and intriguing, the settings - well-described, and the detective work quite up t Four stars for one reason alone - I love the plot of the TV series more than that of the book. But I'll definetely be onto the next book like... today, actually XD The first installment of the Nikki Heat series is dynamic and catching, realistic to the point of seeming based on real events and convoluted enough to keep the reader wondering who's the real bad guy to the very last chapter. I found the characters unique and intriguing, the settings - well-described, and the detective work quite up to the standarts of the TV Series Castle. The thing that made me give it 4 stars was the relationship - as good as are things between Nikki Heat and Jamie Rook, the sparks between Richard Castle and Kate Beckett are on a whole other level. So take note, Mr Castle, and when you write on be sure to include more of that in your next books ;)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Teel

    If you aren't aware, there exists a television show called Castle, currently in its second season on ABC. The premise of the show is that a famous and successful author of crime/thriller novels has used his connections and charm to be allowed to "ride along" with New York City homicide detectives as research for a book with a homicide detective main character. The premise of the book (Heat Wave) is that it is the novel that the fictional novelist wrote, based on his experiences in the first seas If you aren't aware, there exists a television show called Castle, currently in its second season on ABC. The premise of the show is that a famous and successful author of crime/thriller novels has used his connections and charm to be allowed to "ride along" with New York City homicide detectives as research for a book with a homicide detective main character. The premise of the book (Heat Wave) is that it is the novel that the fictional novelist wrote, based on his experiences in the first season of the show. I enjoy watching Castle, largely because the main character of the novelist is played by Nathan Fillion, and because he is given plenty of witty things to say and fun situations to play in. I'm not much of a fan of crime/thriller/procedural dramas that take themselves seriously, but as a comedy it's alright. It's certainly worth the 20hrs/year, and my wife and my sister also watch it. When we realized that Heat Wave, heavily featured in the 2nd season of the show, was actually a real book one could get and read, my wife requested it from the library. When it came in, Mandy read it, my sister read it, and now -since it's coming due and there's a waiting list (so it can't be renewed) at the library- I read it. If you are a fan of the series, it may be worth reading. If I were to give it a rating as an episode of the TV show, I would give it four and a half stars, primarily based on the storyline and the comedy. If I were to give it a rating based on its writing, I would give it two stars. It wasn't so terrible I couldn't finish it (see P&P&Z) but it was difficult to read - on a sentence by sentence basis, and as a whole. (More so if I were to pretend it was actually a novel by Richard Castle.) Some of this may be that I don't read crime novels, I don't like thrillers, and I'm not used to reading the style of book the (actual) author was aiming for. I'm not going to give you a synopsis of the story, except to say that -aside from the brief sex scene wedged into the middle of the book- it exactly follows the basic structure of the show, and is like reading an extra episode of the show. The only variation from the formula for an episode of the show was Castle going home & having a conversation with his mother/daughter which suddenly gives him an insight that helps break the case. All the characters from the show have been renamed, but it's literally like someone did a novelization of a teleplay of an unaired episode, then did a find/replace to change the names. I think this is supposed to be satisfying to fans of the show, since the book delivers more of what the author knows they like, but it made the character of Richard Castle seem like a terrible author. Like he had no imagination and was just writing down whatever he saw and heard with no filter and nothing (but that sex scene) added. Ninety percent of the details in the book seemed to be pulled directly from the screen, and half the dialogue. This led to a lot of awkward sentences and situations, trying to wedge something we'd recognize from the show onto every page and into every conversation. This might have worked better if Castle on the show had been constantly taking notes, but the pseudo-Castle character in the book seemed to take notes more than the Castle character does on TV. The awkward writing resulted in a reading rate about 50% slower than my average reading rate. I set down last night to read it in one sitting and it actually took over 5 hours to read the 200 pages. There were three short sections of the book that flowed really well and seemed well-polished. One was an action sequence (notable because one of the characters was nude - something they couldn't have done on network television), which made it seem like the actual author (not the fictional Richard Castle) was more comfortable writing action-packed books than TV comedy/drama. One was the brief sex scene, which -since they gave the page number on an episode of the show- they could expect would be the most-read and most-closely-read few pages of the book, so it just seemed like they'd spent more time re-writing and polishing that scene and made the rest seem even worse. Then there was the end of the book: The resolution to the story also seemed well-written and highly polished; like they were counting on people's whole impression of the book being based on the last thing they read. I know it's true for a lot of people, but I wish they'd put as much effort into the rest of the book. If Richard Castle's writing was as bad as this, his character loses a lot of his charm and believability. And Beckett (the detective character on the TV show) loses hers, based on her impression of and experience with the book, in the series. They're both supposed to be intelligent and well-read, but this book ... doesn't fit. Since I'm aware that this is actually just part of a marketing campaign for the show, the throw-away writing pandering to (and ripping off) the show at every turn (rather than being a well-written and imaginative story merely inspired by the fictional events of Castle's experiences and written with an authorial voice on par with the Castle portrayed on the show), I can accept it. It is what it is. It isn't what it pretends to be.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beverly Fox

    Heat Wave was not a serious read so I'm not going to give it a terribly serious review. I will simply say that, much like it's originating series, it was a lot of fun. A few simple things that I absolutely loved: there is a doppelganger for every series regular and they all have the same quirks, use the same banter, and do the same moves so it feels right at home. And the Castle doppelganger? His name is Rook. How great is that? It's so obvious but it made me so happy, I can't even tell you. It do Heat Wave was not a serious read so I'm not going to give it a terribly serious review. I will simply say that, much like it's originating series, it was a lot of fun. A few simple things that I absolutely loved: there is a doppelganger for every series regular and they all have the same quirks, use the same banter, and do the same moves so it feels right at home. And the Castle doppelganger? His name is Rook. How great is that? It's so obvious but it made me so happy, I can't even tell you. It doesn't play out exactly like an episode of Castle; there are a few key differences. Number one: Castle goes a lot quicker so the cases aren't as complicated. Because this story had an entire book with which to play out the action there was a lot more going on: more suspects, more murders, more cases that end up being involved and more false endings. The general line-up was the same in that the first suspect you meet is never the person who did it and the climax involves a life-threatening situation that is happily resolved; but there was a lot more detail to this case then you generally find in a Castle ep. (Though I could easily see it as a two-parter.) My main beef is that I imagine Castle to be a better writer than the writer of this book seems to be. Or at least a more crime-focused writer. This story had the tell-tale signs of a crime novel but it lost me in the romance department. First off, it took Castle four full seasons just to get a steamy kiss in with his ingenue. And secondly, the sex scene that the book jumps right into is straight out of a harlequin romance novel complete with fiery metaphors and overly dramatic language. Bleh. There's also a lot more fluttering hearts and body-tightening glances than I can stomach and I wonder if maybe the series gets away with that better because they're showing rather than telling. Either way, the series is far batter in that capacity than the book. But, thankfully there is only the one nausea-inducing sex scene and the bulk of the story is the comical banter and crime drama from Castle that I love so I can forgive the writer and still enjoy the story. And while I wouldn't recommended this book to everyone I would definitely recommend it to Castle fans (but I would recommend you skip the sex scene).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vikas

    It's not interesting that these books exist, it was a brilliant move by ABC and the series writers but what is amazing is that as they started showing the books in the show they could've just be done with the blank books or just the cover but they took pains to hire ghostwriters and got the complete books done and that's how they made sure that when they discussed books in the shows we readers could also follow the same details. Well I am as always way behind the curve but I love 'Castle' and I It's not interesting that these books exist, it was a brilliant move by ABC and the series writers but what is amazing is that as they started showing the books in the show they could've just be done with the blank books or just the cover but they took pains to hire ghostwriters and got the complete books done and that's how they made sure that when they discussed books in the shows we readers could also follow the same details. Well I am as always way behind the curve but I love 'Castle' and I was amazed and happy to find that 4 yes 4 Nikki Heat novels were there along with 4 Storm novels also when when the Graphic Novels of Storm were released they were also released. So they only missed the boat in the first book "Storm Fall" after they they diligently gave us these books and now they might not be classics but they didn't have to be just the fact that they exist and that it has the elements which Richard Castle would've written. If you have seen the show then you would know that while girls and women adore Castle the critics pan his books. So this book is like Castle but with characters with different names and slightly different demeanor and like he was ought to do this book is like an episode but then again Castle would have written the same book after all he is Castle. Now this is what it is a good attempt to make money with the show and it's not a masterpiece and it's not trash. It is what it is and we should enjoy it as such. So read it for the fun and the memories of the TV show Castle you can now see if on Amazon Prime or Hotstar and read this, enjoy this and Keep on Reading. People who don't read generally ask me my reasons for reading. Simply put I just love reading and so to that end I have made it my motto to just Keep on Reading. I love to read everything except for Self Help books but even those once in a while. I read almost all the genre but YA, Fantasy, Biographies are the most. My favorite series is, of course, Harry Potter but then there are many more books that I just adore. I have bookcases filled with books which are waiting to be read so can't stay and spend more time in this review, so remember I loved reading this and love reading more, you should also read what you love and then just Keep on Reading.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    Yes, I picked this up because of the show. Guilty. I am unrepentant. I found the entire ploy to be exceptionally clever. It did, after all, get me to read a genre I have little interest in under normal conditions. The ghostwriter element was a bonus to me, as they refuse to reveal who actually wrote it. There is something incredibly charming to me about a writer, role-playing himself as a fictional character and writing a book purely in that character's voice and mindset, when said character als Yes, I picked this up because of the show. Guilty. I am unrepentant. I found the entire ploy to be exceptionally clever. It did, after all, get me to read a genre I have little interest in under normal conditions. The ghostwriter element was a bonus to me, as they refuse to reveal who actually wrote it. There is something incredibly charming to me about a writer, role-playing himself as a fictional character and writing a book purely in that character's voice and mindset, when said character also happens to be a writer who is essentially writing about himself. One thing I have bet money on already is that the writer is male. (Details and emotions are concise and almost abrupt in description, while action is vividly fleshed out.) The style is distinct. Almost obnoxiously masculine at times. But this is entirely consistent with the character of Castle in the TV show. It's true, the book read exactly like a drawn out episode. That was part of the charm for me. I had all of the exact mannerisms and voices already in my head, so when it came to dialogue, my mind's eye had a field day with the visualization. On the down side, there was no new information offered on character's backgrounds, and the excess of pop culture references ensure that the book won't hold on to lasting relevance. (Not that it's claiming to be a classic.) Also, the book violated the sexual tension they so deliberately guard in the show. (Of course, it can be argued that this has more to do with the ego of Richard Castle as a character.) I don't know that I'd be clamoring to read the next book, but I will certainly continue to be a devoted fan of the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Manda

    Incredible mystery this is not. BUT. It is an actual book written by the fictional author Richard Castle (Nathan Fillion), from the ABC show Castle. I love this show. In it, Castle uses his wealth, popularity and connections to get an indefinite ride-along with Detective Kate Beckett (Stana Katic), who pretends to hate this. Love the cast, love the chemistry, love the dialogue, and I love my cop shows. This is a win all around for me. During the course of the show, Castle starts using Beckett as Incredible mystery this is not. BUT. It is an actual book written by the fictional author Richard Castle (Nathan Fillion), from the ABC show Castle. I love this show. In it, Castle uses his wealth, popularity and connections to get an indefinite ride-along with Detective Kate Beckett (Stana Katic), who pretends to hate this. Love the cast, love the chemistry, love the dialogue, and I love my cop shows. This is a win all around for me. During the course of the show, Castle starts using Beckett as inspiration for his new character Nikki Heat. The first Nikki Heat book is Heat Wave. As a novelty item (haha, novel-ty), ABC released Heat Wave as though it is a real book by a real author, right down to an about the author, author's picture of Nathan Fillion on the jacket cover, acknowlegdements, and dedication (same as from the show). This. Is. Awesome. The mystery itself is fairly easy to solve for an avid mystery reader. However, it is a fun, fast read and fans of the show will enjoy hearing the voice of Castle and how he portrays the doubly fictional counterparts of the characters in the show. Thank you to whoever actually wrote this book. You made my day. I am thoroughly looking forward to the next installment, Naked Heat.

  26. 5 out of 5

    fleurette

    I am not a fan of Castle TV show. I have to admit I haven't watch one single episode of it. Knowledge that this book is a tie-in of the TV show meant nothing to me. I decided to read it because it was recommended to me by Goodreads based on my other reads and because it seemed to be a popular read. My expectations were average, just like for most books by authors I have never read before. Still, I was disappointed with what I got. You know this books written after the movie or the TV show succes I am not a fan of Castle TV show. I have to admit I haven't watch one single episode of it. Knowledge that this book is a tie-in of the TV show meant nothing to me. I decided to read it because it was recommended to me by Goodreads based on my other reads and because it seemed to be a popular read. My expectations were average, just like for most books by authors I have never read before. Still, I was disappointed with what I got. You know this books written after the movie or the TV show success? The ones that make you feel you are reading a movie script feebly composed into phrases? Well, reading Heat Wave was that kind of experience. Even though it was not written as an exact movie script, I felt the scenario in the background. Heat Wave felt like a book written for money and nothing more. What is even worse, badly written. The characters are one-dimensional and boring (except Rook who is just annoying and made me roll my eyes more than once), the dialogues fair to middling and the jokes mediocre. The best thing you can say about this book is that it is short, so you can read it fast and forget about it even faster. The cost is the plot and the characters serious deficiency. The only enjoyable thing in this book was the suspense plot. It wasn't really innovative or surprising but the investigation part was well-written. This is the only reason I am giving 3 stars to this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    okay, trying to voice what I thought and how I approached it. First off: brilliant marketing idea. Second: I love the meta layer of a fictional character publishing a book (in my reality) which is inspired by the woman he is in love with (yup I'm a shipper, your argument is invalid). So I tried to read it as such, which proved to be difficult. Whenever I heard his voice (or that of Nathan) as the narrator's voice, I was fine. I could happily picture him typing away and having a ball at writing pag okay, trying to voice what I thought and how I approached it. First off: brilliant marketing idea. Second: I love the meta layer of a fictional character publishing a book (in my reality) which is inspired by the woman he is in love with (yup I'm a shipper, your argument is invalid). So I tried to read it as such, which proved to be difficult. Whenever I heard his voice (or that of Nathan) as the narrator's voice, I was fine. I could happily picture him typing away and having a ball at writing page 105 (well, d'uh). So I liked the insight it gives into him and how he perceives Kate Beckett (mystery maybe, but you have her figured out more than you give yourself credit for, Rick). I give it a thumbs up. Now. All that meta out of the way, the story itself, without KB and RC attached to it, was okay. I'm not one to read crime, I get bored and lose interest. I don't even watch the show for the crime factor. I'm always interested in characters. And I have to say, don't like Nikki Heat. I really like Beckett (though I want to slap some sense into her sometimes) but Heat... nah. Too bitchy, trying too hard. But that is okay, she can develop. Anyway. Confusing myself here. The plot was good, it is an easy read and I was done in 24 hours. You like crime? Or Castle you can go for it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    This book is a fun novelty for fans of the show, "Castle," as it's the one Richard Castle is writing during the first season of the show. I'm a huge fan of the show, but the book was only okay. The character interactions, supposedly (in the show) based on the detectives Castle shadows, aren't nearly as good as the actual show's character interactions. Also, the names in the book really bug me. I mean, Nikki Heat as the main character is kind of cheesy, of course, but the other ones were grating: This book is a fun novelty for fans of the show, "Castle," as it's the one Richard Castle is writing during the first season of the show. I'm a huge fan of the show, but the book was only okay. The character interactions, supposedly (in the show) based on the detectives Castle shadows, aren't nearly as good as the actual show's character interactions. Also, the names in the book really bug me. I mean, Nikki Heat as the main character is kind of cheesy, of course, but the other ones were grating: Castle was Rook, Ryan and Esposito were Raley and Ochoa--collectively known as Roach. Anyway, it was a fun, fast read, and I love the design of the book, complete with quotes from James Patterson and Stephen J. Cannell (both poker buddies of Castle on the show) and a picture of Nathan Fillion as Castle with the author bio. It was also fun finding little pieces of different cases they solved on the show woven into the mystery in the book. Assuming it was really some writer from the show who wrote the book, I also think it was pretty hilarious that they went very meta with it, and Fillion actually did a book tour as Castle for this book. I'll probably read the other two, just to see how they continue to incorporate show elements and to see what they do with the very big difference in the relationship between Castle and Kate Beckett compared to Rook and Nikki Heat.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maree

    Me like! But is it only because of all the fangirl squee I get out of thinking about how this book is written by 'Richard Castle'? I know that I excuse a lot of the out-there metaphors as something Castle would say, and I don't know that they would be nearly as fun or amusing to someone who picked up the book having never heard of Castle and had no idea what they were getting into. The way Nikki is drawn to Rook (haha, smooth name change there, Rick) is exactly how I can imagine him fantasizing Me like! But is it only because of all the fangirl squee I get out of thinking about how this book is written by 'Richard Castle'? I know that I excuse a lot of the out-there metaphors as something Castle would say, and I don't know that they would be nearly as fun or amusing to someone who picked up the book having never heard of Castle and had no idea what they were getting into. The way Nikki is drawn to Rook (haha, smooth name change there, Rick) is exactly how I can imagine him fantasizing about Beckett. If the book hadn't related to the TV show, it still would have been a pretty fantastic story, I think. Plot-wise, anyway. If it were for the series, I don't know how well I would like the characters--they could seem a little flat at times, but since the author is playing a character writing a character, I'm willing to give it a little room to flex. But the mystery behind it all wasn't something that I immediately guessed, which was nice. Will I read the second? Definitely. It's already on my eReader. Though right now all I want to do is to get back and watch the episode where this book came out and they were talking about it so I get all the comments. :D

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This lies somewhere between reading Castle-Beckett fanfiction and reading a novelization of the show's script. I'd recommend it for more avid fans of the show -- although they will probably be befuddled that this was supposed to be written by author Richard Castle, who is lauded as a writing genius on the show, as this seems to be rushed-to-press by a hack of a ghostwriter instead. As a standalone mystery, without having the show's characters as a starting point, the cast comes off as paper thin This lies somewhere between reading Castle-Beckett fanfiction and reading a novelization of the show's script. I'd recommend it for more avid fans of the show -- although they will probably be befuddled that this was supposed to be written by author Richard Castle, who is lauded as a writing genius on the show, as this seems to be rushed-to-press by a hack of a ghostwriter instead. As a standalone mystery, without having the show's characters as a starting point, the cast comes off as paper thin, although the mystery itself stands up to most pulp whodunits.

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